Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 255-274

Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766. Originally published by London Record Society, London, 1999.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

'Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 255-274', Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999), pp. 83-90. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp83-90 [accessed 25 June 2024].

. "Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 255-274", in Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999) 83-90. British History Online, accessed June 25, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp83-90.

. "Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 255-274", Chelsea Settlement and Bastardy Examinations, 1733-1766, (London, 1999). 83-90. British History Online. Web. 25 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol33/pp83-90.

Examinations, 1750-1766: nos 255-274

255. [p. 40] Middlesex. Anne Boswell, widow aged 57 years, upon oath saith that about 24 years ago she, this examinant, was married to her second husband, John Boswell, gardener, deceased, in the liberty of the Fleet, London. By whom she has a son, aged about 21 years, now an apprentice. And saith that her said late husband (John Boswell) in his lifetime often declared and informed this examinant (and she believes it to be true) that before she was married to him he rented a house and garden ground in the parish of St Andrew in the town of Pershore in the county of Worcester for several years, and that he paid all taxes and served several parochial offices there. And this examinant further saith that she lived with her said husband at Pershore about thirteen years, and that since the time of his death, which was about eight years ago, she, this examinant, has not rented a house of £10 a year, or otherwise done any act, to her knowledge, to gain a settlement. The mark of Anne Boswell. Sworn, 12 Oct. 1752, before us, Peter Elers, Henry Fielding. Passed to St Andrew at Pershore.

256. [p. 41] Middlesex. William Hawker, necklace maker, aged about 45 years, born in the parish of St Andrew Holborn in the county of Middlesex, upon oath says that when he was of the age of 14 years was bound out an apprentice by the parish officers of the said parish to [blank]. And on the same day he, this examinant, was turned over by his master (whose names he cannot recollect) to his son-in-law, one Patt Hammond, necklace maker. Who lived in the liberty of Saffron Hill in the parish of St Andrew Holborn in the county of Middlesex aforesaid, with whom he continued and served near five years of his apprenticeship. But his said master (Patt Hammond) having frequently beat and abused him, he absconded and left his said service. After which this Examinant says he got his living honestly by jobbing about in different places for near 20 years till he entered himself a soldier in the army, where he continued to 28 Aug. 1749, when he was discharged (as appears by his officer's certificate). And this examinant says that since the time of leaving his said master's service as aforesaid, this examinant has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a settlement. The mark of William Hawker. Sworn, 27 Feb. 1753, before us, John Powell, Henry Fielding. Passed to the parish of St Andrew Holborn. [See 435].

257. [p. 42] Middlesex. Joseph Everad, gardener, aged near 48 years, born in the parish of Fulham in the county of Middlesex, upon oath says that about fourteen years since he, this examinant, rented a house with some land in the parish of Fulham aforesaid for eleven years and paid £10 a year rent for the same and all parochial taxes. And says that since the time of his renting the said house and land at Fulham aforesaid, he, this examinant, has not rented a house elsewhere, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act, to his knowledge, to gain a settlement. And says that he has two sons living, the eldest named Thomas, aged about 21 years (by Mary, his first wife) who, being an idiot and lame with the palsy, is not able to work to maintain himself, [and] the other, named John, a child aged about 4 years by Sarah, his present wife. And says he is in such low and mean circumstances that he is not able to support his said family without some relief. Joseph Everad. Sworn, 6 Mar. 1753, before us, Henry Fielding, Thomas Lediard. Passed to Fulham.

258. [p. 43] Middlesex. Gwin Goodyere, aged about 66 years, upon oath says that when he was of the age of 14 years he, this examinant, was bound an apprentice to one Mr Henry Shepard of the parish of St Lawrence Jewry in the city of London, vintner, for the term of seven years. With whom he continued and served his full time of apprenticeship. And says that afterwards he lived in several different places as a drawer, in and about London five years (but not in any one place more than four months at a time). After which he entered himself a soldier in the army where he continued till lately he was admitted an out pensioner of Chelsea Hospital. And further says that though he is entitled to receive his pay of the out pension money (when it becomes due to him or to his agent) he is not at present able to subsist without some relief. The mark of Gwin Goodyere. Sworn, 21 May 1753, before us, Thomas Lediard, Francis Bedwell. Passed to St Lawrence Jewry.

