Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 455-469

Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Originally published by London Record Society, London, 1999.

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Citation:

, 'Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 455-469', in Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999) pp. 148-153. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp148-153 [accessed 27 May 2024].

. "Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 455-469", in Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999) 148-153. British History Online, accessed May 27, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp148-153.

. "Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 455-469", Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999). 148-153. British History Online. Web. 27 May 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp148-153.

Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 455-469

455. [p. 231] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Elizabeth Sharpless. Elizabeth Sharpless, single woman, aged about 35 years, on her oath says that she is the daughter of Richard Sharpless, who was born and lived and followed the trade of a shoemaker in the parish of Hungerford in the county of Berkshire. In which place he kept house and paid parochial taxes. And that she herself was also born in the parish of Hungerford aforesaid. And that she never was married to any man, nor ever lived in any place or service whatever as a yearly hired servant a twelve month together (except to Lady Whitlock which was in the said parish of Hungerford with whom she lived about a whole year), nor ever rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or done any kind of act (to the best of her knowledge) since she left the parish of Hungerford aforesaid to have gained a subsequent settlement. [Blank]. Sworn before me, [blank] May 1766, [blank].

456. [p. 232] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Samuel Abbott. Samuel Abbott, an out pensioner of Chelsea Hospital (from the 12th Regiment of Foot), aged about 44 years, on his oath says that he was born in the parish of Battlesden near the town of Bedford in Bedfordshire, and that he got his livelihood as a husbandman before he went for a soldier. And that the last place he lived in as a yearly hired servant was with one Mr Laurence Peak a farmer in the parish of Thurleigh in the county of Bedford, with whom he lived a whole year as a yearly hired servant and did receive £4 wages, meat, drink and lodging. And on his oath further says that he never lived in any place whatever since he left Mr Peak's service aforesaid, a 12 month, nor rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or ever done any kind of act since (to the best of his knowledge) to have gained a subsequent settlement. And on his oath further says he was married to his wife, Elizabeth, about three years ago in St Michael at Thorn church in the city of Norwich, by whom he has now living one child, named Samuel, aged about 23 weeks. And that he himself, wife and child are become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. [Blank]. Sworn before us, [blank] June 1766, [blank].

457. [p. 233] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Ambroshea Mottrom, widow. Ambroshea Mottrom, aged about 63 years, on her oath says that she was married to Joseph Mottrom about 37 years ago, who was a carpenter and lived and followed the said business in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex until the time of his death, which was about 30 years since. That he her said husband rented a house of £10 per annum and paid parochial taxes for the same in the parish of Chelsea aforesaid. And on her oath further says that she never was married to any man since the death of her said husband Joseph Mottrom, nor rented any house or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, nor ever done any act since (to the best of her knowledge) to have gained a subsequent settlement. Ambroshea Mottrom. Sworn before me, 2 Sept. 1766, Thomas Kynaston.

458. [p. 234] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Mary Bird. This examinant, Mary Bird, single woman, aged about 90 years, on her oath says she was born in the city of Dublin in the kingdom of Ireland. And that about 35 years ago she was there hired to be a house servant to Major John Cottrell and his family, with whom she came over to England where the Major died. She still continued to live with Mrs Cottrell, his widow, in several parts of England, particularly about 10 years in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. And that about two years ago her said mistress, Mrs Cottrell, left the parish of Chelsea and lived at a place called [blank] in Oxfordshire, with whom she still continued and lived as a servant. And [she] was not once discharged from her said service since she first came to live with them in Ireland as is aforementioned, till about 22 Dec. last past, on which day or there about her said mistress discharged her, and sent her to the house of Mr John Greenhead in Millman Row in the parish of Chelsea in a post-chaise under the care of the gardener of the family. With whom she lived and boarded till 8 July last (being somewhat more than six months ). On which day Mr Greenhead brought this examinant to the parish workhouse and lodged her there on a promise and undertaking to pay for her board the time she lived there, for as this deponent further says that he had a note or draft of £30 value in his hands towards the support and maintenance of her. This examinant . . . on her oath further says she never was married to any man, nor never rented any house or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or done any kind of act to have gain[ed] a subsequent settlement since she left her said Mrs Cottrell's service in Oxfordshire as aforesaid. [Blank]. Sworn before me, [blank] Sept. 1766, [blank].

