Henry VIII: November 1521, 21-25

Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 3, 1519-1523. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1867.

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'Henry VIII: November 1521, 21-25', in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 3, 1519-1523, (London, 1867) pp. 756-762. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/letters-papers-hen8/vol3/pp756-762 [accessed 11 April 2024]

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November 1521

21 Nov.
Mon. Habs.
460.
1793. GATTINARA, DE PLEINE, CARIATI and LAURENS to CHARLES V.
This morning, at 8, the Audiencer declared his charge to the Legate, principally to the effect that Charles would not accept the truce without restitution of Fontarabia. Wolsey said he had already expostulated with the French ambassadors for proposing such dishonorable conditions, threatening not only that his master would declare against France, but that he would incite other Christian princes to do the same: the only effect has been to make them suspect his master, as Francis is determined to hold Fontarabia, and will hazard half his kingdom rather than abandon it. Wolsey sees the danger of offending the Castilians by making peace without them, and proposes a simple truce, on condition they consent, to be declared in a month or six weeks, or at least an abstinence of war for a similar period, during which Charles can send to Castile to learn the disposition and wishes of his subjects.
After this conversation the French ambassadors arrived, being also invited to dine with him. After conversing a short time with them, he told us he had proposed an abstinence to them, which they did not strenuously oppose, and he thought Francis would consent to it if Tournay might be revictualled for the same period. He further said the French made two other overtures; one of a simple truce for this side of the mountains, the countries on the further side remaining as they are; and the other, that if Francis found Tournay was hard pressed, would Henry accept it, as Francis would rather England had it than Charles. But this, they said, was proposed by themselves without instructions. After dinner he put the three overtures, of an abstinence of war for six weeks, a simple truce for eighteen months for this side of the mountains, and the surrender of Tournay to Henry. As to the abstinence, the president of Paris said he did not think. Francis would consent to it, unless he could revictual Tournay at least for those six weeks; at which Wolsey was troubled, and said there was no great likelihood of that being granted. Each party will write for their master's pleasure, and will inform Wolsey before Sunday. He also offered that Henry should forego the money due to him this month if Francis would give up Fontarabia, and promised that Charles should pay the arrears of the 100,000 cr. from Naples. They will return to their master tomorrow morning, but one will be left to accompany Wolsey to England to continue the negotiations. When they were gone, Wolsey told the writers that a six weeks' abstinence would be very beneficial to Charles, and advised him to accept it. If he mean to do his, he must try to take Tournay before Monday. Do not expect that Francis will accept it, unless he may revictual Tournay. As to the simple truce of eighteen months, he thinks Charles should accept it, unless he can prevent the fortification of Fontarabia, or retake it, by continuing the war. Cannot give him any advice till they know the intentions of the Spaniards. The Legate would be much pleased if Francis would deliver Tournay to Henry, of which Charles might then obtain possession by repaying him the money paid and to be paid for it. Advise him, however, to do all he can to take it by force before Sunday, or by famine as soon as possible. Wolsey will wait till Monday for the answers of Charles and Francis to these overtures. Ask him to send the bishop of Elna hither, and to commission some one to cross the sea with Wolsey. Calais, 21 Nov. 1521.
Fr.
21 Nov.
Le Glay,
Négoc. II. 524.
