Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 275-294

Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Originally published by London Record Society, London, 1999.

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'Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 275-294', in Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, ed. Tim Hitchcock, John Black( London, 1999), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp90-96 [accessed 14 July 2024].

'Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 275-294', in Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Edited by Tim Hitchcock, John Black( London, 1999), British History Online, accessed July 14, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp90-96.

"Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 275-294". Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Ed. Tim Hitchcock, John Black(London, 1999), , British History Online. Web. 14 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp90-96.

Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 275-294

275. [p. 59] Middlesex. William Muggeridge, aged about 32 years, born at Chislehurst in the county of Kent, upon oath saith that he was bound out an apprentice by his father to one John Branness of the parish of Crayford in the county of Kent, baker, for the term of seven years. With whom he continued and served his full time of his apprenticeship and had meat, drink, washing and lodging. And says that since the time of serving his apprenticeship as aforesaid he, this examinant, has not been a hired servant a year in any place, or otherwise done any act or thing, to his knowledge, to gain a settlement elsewhere. William Muggeridge. Sworn, 15 June 1754, before us, Benjamin Cox, Thomas Lediard. Passed to Crayford.

276. [p. 60] Middlesex. John Rea, aged upwards of 77 years, born near Carlisle, upon oath says that when he was 17 years of age he was pressed for a foot soldier in the army. In which station he continued till he was admitted an out pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, and is now an in pensioner there. Says that about 50 years ago he, this examinant, was married at the chapel near the Blue Coat Hospital in Westminster to Mary, his wife, who is also 77 years of age. And says that at the time there was a camp in Hyde Park. In the late King George I's time he rented a house in Lloyd's Court in the parish of St Giles in the Fields in the county of Middlesex where he continued near four years and paid £15 a year rent, and all parochial taxes for the same. And says that since the time of his quitting the said house he, this examinant, has not rented any other house, or done any act, to his knowledge, to gain a settlement. And further says that he being ancient and infirm, and no other dependence but the said Hospital, is not able to support his said wife without relief. The mark of John Rea. Sworn, 15 Oct. 1754, before us, Thomas Lediard, Benjamin Cox. Mary the wife passed to St Giles parish.

277. [p. 61] Middlesex and Westminster, to wit. The voluntary examination of Sarah Powell, single woman, taken 15 Oct. 1754, before Thomas Lediard esq. . . . Who upon oath saith that she is pregnant of a bastard child or children which was or were unlawfully begotten on her body by one James Silvester of the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex aforesaid (with whom this examinant lived as a hired servant). [She] saith that the said James Silvester in the month of June last, about two o'clock in the morning (being just after her mistress was gone to market) came to this examinant's bedside in his dwelling house and waked her out of her sleep, and did take the advantage of getting to her in bed. And then [he] had carnal knowledge of her body the first time, and twice afterwards in the said dwelling house. And this examinant saith that the said James Silvester is the true father of the said child or children. And further saith not. The mark of Sarah Powell. Sworn at Chelsea, the day and year above written, before me, Thomas Lediard.

278. [p. 62] Middlesex. Elizabeth Wingfield, widow, aged near 54 years, upon oath saith that she was married in the year 1720 to Edward Wingfield, deceased, at the parish of St Mary Magdalene, Old Fish Street, London. And that about four years ago her said late husband rented a house of £10 a year near the bridge belonging to Chelsea Waterworks, which is in the parish of St George Hanover Square in the county of Middlesex, where they continued not quite a year. But says that her said husband was charged for the said house towards the relief of the poor and that it was paid accordingly. And this examinant says that since the time of quitting the said house she, nor her said late husband, has not done any act to gain a settlement elsewhere. Elizabeth Wingfield. Sworn, 1 Nov. 1754, before us, Thomas Lediard, Benjamin Cox. Passed to St George Hanover Square.

279. [p. 63] Middlesex. John Tovey, gardener, aged near 70 years, maketh oath and saith that about 20 years ago he rented a house and some land upon lease for the term of eleven years in the parish of Binstead in Hampshire at £16 a year rent, which he held for six years and paid all parochial taxes. After he quitted the said premises he, this examinant, lived a servant in two places, the last was with the Reverend Mr Rother at Chelsea for about five years. But says that he had a wife all the time he lived there who had lodgings near Chelsea. And this examinant says that since the time of his quitting the premises at Binstead aforesaid he has not rent[ed] any other house or paid any parochial taxes or otherwise done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a legal settlement. John Tovey. Sworn, 14 Dec. 1754, before Benjamin Cox.