459. [p. 235] Middlesex, to wit. The voluntary examination of Lucy Robinson, single woman, taken 11 Sept. 1766, before Thomas Kynaston esq. . . . This examinant, Lucy Robinson, aged about 21 years, on her oath says that she never was married and that she lived with Mr David Deacon and his wife who keep the sign of the Five Bells in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex upwards of a year as a yearly hired servant, and received £4 wages per annum, board and lodging. And that she left her said service the latter end of October last past, and that she has not since she left her said service in Chelsea done any act (to the best of her knowledge) to have gained a subsequent settlement. And on her voluntary oath says that she is now pregnant of a bastard child or children which was or were unlawfully begotten on her body by one James Randall, who is by trade a painter and glazier, who worked as a journeyman with Mr David Deacon, her master, at the time she lived with him at Chelsea. And that the said James Randall and this examinant have cohabited and lived together, and that he has had carnal knowledge of her body several times, and that the said James Randall is the real and true father of the child or children that she is now pregnant with. And that she reckoneth that she has about two months to go before she shall be delivered. And that she is now become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea aforesaid on account of her being so far advanced in her pregnancy. Lucy Robbinson her mark. Sworn before me, 11 Sept 1766, Thomas Kynaston.

460. [p. 236] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Mary Rycroft. Mary Rycroft (whose maiden name was Whitaker), aged about 31 years, on her oath says that she lived between six and seven years ago with Mrs Villers on the King's private road in the parish of Chelsea as a yearly hired servant. At which time lived Benjamin Rycroft, who was a hired servant also and coachman to the said Mrs Villers, in which service he lived upwards of fourteen months before they were married together. And that he, the said Benjamin Rycroft, and this examinant were married to each other about six years since in the parish of Chelsea aforesaid. By whom she has now two children living; vizt, Mary-Elizabeth, about 5 years old, and Benjamin-Henry, about 18 months. And that her husband has deserted and left her and her two children, and that she is become poor and destitute. They, her said two children, were with her friends in Yorkshire, who are also very poor, and unless they have relief or some allowance from their father's parish they must become chargeable. And this examinant further says that she never was married to any other man, neither did she ever knew or heard that her said husband was married before, and that they never rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or done any kind of act to have gained a subsequent settlement since they were married together (to the best of her knowledge). Mary Rycroft. Sworn before me, 7 Nov. 1766, Richard Glyn.

461. [p. 237] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Ann Roberts, single woman. Ann Roberts, aged about 63 years, on her oath says that she never was married, and that she got her livelihood by being a servant, and that the last place she lived in was with Mrs Aylworth, who kept a boarding-school near Chelsea Common, with whom she lived as a yearly hired servant 22 years and received £6 per annum wages, boarding and lodging. And that since she left Mrs Aylworth[és] service she has not been in any service whatever, nor rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, or done any act (to the best of her knowledge) to have gained a settlement since. And that she has lived in the parish of Chelsea upwards of 40 years, and that at this time is an inhabitant thereof. And that she is become poor and destitute and desires relief from the parish. Ann Roberts. Sworn before me, 20 Nov. 1766, Thomas Kynaston.

462. [p. 238] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Daniel Farrant. Daniel Farrant, aged about 63 years, who on his oath says that he was born in the parish of Barking in the county of Essex, never was apprenticed to any person, got his livelihood by service, and that the last place he lived in a yearly hired servant was with one Mr Joseph Roberts, a plumber in the parish of South Weald near Brentwood in the county of Essex, with whom he lived one whole year as a yearly hired servant, and received and £7 7s. per annum, board and lodging. And that about nine months after he left the said service he was married to his late wife, by whom he has three daughters now living. And on his oath further says that Ann Farrant, one of his said daughters, was passed by an order near upon eight years since from the parish of Chelsea to the aforesaid parish of South Weald in the county of Essex, upon it being his parish or place of settlement. And further that the said parish of South Weald did, to him this examinant, give a proper certificate about 32 years ago, which said certificate he brought with him to the parish of Chelsea, by virtue of which he was permitted with his family to reside there. That the said certificate was put in the hands of the then vestry clerk of Chelsea. All which more fully appears by a former examination on his oath taken 25 Nov. 1758, which is in this book. Lastly he maketh oath that since he received the above certificate to this time, he never rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid parochial taxes, or served any parochial office. And that he is very poor and is now at this time become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. Daniel Farrant, his mark. Sworn before us, 20 Nov. 1766, Thomas Kynaston, Jonathan Durden. Passed to South Weald in Essex, [blank] Nov. 1766. [See 372].

463. [p. 239] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Jane Temple. This examinant, Jane Temple, aged about near 30 years, on her oath says that she is a single woman, and that she never was married to any man whatever in her life, and that she lived with John Browning esq. in the parish of Chelsea about fourteen months as a yearly hired servant and did receive £6 6s. per annum wages, boarding and lodging. And that she was discharged from the said service in Chelsea between four and five years since, and that since she left the said service she never lived any place as a yearly hired servant twelve month, nor rented any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or paid any parochial taxes. This examinant further on her voluntary oath says that she kept company with a man by whom she had a child born of her body and is now living and with her. And that the said child was born a bastard, and that she was delivered of the said child in a house in or near to the corner of the place called Leeches Passage near Church Street in the parish of Greenwich in the county of Kent about thirteen months ago. And the said child is baptised by the name of Esther Temple. And that she was not married to the father on the said child, nor never was married to any man whatever, and that the father of the child is dead, whose name was John Bates who had carnal knowledge of her body several times. Jane Temple, her mark. Sworn before us, 20 Nov. 1766, Thomas Kynaston, Jonathan Durden. Passed the child to Greenwich. [See 464].