1794. DU PRAT, DE SELVE and GEDOYN to FRANCIS I.
Received yesterday his letters and cipher. Dined today with the Cardinal, and found there the ambassadors of the King Catholic, and the Audiencer, who he said had brought word from the King Catholic that he could not treat of a truce without the advice of the Spaniards, and accordingly an armistice for forty days was proposed, during which Francis should cease war in all places, and the siege at Tournay should be suspended; and that if after the said forty days the Spaniards agreed, he would conclude a simple truce. He was intending to leave for England, but would stay till Monday, if they would promise that Francis would by that time say whether he would accept that overture or not. The ambassadors of the King Catholic had also promised to stay till that day, and to ask their master's opinion. Said they dared not stay after what Francis had said in his last letter, but would obtain an answer before Monday. Made an overture for a simple truce; but the Flemish ambassadors said they had no instructions, but would write for an answer before Monday. Told the Cardinal that if Tournay were lost, they would not be bound to pay the yearly sum to England for it, and endeavored to persuade him that Henry ought to assist in the defence, since, in certain cases, it was to be returned to him, which could not be if it were taken. Finally proposed, as of themselves, that if it were found very difficult to defend, it should be delivered to Henry on his returning the hostages and the money received. He seemed to like this. Told him they would write for Francis' opinion before Monday.
After dinner, during a discussion about the peace by all the ambassadors, the Cardinal said that the taking of Fontarabia was the chief hindrance to a long truce; and therefore, as his master was so desirous of peace, he would give up the next payment due to him, 50,000 francs, and, in addition, cause the arrears due from Naples to be paid, if Francis would surrender the town. Intend to depart, leaving the bishops of Clermont and Poillot. The Cardinal took the Chancellor apart after dinner, and told him some things which he hopes to report to Francis, but it must be by word of mouth. If the effects are as good as the words, Francis will have reason to be satisfied. Calais, 21 Nov.
Fr.
21 Nov.
Vit. B. IV. 203.
B. M.
1795. _ to _.
Started yesterday from Clarevaux towards the French. When they were two miles from Milan, as the marquis of Peschiera advanced to reconnoitre, a skirmish took place, and the enemy were driven back to the Porta Ludovica. The suburbs and town were taken with difficulty; 100 Venetians have been made prisoners, with Theod. Trivulcio, Julius Sanseverino, and count Fran. Torniello. As the whole city took to arms, the French were driven out, and fled towards Como. Milan, 19 Nov. 1521.
ii. Copy of other letters of the 21 Nov.
As the army was advancing to Milan, Sion arrived, and urged them not to stop, but take the enemy unawares. The enemy have been routed, and Milan captured. The Spaniards, though they had the opportunity, did not slay more than three of the Swiss that served the French, but allowed them to depart. Theod. Trivulcio and Mercurio Manfrono were made prisoners. The suburbs, citadel and Porta Ludovica, were taken at a blow. Card. Medici, the marquis of Mantua and Peschiera, Prosper Colonna and Sion entered the same night to save the city from plunder, which pleased the Swiss. Does not know what the enemy intends at Como. Pavia is surrendered. Sion has recovered Viglevano, the Zurichers have Placentia, Parma is expected to surrender. So many French have fallen, it is a common saying, "Octo libras Mediolan' fore perditum Mediolanum; uno scilicet Scu, quod valet libras quinque et uno Trech Floreno sic appellato, qui tres libras valet. Taxat enim proverbium hoc dominum de Lautrech et dominum de la Scu."
Lat., mutilated, pp. 4.
22 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
153.
B. M.
Mon. Habs.
466.
1796. HENRY VIII. and CHARLES V.
On Friday, 22 Nov. 1521, the Pope's nuncio and the Emperor's ambassadors at Calais were with Wolsey, who had with him the bishop of Durham, the master of the Rolls and others, when the articles of the new offensive and defensive league were agreed to. To render it more firm Wolsey proposed the points following: (1.) That the Princes agree together about the time for the declaration, and draw up instructions for treating with the Swiss. (2.) That it shall be agreed beforehand what contribution each Power shall make for this purpose. (3.) That the Pope and Emperor despatch letters patent of the offences committed by France against the Emperor and the king of England, especially against the treaty of London, by virtue of which they shall require England to declare itself against France. (4.) That the allies shall endeavor to get the kings of Portugal, Hungary and Denmark, the duke of Savoy and others, to join them.
