Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 415-434

Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Originally published by London Record Society, London, 1999.

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Citation:

'Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 415-434', Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999), pp. 132-140. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/132-140 [accessed 17 June 2024].

. "Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 415-434", in Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999) 132-140. British History Online, accessed June 17, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/132-140.

. "Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 415-434", Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999). 132-140. British History Online. Web. 17 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/132-140.

Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 415-434

415. [p. 191] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Mary Younge. Mary Younge, widow of Alexander Younge, an in pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, lately deceased, aged now about 30 years, upon her oath says that she was married to the said Younge about twelve years since in the Fleet. And that he was born in Scotland, but in what part thereof she knows not. And that she now has three children living by her said husband, all born in the parish of Chelsea; vizt, Jane, about 7 years of age, Mary, about 5 years of age, and Elizabeth, about 3 years of age. And this examinant on her oath further says that she was the daughter of one James Thompson who also was an in pensioner of Chelsea Hospital (but he has been dead 24 or 25 years). And that her said father was born and also served his time of apprenticeship in the city of Norwich, but in what parish there she never heard. And that her mother lived in the parish of Chelsea when her father married her, and that she herself was born in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. And lastly on her oath says that neither her aforesaid husband, Alexander Younge, or her father or mother ever rented a house or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid parochial taxes in any place whatever (to the best of her knowledge and belief). And that [she] herself never lived as a hired servant in any one place twelve months. Mary Younge, her mark. Sworn before me, 9 July 1762, William Spinnage.

416. [p. 192] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Frances Taylor. Frances Taylor, aged about 42 years, on her oath says that she was married to John Taylor, her husband, by licence in the parish church of St James in the liberty of Westminster in the year 1748. Soon after her said husband took a public house known by the sign of the Goat at Four Tree Hill in the parish of Enfield in the county of Middlesex, and they kept the same for near four years, paid £20 per annum for the same, and also all parochial taxes. Business not answering, was obliged to quit the said house and being so reduced, both were obliged to go to labouring work. And that [he] never kept any house or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes since they left the said parish of Enfield. And to the best of her knowledge never has done any thing since to gain a subsequent settlement. And further says her said husband, about six weeks since, left her poor and destitute, and is now become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. Frances Taylor, her mark. Sworn, 9 July 1762, before us, William Spinnage. Passed to Enfield, 9 July, by an order.

417. [p. 193] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of John Woodcock. John Woodcock, an out pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, at this time in the workhouse in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, aged about 57 years, on his oath says he was born in the parish of Bardwell, near Bury St Edmunds in the county of Suffolk, in which said parish of Bardwell he was put out apprentice to one Mr Thomas Cox, a miller for seven years. With whom he lived about five years of his apprenticeship (his mother bought out the other two years of his time from his master). Soon after he enlisted himself for a soldier and has ever since belonged to the army. That about 31 years ago he was married to his present wife, Elizabeth, in Belfast, in the North of Ireland. And that by her (his said wife who now is about 56 years of age) has had several children. Two whereof he believes are now living; vizt, James, aged about 25 years, now a soldier in Jamaica, also a daughter, Mary, aged about 23 years, married to one Philip Owen, an invalid soldier at Portsmouth. And that on his oath this examinant further says he was passed about four years ago by a vagrant pass from Barnet in Hertfordshire to his aforesaid parish of Bardwell. And further says since his said apprenticeship he never lived in any place as a yearly hired servant twelve months, nor never rented any house or tenement of £10 per annum, nor ever paid parochial taxes, nor ever did any thing, to the best of his knowledge, to gain a subsequent settlement. John Woodcock, his mark. Sworn before us, 9 July 1762, William Spinnage. Died in our workhouse.

