Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 435-454

Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Originally published by London Record Society, London, 1999.

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'Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 435-454', Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999), pp. 140-148. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp140-148 [accessed 19 June 2024].

. "Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 435-454", in Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999) 140-148. British History Online, accessed June 19, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp140-148.

. "Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 435-454", Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999). 140-148. British History Online. Web. 19 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp140-148.

Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 435-454

435. [p. 211] Middlesex, to wit. William Hawker, aged about 55 years, born in the parish of St Andrew Holborn in the county of Middlesex, who on his oath says that when he was about the age of 14 years he was put out and bound apprentice by the parish officers of the aforesaid parish to one Pattrick Hammond, a necklace maker who lived in the liberty of Saffron Hill within the said parish of St Andrew Holborn in the county of Middlesex, with whom he continued and lived with as an apprentice near five years of his time. But as his said master Pattrick Hammond, having frequently beat and abused him, he thereupon absconded and left his said master. After which this examinant says he got his living by labouring work and going on errands in different places for several years, and that he was soldier in the army some years till he was discharged in the year 1749. And on his oath says that in the year 1753 he was passed by an order from the parish of St Luke Chelsea in the county of Middlesex to the parish of St Andrew Holborn in the county of Middlesex. And lastly this examinant says that he never in his life time rented any tenement or land of £10 per annum, or ever lived with any person as a hired yearly servant, or ever paid any parochial taxes since his said apprenticeship, or ever done any act to gain a subsequent settlement since (to the best of his knowledge). And that he is now become chargeable to the parish of St Luke Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. The mark of William Hawker. Sworn, 17 Dec. 1763, before us, Benjamin Cox, Thomas Kynaston. Passed him to St Andrews. [See 256].

436. [p. 212] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Dorcus Edmunds, single woman. This examinant on her oath says that she is about 30 years of age, and that she never was married to any man, and that she got her livelihood by going out to service. And that the last place she lived in a twelve month together was with one Mr John Keen in Beach Lane near Cripplegate in the parish of St Giles in the city of London. With whom she lived until he died, which was near two years. And that her said master Keen died about twelve months ago. And on her oath further says that she never since lived in any place whatever as a hired servant a twelve month, nor ever rented any house, ground or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or done any subsequent act to gain a settlement, to the best of [her] knowledge. This examinant, Dorcus Edmunds, on her voluntary oath says that the female child born of [her] body, from which said child she was delivered on Tuesday last in the house of Mrs Mary Vias near Ranelagh House in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, which said child has been baptised by the name of Mary, was born a bastard, for that she never was married to any man whatever. And lastly on her oath says that one John Brown who lived with a gentleman as a servant was the real and true father of the said female bastard child and no man else. And that the said Brown (as she has heard say) left England to go to the West Indies, and that he is since dead. Dorcus Edmunds. Sworn before me, 16 April 1764, Thomas Kynaston. The child was sent to our workhouse and there died.

437. [p. 213] Middlesex, to wit. The information of Elizabeth Hatt of the parish of Fulham in the county of Middlesex, widow, touching the settlement of Ann Hatt, her daughter (now a lunatic) by William Hatt her late husband. Who on her oath says that the said Ann Hatt, her daughter, is about 27 years of age and never was married. And that the last place she lived in for a year as a yearly hired servant was with one Mr Francis Smith and his wife in the parish of St Luke Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. With whom she lived two years. And that her said daughter never since lived in any one place one year as a hired servant, nor ever did any act whatever (to the best of her knowledge) to gain a subsequent settlement since she left Mr Smith's service, which is about seven years and a half ago. Elizabeth Hatt, her mark. Sworn before me, 18 April 1764, Thomas Kynaston. N.B. The above Ann Hatt is in our workhouse.

438. [p. 214] Middlesex. The examination of Susannah Jones, who says that she is about 40 years of age and on her oath says that about nineteen years since she was married in the liberty of the Fleet in the city of London to Thomas Jones, who was at that time an apprentice to one Mr Partridge, a barber and periwig maker at the Gore in the parish of Kensington in the county of Middlesex. And that when he had served upwards of six years of his said apprenticeship he enlisted himself for a soldier. And when discharged from the army [he] became an invalid in pensioner of Chelsea Hospital [and] therein lived some years. And as she has heard say, he dismissed himself from the said hospital at Chelsea and went away. And that she has now living two children; vizt, a son and a daughter. George Smith, [the] eldest child was born on 24 Mar. 1757, and the youngest child, Sarah Smith, was born the latter end of August 1762. And on her oath further says that her said husband never since his apprenticeship aforesaid has done any act whatever (to the best of her knowledge) to gain a subsequent settlement. Susannah Jones her mark. Sworn before us, 31 May 1764, Thomas Kynaston, Paul Vaillant. All passed to Kensington.