After the retirement of the Nuncio, Wolsey declared to the ambassadors the long stay he had made in Calais, endeavoring to put an end to the war commenced by France against the Pope and Emperor, in which he had not succeeded; and said that as the Emperor remained at war with France, he must arrange his voyage to Spain immediately; that he and the king of England must get ready their forces by sea as soon as possible, and if the war continue that the number of 3,000 men agreed upon by each must be doubled; that each prince ought to send to the other, besides the ordinary ambassadors, a gentleman well experienced in such affairs, to urge the preparations. Wolsey then assured the ambassadors that the King and he were determined to hold to what they had promised, and advised that the King and the Emperor should constantly communicate on their common affairs; also that the Emperor should act prudently towards his subjects in Spain, rewarding the good, and punishing the evil. Although Wolsey has not been able to induce France to deliver Fontarabia, he thinks the Emperor would do well to accept a simple truce. Finally, he must return to the King his master as soon as possible, to show what he has done, and solicit the meeting of Parliament, to induce the King's subjects to give their aid in the war.
Fr., mutilated, pp. 4. Endd.: Memoriale pro R. D. Legato eorum quæ oratores Cæsaris dicturi sunt suæ C. majestati in eorum applicatione. And in another hand: Remembrances for the Emperor's ambassadors at their coming to my Lord's grace.
22 Nov.
R. O.
1797. FITZWILLIAM to WOLSEY.
Writes no news, as the lord Chamberlain and "my lord of Elle" (West) can tell you all I know. Beseeches Wolsey to remember his coming home, "to set order in such great matters as I have to do, which touches both my soul and my goods;" also considering his great expense here, and that five of his servants are so sick that they cannot travel with him. Ameas, 22 Nov.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To my lord Cardinal's grace.
23 Nov.
R. O.
1798. CHARLES V. to WOLSEY.
I wrote to you in my own hand two days ago, in answer to your letters. I am sorry you found the enemy so unreasonable as not to listen to any honorable conditions of truce. I hope you will be able to accomplish in England what you failed to do at Calais, that your great labor may not be unfruitful. I am writing to my ambassadors, for whom I desire credence. I wish you, before leaving Calais, to write to the king of France, that the county of Burgundy may be preserved, as you promised my aunt at Bruges. From its confidence in you, the county is unprovided with troops. Oudenarde, 23 Nov. 1521. Signed. Countersigned: Lalemande.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: Mons. le card. d'York, legat, primat et lieutenant general d'Angleterre.
23 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
154*.
B. M.
1799. CHARLES V. to WOLSEY.
My obligations to you are doubled by what the ambassador of the kings of Hungary and Portugal has reported to me. I beg you will commend the affairs of the king of Hungary to the king of England. Oudenarde, 23 Nov. 1521. Signed and sealed.
Fr., p. 1. Add. Endd.
23 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
156.
B. M.
1800. SIR RIC. WINGFIELD and SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
On Wingfield's return being known, he was visited by the duke of Alva, who desired him to tell you how much those who were well inclined to the confederation desired the arrival of the Emperor in Eng- land, to correct past errors. Fonseca also came, and expressed the same opinions, and said the King might be as sure of the Emperor's Spanish subjects as of his own. The ambassador of Hungary has told the Emperor that the estates of the realm will shortly assemble at Buda to consult for defence against the Turks; and that if the Emperor do not assist them, they will be compelled to make a truce; but if he will allow them a portion of the aid granted by the estates of Almain, they will do nothing without his consent. When he has got the Emperor's answer, he will go to England. The garrison of Kennoye has burned villages about Guise, where captain Bayard lay, who desired the Burgundians to cease the burning. Expect shortly to hear of the success of the Tournay enterprise. Oudenarde, 23 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.: To my lord Cardinal. Endd.
23 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
155.