280. [p. 64] Middlesex. Richard Britton, aged near 48 years, upon oath saith that his late father (Thomas Britton) was a labouring man and lived in the parish of Dean in the county of Bedford. [And] says that he has often heard his said late father mention and declare (and he believes it to be true) that he, this examinant, was born in the said parish of Dean. And says he was brought up in the said parish and when he attained the age of 17 years he, this examinant, entered himself a soldier in the army. And says that he has not lived a year as a hired servant in any place, nor done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a legal settlement since his birth at the parish aforesaid, nor can give any other account with regard to his late father's settlement as aforesaid. And this examinant further says that about sixteen years ago he was married in the city of Dublin to Elizabeth, his present wife, by whom he has four children living; to wit, Elizabeth, aged 10 years, Richard, 6 years, Dina, upwards of 3 years, and Jane Leasy, an infant aged near 6 months. And this examinant says that he is not, nor has not been able to for some time past, to support his said family but by the charitable assistance and relief of several kind people. The mark of Richard Britton. Sworn, 18 Dec. 1754, before Thomas Lediard. All passed as vagrants to Dean.

281. [p. 65] Middlesex. Margaret McGrigore, widow, aged near 60 years, upon oath says that she was born (as she hath been informed) about 20 miles of the town of Galway in the kingdom of Ireland. And says that before she was married she lived a hired servant for a year and upwards with one Mr [blank] French, a merchant in the said town of Galway. And says that she hath had two husbands (who were both soldiers) but cannot give any account of the place of settlement of either of them. And this examinant says and declares as to herself, she has not done any act, to her knowledge, to gain a settlement since she lived a servant with the said Mr French in Galway as aforesaid. The mark of Margaret McGrigore. Sworn, 18 Dec. 1754, before Thomas Lediard. Passed as a vagrant.

282. [p. 66] Middlesex. Andrew Conningham, labourer, aged about 28 years, born in the parish of Rossnowleghe in the kingdom of Ireland, says that about nine years ago he lived a servant hired by the year with one John Stanley, a farmer in the parish of Powerscourt in Ireland aforesaid, with whom he continued and served fifteen months and received his full wages for the said time at the rate of £2 15s. a year, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And says that about three years ago he was married in the . . . liberty of the Fleet, London, to Sarah, his present wife. By whom he has a child living, named Sarah, aged near 15 months. And this examinant says that since the time of his living with the said John Stanley as aforesaid, he has not done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a legal settlement. Andrew Conningham. Sworn, 24 Dec. 1754, before Thomas Lediard.

283. [p. 68] Middlesex. Mary Crooke, aged 65 years, upon oath says that she is the widow of Richard Crooke, deceased, who was an in pensioner of Chelsea hospital. [She] says that she cannot give any account of the place of her said late husband's settlement. But as to her own settlement, she declares and says that she has been often informed, and she believes it to be true, that she was born in the parish of Penn in the county of Buckinghamshire, she having been brought up and lived with her father (William Bowles) in the said parish till she came at the age of 20 years and upwards. After which she left her parents and for a livelihood says she has worked in different places in the fields and gardens, and has not been a hired servant a year in any place, or done any act (save and except her intermarriage) to gain a legal settlement since she came away from the said parish of Penn. The mark of Mary Crooke. Sworn, 4 Feb. 1755 before Samuel Bever.

284. [p. 69] Middlesex. Thomas Robinson, aged 61 years, born as he has been informed in the parish of Kinross in Scotland, says that his late father, Archibald Robinson, was a tailor and lived in the said parish of Kinross, and that he, this examinant, lived with his said father till he entered for a soldier at the age of 23 years, and continued in the army till he was discharged, and is now an out pensioner of Chelsea Hospital. And this examinant says that he has not done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a legal settlement since the time of his birth and living with his father at Kinross in Scotland as aforesaid. And this examinant further says that about eleven years ago he was married to Jane, his present wife, in the liberty of the Fleet, London.