418. [p. 194] Middlesex. The voluntary examination of Sarah Baldwin, single woman, taken upon her oath before me, William Spinnage esq. . . . Who saith that she is pregnant of a bastard child or children which was or were unlawfully begotten on her body by one Thomas Ball, who keeps the sign of the Flask, near Avery Farm in the parish of St George Hanover Square in the liberty of Westminster. With whom she lived for the space of nineteen months as a hired yearly servant. And this examinant says he frequently and often times lay with her in her bed in the house aforesaid, and had carnal knowledge of her body diverse times. And that the said child or children is or are likely to be chargeable to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. And this examinant saith that the said Thomas Ball is the true father of the said child or children she is now pregnant with, and no other person whatsoever. [Blank]. Taken and sworn before me, [blank] Aug. 1762, [blank]. The said Sarah Baldwin was passed by an order to us from St George Hanover Square, on our appeal at Hick's Hall, the pauper was to go to them.

419. [p. 195] The voluntary examination of Elizabeth (whose maiden name was Carpenter) now the wife of Stephen Dodd of Brentford in the county of Middlesex, taken before me, William Spinnage esq.. . . Who on her oath says that before she was married and at the time she was a single woman she lived with James Worthington esq., a hired servant at his house in Pall Mall in the parish of St James within the city and liberty of Westminster. At which time in the said house lived Richard Dickinson, a hired servant also to the said James Worthington esq. During the time of their living there he, the said Richard Dickinson, several times and often lay with her. the said Elizabeth Carpenter (now Dodd), in her bed and had carnal knowledge of her body several times. By whom she was got with child. And when her time of delivery grew near, lodgings was taken for her in the house of John Pearse in Turk's Row in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, in which said house or lodging she was delivered of a daughter on 1 Oct. 1759, and that the said child was baptised in the parish church of Chelsea by the name of Hannah. And that the said child is now living in the parish of Chelsea and is become chargeable to the said parish, and that it is not in her power or capacity to provide and support her said child. And further this examinant says on her oath that the aforementioned Richard Dickinson is the true and real father of the said child, Hannah Carpenter, and no man else. And that on 23 Sept. 1761 she was married (since the birth of the said child) to Stephen Dodd, with whom she lives in [p. 196] New Brentford in the county of Middlesex. Elizabeth Dodd. Sworn before me, 25 Aug. 1762, at Knightsbridge, William Spinnage.

420. Middlesex. Ann Whitman, single woman, aged about 60 years, on her oath says that she is the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Whitman, late of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, gardeners. Who kept a house and gardens in the King's Road (leading to Fulham), in which house she heard her mother say she was born. And that when she was about 20 years of age, she went and lived as a servant with one Mr William Burchett, a farmer in Little Chelsea in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, deceased. With whom she lived near five years together, and received £5 per annum, meat, drink and lodging. And after she left her said service she has travelled about the country selling fruit etc. for to get her livelihood and maintenance. And this examinant on her oath further says that she never lived in any one place as a hired servant since she left Mr Burchett aforesaid twelve months together. And that she never was married to any man, and that she never rented any tenement or land of £10 per annum, nor paid any parochial taxes, nor has done any act since (to the best of her knowledge) to gain a subsequent settlement. [Blank]. Sworn before me, [blank] Aug. 1762, [blank].

421. [p. 197] Middlesex. The examination of Robert Ridhall. Robert Ridhall, aged about 33 years, on his oath says he was born in the parish of Painswick in the county of Gloucester. And that he served seven years apprenticeship to his father, John Ridhall, a carpenter in the said parish of Painswick. And as soon as he had served the full time of his apprenticeship, he worked journey work and has continued so ever since. And that about three years ago he was married to Ann Barton, a widow, in St Margaret's church, Westminster (who lately died). By whom he has a child living near eighteen months old, named William. And that he never lived as a yearly hired servant, never rented any tenement or land of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or ever did any thing (to the best of his knowledge) to gain a subsequent settlement. Robert Ridhall. Sworn before us, 6 Oct. 1762, Thomas Kynaston. Went with his said child to the place of its nativity. Voluntary.