B. M.
1801. SIR RIC. WINGFIELD to [WOLSEY].
Yesterday afternoon, when about to take leave of the Emperor to return to you, I received by Richmond your letter of the 20th, commanding me to remain yet for a time; which I shall do, though I would it were otherwise, hoping that, after your return to England, you will find some one to supply my place. Although Spinelly, as I have already written, has informed me, since his return, that you made him privy to all the secret affairs, I beg to know your pleasure therein. Oudenarde, 23 Nov. Signed.
P. 1.
24 Nov.
R. O.
1802. TREATY with CHARLES V. against FRANCE.
Treaty concluded between Mercurinus de Gattinara, Bernard de Mesa, bishop of Helna, John Baptista Spinelli, Gerard de Pleine and Jodocus Laurenti, LL.D., on the one part, with Jerome de Ghinucci, bishop of Ascoli, Papal nuncio, and Wolsey, on the other part, against Francis I. (1.) This treaty to precede all others. (2.) To apply to all dominions hereafter acquired. (3.) A fleet to attend the Emperor on his voyage to Spain in February next. (4.) War to be proclaimed in March 1523. Arrangements for the war, and leave for Henry to take German troops into his pay. (5.) A fleet to be provided by both confederates, with 3,000 men in each, to attack the French coast. (6.) England to declare war against France, unless it desist from hostilities against the Emperor before the end of the present month of November. (7.) The Pope to place France under an interdict. (8.) Both confederates to take cardinal de Medicis under their protection. (9.) To procure aid from the Swiss. (10.) Both to punish in their dominions the enemies of the Church, and all "qui de fide Catholica male sentire videntur." (11.) All provinces recovered from the French to be restored to the Papal jurisdiction. (12.) War to be made by both, for the salvation of their souls, on all enemies of the Christian faith. (13.) No confederates to treat with any king or prince to the prejudice of the others. (14.) Treaties of marriage between the Emperor or England and France to be set aside, and the Pope to grant a dispensation for the marriage of Charles with the princess Mary, who are "consobrini ex duabus sororibus geniti." (15.) The contents of this treaty to be secret. (16.) Arrangements for ratification. (17.) Not to interfere with any preceding treaties.
Commission of Leo X. to the bishop of Ascoli and Marin Caracioli, to treat with both sovereigns for the extirpation of the Lutheran heresy, and the safeguard of the Church. Rome, 17 cal. Oct. 1521.
Commission of Charles V. to his ambassadors aforesaid, Oudenarde, 4 Nov. 1521; and of Henry VIII. to Wolsey, Windsor, 11 Nov. 13 Hen. VIII.
Signed by the imperial ambassadors, with a notification that they have received under the great seal a notification that Charles will ratify the same. Calais, 24 Nov. 1521. Signed by them. Four of their seals attached.
Lat., on vellum, badly mutilated, pp. 15.
R. O. 2. Copy of the articles in the preceding, in a later hand.
Pp. 8.
Vit. B. IV.
204 b.
B. M.
3. Treaty between Henry VIII., Charles V. and the Pope. Dated Calais, [24 Nov.] 1521.
Pp. 20, a mere fragment on vellum.
24 Nov.
[Calig.
E. I. II.?]
I. 46.
B.M.
1803. FRANCIS I. to [his AMBASSADORS].
Has received their letters containing their final resolution taken with the cardinal of York, in order that, before Wolsey's departure from Calais to England, he may know the affection Francis has for him. Is satisfied that the abstinence of war be continued for thirty days, and the besiegers shall retire from Tournay, and abandon Tournesis. Is content to redeliver Tournay into the hands of the King, if he will restore the hostages and the money he has received for it. The treaty for the marriage of the Dauphin and the Princess is to remain in its entirety. They are to explain the whole to the bishop Declere ... and Poillot. Will send a power in Latin for the two last to conclude the treaty. Con[gnac], 24 Nov. Not signed.
Fr., mutilated, pp. 2.
24 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
158.