439. [p. 215] Middlesex, to wit. John Spooner of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex maketh oath and says that he was well acquainted and knew John Davis and also his wife Mary who is at this present time not perfect in her understanding. And that he believes them to be married to each other, and that they lived together as man and wife for several years. And that they kept together a public house, the sign of the Scotch Grey, in the parish of Kensington in the county of Middlesex, but being reduced has left his said wife. And at this time she is not capable to maintain herself and is burdensome to the parish of Chelsea. And this examinant on his oath further says that since they left the aforesaid public house, that they have not gained (to the best of his knowledge) any subsequent settlement. John Spooner. Sworn before us, 30 May 1764, Thomas Kynaston, Paul Vaillant. Passed to Kensington. [See 400].

440. [p. 216] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Elizabeth Davis, single woman. This examinant on her oath says that she is about 28 years of age, and that she never was married to any man, and that she got her livelihood by going out to service, and that the last place she lived in a twelve month together as a hired servant was with one Mrs Hannand, a green grocer in St Albans Street in the parish of St James in the liberty of Westminster in the county of Middlesex. With whom she lived four years and a half and had £3 per annum wages. Which place she left about two years and a half ago. Since which time she went to live at Chiswick with one Mr Holland, a baker with whom she lived about four months, which place she left on account being with child. And that to the best of her knowledge [she] never did any act to gain a settlement since she left her service as above mentioned in St Albans Street. This examinant, Elizabeth Davis, on her voluntary oath says that the female bastard child . . . she now has with her, was born on her body, and that the said child is now about 10 months and a fortnight old. And that she was delivered of the same in a house in Watermans Court in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, since baptised by the name of Sarah. And that at the time she lived at Chiswick as a servant, Moses Gibson, a journeyman to her master had carnal knowledge of her body several times. And on her oath says that the said Moses Gibson is the true and real father of the said bastard child, and no man else. Elizabeth Davis her mark. Sworn before me, 13 July 1764, Thomas Kynaston. N.B. The said Moses Gibson was taken up and made satisfaction to the parish of Chelsea. The girl was sent to our workhouse and is since dead.

441. [p. 217] Middlesex, to wit. William Horder, aged about 68 years, on his oath says that about 33 years ago he lived with Captain Richard Culliford in Laurence Street in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. With whom he lived twelve months and 11 days as a yearly hired livery servant. Soon after he left the said service he went to Lymington in Hampshire, and there and thereabouts he worked as a labourer at the brick kilns ever since. And about 28 years ago there he was married to his now present wife, Hannah, who is now aged about 62 years of age. And this examinant on his oath further says that since he left his aforesaid service with Captain Culliford, he never lived as a yearly hired servant a year in any place whatever, nor rented any house or land of £10 per annum, or ever did any act since (to the best of his knowledge) to gain a subsequent settlement. Nor has he at this time any child or grandchild living. William Horder, his mark. Sworn before me, 2 Oct. 1764, Thomas Kynaston. N.B. The above William Horder and his wife Hannah were sent to the parish of Chelsea per an order from Lymington. But at the request and by permission of the officers of Lymington they both went back again on the promise of the officers of Chelsea to allow each of them one shilling each. Which is to be sent to them half yearly.

