Henry VIII: November 1521, 11-20

Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 3, 1519-1523. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1867.

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'Henry VIII: November 1521, 11-20', in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 3, 1519-1523, (London, 1867) pp. 740-756. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/letters-papers-hen8/vol3/pp740-756 [accessed 19 April 2024]

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November 1521

11 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
141.
B. M.
1753. DOCWRA and BOLEYN to WOLSEY.
Wrote last on Saturday. Received the same day your letter of the 8th, with a copy of a letter from the English ambassadors in France, of which we told the Emperor the contents. Yesterday afternoon, on showing him your advice to agree to the articles of the truce, he said he thought them not unreasonable if any arrangement could be made for Fontarabia, either to put it into the King's hands for the time, or some other way by which it might not be left in possession of his enemies; that the Spaniards would never rest till they got it back; and that it would create great discontent among them, if he made truce when on the point of recovering it. We said we thought he would do himself injury by deferring the truce to such an uncertainty, and put before him the considerations mentioned in both your last letters, telling him finally that if he would not consent to it, we were commanded to return, and you would no longer stay at Calais. On this he desired us to write to you that he had sent for my lady of Savoy, who, with Berghes, would be here tomorrow, and the day after he would show us his final determination. Meantime he would consult the nobles of Spain, and hear their advice upon the articles. Our conversation lasted more than an hour, and he said if Fontarabia were left in the French king's hands, he thought it would be fortified so that it would be hard to recover. We said there was an article which forbids reinforcements of garrisons. He evidently doubts the French king's faith in keeping the truce, if he find it advantageous to break it. He told us he saw, by the letters from Fitzwilliam, that Francis has some distrust of the King, and that in spite of the truce he might send suddenly to Tournay a number of men-of-arms, when the country here was ill provided for defence, and overrun it without resistance. We told him Francis would not dare to provoke the King's enmity. Oudenarde, 11 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.: To my lord Cardinal.
11 Nov.
R. O.
1754. M. SANDERUS, Dean of Breslaw, to WOLSEY.
On behalf of his patron, cardinal Sion, who is in great need. De la Rochia will explain the cause why the writer was prevented from visiting Wolsey. Ex Odernaco, 11 Nov. 1521. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add.: Ill., &c. Th. card. Ebor., &c., Callesii.
12 Nov.
Harl. 283. f. 9.
B. M.
1755. [THOS. EARL OF] ARUNDELL to JOHN FITZJAMES the King's Attorney.
Thanks him for the pains he has taken in the causes between himself and Sir Thos. West. Desires him, as my lord Cardinal is willing to set a good order therein, to see that he does not lose his right of inheritance. Requests him to favor his chaplain, the parson of Wychehampton, touching a bill of complaint to the council by the parson of Lychett, affecting the writer's inheritance. His audit is appointed for next week. Downley, 12 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. John Phyjamus (?), the King's attorney.
* The address is rendered indistinct by the whole back of the letter being written over in a modern hand.
12 Nov. 1756. For PETER VAN (VANNES), clk.
Presentation to the church of Mottram, Cov. and Lich. dioc., vice Walt. Dey. Calais, 12 Nov.
Pat. 13 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 13.
12 Nov.
P.S.
Rym. XIII. 759.
1757. For JOHN [KITE].
Restitution of the temporalities of the see of Carlisle, on his preferment by the Pope (whose bull is enclosed), on the King's recommendation. Oking, 8 Sept. 13 Hen. VIII. Del. Calais, 12 Nov.
Pat. 13 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 11.
ii. The bull referred to above. Rome, 1521, 4 id. Julii, pont. 9.
Vit. B. IV. 43.
B. M.
1758. FRANCIS I. and CHARLES V.
Proposed truce between the French king, the Pope and the elect king of the Romans, for eighteen months. The French king to be at liberty to victual Tournay. Charles to bind himself, by letters apart under his hand and seal, not to go to Italy to be crowned. The resort of Flanders to be allowed as in the time of king Philip. The dukes of Lorraine, Gueldres and Ferrara, and the signory of Venice, to be included on the part of France, and any allies to be named within a month on either side, except the rebels of Milan.
Fr., pp. 2, mutilated.
13 Nov.
Vit. B. IV. 197.
B. M.
Ellis, 3 Ser.
I. 274.
1759. PACE to [WOLSEY].
The bearer, with other monks of St. Alban's, were yesterday with the King, to certify him of the death of their abbot, desiring licence to elect another. The King's speech on the occasion, vere regia. Wyndsore, xiii. Nov.
P.S.—Has received Wolsey's letter of the 13th, touching St. Alban's. Took his letter to the King, ready to go out shooting; who desired Pace to come with him by his secret way into the park. The few words that his highness spoke [to me] in this cause were these: "By God, my lord Cardinal hath sustained many charges in this his voyage, and ex[pended] 10,000l." The King said he would give the abbey to Wolsey rather than to any monk. He has signed letters to the Pope for that purpose. The King is content, when the bull comes of his new title, it shall be proclaimed as Wolsey advises.
Hol., mutilated, pp. 5.
Nov.
Vit. B. IV. 207.
B. M.
Ellis, 3 Ser.
I. 282.
1760. [WOLSEY to CLERK.]
On returning from Bruges, received several of his letters, the last dated [Rome], 23rd Oct., advertising him of the reception of the King's book by the Pope and the Cardinals. Has signified the same to the King. He is to have the bulls for the King's title expedited, and the book sent to various universities. Is to require the Pope's ratification to the treaty concluded by Wolsey between England, the Pope and the Emperor. The King, in consideration of Wolsey's services and expenses, has given him the abbey of St. Alban's. Advises him that the Pope's nuncio in England has desired to have the expediting of Wolsey's briefs for that purpose. Clerk is to do the best he can to further it; and assure the Pope that Wolsey's stay [at Bruges] has been to obtain such an abstinence of war as should be beneficial to the Pope and the Emperor. But as Fonterabia has been surprised by the French (fn. 1), the Emperor does not think it advisable at present to consent to a truce. Intends shortly to cross to England * * *
Draft, pp. 4, mutilated.
Calig. B. III.
52.
B. M.
1761. WOLSEY to DACRE.
"The copy of my lord Cardinal's letter sent to the lord Dacre of the North."