285. [p. 70] Middlesex. Elizabeth Gordon (the wife of Roger Gordon), aged 39 years, upon oath says that about two years ago she, this examinant, was married to her said husband in the town of Leeds in Yorkshire. [She] says that he is an out pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, but cannot give any account as to the place of his legal settlement, only that he was born in some part of Scotland. As to her own settlement, [she] says that the last place she lived in as a hired servant by the year (before marriage) was with one Mr William Lonemore, a smith and farrier in the parish of Stockwell in the city of Glasgow in Scotland aforesaid, where she continued four years and received her wages for the said time, meat, drink, washing and lodging. Since which this examinant says she has not done any act, to her knowledge, (save and except her marriage aforesaid) to gain a legal settlement elsewhere. And this examinant further says that her said husband having been absconded and gone away from her for some months past, she has been so much distressed that she has been forced to ask for relief for her subsistence and support. [She] says that she has a son named Herbert Cole, aged near 3 years, a child by her first husband, John Cole, deceased, who was also a Scotsman, and was born in Glasgow aforesaid. The mark of Elizabeth Gordon. Sworn, 15 Jan. 1755, before Samuel Bever.

286. [p. 71] Middlesex. The voluntary examination of Mary Morris, single woman, taken on oath before me . . . . 14 Jan. 1755. This examinant on her oath saith that on the night before King George's birthday last twelve month, she was delivered of a female bastard child in the dwelling house of one Mrs Hinton in the hamlet of Hammersmith in the parish of Fulham in the county of Middlesex aforesaid (which child is baptised and named Ann). And was unlawfully begotten on her body by one Thomas Howard of the parish of St Martin in the Fields in the county of Middlesex aforesaid, peruke maker, who had carnal knowledge of her body the first time in the room where this examinant lay in the dwelling house of the said Mr Howard, with whom this examinant lived about two months a hired servant. And [he] had carnal knowledge several times after in the said house. And this examinant says that the said Thomas Howard is the true father of the said female bastard child. And this examinant as to her own settlement says that about four years ago she lived a hired servant with her late uncle (Henry Blake) in Church Lane in the parish of Chelsea for a year and upwards, and received £3 a year wages, and has not done any act since to gain a settlement. The mark of Mary Morris. Sworn at Chelsea, 14 Jan. 1755, before Samuel Bever.

287. [p. 72] Middlesex. The voluntary examination of Elizabeth Powell, single woman, taken before me, . . . [blank] Jan. 1755. Who upon oath says that on Sunday last, was five weeks, (which was 8 Dec. last) she, this examinant was delivered of a female bastard child in the apartment where her parents live in the stable yard behind Great Cheyne Row in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex. Which child is baptised and named Elizabeth and was unlawfully begotten on her body by one John Stansby, a journeyman barber in Chelsea, who had carnal knowledge of her body the first time in the garret at the house of Mr Bradley's in Chelsea aforesaid (where the examinant lived a servant) and several times after in the stable belonging to the said house. And the examinant says that the said John Stansby is the true father of the said female bastard child. The mark of Elizabeth Powell. Sworn at Chelsea the day and year above mentioned, before Samuel Bever.

288. [p. 73] Middlesex. William Gentleman, aged 27 years, upon oath says that he lived in the last place a servant hired by the year with one Alexander Irwin at the Faulcon Alehouse in Pall Mall in the parish of St James, Westminster, in the county of Middlesex, where he continued and served six years, and received his wages for the said time. And says that since he quitted the said service [he] has not done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a settlement. And further says that about nine years ago he married Susannah, his present wife, at the parish church of St James in Westminster aforesaid. William Gentleman. Sworn, 15 Jan. 1755, before Samuel Bever.

289. [p. 74] Middlesex. James Fox, aged near 60 years, upon oath says that he was often informed and does believe it to be true that he, this examinant, was born in the town of Galway in the kingdom of Ireland, and that he was removed from thence in his infancy (his father being at that time a soldier). And says that about 40 years ago he entered for a soldier in the army, in which station he continued always, and is now an in pensioner of Chelsea Hospital. And this examinant says that he has never rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or been a yearly hired servant or otherwise done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a legal settlement. And further says that he, this examinant, was married about four years ago to Ann, his wife, at Wisbech in the Isle of Ely in the county of Cambridge. The mark of James Fox. Sworn, 4 Feb. 1755, before Samuel Bever. [See 314].