442. [p. 218] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Thomas Waters taken 18 Oct. 1764. This examinant, Thomas Waters, who is now about 42 years of age, on his oath says that he served his apprenticeship to his father, Joseph Waters, in the parish of St Margaret Lothbury within the city of London, to learn the art and mystery of a tailor. Soon after he served his said apprenticeship he entered into the army, and in or about the month of Sept. 1763 was discharged from the army as an invalid, and was recommended to the Royal Bounty of Chelsea. And [he] was admitted on the books of the said hospital as an out pensioner in the said month of September. Some little time after he goes to the parish of St Katherine by the Tower and lodged in the house of one Thomas Lewis in the court called Hansons Gain in the said parish of St Katherine, where he was taken ill of a fever (so ill that it is now much doubted whether he will recover). And that the said Thomas Lewis and his wife Mary, with the assistance of a waterman (whose name he knows not), did put him in a boat on the Thames about 4 o'clock in the morning on Tuesday 16 Oct. 1764. Forcibly and against his consent [they] did convey him to Chelsea and did leave him in the said parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex in the above said illegal manner. And that he is now become chargeable and expensive to the said parish of Chelsea. And this examinant on his oath further says that since he came out of his said apprenticeship [he] never has done any act, to the best of his knowledge, to have any other settlement. Thomas Waters. Sworn before me, 18 Oct. 1764, Thomas Kynaston. N.B. The above said Thomas Lewis was taken up by a warrant and made satisfaction.

443. [p. 219] Middlesex, to wit. The voluntary examination of Elizabeth Edwards, single woman, taken 18 October 1764, before Thomas Kynaston esq. . . . This examinant, Elizabeth Edwards, aged about 20 years, on her oath says that she never was married, and that she lived with Mr Thomas Reynardson in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex as a hired servant upwards of fifteen months. And that she left her said service about 35 days since. And on her voluntary oath says that she is now pregnant of a bastard child or children which was or were unlawfully begotten on her body by one Thomas Reynardson, nephew to her above said master, who did and now does live with her said master in Chelsea aforesaid. And that he had carnal knowledge of her body several times in her bed in her said master's house. And further on her oath says that the said Thomas Reynardson, nephew to her said master, is the real and true father on the said child or children, and no man else. And that she is now chargeable to the parish of Chelsea on account of her being so far advanced in her pregnancy. Elizabeth Edwards, her mark. Sworn before me the day and year above written, Thomas Kynaston. N.B. Thomas Reynardson made satisfaction. The child [is] since dead.

444. [p. 220] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Elizabeth Smith. This examinant, Elizabeth Smith, aged about 42 years, on her oath says that she was married to her husband, Richard Smith, upwards of fourteen years ago in the parish of St Brides in London (which also appears by a certificate of the same). By whom she has now a daughter living, whose name is Elizabeth, aged about twelve years and upwards. Since which her said husband has left her, but whether he is living at this time she knows not. And this examinant on her oath further says that she had oft times heard her said husband say that he had lived with Lord Percival as a footman at his Lordship's house in Pall Mall in the parish of St James in the liberty of Westminster upwards of two years. From which house and service he was discharged. Since which time he never lived with any person a twelve month as a yearly hired servant, nor have done any act whatever (to the best of her knowledge) to have gained a subsequent settlement. Elizabeth Smith, her mark. Sworn before us, 11 April 1765, Thomas Kynaston, Paul Vaillant. Passed both to St James parish.

445. [p. 221] Middlesex, to wit. The voluntary examination of Mary Brown, taken 8 May 1765, before Thomas Kynaston esq. . . . This examinant, Mary Brown, aged about 37 years on her oath says that she was married in London to her husband, James Brown, about fifteen years since, and that about twelve years ago they both went to Ireland, and there lived together about two years. After which time he left her big with child, and on her oath says that she has never once seen her said husband James Brown or ever heard from him since he deserted her in Ireland, which is ten years ago and upwards. And on her voluntary oath further says that she was delivered of a male bastard child born of her body, since baptised by the name of William Walter Grimbleson. That the said child was born 18 Jan. last in the house of William Jackson in Jews Row in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. And that William Walter Grimbleson, who at this time keeps a house in Silver Street, facing the end of great Pulteney Street, by trade a carver and gilder, had carnal knowledge of her body several times, and that he is the real and true father of the said bastard child, and no man else. And that the said bastard is become chargeable to the said parish of Chelsea. Mary Brown. Sworn before me, 8 May 1765, Thomas Kynaston.