Has received no letters from him since his arrival on this side the sea; nor has he advertised the King of what is reported, viz., that since Wolsey left England the Scots have made many excursions in Northumberland, burning villages and taking prisoners, and that they are making great preparations for the coming of Albany. Desires to be fully informed, with all diligence, that he may advertise the King on coming to his presence. It is credibly reported that Albany is going into Scotland with 2,000 or 3,000 men, and has labored at Rome for a divorce between Angus and the queen of Scots, with a view of marrying the latter, and aspiring to the crown, which he can only obtain by the destruction of the young King. If these reports he true, Dacre should have warned Angus and the Humes. The French king lately told Worcester and the bp. of Ely that Albany not only meant to pass into Scotland, but to obtain the divorce. Though he requires the French king's permission to leave France, that is not to be trusted to. Dacre must tell Angus and the Homes that, as they value their lives and the safety of their Prince, they must make ready against their mortal enemy; that he doubts not Henry will uphold their cause, and endeavor to excite the nobles and commons of Scotland against the Duke. 500 or 1,000 marks may be politicly spent in stirring up dissension in Scotland.
Pp. 4.
Galba, B. VII.
45.
Calig. D. VIII.
143, 149.
B. M.
St. P. I. 84.
1762. [WOLSEY to HENRY VIII.]
Perceives by the letters of the King's secretary, dated the 12th inst., that although Henry approves of the articles he had devised for a truce between the Emperor and French king, with the instructions Wolsey had sent to the ambassadors to induce both parties to consent to it, he thinks it unnecessary for Wolsey to remain here longer, as there is little hope of effecting it without great loss of time, and his presence is required in England for the administration of justice and the King's affairs, as well as for the preservation of his own health, which is endangered by this contagious air. Thanks the King, and trusts he has done everything for the establishment of his reputation throughout Christendom, so that though his object has been hindered, the blame will be thrown upon those who have refused his counsel. Has brought the matter to a narrow point, and waits only an answer from the Emperor, on receiving which, whatever it be, he will forthwith repair to the King. Finds the King objects to one article, viz., that as he is named conservator of the truce, so that it shall be lawful for him to declare himself enemy to the violator of it, he would be perplexed if a corporal oath were demanded of him for the observance of that article, for he would be compelled to break either that oath, or the oath made by Wolsey at Bruges for the stricter alliance with the Emperor, as the Spaniards will certainly endeavor to revenge themselves on the French for the loss of Fontarabia. Cannot express the joy and comfort with which he noted the King's prudence in this objection, "wherein, surely, if all your whole council had been assembled together, they could not have more deeply perceived or spoken therein." It was never intended, however, that this article should be corroborated by an oath on the King's part, as it binds only the contracting parties. Moreover, the wording of it, "quod licebit majestati vestræ," does not bind the King, even if he were sworn to it, to declare himself unless he would; (fn. 2) nevertheless, the French have qualified the articles with such additions and apostils that the most substantial clauses are clearly wiped away, as the King will see by the copies now sent; and though the Emperor agreed that the King should be conservator according to the article first desired, the French king has put out all the clauses giving him authority either for cognition or trial to be had on any such breach, or to declare himself enemy to the violator, so that the King's scruples are completely answered. Francis will only agree to the articles corrected in that form, or else to take a simple "treux marchaun[de]," in a form also sent herewith, "being so meagre and bare that almost nothing is left therein." Has sent both of these forms to the Emperor to know if he can accept either, and will return immediately upon his answer.
When I had got thus far, the Emperor's chancellor and ambassadors brought me letters credential from his Majesty, written with his own hand, and the Chancellor showed me the original letter addressed to them by the Emperor, of which I enclose copies. Although I wrote to your ambassador in the Emperor's court, showing how advantageous a truce would be to the Emperor, of which letter I lately sent home a duplicate, yet I approve the reasons which have now induced his Majesty to delay acceptance of the truce, viz. (1.) If the wars in Italy be successful in expelling the French from Milan it would be a great pity to hinder them, as it will diminish his power in those parts, increase that of the Pope and Emperor, and cut off the Swiss from him for ever. (2.) Tournay is in such great need of victuals that the opportunity for surprising it should not be lost; and its conquest will be a great advantage to the King, when he has crossed with his army into Flanders, and so into the bowels of France, before they are aware. The Flemings are so intent upon this enterprise that if it were stopped they might mutiny. (3.) The Emperor has no certain news yet, either of the surprise of Fontarabia, or of the way the Spaniards take it, or what they will do about the realm of Navarre; and as Fontarabia is the great port for the English, either in the way of merchandise, or for any attempt to recover Guienne, it is very important that it should be retaken. (4.) The Pope will not consent to a truce till he has seen how the Emperor succeeds in expelling the French from Italy; and although he has placed a commission in the hands of his ambassador with the Emperor to accept the truce, he has ordered him not to act upon it till the success of that expedition be known.
As the Emperor has authorized his ambassador in England to treat and conclude for a truce when he shall see time, I have induced the French king to send ambassadors for the same purpose if the truce be not concluded here. Was lately informed of his resolution by the earl of Worcester and the bishop of Ely, so that this diet shall not now be dissolved, but only respited, that the matters may be brought to a conclusion by Henry's mediation. If the enterprise of Tournay succeed, and the Spaniards are determined to revenge the outrages of the French upon Navarre, Biscay and Fontarabia, their power will be so shaken that they will be easy enough to meddle with; so it is better "to suffer these princes to ruffle with the said French king, and infest him on all parts for the consumption of his treasure, which is almost clearly extenuate, than suddenly to take this truce now, when he can do no more harm." Sends copies of news lately come from Italy, by which it seems the French prospects proceed from ill to worse. Has seen a letter sent to Sir Wm. Compton touching the transporting of Albany into Scotland. If the contents be true, "as I cannot yet verily believe," it is necessary to look to it betimes. Although bruits were spread abroad this month about preparations being made in Brittany for his conveyance, has heard no such news from Dieppe, Havre, or the New Haven. Has sent spies to know the truth. Cannot think the French king will first break with England, or allow Albany to pass, contrary to his promise; or that Dacre would have remained in ignorance that he was expected. I have received no letter from Dacre since my coming on this side the sea, so I suppose the Borders are quiet. Nevertheless I have instructed him to be watchful, and entertain the Homes and other rebels after his usual manner, so that if Albany do come he may be put in danger. Some money spent on the entertainment of the said Homes will be worth while. Has written to the English ambassador at Rome to hinder the queen of Scots' suit for a divorce from the earl of Angus, and has caused the Pope's ambassador here to write to his Holiness to stop it, as it is only got up to procure a marriage between the Queen and Albany, whereby the destruction of the young King shall ensue. (fn. 3)
Thinks the request made to the King in Sir Piers butler's letter very reasonable. He would do the King great service in that land, considering the towardness of his son, who is right active and discreet. Yet it would be well to see how the said Sir Piers shall acquit himself in the authority lately committed to him; no doubt, his son being in England, he will do all the better in order to get him home the sooner. On my return I will talk with you how to bring about the marriage between his son and Sir Thos. Boleyn's daughter, which will be a good pretext for delaying to send his son over.