422. [p. 198] Middlesex. The examination of Joannah Philips. Joannah Philips, aged about 61 years, wife of William Philips, to whom she was married as appears by a certificate on 11 Oct. 1751, on her oath further says that she has often heard her said husband say that his friends bound him out an apprentice to the trade of a wine cooper (his master's name she forgot), near the church in Botolph Lane (the said house her husband has shown her, which she well knows and remembers) in the parish of St George Botolph Lane within the city of London. With whom he lived between two and three years an apprentice until his master died. And [he] was never after turned over to any other person, but went home and lived with his friends in Buckinghamshire. And that he never was after his said master died a covenant or yearly hired servant to any person whatever, never rented any house or land of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or ever done any act since his said apprenticeship, to the best of her knowledge, to gain a subsequent settlement. And that her said husband is gone and left her in a poor, distressed condition, and that now she is become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea. Joannah Phillips. Sworn before [blank] this 20 Oct 1762, Thomas Kynaston, J. Miller. Passed by an order to St George Botolph Lane, 20 Oct.

423. [p. 199] Middlesex. The examination of Mary Painter. Mary Painter, aged about 32 years, single woman, on her oath says that she was born in the parish of Goring in Oxfordshire, in which said parish her father, Matthew Painter (who now is living), was also born, as was also her grandfather, as she oft times had heard her said father say. And this examinant on her oath further says that she never was married, that she never lived with any person as a yearly hired servant, nor ever rented any land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever did any act, to the best of her knowledge, to gain any subsequent settlement since her birth. Mary Painter, her mark. Sworn before me, 20 Oct. 1762, Thomas Kynaston. Passed away by a permit, 20 Oct. 1762.

424. [p. 200] Middlesex, to wit. The voluntary examination of Jane Tapsell taken on oath the [blank] Nov. 1762. This examinant on her oath says that she is near 28 years of age, that she has lived in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex upwards of three years last past. The first two years thereof she lived as a yearly hired servant with Miss Elizabeth Storey in Paradise Row in Chelsea. That as soon as she left that service she hired her self and lived in the service of James George Douglas esq., at his house in the King's Road, Chelsea aforesaid. There she lived a full and complete twelve months together. From which house she was discharged 29 Aug. 1762 (or then about). And there also she received her wages, £7 per annum and 7s. per week board wages. And this examinant on her oath further says that she never was married, that she never rented any house or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid parochial taxes, or ever did any act, to the best of her knowledge, to gain a settlement than as is aforesaid. Sworn before me the day and year above written, [blank]. [See 425].

425. [p. 201] Middlesex. The voluntary examination of Jane Tapsell, single woman, taken 12 Nov. 1762, before me, Thomas Kynaston esq. . . . Who on her oath says that she is pregnant of a bastard child or children which was or were unlawfully begotten on her body by one Richard, whose surnames she knows not, a bricklayer who works at the said trade or business in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. Who had carnal knowledge of her body the first time, was the latter end of April last, in the house of James George Douglas esq. in the King's Road in the parish of Chelsea aforesaid. At which time and in the said house she lived a yearly hired servant. And says that the said Richard [blank] had carnal knowledge of her body several times after in the said house, and that the said Richard [blank] is the true and only father of the said child or children that she is pregnant with, and no other man else. And that she is in distress, and is become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea. Jane Tapsell, her mark. Sworn before me, the day and year above written, Thomas Kynaston. N.B. Richard Brittain was the man's name. He made satisfaction. The child [is] since dead. [See 424].