290. [p. 75] Middlesex. William Storey, aged about 66, by trade a barber and peruke maker, maketh oath and saith that in the year 1724 he, this examinant, rented a house in Orchard Street facing St Ann's Lane in the parish of St Margaret, Westminster, in the county aforesaid. Where he continued two years and paid £13 a year rent and all parochial taxes for the same. [He] says that soon after he quitted the said house he rented an apartment of one Mrs Arundell in Hermin's Row in the parish of St Martin in the Fields in the said county of Middlesex, consisting of a shop and room behind with another room [up] two pair of stairs. But says that the way his customers came to and from his shop was through the entry or passage from the street in common with the other inmates or lodgers of the said house. And [he] paid £12 a year rent (but no taxes) and continued there one year. And this examinant says that he has never done any act, to his knowledge, to gain a legal settlement since he quitted the house in Westminster as aforesaid. William Storey. Sworn, 10 Feb. 1755, before us, Benjamin Cox, Francis Bedwell.

291. [p. 76] Middlesex. Margaret Phillips, widow, aged about 37 years, upon oath saith that about eighteen years since she was married at the Fleet to John Phillips, an yearly servant to one Mr Bartholemew of Knightsbridge in the parish of St Margaret, Westminster, in the county of Middlesex, ass man. With whom he continued for the space of two years or thereabouts. And this examinant further saith that her said husband (as she has been often informed by him) never rented a house of £10 a year, or been an apprentice, or done any act to gain a settlement since the time of living with the said Mr Bartholemew. Nor has this examinant gained a settlement in any other parish since the death of her said husband. Margaret Phillips, her mark. Sworn, 18 June 1755, before us, Benjamin Cox, Saunder Welch. Passed.

292. [p. 77] Middlesex. Matthew Sutton, aged about 56 years, born in the parish of St James in the liberty of Westminster, upon oath saith that about 9 Mar., which was in the year of our Lord 1716/7 he was bound apprentice to John DeSeret of the parish of St Ann in the liberty of Westminster, silver smith, for the term of seven years, with whom he continued and served during all the said term of seven years. Since which time this examinant hath jobbed and done journey work but hath never lived as a servant hired by the year, or rented a house of £10 a year, or done any act (to the best of his knowledge) to gain a settlement since the serving his said apprenticeship. That on 5 Jan., which was in the year of our Lord 1753 he was married to Sarah, his present wife, in the liberty of the Fleet, London. And this examinant saith that he hath not done any act, to his knowledge, to gain a legal settlement since his apprenticeship. Matthew Sutton. Sworn, 26 July 1755, before us, Thomas Lediard, Benjamin Cox. Passed.

293. [p. 78] Middlesex. The examination of Hannah Baker, who on her oath says that she is the widow of Edmund Baker, who hath been dead one year and better. Her said husband rented a house in Russell Court in the parish of St Martin in the Fields at the rent of £30 per annum and upwards, by whom she hath two children; vizt, Edmund, about 9 years of age, [and] Sarah, about 2 years of age and upwards. And [she] is now likely to become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea. The mark of Hannah Baker. Sworn before us, 29 July 1755, Samuel Bever, Benjamin Cox. Passed.

294. [p. 79] Middlesex. The examination of Alice Barton, who on her oath says that she is the widow of Samuel Barton. That she hath heard her late husband declare that when he was a single man that he was a hired servant in the house of Mr Spencer, a brewer in the parish of Kensington by the year at the wages of £8 per annum, and lived with the said Mr Spencer about one year and a half, and also meat, drink and lodging. And then he lived in several places afterwards, but always was hired by the week. And about three years past he married this examinant, by whom she hath two children; vizt, John, aged about 17 months, and Samuel, aged about 11 weeks. And now is likely to become chargeable to the parish of Chelsea. The mark of Alice Barton. Sworn before us, 29 July 1755, Samuel Bever, Benjamin Cox. Passed.