464. [p. 240] Middlesex, to wit. Edward Ellis, master of the parish workhouse in and for the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, maketh oath that one Jane Temple, who was passed by an order of removal bearing the date 18 Nov. 1766 from the parish of Greenwich in the county of Kent to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, was received and sent into the parish workhouse of Chelsea aforesaid, where the poor of the said parish are maintained and kept. That she brought also with her (as she said) her bastard child, aged about 13 months, called by the name of Esther Temple, which said child was born of her body in the parish of Greenwich in the county of Kent. And that the above said Jane Temple is gone from the said parish workhouse and left her said bastard child, Esther Temple, chargeable to the parish of Chelsea. And further, this deponent knows not where the said Jane Temple is gone since she deserted her said child. Edward Ellis. Sworn before me, 6 Dec. 1766, Thomas Kynaston. [See 463].

465. [p. 241] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Ann Pugh. Ann Pugh, aged about 49 years, widow of Thomas Pugh, on her oath says that her said husband was an invalid soldier at Chelsea garrison and there died near seven years ago. That she was married to him at Shrewsbury about 28 years ago. That she has now living by him two children; vizt, a son, near 27 years of age who is by trade a weaver and rents a house in the parish of Bethnal Green, also a daughter, whose name is Amelia, aged about 14 years. And that she has often heard her said husband say that he served seven years apprenticeship to Mr Richard Hosier in the parish of St Ann Blackfriars London, a glover by trade. That her said daughter Amelia was born in the parish workhouse belonging to the said parish of St Ann, and that she has been several times relieved by the officers of that parish. And on her oath this examinant further says that her husband never was a hired yearly servant, nor did he ever rent any house, land or tenement of £10 per annum, or ever paid any parochial taxes, nor done any kind of act, to the best of her knowledge, to have gain[ed] a settlement since she was married to her said husband. And since his death she has not been married to any other man. And that she and her daughter are become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. Ann Pugh her mark. Sworn before us, 28 Nov. 1766, Thomas Kynaston, Thomas Balack. Passed them both to St Ann Blackfriars London, 28 Nov. 1766.

466. [n.p.] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Mary Redford, single woman, a rogue and vagabond apprehended by Daniel Browne, an inhabitant of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, and brought before me, . . . and taken before me, 28 Dec. 1766. This examinant, Mary Redford, aged about 20 years, who on her oath says that she was born in the parish and town of St Ives in the county of Huntingdon, in which said parish she lived a year as a yearly hired servant with Mr William Whittam, a farmer, and that she never was married, and that she has not done any act to have gained a subsequent settlement since she left her aforesaid service in St Ives. Mary Redford, her mark. Sworn the day and year above written, Thomas Kynaston. [See 467, 468, 469].

467. Middlesex, to wit. The information of Daniel Browne, an inhabitant of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, taken on oath 28 Dec. 1766. This informant on his oath says that he did, the sixth instant December, apprehend Mary Redford, a rogue and vagabond, in the parish of Chelsea aforesaid lodging in the open air contrary to the statute in that case [made] and provided. Daniel Browne. Sworn the day and year above written, Thomas Kynaston. [See 466, 468, 469].

468. [n.p.] Middlesex, to wit. The examination of Elizabeth Redfern, single woman, aged about 28 years, a rogue and vagabond, apprehended by Daniel Browne, an inhabitant of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, and brought before me, . . . and taken before me, 28 December 1766. This examinant, Elizabeth Redfern, who on her oath says that she is about 28 years of age, and that she never was married. And that the last place she lived in a yearly hired servant was with one Mr Andrew Cockan, who kept the sign of the Talbot Inn in the parish of Ashbourne in the county of Derby, with whom she lived a year and a half at the yearly wages of £4, diet and lodging. And that she has not done any act to have gained a settlement since. And that about two years ago she was passed as a vagrant to the aforesaid parish of Ashbourne in Derbyshire. Elizabeth Redfern, her mark. Sworn the day and year above written, Thomas Kynaston. [See 466, 467, 469].

469. Middlesex, to wit. The information of Daniel Browne, an inhabitant of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, taken on oath 28 Dec. 1766. This informant on his oath says that he did, the sixth instant December, apprehend Elizabeth Redfern, a rogue and vagabond in the parish of Chelsea aforesaid [lodging] in the open air contrary to the statute in that case made and provided. Daniel Browne. Sworn the day and year above written, Thomas Kynaston. [See 466, 467, 468].