426. [n.p.] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Isabella Mills, widow. Isabella Mills, aged about 65 years, the widow of John Mills, late a pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, deceased, upon oath saith that she was married to her said late husband on 10 Dec. 1732 in the liberty of the Fleet within the city of London (which also appears by certificate). And at that time he was a soldier belonging to the army. And this examinant further says that she often heard him say that he, her said husband, was born in Scotland, but in what part or parish she never heard, and that he enlisted in the army when he was young. That he . . . [had] no trade, never lived with any person as a hired yearly servant, nor ever rented any house or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid parochial taxes. By whom she had eight children, seven of which are dead. Her only now child living is Sarah, unmarried, aged about 21 years and lives in London. And this examinant further says that before her said husband was married to her, she got her livelihood by going to service, and that the last place she lived in for a twelve month together before she was married was with one Mr Hazard, a shoemaker in Bow Lane in the parish of St Mary Le Bow within the city of London, with whom she lived thirteen months together, and had £5 per annum, board etc. and lodging. And that after she left her said service [she] never lived in any one place twelve months and since, has done no act to gain a subsequent settlement, to the best of her knowledge, and that she is become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea. [Blank]. Sworn before us, [blank] Feb. 1763, [blank].

427. [p. 203] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Thomas Wythe. Thomas Wythe, aged about 39 years, on his oath saith that when he was about [blank] years of age he was put out and apprenticed to one Mr Nebot in the parish of St Giles in the Fields in the county of Middlesex, limner and painter, for the term of seven years. Which said term he served as an apprentice, lodged and boarded in the said house with his aforesaid master. And that after he was out of his said apprenticeship he got his livelihood by working at his trade, sometime as a journeyman and sometime by piece work. And that about ten years ago he was married to his present wife, Mary, by whom he has now three children living; vizt, Montilla, his eldest daughter, aged near 9 years, the 2nd daughter, Mary, aged near 7 years, 3rd George, his son, aged about 2 months. And this examinant further says that he never lived a twelve month together in any place as a yearly hired servant since his said apprenticeship, nor ever rented any house or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or ever did any kind of act since to gain a subsequent settlement, to the best of his knowledge. And that he and his family are become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea. [Blank]. Sworn before us, [blank] Feb. 1763, [blank].

428. [p. 204] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Philadelphia Ford, single woman. Philadelphia Ford, single woman, aged 20 years and upwards, on her oath saith that the last place she lived in for a 12 month together was in the service of the Right Honourable the Earl of Peterborough at Parson's Green in the parish of Fulham in the county of Middlesex, in which place she lived twelve months and about seven weeks as a dairymaid, and received £5 per annum, lodging board etc. And that she left the said service about four months ago. And this examinant on her oath further saith that she never was married, never rented any tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or has ever done any act to gain a settlement since she left her aforesaid service, to the best of her knowledge. And that she is become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. Philadelphia Ford, her mark. Sworn before us, 5 Mar. 1763, Richard Glyn, Thomas Kynaston. Passed to Fulham.

429. [p. 205] Surrey and Middlesex, to wit. The voluntary examination of Christian Dew, wife of Edward Dew, taken 20 April 1763 before me, Sir John Fielding knight.... Who on her oath says that she is about 36 years of age and that about thirteen years ago she was married to Edward Dew, and that upwards of five [years] ago he left her. Since which time she never once have seen him, but by a letter (which was near three years since), which informed her that he, her said husband, was gone or going abroad in one of his Majesty's ships of war as a marine or sailor, but which she cannot tell. And on her oath this examinant further says that she is now pregnant of a bastard child or children, which was or were unlawfully begotten of her body by one Philip Gibson of the parish of Richmond in the county of Surrey, bricklayer, who had carnal knowledge of her body several times in his own dwelling house in the parish of Richmond aforesaid. And that she reckoneth that she now has about six or seven weeks to go before she is delivered. And that the aforesaid Philip Gibson is the true and real father of the said child or children that she is pregnant with, and no man else. And that she has now become chargeable to the parish of St Luke Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. And that she has not been married to any man since her said husband Edward Dew left her. Christian Dew. Sworn before me, 20 April 1762, John Fielding. Vide 209. [See 433].

430. [p. 206] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Thomas Matthews. Thomas Matthews, aged near 39 years, on his oath saith that he was born in the parish of Buxton in the county of Norfolk, that he was bound apprentice to his father, Robert Matthews, a smith, and served out his full time of apprenticeship for his said father in the parish of Buxton aforesaid. And that he never since lived with any person as a hired yearly servant, nor ever rented any house, tenement or land of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, nor never since he came out of his apprenticeship done any act (to the best of his knowledge) to gain a subsequent settlement. And further says that he at this time is not married to any woman whatsoever. Thomas Matthews. Sworn before me, 29 April 1763, Richard Glyn.