Draft corrected by Ruthal, mutilated, pp. 7.
14 Nov.
Calig. D. VIII.
170.
B. M.
1763. WORCESTER, WEST and FITZWILLIAM to WOLSEY.
Received by Richecrosse, on the 12th, your letters dated Calais the 11th. We wrote in our last that the French king had consented for the King's sake that my lady Margaret's lands should be considered neutral. Although we trusted that he had written this to his Chancellor according to his promise, we desired Fitzwilliam to go to the treasurer Robertet and find out. He said that as yet he had written nothing of it. Trusting that the King would fulfil his promise, we desired Fitzwilliam to remind him. He told Francis that the King and Wolsey gave him great thanks for consenting to the neutrality of my Lady's lands, and besought him to give us letters to his Chancellor, as we found from you that his Chancellor had no word of it. To this he showed himself more "difficile" than ever; for what reason we know not, unless it were some bad news from Italy. He said the Chancellor had informed him that the lady Margaret [wishes] all the county of Burgundy to be in neutrality; but as the Emperor and she did the worst they could against him in Italy and Flanders, he would do the like against them. If they were content to take this truce, he would abide by his promises; if not, they should have no neutrality from him.
Fitzwilliam begged he would remember his promise, otherwise the King would be driven to think either that he had no discretion to understand what he said, or that he said one thing, and meant another. He answered roundly "that in [case] my lord Chamberlain and the bishop of Ely could c[onstrain] the Emperor to abide by such things as they declared un[to him] at their first arrival, according to their instructions, [he] would be content to abide by his word;" but as the Emperor's council changed their purpose every day for their own advantage, he would do the like. He thought the King might regard his interests as well as my lady Margaret's. My lord Chamberlain and my lord of Ely will go to him tomorrow the 13th to make answer to that which he lays against them, and tell him that if he will put everything in the state it was at their departure from Calais, when they received their instructions, they will engage that the Emperor shall abide by their first overture; for his change of purpose was owing to the capture of Fontarabia, and the burning of Hainault and Hesdin.
Having written thus far, received on the 13th, between 2 and 3 p.m., your letters by Willowbye. Went accordingly to Francis on Thursday the 14th, and urged him to consent to your articles of truce, but could not alter his determination mentioned in our last. Told him we had informed you that he had written to his Chancellor, commanding him to stay at Calais till an answer came from the Emperor about the truce, and yet his Chancellor had been with you and asked leave to depart, saying he had no such command, and that on this you had charged us with inaccuracy, and not being attentive to what the French king had said. He said it was true he had so promised, and had written to his Chancellor, but he supposed his letter had not arrived at Calais so soon as ours. Robertet, however, says it was sent by the post that went in company with ours. We then desired the King to write again to his Chancellor, not only that, but also an ample commission not to be obstinate in matters of small importance. He said [he would] so write, provided the Chancellor first should advertise him of those points, whatever they were. Spoke to him about the neutrality of my lady Margaret's lands, when he made us the same answer as he had given Fitzwilliam. Made answer as above to what he had said about his willingness to perform his promise, if my lord Chamberlain and my lord of Ely would get the Emperor to make truce according to their first overture. He then said he hoped the King would not ask him to give up such advantages as he had got of his enemy, for if this truce were not taken he would have despatched La Tremouille with 500 spears and 6,000 foot to Burgundy; that the Emperor was putting off time only for Tournay and the feats of Italy; and as for Tournay, he was sure the town was victualled for three months, and the citadel for a year. As for Milan, he would make no truce if he did not think himself strong enough to defend it, and he was sure the Pope's army could take no town of any importance.
Are informed, however, that 9,000 or 10,000 Swiss have lately come into the duchy. The French say they have come at their own expense to drive the Pope's army back; but today the French king told us he had sent thither 6,000 ducats to retain more footmen. We imagine it was really to satisfy the Swiss, at whose coming he does not seem very well pleased. He says he will be content to give up Tournay to the Emperor if he be allowed to enjoy Fontarabia, "for that was in his country and profitable to him, and the other out of his country and chargeable." He had repaired Fontarabia, made it stronger than ever, and victualled it for 6,000 men for six months. He is willing to send an ambassador to England to treat for truce or peace, if no conclusion be taken at Calais. After long communication [thanked] the King for the good reception we had met with, and begged to be allowed to leave for Calais next day. He said if we would depart, he would write to the King and you, but he would then recall his Chancellor immediately. We said, in that case we would be glad to remain here, although my lord of Ely was sore diseased in both his legs, and ill of a fever. On this the King left us, and talked some time with his council, and then went into an inner chamber. Afterwards the Grand Master came to us, and said if we wished to depart, the King would send some archers with us to Boulogne, where the Chancellor would meet us. We said that, as we had told the King, we would not depart till we knew your pleasure further. Amiens, 14 Nov. Signed.
Mutilated, pp. 7. Add.: To my lord Cardinal's grace.
14 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
143.
B. M.
1764. CHARLES V. to [WOLSEY].
I have received the articles drawn up by you for the truce. As there is no mention of the reduction of Fontarabia, a thing of the greatest importance to give effect to the intention of the King my uncle, I have desired my ambassador to point this out to you. Oudenarde, 14 Nov.