259. [p. 44] Middlesex. Creswell Brown, labourer, aged about 30 years, born in Herefordshire, upon oath says that about eight years since he, this examinant, lived a servant hired by the year with one Mr Humphry Lewis of Carnaby Market in the parish of St James, Westminster, in the county of Middlesex, cheesemonger. With whom he continued and served a year and a quarter and received of his said master his full wages for the said time at the rate of £3 10s. a year, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And says that after he quitted the said service of Mr Lewis he got his living by jobbing work in several places but not as a hired servant by the year. After which he entered himself a soldier in the army. And [he] has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a legal settlement. And further says that upwards of a year ago he, this examinant, was married to Catherine, his wife, in the liberty of the Fleet, London, by whom he has two children (twins), aged almost 2 months, named William and Joseph. And this examinant says he is not able by his labour to support his said family without some relief, and is now chargeable to the parish of Chelsea. The mark of Creswell Brown. Sworn, 12 July 1753, before us, Samuel Bever, Thomas Lediard. Passed to the parish of St James.

260. [p45] Middlesex. Thomas Boxall, by trade a whitesmith, aged about 21 years, born at Petworth in the county of Sussex, upon oath says that about a year ago he went away and left the service of his father, William Boxall, clock maker and whitesmith, with whom he lived the four preceding years and learnt his said trade of a whitesmith, but not as an apprentice. And says that his father during the said four years he lived with him found him in all necessary apparel, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And says that his said father followed the said trades of a clock maker and whitesmith in the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex several years, and is now a parishioner there, having paid parochial taxes. And this examinant says that since he left his father's service as aforesaid, he has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act, to his knowledge, to gain a settlement. And this examinant also says that about a year ago he was married to Elizabeth, his wife, in the liberty of the Fleet, London. And says that the parish officers of Petworth aforesaid (where he has been employed as a journeyman for some short time) will not let him continue there without bringing a certificate to indemnify their parish. {Memorandum: Thomas Boxall and Elizabeth his wife had a certificate from Chelsea to indemnify the parish of Petworth. } [See 261, 352, 452].

261. A woman being come from Chatham with a permit pass pretending to be the wife of Thomas Boxall this 9 Jan. 1761, and says that her maiden name was Elizabeth Langford of the parish of Fulham, with one male child of 7 weeks old. Says that her husband aforesaid keeps another woman and therefore cannot keep her, and she now is chargeable to the parish of Chelsea. [See 260, 452].

262. [p. 46] Middlesex. Jane Turner, widow, aged near 40 years, upon oath saith that about 20 years ago she was married to William Turner, her late husband, at a private house in the parish of St Paul Covent Garden in the liberty of Westminster. By whom she has a daughter living, named Elizabeth, aged 18 years, who is in service. And says that her said late husband was bound an apprentice to one William Billingham, white smith, who at that time lived in Butcherall Lane in the parish of Christ Church in the city of London. With whom he continued and served six years of his apprenticeship and then went to sea where he was blown-up on board his Majesty's ship the Tilbury Man of War. And this Examinant says as to her part she has never rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act, to her knowledge, to gain a settlement since that of her said late husband's. And further says that she being in a very bad state of health is not capable to support herself without some relief. The mark of Jane Turner. Sworn, 2 Oct. 1753, before us, Philip Dyos, Francis Bedwell. Passed to Christ Church.

263. [p. 47] Middlesex. Frances Cooke, single woman, aged near 26 years, upon oath saith that she, this examinant, about seven years ago quitted the service of Sir Humphry Moleneaux, who at that time lived in St James Place which is in the parish of St James in the liberty of Westminster in the county of Middlesex, where she lived as a hired servant by the year and continued in the said service near nine years. And [she] received her full wages for the last three years of the said time at the rate of £4 10s. a year, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And this examinant says that since her living in Sir Humphry Moleneaux's service as aforesaid, she has not been a hired servant a year in any other place, or otherwise done any act, to her knowledge, to gain a settlement. Frances Cook. Sworn, 17 Oct. 1753, before us, Francis Bedwell, Thomas Lediard. Passed to St James in the liberty of Westminster.