431. [p. 207] Middlesex, to wit. The voluntary examination of Sophia Maria Saint, single woman, taken before me, ... 31 May 1763. This examinant on her oath says that on Sunday 10 April last past she, this examinant, was delivered of a female bastard child in the house of John Verney in Jews Row in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. Which said child is baptised by the name of Henrietta, [and] was unlawfully begotten on her body by William Bared De' Costa who lodges in the house of Mr Bowsey in Newport Street near Leicester Fields in the parish of St Martins in the Fields, with whom she lived as a hired yearly servant. In which said house he had carnal knowledge of her body several times. And this examinant further says that the said William Bared De' Costa is the father of the said child, and no man else. And that she now is become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex and that she has no thing to support her and the said child. Sophia Maria Saint. Thomas Kynaston.

432. [p. 208] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Diana Granger, widow. Diana Granger, widow, aged about 58 years, on her oath says that she was married about 19 years ago to one John Granger who was several years an inhabitant in the parish of Chelsea. And that he rented a house in the parish, but not with any certainty knows whether he ever paid taxes for the same. But further on her oath says that she has often been told that he, her said husband, when he first came to live in Chelsea was with one Mr Thomas Fleet, a gardener, with whom he lived some years as a yearly hired servant. Soon after he left his said service he was married. That her said husband died in Chelsea about twelve years ago. And further says that she has not been married since, nor done any act to get a subsequent settlement (to the best of her knowledge). Diana Granger, her mark. Sworn before me ... 15 June 1763, Thomas Kynaston. Sent to the work house.

433. [p. 209] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Christian Dew, who on her oath says that she is about 36 years of age, and is the wife of Edward Dew (if living), a soldier who has been gone abroad about three years and hath not been in England since, to the best of this examinant's knowledge and belief. And further on her voluntary oath says that on Thursday 16 June 1763 she was delivered of a female bastard child in the workhouse in and belonging to the parish of St Luke Chelsea in the county of Middlesex (since christened by the name of Sarah). Which said child is now living and chargeable to the said parish of St Luke Chelsea. And that Philip Gibson, a bricklayer in the parish of Richmond in the county of Surrey unlawfully begot on her body the said female bastard child so born of her body aforesaid. That the said Philip Gibson is the only true and real father thereof and no other person whatever. Christian Dew. Sworn before us, 3 July 1763, Richard Glyn, Thomas Kynaston. N.B. Satisfaction made to the parish of Chelsea. The child since dead. [See 429].

434. [p. 210] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Martha Elms, single woman. This examinant, Martha Elms, single woman, aged about 22 years, on her oath saith that she never was married, that she maintains and supports her self by going to service and that the last place she lived in for a twelve month together was with Mr John Glass at the Swan Tavern in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, with whom she lived about eighteen months as a yearly hired servant. And that she had wages [of] £5 per annum, board and lodging etc. and that she left the said service in the month of Feb. 1763 on account that she was far advanced in her pregnancy of a bastard child. And this examinant voluntary maketh oath that the said bastard child, as before mentioned, [was] born of her body, and [she] was delivered of the said child in the house of Mrs Mary Adams near the Physic Gardens in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex on 10 April 1763, since christened by the name of Matthew. And on her voluntary oath further saith that Matthew Murphy, who was a waiter or servant with Mr John Glass, had carnal knowledge of her body several times in the house of Mr Glass, and that the said Matthew Murphy is the only and true father of the said bastard child and no man else. And further says that the said bastard child is now living and is still supported and kept at the sole expense of the parish of Chelsea. Martha Elms. Sworn before me, 4 July 1764, Thomas Kynaston. The child [is] in our workhouse.