Hol., Fr., p. 1.
Mon. Habs.
448.
1765. CHARLES V. to his AMBASSADORS in CALAIS.
Since receiving their letters of the 8th has several times examined the articles, by which he perceives that Wolsey spares no trouble in his service. Trusts entirely to Wolsey, and writes with his own hand letters of credence. They shall say that, though Charles is convinced of the necessity of a truce for the accomplishment of his voyage to Spain, and of what is agreed between them, he sees great difficulties in the articles. For their possessions to remain as at present is neither honorable nor profitable to him; for France would retain Fontarabia and other places in Biscay and Navarre, and would make sure of Tournay and the duchies of Milan and Genoa. It is no wonder the French agree to it easily, knowing the state of their affairs; but Charles knows nothing of the state of Spain, or the wish of his subjects there, and news cannot arrive very soon. The Spaniards with him do not advise a truce without consulting the people of Spain, unless Fontarabia be restored, as his subjects might be set against him. The French occupation of Fontarabia would prevent the enterprise against Guyenne, as the English would have no port to land at. The town is of more importance than Wolsey thinks; for it commands all the province of Guispogne, which is larger than his territories here. Twelve thousand men loyal to the crown of Castile would thus be lost; Biscay and Navarre would be easily taken; and he would lose the love of his Spanish subjects. They must desire the Legate to do all he can for its restitution; and if he will only bully them (bailler cominacion), as would be quite lawful, they will not refuse, as Charles will restore his conquests.
As to the Pope, knows nothing of his will, or of Italian affairs; for the nuncio here, though he has power to treat for a truce, has express charge not to send it without knowing that the conditions are agreeable to the Pope, and is not contented with the present articles, saying there is no provision for the security of his Holiness. Cannot make a truce without him. Such a course might cause him to rejoin the French, and thus endanger Naples, Sicily and the Empire, depriving Charles of the aid of the Swiss. His subjects here seem inclined to mutiny if the truce is made without taking Tournay. Although the publication of the truce can be put off till the end of the month, by which time, it is said, it will be seen if Tournay can be taken, still, if they hear of the truce, they will hold out for this month, and for the next also, rather than surrender. Must, therefore, insist on the restoration of Fontarabia, whatever happens. If Wolsey's persuasions and menaces are of no use, he should say that he cannot remain any longer, and propose that each party send one ambassador over the sea with him, with power to consent to a truce, while the others should return. By doing this the garrison of Tournay will despair of a truce, and will surrender more easily, and there will be more certain news from Italy and Spain, which will give him a better chance of making a good truce. If the French will not consent to send an ambassador, or after the capture of Tournay refuse a truce, they must ask Wolsey to provide for the 300 foot soldiers he promised at Bruges. If this is concluded, nothing can hinder his voyage. Will come to England, even if the truce cannot be arranged, and leave his countries here to the King's protection.
Fr., draft.
Mon. Habs.
441.
1766. [MARGARET OF SAVOY] to DE BERGHES.
He knows she has always been a friend to England, and desirous above all things of a perfect amity between the two princes, which now she sees is in danger of being broken off. Sees no remedy, considering the terms the Cardinal proposes; for no one can make the Emperor change his mind. Heard him say today with an angry face, "I see well that the Cardinal wants to do with me as he advised our ambassadors to do with those of France; that is to say, ask of me things so unreasonable that I could not agree to them either for my honor or advantage. It seems he wishes to constrain me to do everything at his will and to their advantage, as if I had become their prisoner. He has mistaken his man; for if the one will not have me, the other will (si l'un ne me veut, l'autre me prie). I shall be in no want of wives, and need not buy them so dear." Has heard also that, contrary to Berghes' original advice, it has been resolved to keep on the alert (se trouver an alarmee), and push on the enterprise, whatever happens. Herself and the privy council have with difficulty gained their point of waiting here till Wednesday. If they remain longer, it is intended to go to Esclo as if to hunt, and then to go further, while the ladies will follow. Wishes she could have two hours' conversation with the Cardinal to show him his error in trying to lead them in this way. The Emperor only regrets that Wolsey's and Berghes' fair words and letters have made him waste so much time, and come hither to no purpose.
Today the duke of Alva left on his way to the Cardinal. He has been countermanded, not without a murmur of the light esteem in which his majesty is held. Prays God to inspire him, who has the power of doing good or bad. I If this stroke fail, it will be impossible to recover it. If she did not think it would do harm, would have written to the Cardinal, because she promised, when leaving Calais in her litter, to inform him if she knew of any difficulty that would arise between the King and the Emperor. Wishes him to show this to the Audiencer, and communicate to Wolsey what they think he should know.
Fr., draft.
15 Nov.
Vit. B. IV. 200.
B. M.
1767. CAMPEGGIO to WOLSEY.
Had written to the King, congratulating him on his book against Luther. Fears his letters have been intercepted, which he regrets the more as the King had presented him with a copy. Since the arrival of the Swiss and of Sion, and the passage of the Olio and the Adda, their matters have succeeded. Details the method of their march. The French have shut themselves up in Cremona, Parma and Milan. Rome, 15 Nov. 1521. Signature burnt.
Lat., mutilated, pp. 2. Add.
16 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
145.
B. M.
1768. DOCWRA, BOLEYN and SIR RIC. WINGFIELD to WOLSEY.
Wrote on the 11th. Next day we received yours of the same date, but had done already as you directed. We have not written till now, awaiting the coming of my Lady and lord Berghes, who arrived on Wednesday last, and have been continually in council on Thursday and Friday. Although the Emperor had determined to give us resolute answer on Friday at 2 o'clock, on the arrival of your last letters of the 13th yesterday morning, his majesty having received similar news from his ambassadors, we were delayed till 7 o'clock at night, when he told us he had been in consultation upon your articles and those of the chancellor of France, and was finally determined not to agree to either, for divers serious considerations, which he has sent Haneton to declare to you. He also sends by Haneton a form of simple truce, with which he would be satisfied, otherwise he will continue the war. We said we were commanded, upon receiving this answer, to return to you, and that Worcester and Ely would withdraw from the French court. He asked if we must all depart. We said, Yes, and we doubted not you had provided some other person to be resident with him. He then asked if Fitzwilliam would return with the said lords. We said we thought so, but could not tell. He appointed next day for us to take leave. The same night, at 9 o'clock, my Lady sent Marynes unto us, desiring us not to despatch this post till we had spoken with her. Berghes also sent to us, between 10 and 11, to the same effect, stating that he would be with us at 7 in the morning. He then told us the Emperor and my Lady thought it very strange that we should be recalled at this juncture, and that to avoid evil rumors he thought we should not all depart. After a consultation among ourselves, we said we would take his advice, and went immediately to the Emperor, having arranged among ourselves that Docwra and Boleyn should return, and Wingfield remain till some one was appointed in his place, which he desires may be done shortly, before you cross to England, as he is not in health to exercise this office. Were with my Lady at 11 o'clock, who repeated all that the Emperor had said. Oudenarde, 16 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 3, mutilated. Add.: To my lord Cardinal.