264. [p. 48] Middlesex. Jonathan Ludler, labourer aged 33 years, born at Ardington in the county of Berkshire, upon oath saith that he, this examinant, lived a servant hired by the year with one Mr Nathaniel Cooper, a farmer in the parish of Mitcham, in the county of Surrey. With whom he continued and served one whole year and received of his said master his full wages for the said time (which was £7), meat, drink, washing and lodging. And says that he afterwards worked by the week with his said master (Mr Cooper) for near two years. And says that since he quitted the said service he has not lived a whole year as a hired servant in any place, or paid any parochial taxes, or done any act, to his knowledge, to gain a settlement. And this examinant further saith that about two years ago he was married to Elizabeth, his present wife, in the liberty of the Fleet, London, who at this time is big with child and near her time of reckoning. And says that he being in a very ill state of health is not able to work to maintain himself and wife without relief. Jonathan Ludler, his mark. Sworn, 24 Oct. 1753. Passed to Mitcham in the county of Surrey.

265. [p. 49] Middlesex. Jane Webber, widow, aged near 60 years, upon oath saith that about three years ago she, this examinant, lived a servant hired by the year with Colonel Cossly, lieutenant governor of the Royal Hospital at Chelsea, in the station of a cook. Where she continued and served a year and half and received her full wages for the said time at the rate of £8 a year, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And this examinant says that since she quitted the said service of Colonel Cossly's, [she] has not been a hired servant a year in any place, or done any act, to her knowledge, to gain a settlement. Jane Webber. Sworn, 24 Oct. 1753, before us, Benjamin Cox.

266. [p. 50] Middlesex. Margaret Chappel, widow, aged about 70 years, upon oath saith that she, this examinant, about five years ago was passed from the parish of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex to the parish of St Giles in the Fields in the said county as the place of her last legal settlement. And says that she was received at that time by one of the parish officers of St Giles, and was sent by him to their workhouse, where she was kept and maintained for about ten months. Which pass warrant or order was grounded upon the affidavit of her late husband (John Chappel) that he was born in the said parish of St Giles in the Fields and never did any act afterwards to gain settlement, he having been a soldier for many years in the army and was admitted afterwards an in pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, where he continued till the time he died about five years since and upwards. And this examinant as to her own part saith that since the time of her being passed to the said parish of St Giles in the Fields and maintained in the workhouse there for ten months as aforesaid, she has not been married or done any other act, to her knowledge, to gain a settlement. The mark of Margaret Chappel. Sworn, 30 Oct. 1753, before us, Thomas Lediard, Benjamin Cox. Passed to St Giles parish and passed before to the parish of St Giles in the fields, 2 Sept. 1748. Vide old examination book. [See 195].

267. [p. 51] Middlesex. Jane Hunter, aged about 49 years, the widow of James Hunter, late an in pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, deceased, upon oath saith that about eight years ago she, this examinant, was married to her said late husband in the liberty of the Fleet, London, who was a Scotsman. But as to the particular place where he was born, or of his settlement, this examinant says she never heard him mention or declare, nor can [she] give any account thereof. And this examinant saith that about 22 years ago she was married to her first husband (John Ebsworth) in the Fleet aforesaid, by whom she has a daughter (named Mary) who was bound out apprentice by the parish officers of Croydon in the county of Surrey, and is now married and provided for. And this examinant also saith that she hath often heard her first husband declare (and she verily believes it to be true) that he was bound and served his apprenticeship to a barber and peruke maker in the parish of Croydon aforesaid. And says that when she had two children by her said husband (John Ebsworth) they lived as inmates in the parish of Fulham in Middlesex. At which time the parish officers of Fulham had a certificate from the parish of Croydon, to indemnify them from all charges and expenses on account of this examinant and family residing in their parish. And this examinant further saith that her first husband (John Ebsworth) since the time of serving his apprenticeship at Croydon aforesaid, she never heard nor does she believe he ever rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, [or] otherwise done any act (to her knowledge) to gain a settlement. The mark of Jane Hunter. Sworn, 12 Nov. 1753, before us, Benjamin Cox, Francis Bedwell. Passed to the parish of Croydon.