446. [p. 222] Middlesex, to wit. Samuel Gatehouse, aged about 45 years, upon oath says that at the age of about 14 years he, this examinant, was bound apprentice to one Mr William Hancock in or near Grosvenor Street in the parish of St George Hanover Square in the liberty of Westminster in the county of Middlesex, barber and peruke maker, for the term of seven years. And that he served his said master the said term. And on his oath further says about ten years ago he was married to his present wife, Elizabeth, at Perth in North Britain, by whom he has three children now living; vizt, Sarah, the eldest, near 8 years old, Ann, near 4 years old and Jane, the youngest, near 8 months old. And this examinant on his oath further says that he never lived with any person since he came out of his apprenticeship (as is above mentioned) as a yearly servant, nor rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or done any subsequent act to gain any other settlement, to the best of his knowledge. Sam Gatehouse. Sworn before us, 30 Oct. 1765, Richard Glyn, Thomas Kynaston. Passed to St George Hanover Square, the whole family.

447. [p. 223] Middlesex, to wit. Elenor McDonold (otherwise Kilbourn), aged about 26 years, who on her oath says that she was married between six and seven years ago to one Thomas Kilbourn, by trade a peruke maker, by a Romish priest in her own apartment in a private house in the parish of St Martin in the Fields in the liberty of Westminster in the county of Middlesex, and in no other manner was she married. By which said Thomas Kilbourn (who is now dead) she has living at this time two children; George, the eldest, near 2 years old, Margaret, the youngest is 8 months old. Which said two children were both born in Hedge Lane in the parish of St Martin in the Fields aforesaid, and that the said Thomas Kilbourn was the real and true father of her said two children. And on her oath further says that she never was married to any other man whatever, nor in any other manner than what is above mentioned. Elenor McDonold. Sworn before us, 6 Dec. 1765, Richard Glyn, Paul Vaillant.

448. [p. 224] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Sarah Dequester, single woman. This examinant says that she is about 64 years of age and that she was the daughter of one Mr Jacob Dequester who kept the Naggs Head Tavern in Cheapside in the city of London, where she was born. Who on her oath says that her father bound her an apprentice to one Mrs Nelson, a milliner in the Old Jewry in the city of London for the term and space of seven years. And that when she had served about five years of her said apprenticeship her said mistress failed and left off trade. And as her father was desirous she should serve her full time, on her oath further says, that she was bound again as an apprentice for the remaining two years to one Mrs Davage in Tavistock Street in the parish of St Paul Covent Garden in the liberty of Westminster in the county of Middlesex, milliner, which two years she faithfully served as an apprentice. Since which time she never lived with any person whatever as a yearly hired servant, nor rented any house or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes. Neither was she ever married to any man, or ever done any act since she served her time as apprentice as is above mentioned, to the best of her knowledge, to have gained a subsequent settlement. And that she now is become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. Sarah Dequester, her mark. Sworn before us, 20 Dec. 1765, Thomas Kynaston. Passed to St Paul Covent Garden.

449. [p. 225] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Thomas Baker. Thomas Baker, aged about 53 years, who is at this time an inhabitant of the parish of St Luke Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, labourer, . . . on his oath says that about 30 years ago he lived with one Mr Tooley who then kept the White Horse Inn in Church Lane in the parish of Chelsea aforesaid. With whom he lived near eighteen months at the said inn as a hired yearly servant and did receive £4 per annum wages, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And this examinant on his oath further says that he has not since he was discharged from the service of the above mentioned Mr Tooley in Chelsea lived with any person whatever for a twelve month together as a yearly hired servant, nor rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or ever done any kind of act whatever since to have gain[ed] a subsequent settlement, to the best of his knowledge. And that he is become poor and wants relief. Thomas Baker his mark. Sworn before me, 25 Jan. 1766, Thomas Kynaston.

450. [p. 226] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Elizabeth White, widow. This examinant, Elizabeth White, aged near 40 years, on her oath says that about 17 years ago she lived with Sir George Pocock as a yearly hired servant at his house [at] the upper end of St James Street in the parish of St George Hanover Square in the liberty of Westminster in the county of Middlesex for the space of near two years, as did also her husband, John White, at the said time live with the said Sir George Pocock in the said house for the space of near six years as a yearly hired servant. In which service they both married together. But soon after they quitted it on account she being with child. And that her said husband, John White, has been dead about four years since and left four children born on her body. . . . James, the eldest, near 16 years of age, is now a servant. Elizabeth, near 13 years of age, and Robert, near 10 years of age, were apprenticed out by the officers of the parish of the aforesaid parish of St George Hanover Square. Mary, the youngest, near 6 years of age, is now living with her. This examinant on her oath further says that she nor her husband since they were married did rent any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or did ever pay any parochial taxes. Neither has she since her said husband['s] death done any act, to the best of her knowledge, to have gained a subsequent settlement since their marriage as aforesaid. And on her oath further says that she has not been married to any man since her said husband, John White's death. And that she herself and her said child Mary is in great want, and is become chargeable to the parish of St Luke Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. Elizabeth White, her mark. Sworn before us, 11 Feb. 1766, Thomas Kynaston, Thomas Balack. N.B. It is to be observed that Sir George Pocock at the time I then lived with him was called Captain George Pocock. Passed she and her child 11 Feb. 1766 to St George Hanover Square.