16 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
144.
B. M.
1769. CHARLES V. to [WOLSEY].
Since I last wrote to you with my own hand, I have seen the corrections made by the king of France upon your articles, and find them unreasonable. I have sent my audiencer, Haneton, to show you my final resolution. I pray you to let me see the good will you and my uncle bear to me. Oudinarde, 16 Nov.
Hol., Fr., p. 1.
16 Nov.
Mon. Habs.
453.
1770. CHARLES V.
Instructions to Haneton, to be declared to Wolsey and Gattinara. He shall tell the Chancellor that, after debating the truce with Madame and his chief councillors, Charles cannot agree to it, chiefly because the king of France will not restore Fontarabia. On the other hand, if Charles refuse the truce, he cannot afford to guard his frontiers, which would cost 200,000 fl. a month; for when he has paid his army, 30,000 foot and 4,000 horse, for the current month, there will be nothing left for the garrisons; even "les deniers de demaine" and the aids are anticipated for the next two years. More than 100,000 fl. are owing to Franchisque (Seckingen), who threatens to make war on the Emperor if he is not paid. The count Palatine and other princes have written to Antwerp and Malines, threatening to arrest the merchants unless their pensions are paid. If the war continue till spring, the enemy will have their own way, and the people here would not let him go to Spain, but would probably mutiny, and force him to make a shameful peace, as they have done before. He cannot hope for any help from Italy, for the French have secured Milan, and the Swiss have openly refused to fight against each other, and are trying to make a league between the Pope, Francis, the Venetians and themselves; so that Charles is in danger of losing both the Pope and the Swiss, which would cause the loss of Naples and Sicily, and endanger his whole state in Almain. As to Tournay, there is no great chance of taking it by famine, and the season is not fit for an assault, for the soldiers can hardly lodge in the fields, and are too discouraged to do anything, being mostly peasants, not understanding war. It is therefore thought best not to besiege it. Charles wishes for the advice of the ambassadors, and informs them that his council believe that if he cannot obtain the restoration of Fontarabia, he had better accept the truce, go to Spain, and save what he can. The Audiencer must, however impress on Wolsey the importance of Fontarabia, and that the Emperor will never abandon it. Its situation will enable France to occupy Navarre and Castile, and prevent the English expedition to Guienne. For these reasons, England ought not to allow Charles to give up the town, especially as France was the first violator of the treaties, not only of those with the Emperor, but of the treaty of London; and they ought, if he refuse, to say that they have good cause to declare against him. To make Wolsey inclined to this, they shall show him the practices of the French to make Charles treat with them, without the intervention of the Cardinal; to do which, they would give up Fontarabia and matters of greater importance, but the Emperor will do nothing prejudicial to his treaties with England, and wishes for Wolsey's fatherly advice. If the French will not restore Fontarabia, he must try to get it put into the hands of the king of England during the truce. Haneton must show the Cardinal that even if he cannot obtain the restoration, Charles will go to Spain, with the assistance of all his friends and subjects, and intends to pass through England. He must find out what the ambassadors have done upon the despatch sent yesterday. Oudenarde, 16 Nov. 1521.
Fr.
17 Nov.
R. O.
1771. PACE to WOLSEY.
According to your letters of the 11th, I have read your congratulatory letters for the King's new title to all the noblemen and councillors present, to their great joy and comfort. I am marvellous glad that, by God's help and your wisdom, he has obtained the most excellent title he could have. You will see how contented he is with it and with your letters, by the answer I have sent at his commandment. Windsor, 17 Nov.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To my lord Legate's grace. In haste.
17 Nov.
Vit. B. IV.
202.
B. M.
1772. [PACE to WOLSEY.]
"Please it your grace, the King hath recei[ved] your letters, one written in English, the other in the Latin tongue, with two other letters f[rom] the cardinal Campegius, and the extract of the Dean of his Chapel's letters, and a copy of [a] letter written to Rome by the cardinal of Medici's secretary. And whereas the King perceiveth by the contents of your grace's two say[d] letters, which he did read w[ord] by wo[rd] his self, the great honor, laud and commendation he hath obtained by the writing of his book against the detestable heresies of Martine Luther, and t[hat] it hath pleased the Pope's holiness, i[n] memory of that Catholic work, to g[ive] unto him the high and most excellent tit[le] of Defensor of the Faith, to the perpetu[al] renown and glory of him and all his s[uc]cessors, his highness saith, that though God hath send unto him a little ler[ning], whereby he hath attempted to write [against] the erroneous opinions and heresies of the [said] Luther, yet he never intended so to [do] afore he was by your grace moved and [led] thereunto. Wherefore his highness saith that your grace must of good congru[ity] be partner of all the honor and glory [he] hath obtained by that act. And his [highness,] for this high honor purchased to [him]self and all his successors by the said book, first giveth thanks to Almighty God, and secondly thinketh himself much bound to the Pope's holiness, w[ho] hath accepted his book so honorably [and] thankfully, and given unto him so [notable a reward spiritual for his labor, [with] the whole consent of all the College of Cardinals without contradiction.
"And thus t[he] king heartily commendeth unto your [grace], whom Jesu preserve in long health [and con]tinual prosperity. From Windsor, [the] 17 of Nov., by your grace's most humble and faithful servant," [Ri. Pace].
Hol., mutilated, and the writing much faded.