268. [p. 52] Middlesex. Elizabeth Moor, widow, aged about 40 years, born at Chelsea in Middlesex, upon oath saith that in the year 1738 she, this examinant, was married to William Moor, her late husband, in the liberty of the Fleet, London. And says that her said late husband was by trade a blacksmith, and that she hath often heard him say and declare to her, and this examinant verily believes it to be true, that he served his apprenticeship, or the greater part of it, with one Mr [blank] Twiford in the upper ground in the parish of Christ Church in the county of Surrey, blacksmith. And this examinant further saith that she doth not know, nor does believe, that her said husband ever rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act (to her knowledge) to gain a legal settlement since serving his apprenticeship with Mr Twiford as aforesaid. The mark of Elizabeth Moor. Sworn, 30 November 1753, before us, Thomas Lediard, Benjamin Cox. Passed to Christ Church.

269. [p. 53] Middlesex. Mary Andrews, aged about 34 years, the wife of James Andrews, basket maker, upon oath saith that about 8 years ago she, this examinant was married to her said husband in the liberty of the Fleet, London. By whom she has two children living; vizt, Thomas, aged near 4 years, and Mary, 2 years and upwards. And says that her said husband often told her, and she believes it to be true (she having the custody of his indentures), that he was bound to and served his apprenticeship with one Mr John Lovell, a basket maker in the parish of Wantage in the county of Berkshire for seven years. And says that her said husband, since the time of serving his apprenticeship as aforesaid, has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes or otherwise done any act (to her knowledge) to gain a legal settlement. And says that her husband having absconded and left her and she being ill, [she] is not capable of working to support her family. And this examinant farther says that she has a daughter named Elizabeth Carpenter, aged near 15 years, who was born about seven years before this examinant was married, at some village or place upon the road in Oxfordshire as she was going to Cirencester in order to lie-in at her father's house there. But the name of the place where she was delivered, this examinant declares she does not know or can remember. And this examinant also further says that as to her own settlement before her marriage (and at the time she was delivered of her said daughter Elizabeth) [it] was in the parish of Kensington in the county of Middlesex by living near four years a hired servant with one Mr Henry Linford, a farmer in the said parish of Kensington, of whom she received £4 pounds a year wages, meat, drink and lodging. The mark of Mary Andrews. Sworn, 10 Dec., before us, King Gould, Samuel Wegg. Mary Andrews and her two children; vizt, Thomas and Mary, were passed to Wantage.

270. [p. 54] Middlesex. Jeffery Hunt, Midshipman, aged about 29 years, upon oath says that his father, Jeffery Hunt, peruke maker, often informed this examinant, and he believes it to be true, that his said father above 29 years ago rented a house of £40 a year, or thereabouts, for several years and paid all parochial taxes in the parish of St Peter and St Paul in the town or city of Bath in the county of Somerset (where this examinant was born). And that his father since the time of his quitting and leaving the said house had not rented any other house of £10 a year, or done any act to his, this examinant's knowledge, to gain a settlement elsewhere. And this examinant as to his own part, says he has not rented a house any where of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act, to his knowledge, to gain a legal settlement since the time of his birth in the parish of St Peter and St Paul in the town of Bath aforesaid. Save and except this examinant being bound an apprentice about 13 years ago to one Mr Andrew Haws, captain of a man of war, who is since deceased. But says he did not serve his master one day, he going to sea without him. And as to the place of settlement of the said late captain, he declares he does not know or can give any account relating to it. And the examinant further says that about four years ago he was married to Betty Hunt, his present wife, at the parish church of Norton St Philip in the said county of Somerset, by whom he has two children; to wit, William, aged near 3 years, and Anne, an infant, aged almost 10 months. Says that his said wife is dangerously ill and he being at present out of employment, is not able to support his said family. Jeffery Hunt. Sworn, 28 Jan. 1754, before us, Benjamin Cox, Bartholomew Hammond. Passed the two children to the parish of St Peter and St Paul at Bath. N.B. The mother died upon the road going down.