451. [p. 227] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of William Wedell. This examinant, William Wedell, aged 52 years, on his oath says that when about 18 years of age he was hired as a yearly servant to live with the late Earl of Burlington, in which service he continued for about nineteen years, until he married his late wife, who was at that time also a servant in the same family, who has been dead near fifteen years past. On his oath further says that most of the time he was in the said service was in his Lordship's House called Burlington House in Piccadilly in the parish of St James in the liberty of Westminster in the county of Middlesex. And that the last 40 days and upwards of his said service, before he was married or dismissed from his Lordship's service, was at Burlington House in Piccadilly aforesaid. And further on his oath says that since he left the said service he never rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or done any act whatever (to the best of his knowledge) to have gained any subsequent settlement. And that he is now sick and become chargeable to the parish of St Luke Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. William Wedell, his mark. Sworn before us, 18 Feb. 1766, John Fielding, J. Lonsdale. Passed him to the parish of St James Westminster, 18 Feb. 1766.

452. [p. 228] Middlesex, to wit. The voluntary examination of Elizabeth Boxall, single woman, taken upon oath before me, Thomas Kynaston esq. . . . Elizabeth Boxall, aged about 32 years, widow of Thomas Boxall, late an inhabitant and parishioner of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, smith, by whom she has now living a boy named James, aged 5 years, who on her oath says that since her said husband's death she has not been married to any man, nor has she done any act whatever to have gained a settlement since (to the best of her knowledge). This examinant, Elizabeth Boxall aforesaid, on her voluntary oath says that she is at this time pregnant of a bastard child or children which was or were unlawfully begotten on her body by David Edwards, who by trade is a baker, and works as a journeyman with Mr Christopher Holm, a master baker in the parish of St Paul Shadwell in the county of Middlesex, in whose service she herself did live. And that he has had several times carnal knowledge of her body since she left the said service. And she on her said oath says that he, the said David Edwards, is the true and real father of the said child or children that she is now pregnant with, and no man else. And she now believes she has about two months to go before she shall be delivered. And that the said child or children is or are likely to become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. And that she is become chargeable to the said parish of Chelsea on account of her pregnancy. Elizabeth Boxall. Sworn before me, 16 Apr. 1766, Thomas Kynaston. [See 260, 261].

453. [p. 229] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Anne Desborow. Anne Desborow, aged about 63 years, maketh oath that she is the widow of Captain Dasigney Desborow, to whom she was married about 25 years at the time of his death. And that he died at his house in Manor Street in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex about 15 years since. And this examinant on her oath further says that since her said husband's death she has not been married to any man, nor rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or paid any parochial taxes, or ever lived in any place since a twelve month together as a yearly hired servant, or ever done any act whatever, since her said husband's death (to the best of her knowledge) to have gained a subsequent settlement. And that she now is in great necessity and want and is become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea aforesaid. Anne Desborow. Sworn before me, 12 April 1766, Thomas Kynaston.

454. [p. 230] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Ann Legattee, widow of James Legattee. Ann Legattee, aged about 61 years, on her oath says that she was legally married about 30 years ago in the parish of St Brides (otherwise St Bridgets) in the city of London to James Legattee, a parishioner and an inhabitant of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, husbandman, he being at that time a single man, and she herself a spinster. And that he, her said husband, has been dead about 4 years, and that since his death she has not been married. And on her oath further says that while her said husband was living he never rented out of the parish of Chelsea any land or tenement, or ever paid any parochial taxes. Neither has she since his death, nor done any kind of act (to the best of her knowledge) to have gained any other subsequent settlement. Ann Legattee, her mark. Sworn before me, 24 April 1766, Thomas Kynaston.