17 Nov.
P. S.
1773. For SIR HENRY COURTENEY, son and heir apparent of Katharine Countess of Devon, alias HENRY EARL OF DEVON.
Reversion, in tail male, on the death of Sir John Peche without heirs male, of all the possessions specified in patent 7 March 1 Hen. VII., which granted to Sir Thomas Bourgchier, jun., and Agnes his wife, in tail male, the manors of Edelmeton, alias Saysbury, and Dyphams, with lands, &c. called Claveringes, in Edelmeton, Middx., forfeited by Sir Richard Charleton, and reversion of the manors of Swalclyffe and Covelehall, lands in Woxbrigge, Middx., and all the lands called Hersies, Lytle Helyndon and Greate Helyndon, in Helyndon, Middx., on the death of Elizabeth, widow of the said Sir Richard. Peche holds the above by grant, in tail male, to him and John Sharpe (now deceased), in reversion on the death of the said Sir Thomas Bourgchier, deceased, who was then sole possessor, by death of the said Agnes and Elizabeth. Windsor [Castle], 4 Nov. 13 Hen. VIII. Del. Calais, 17 Nov.
Pat. 13 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 4.
18 Nov.
Lamb. MS.
602. f. 62.
St. P. I. 92.
1774. PACE to WOLSEY.
Sends the letters of the King's lieutenant in Ireland delivered by a servant of the dean of St. Stephen's, Sir Thos. Nevell. Sir Thos. More, Mr. More, the judge, and Mr. Broke have discussed the matter of substituting a deputy, and are of Wolsey's opinion. They will wait, however consultation with the rest of the judges, who have been sent for by the King. The King somewhat doubts the propriety of sending the patent devised by Wolsey, as Sir Piers Butler might refuse the office. Windsor, 18 Nov. Signed.
Add.
18 Nov.
Add. MS.
21,505. f. 16.
B. M.
1775. HENRY VIII.
Warrant for the payment of 80l. to Sir Thos. More, 5l. of which is by way of loan, and the remaining 75l. due to him for his diets when sent to Bruges last year, and again in the present year, about a diet between England and the Easterlings, for which he was to be paid 20s. a day. Windsor, 18 Nov. 13 Hen. VIII. Signed.
18 Nov.
Calig. D. VIII.
174.
B. M.
1776. WORCESTER, WEST and FITZWILLIAM to WOLSEY.
Received your letters by Clarencieux on the 18th inst., between 7 and 8 a.m. After dinner went to the King, and endeavored to persuade him, not omitting the reasons in your letters, to grant the neutrality of my lady Margaret's lands, according to his promise; and asked him to authorize his Chancellor to make out his letters for the same. This he long debated, saying he knew not her lands, nor what part she desired to have in neutrality, for they might be such that he would grant it, or they might not. We begged him to write his pleasure on that point to the Chancellor. Pressed in this manner, he said, I will tell you frankly, to write to my Chancellor would only be waste of time; and told us he was determined she should have no neutrality from him, for the Emperor was putting off time in this truce, in the hope of winning Tournay. He would therefore set upon Burgundy, and make a pact with the Swiss that they should have one part, and he the other. "While I am the Emperor's enemy," he said, "I will do him the worst I can; and when we be friends, I will deal with him as a friend." We begged him not to think that any delay had been made by the King or you. He said he did not think so, but knew that it was all owing to the Emperor, who hoped to have Tournay. We said we could not think that, as we had put him in discomfort of it, and told you in our last that he [knew] the town was victualled for two months and a half, and the citadel for six. We have moved the French king to send ambassadors to England to treat for truce or peace, if it be not made by you. To this he consents, but we can learn nothing about the persons or the time.
Francis told us that the Emperor had laid garrisons in every town upon the frontier, and captain Bayard had distressed 100 of one of his garrisons who went out to burn two or three houses, and the captain had burned two good villages, and sent word to the Burgundians that if they would make war without burning, he would do the like. Have told the King that soon as we have news from you of the Emperor's determination about the truce, we will repair to him again. Amiens, 18 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 3, mutilated. Add.: To my lord Cardinal's grace.
18 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
147.
B. M.
1777. SIR RICHARD WINGFIELD to [WOLSEY].
Docwra and Boleyn left yesterday at 11. Was not with them the day before, when they took leave of the Emperor, nor strong enough to accompany them out of the town; but they told me that on taking leave the Emperor said he was informed you had appointed Knight as ambassador to attend upon him, and that he trusted you would not appoint a more mean person to be resident with him than was with the French king, especially considering that he had appointed a worshipful prelate to attend the king of England. On hearing this I told Docwra and Boleyn that it would be well, after Richmond had brought them out of the town, to send him back to Berghes, to know what personage would be acceptable to the Emperor. This they did; and Richmond told me the Emperor would be content with any noble personage the King might appoint, but he would prefer my brother Sir Robert, for the knowledge they had of him, and the affection he bore to this house.
In the evening the Emperor sent Lalemand to tell me of Richmond's message and his answer. I do not wish this for my brother's sake, who has as little desire for the post as I, especially as the little plate he has is either sold or pawned, and I know he could hardly be here before Christmas. I think if I remain here much longer I shall never see you; but my hope of seeing the King and you shortly, and my poor family, gives me some comfort of recovery. I think the Master of the Rolls might continue here, and I might return with you to England. I beg that my remaining here may not be to the detriment of my wards.
Lalemand told me you had sent word to the Emperor that Francis would not allow the lords of Ely and Worcester to return till his ambassadors had arrived at Boulogne; an evident sign of distrust. Surely he means to retain the King's payment, and try to stop your passage. He must know the state of Calais, which is as barely provided with victuals as it has been many years, but I hope not so scantily as reported. The Pale, both east and west, may be laid waste in two or three days, before victuals can come out of England; and if the town were besieged by land and sea, it might be brought to necessity, for it would be difficult to obtain provisions or succors from these parts with so little arrangement for defence upon the passage of Gravelines water; especially as by means of Gueldres he may keep the Emperor employed, whose army is now drawing down upon Tournay, and his artillery already sent thither. He may also cause a disturbance in Scotland. The French have been long at Calais, and have noted the condition of the town; "and, Sir, to make a sudden and furious exploit where they see a[ny] appearance of advantage, the Frenchmen do it as well, and with as much diligence, as any nation living." I forgot to write in my last that the Emperor was willing to send De la Roche to England, to commune further upon the truce, if the French king sent a like personage as the president Oliver. By the last news from Italy, the French had garrisoned themselves within Cremona. The allied army was marching to Milan, and remained "seigneur de la Campagne." No news from Spain, except French bruits. Oudenarde, 18 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 4, mutilated.