271. [p. 55] Middlesex. Charles Taylor, labourer, aged upwards of 27 years, upon oath says that he, this examinant, about 13 years ago was bound apprentice for seven years to Mr David Lee, distiller, who at that time lived in Old Pye Street in the parish of St John the Evangelist in the liberty of Westminster and county of Middlesex. With whom he continued and served his time except the last three months, which his master voluntarily forgave him and delivered him up his indentures. And this examinant says that since the time of his leaving his said master's service as aforesaid, he has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act or thing, to his knowledge, to gain a settlement. Charles Taylor. Sworn, 13 Feb. 1754, before us, Benjamin Cox, Henry Fielding. Passed to the parish of St John the Evangelist.

272. [p. 56] Middlesex. Rebecca Lord, widow, aged about 43 years, upon oath says that about three years ago she was married in the liberty of the Fleet, London, to John Lord, her late husband. And says that he served his apprenticeship (before her marriage with him) to his father for seven years in the parish of St James, Garlickhithe, London, where his father at that time lived a housekeeper and paid parish taxes (as this examinant's late husband frequently informed her, and by showing her his indentures and his freedom, which he took up). And this examinant says that her said late husband since the time of his serving apprenticeship with his father as aforesaid, had not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act, to her knowledge, to gain a settlement. Rebecca Lord, her mark. Sworn, 13 Feb. 1754, before us, Bejamin Cox, Henry Fielding. Passed to the parish of St James, Garlickhithe.

273. [p. 57] Middlesex. William Pugh, out pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, aged 60 years, upon oath says that he, this examinant, about 30 years ago lived a servant hired by the year with the Reverend Doctor Mansar in [Holy] Trinity parish in the city of London. With whom he continued and served one year and three quarters in the station of footman and received his full wages of his said master for the said time at the rate of £5 pounds a year, meat, drink, washing and lodging. And this examinant says that about three months after he parted from his said place he was married to Mary, his first wife (who lived with him as fellow servant in the said place). And says that about two years after such his marriage, he entered himself a soldier in the army and is now an out pensioner as aforesaid. And [he] has not rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act or thing, to his knowledge, to gain a settlement since the time of living a hired servant in the parish of [Holy] Trinity as aforesaid. And this examinant further says that on the month of June last he was married to Mary, his present wife, in the liberty of the Fleet, London. And he being ill of a consumptive disorder is not capable to support himself or wife. William Pugh. Sworn, 21 Feb. 1754, before us, Bejamin Cox, Francis Bedwell. Passed to [Holy] Trinity parish.

274. [p. 58] Middlesex. John Goldhawk, basket maker, aged 45, upon oath says that he was born in the parish of Egham in the county of Surrey, where his father, Joseph Goldhawk, was an inhabitant and parishioner. And says that since the time of such his birth he, this examinant, has not been bound an apprentice, or rented a house of £10 a year, or paid any parochial taxes, or otherwise done any act (to his knowledge) to gain a legal settlement. And this examinant also says that about seventeen years ago he was married to Anne, his late wife, in the liberty of the Fleet, London, by whom he has four children living; to wit, John, aged 15 (who is now an apprentice), Joseph, aged 12, Thomas, aged 8, and Mary, aged 7 years. And says that at present he is not able by his labour to support and maintain Joseph, Thomas, and Mary aforesaid, without some assistance and relief. John Goldhawk. Sworn, 6 Apr. 1754, before us, Thomas Lediard, Benjamin Cox. Joseph, Thomas, and Mary were passed to Egham.