B. M.
1804. SIR RIC. WINGFIELD and SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
Wrote yesterday. Went this afternoon to the Emperor, to whom Wingfield showed your pleasure as to his remaining here. He told us the assembly was dissolved without any conclusion, and the French had made new offers, to which he could not consent; that he would be always ready, as Wolsey desires, to send the King an honorable personage of such degree as the French king shall do, to continue the practices begun by you, and would follow the King's advice in everything not derogatory to his honor; that he had received letters of the 10th from Italy, from a place on the river Adda, twenty English miles from Milan, stating that the allied army were upon the passage of the Adda, that the Swiss and Sion had taken Caravaggio, and were determined to go to Milan, that the French had left Lescu in Cremona, and withdrawn towards Milan with the Venetians, who, it is thought, followed them unwillingly, and it is supposed they must either give battle to their enemies, or abandon the passage and put themselves in Milan. It is affirmed the Swiss have left them. Nassau has arrived with the Almains before Tournay. Francis Seken is come to the Emperor because of his reckonings. Oudenarde, 24 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 3, mutilated. Add.: To my lord Cardinal. Endd.
25 Nov.
Galba, B. VII.
160.
B. M.
1805. SIR RIC. WINGFIELD and SPINELLY to [WOLSEY].
Wrote yesterday. This morning the Emperor and the Pope's ambassadors had news of the 13th from Italy, stating that on the resistance made by the French at the passage of the Adda, the army went with all celerity to Guavero, between Kassan and Treze, and sending 2,000 Italian foot along the river, crossed in small boats a little way above. They had some skirmishing with the French, when the Pope's army sent 1,500 Spanish gunners to their aid; meanwhile a bridge was made, and the whole army passed over. The French took to flight. Oudenarde, 25 Nov. Signed.
P. 1.
25 Nov.
Mon. Habs.
469.
1806. WOLSEY to CHARLES V.
Has received his letters to the King and himself. Thanks him for the pains he has taken in this matter. Will have as much regard to his honor and safety as to that of his own master, and will do all he can to preserve their union, and accomplish what Henry is bound to do. Calais, 25 Nov.
Fr.
25 Nov.
Vit. B. XIX.
328.
B.M.
1807. _ to [CHARLES V.]
"Sire, aujourdhuy date de ... jure de Messieurs de Zurich venu ... montaigne de Gothart qui affer [me] ... que la ville de Millan a este gaign[e par les gens] de guerre du Pape et de vostre Majest[e] ... Laflaire advenu et alle selon que v[ostre Majeste] veoir pourra par la copic que avec ces[tes je vous] envoye. Et dit davantage que les [Franchois] ont a la riviere de Ada perdu et [laisse] derriere toute lartellerye quilz avoient [avec] eulx; mais ne scavoit quel ch ... [les] autres Franchois et Venissiens veulent et ... les 4,000 qui sont tirez vers Comme entre ... estoient les Suysses autant quil en ... demourez au service desdits Franchois ont ... "Et retournent en leurs maisons les [deputes] de tous les cantons des Suysses, q[ui] ... jours passez avoient este mandez en ... pour faire une paix entre le Pape [et le] roy de France. Dont a ce que p ... hors des choses dessusdites tiens fermeme[nt que] ledit Comme ne tiendra point. Ou [il] nya a mon adviz plus si grant dan[ger] ausdits Suysses; car lesdits affaire[s] ... tournans ne se chargeront plus a ... Franchois.
"[Le dit] messangier m'a aussi dit que [Galeas] Visconte, lequel aucunes annees passees ... cquoit avec feu lempereur Maximilian vostre grant pere, tire comme dechasse, et miserablement, oultre la montaigne dudit Gothart, en intention et vouloir daller a Lucerne sur la journee ou il ne sera bien receu ainsi povre et sans argent." Some Swiss foot have returned from France, and say that the Swiss there (cellepart) are returning also. Has been advised not to go to the diet at Lucerne, but only to write thither what the Emperor has commanded him; which he has done. 25 Nov., 10 o'clock at night.
Fr., pp. 2, mutilated.