19 Nov.
R. O.
1778. DOCWRA and BOLEYN to WOLSEY.
We took leave of the Emperor at Oudenarde on Saturday, and came on Sunday to Lowe, and yesterday to this town to mass, "where I, the lord of St. John's, is fallen sick, and hath had this night passed no rest." The Audiencer, who is going to you in haste, will tell you the Emperor's mind about the truce. The Emperor told us, when we took leave, that his ambassadors at Calais wrote to him that a doctor and Spinelly should shortly come to him, and he said that you promised him there should always be one with him "that is of the serment, to whom he would always frankly show his mind." He thought it would be to the King's honor and his that some honorable personage should continually reside with him, "considering the world looketh now much upon reputation." He has appointed the bishop to be in England, but, if there is any other more agreeable to you, will follow your pleasure. We write because we cannot be with you so soon as we expected. Bruges, 10 a.m., 19 Nov. Signed. Sealed (a bull's head).
P. 1. Add.: To my lord Cardinal's good grace.
19 Nov.
R. O.
1779. FRANCIS I. to the TOWN OF TOURNAY.
Has received their letters. Has remained here, hoping to relieve them either by the truce which is in negotiation, or by some other means. As he has had no final answer concerning the truce, and it is difficult to succour them with victuals in sufficient quantity, is content that, if they receive no news from him within 15 days, they make an honorable composition "au bien et repos d'entre vous et la dite ville." They have done all that loyal subjects could do. Amyens, 19 Nov. 1521.
Fr., p. 1. Headed: Coppie d'une lettre que le roy de France escripvoit en chiffre à la ville de Tournay. Endd.
19 Nov.
Le Glay,
II. 584.
1780. FRANCIS I. to the CHANCELLOR.
Has received a letter from Lautrec with news from Italy. Encloses a copy. In order to bring the matter of the truce to a conclusion, he must tell the Cardinal as from himself, that if the King Catholic will make a truce for these countries and Spain, omitting Italy, Francis will consent. He must also ask him to tell the King, that as Francis has done all he can to succor Tournay, and would be sorry for Henry to lose his yearly profit from it, Henry may either help him to keep it, or take it into his possession, for it would not be reasonable to pay while not holding it. Amiens, 19 Nov. 1521.
Fr.
19 Nov.
R. O.
1781. SIR RIC. WINGFIELD to WOLSEY.
I wrote last on Monday. Yesterday Sir Thos. Spinelly arrived, and told me that Knight and he are appointed to attend on the Emperor, and he declared this to the Emperor and my Lady, when he delivered your letters. I think they will be contented with your order, "considering that you have not, on this side the sea, the choice of personages to be sent hither of such qualities as they desire." As Knight will be here in two or three days, will take leave of the Emperor and my Lady, and hopes to be with Wolsey before he meets the King. Owdenarde, 19 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To my lord Cardinal's good grace.
19 Nov.
R. O.
1782. MARGARET OF SAVOY to HENRY VIII.
Till now has delayed writing concerning the friendship concluded by the Legate, "votre lieutenant general," between the Emperor and the King at Bruges, expecting every day that Wolsey, who is now setting out, would quit Calais for England. No Power will be able to injure them thus united, and the alliance will tend to the universal good of Christendom. The Legate will give fuller information. Oudenarde, 19 Nov.
Fr., p. 1. Endd.: 29 Nov. Copy of the lady Margaret's letters to the King's grace of her own hand.
19 Nov.
R. O.
1783. MARGARET OF SAVOY to WOLSEY.
Received Wolsey's letters of the 15th, and the enclosed minute, and immediately wrote in her own hand to the King according to the minute, making no alteration, except "à l'adresse du lengaige," as you will see by the copy I enclose. As you have been the means of uniting the King and Emperor by indissoluble friendship, you will make no difficulty in effecting the matters treated of, and preserving the peace, as I will do on my part. I hope that before you leave Calais, you will take some good resolution in the Emperor's affairs. Oudenarde, 19 Nov. 1521. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: A mons. le legat et lieutenant general d'Angleterre.
Galba, B. VIII.
96*.
B. M.
1784. CHARLES V. to HENRY VIII.
Has at present a great matter, which makes it necessary he should appeal to his friendship. Henry will understand it by a letter which he has written to the Cardinal and by his ambassadors.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
20 Nov.
R. O.
1785. CHARLES V. to WOLSEY.
I have received your letters of the 15th by Spinelly, and have heard his charge. I thank you for your kind offers and advice. Spinelly is very welcome, as I have always found him a faithful servant to the King, you and myself. Oudenarde, 20 Nov. Signed. Countersigned: Lalemande.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: A mons. le card. d'York, legat, primat et lieutenant general d'Angleterre.
20 Nov.
R. O.
1786. CHARLES V. to WOLSEY.
I have heard from my ambassadors of the good will of the master mason who built the castle at Tournay. As he will be of service to me, I wish you would order him to come to me secretly with all diligence. I will treat him well, and it shall not be known from whom he came. Oudenarde, 20 Nov. 1521. Signed. Countersigned: Lalemande.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: A mons. le card. d'York, legat, primat et lieutenant general d'Angleterre, mon bon amy.
20 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
150.
B. M.
1787. SPINELLY to [WOLSEY].
Arrived at Oudenarde on Monday morning, having spoken with Wingfield, who was not yet recovered. I went to the Emperor in the afternoon, and delivered your credentials, before showing him which his Majesty asked after your health. I said you were never more lusty nor better cheered; at which he was sincerely pleased. He called me apart to declare my charge, and said he had despatched the Audiencer to you, and had no doubt you would approve his resolution touching the objections to the truce as the French would have it; that he was determined to follow the advice of the King and Wolsey, and would yield to their persuasions for his shortly going to Spain. On desiring him to write to the King, according to the copy sent by you, he said he would do it yesterday; and last night he promised to give it me this morning. I likewise delivered your letters to my Lady, who hoped you would appreciate the Emperor's sincerity, and maintain the amity on both sides. She was willing to write to the King, and last night showed me her letters before they were closed, along with the copy, that I might assure you they agreed; and delivered them to me, with the answer, which I send. I told the Emperor and my Lady of the coming of Dr. Knight, who is to have a joint commission with me. Berghes, who came hither with my Lady, tells me the Emperor has 34,000 "payes," and over 5,000 horse about Tournay and on the French frontier, and promised me a bill of the captains and places where they lay. Speaking of the inconvenience of the season for the enterprise of Tournay, Berghes said the Emperor had been urged to it by the great instance of the Flemings, and could do no less than attempt it. "Master Dostall Mactynee" came last night from the siege, and says they are daily making their approaches; but the great artillery was not laid. Various reports prevailed as to the disposition of the citizens, and their supplies. According to the reports of prisoners, the town would not resist, and the captain of the castle maintained order only by the hope of a truce. De Reux and Beauren his son have orders to destroy Ardra and Mountory. Francis Seken is at Brussels, "making his reckonings," and it is said will not depart without the Emperor's leave. Don Ferdinand is believed to have arrived at Cologne. The Pope's power "to entend to the truce" was sent thither, I think only for show, coming out of season. Will not delay the post, though I have not the Emperor's letters, but will write tomorrow. Oudenarde, 20 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 4.
20 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
149.
B. M.
1788. CHARLES V. to [WOLSEY].
Have received your letters of the 15th, with inclosure; and, conformably to your advice, I have written the letters with my hand, according to the contents of the minute, without changing the substance. I beg you to show my good will to the King my uncle, and thank you for your good offers, by which I see your affection to me has not diminished. I have sent an answer to the credence of Thos. Spinelly by other letters. Oudenarde, 20 Nov.
Hol., Fr., pp. 2, mutilated.
20 Nov.
Mon. Habs.
457.
1789. GATTINARA, DE PLEINE, CARIATI and LAURENS to CHARLES V.
Have received his letters of the 18th. Went this afternoon to the Cardinal, who showed them letters from the Chamberlain and the bishop of Ely, of which they send a translation. Declared to him the contents of Charles's letters, that Charles was determined to assist Madame to keep Burgundy, and desired that she might have aid from England, according to the treaty of London. Wolsey said he had mentioned the treaty of London to the French ambassadors, who replied that she had not sent letters to the two principals to state her wish to be comprehended. We replied that she was nominated by Henry without any condition. The French ambassadors also say, that she is helping Charles in every possible way. After some conversation he said that as Charles and Francis are on bad terms, and his master is much suspected, all preparations should be made in case of an attack, and word should be sent to the Swiss to resist Francis' intentions on Burgundy. He makes no difficulty about Henry's performing the treaty of London, but it would be useless to make a declaration while he is unable to follow it up, and he would lose 100,000 cr. which fall due on the 26th. The French chancellor has told the Cardinal openly, that he will leave on Friday next, and that he only waited for the Audiencer to please Wolsey, for he knew what his charge was before he left Oudenarde. Wolsey says the French chancellor has told him Francis knows all Charles's plans. When the Chancellor goes the Legate intends to conclude the papal league, and says he does not think his master and Charles ought to be led by the Pope;—they ought rather to lead him to their own advantage.
The Audiencer has arrived this evening, and will declare his charge to the Cardinal tomorrow. Expect he will conclude this meeting, and ask for ambassadors to be sent to England. The master of the works, who built the castle of Tournay, and is a good artilleryman, says the town can be battered in two places according to the enclosed figure, but it is easier to be taken on the side where messires Talbot and St. John were lodged during the siege, for the wall there is rotten, and the water can be drawn out of the ditch. When the town is taken, he knows a way to take the castle. Calais, 20 Nov.
Fr.
20 Nov.
R. O.
1790. SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
Reminded my Lady of "the hors lectyera," and a messenger was instantly sent to Bressyll for it. Hears it is very fair and fit for Wolsey. Showed lord Berges, who is most affectionate to Wolsey, that his Spanish pensions were never paid, though Wolsey did not wish to make any instance for them. He says he will see to it, and that the Emperor not only intends they should be paid, but has sent the Audiencer with other grants; so that if the French pension is not paid, Wolsey shall lose nothing.
Berges says further, that the unreasonable demands of the French in the truce proceed only from their wish that neither the King nor Wolsey should meddle therein, but that it should pass by the hands of some about the Emperor, "which continually studieth the same; concluding to me when on that side shalbe fynde no correspondence to the promises and treaties, such malicious authors might come to their desires."
Wyngfield is highly esteemed for his prudence, and "marvellously minded" in all causes concerning Wolsey's honor. Udenardo, 20 Nov.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: T[o the] lord Cardinal's grace.
20 Nov.
S. B.
1791. For SIR EDWARD GULDEFORD.
To be constable of Dover castle, and warden of the Cinque Ports. Del ..., 20 Nov. 13 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 13 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 5. See also 6 Dec. 1521.
20 Nov.
R. O.
1792. HENRY VIII.
Warrant to the surveyors of crown lands, general surveyors and auditors of butlerage, to pay the executors of Sir Edw. Belknap his diets from 12 March 11 Hen. VIII. to 26 July 12 Hen. VIII., at 1l. a day, during which time he was overseer of the buildings at Guisnes, from arrears of butlerage in their hands or in those of Henry Sadler, Belknap's servant. 20 Nov. 13 Hen. VIII. Signed and sealed. On vellum.

Footnotes

  • 1. Oct. 18, 1521.
  • 2. Here occurs in the first draft a passage to the following effect, which is crossed out:—However, the doubt is removed, as the French king has expunged the clause from the article. Thus the French are so elevated by their success that although they offered formerly an honorable truce, which the Emperor at that time refused to take, Francis could hardly now be induced, except for the King's sake, to consent to any truce which would keep him from trying to hinder the King Catholic's voyage to Spain. Nevertheless, if the [truce] be not concluded before Wolsey's departure, the French king will send ambassadors to England, fully authorized to treat before the King as mediator.
  • 3. Here occurs the mark ⊙