3 Amcotts v Shuttleworth

The Court of Chivalry 1634-1640.

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3 AMCOTTS V SHUTTLEWORTH

William Amcotts of Aisthorpe, co. Lincoln, esq v Leon Shuttleworth, attorney in the Court of Common Pleas

Trinity Term, 1638 - December 1640

Figure 3:

Lincoln in 1610, with the market place where Leon Shuttleworth insulted William Amcotts, esq, immediately to the east of the cathedral (From John Speed, Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain (1611))

Abstract

Shuttleworth stood accused of speaking scandalous words against Amcotts, a Lincolnshire J.P. and the son of Sir Richard Amcotts, Knight of the Bath. Amcotts's libel complained that in Lincoln market place during a busy market day in early June 1638, Shuttleworth said that he was 'as good a man, and as good a gentleman, and a better man and a better gentleman than Mr Amcotts of Aistropp, or anie Amcotts in Lincolnshire. And that if Mr Amcotts was a justice he was a drunken justice.' Amcotts was in London at the time, but this was said in front of his servants and tenants allegedly in order to provoke him to fight a duel. Amcotts's fourteen witnesses summoned to testify at the Angel Inn, on the bailey of Lincoln, on 8 January 1638/9 included Sir Thomas and Sir John Monson and William Dalison esq. Amcotts won the case and was awarded £100 in damages. Shuttleworth performed his submission on 15 August 1639 at the house of the mayor of Lincoln before the mayor and four or five aldermen. He apologised and confessed Amcotts was 'a worshipful gentleman and better than myself'.

Initial proceedings

11/27b, Libel

1. The Amcotts family had been gentry for up to 300 years.

2. Between May and July 1638, in the city of Lincoln, Leon Shuttleworth had said 'that he was as good a man, and as good a gentleman, and a better man, and a better gentleman then I Amcotts of Aystropp, or any Amcotts in Lincolnshyre, and that if I were a Justice, I was a drunken Justice.'

No date.

Signed by Arthur Duck.

Plaintiff's case

11/27a, Letters commissory for the plaintiff

[Damaged: half of document torn away and rest stuck to back of 11/27b]

Addressed to commissioners which included Charles Hall, esq, and Alexander Emerson, esq, to meet in a cause of scandalous words provocative of a duel, at the inn called the Angel in the bailey of Lincoln.

Signed by Gilbert Dethick, 1638.

11/27c, Defence interrogatories

1. The witnesses were warned of the penalty for perjury and bearing false witness.

2. Did the witness live of their own or depend upon another? How much were they worth in goods with their debts paid? How much did they pay in the last subsidy to the King?

3. Was the witness a household servant or retainer to Amcotts? Was the witness related to Amcotts and if so, in what degree? Which party did they favour and to whom would they give the victory if it were within their power?

4. How had they come to testify? Had they been asked or required? Had they received or promised expenses for their testimony?

5. Had there been any discord or controversy among the witnesses?

6. Had the witness spoken with any others concerning his testimony? Had the witness been directed or instructed how to depose? If so by whom and how?

7. Had the witness known the defendant at the time of the 'pretended words', and for how long? Was the defendant provoked; by whom, and by what words or means? Where and in whose presence were the words spoken?

8. Had the witness or any other encouraged Amcotts to prosecute Shuttleworth? Had they given instructions or directions to Amcotts, his counsel, proctor, attorney or solicitor?

9. Did the witness know that Shuttleworth knew he was speaking to Amcotts' servants at the time of his speaking? Did the defendant omit the Christian name of Mr Amcotts? How did he address him?

10. Had the witness promised Amcotts in writing to depose as he had?

11. 'What other matter of thinge doe you know or have you heard concerning the suite'?

No date.

Signed by Thomas Exton.

11/35a, Plaintiff depositions

Taken before commissioners Charles Hall, esq, Thomas Lawrence, gent, and Alexander Emerson, esq, with George Walker as notary public, on 8 January 1638/9, at the Angel Inn in the bailey of Lincoln.

(Witness 1), Sir Thomas Monson of Burton juxta Lincoln, knt and bart, aged about 72

To Amcotts's libel:

1. The plaintiff was an esquire and heir of Sir Richard Amcotts, Knight of the Bath now deceased. He was present when Sir Richard was made Knight of the Bath, 'and to the best of his remembraunce putt on his spurrs at the solemnitie thereof, which he saith is above thirtie yeares agoe; and William Amcotts ever since the death of Sir Richard his father enjoyed his lands and other estate as his heire.' William Amcotts was a Justice of the Peace. Monson 'verie well knew the grandfather *was a gentleman and verilie believeth that his* predecessors were for manie yeares and verie ancientlie gentlemen descended'. He believed 'they were and are Amcotts of Amcotts a towne in Lincolnshire of which William Amcotts is now lord and owner... saving he knew the father Leon Shuttleworth.'

Signed by Thomas Mounson and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 2), William Dalison of Greetwell, co. Lincoln, esq, aged about 56

To Amcotts's libel:

1. William Amcotts was an esquire and the son and heir of Sir Richard Amcotts Knight of the Bath, deceased, and a J.P. for co. Lincoln. He had seen Sir Richard wear the ribbon for that order of knighthood, 'and that he was generallie so called, and stiled *and tooke place in all publique meetings according to the rank of that order* and for that William Amcotts enjoyeth Sir Richards lands and other estate as *his eldest sonne and heir*'. Dalison heard the late Sir Richard Amcotts often mention William as his son and heir.He had seen William Amcotts named as a J.P. for co. Lincoln at the Assizes. William Amcotts's family was descended of gentlemen for a hundred years. Dalison had heard his father and other gentry say that William Amcotts's ancestors were gentlemen dwelling at Aisthorpe, co. Lincoln during the reign of Edward IV, and before that at Amcotts in co. Lincoln, 'of which they were Lords *or owners* as William now is *as he believeth*... saving he deposeth that he knew the father of Leon Shuttleworth to be an attorney at law, having emploied him in his life time in suites and causes at law.'

Signed by William Dalison and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 3), Sir John Monson of Burton juxta Lincoln, co. Lincoln, knt, aged about 38

To Amcotts's libel:

1. He knew the plaintiff was an esq, as son and heir to Sir Richard Amcotts, Knight of the Bath. He knew the plaintiff was a J.P. as he served alongside Amcotts at the sessions and assizes in co. Lincoln. He knew Sir Richard Amcotts 'to be a gentleman in comon reputation, and as he verilie believeth as ancient as most are in the countrie, and to have borne the qualitie of Knight of the Bath and Justice of Peace... wherein he was as active, able and deserving a gentleman, both from the kinges Majestie and countrie, as anie man Monson knew in his time.' He had also served alongside the plaintiff's father as a J.P. Leon Shuttleworth was accounted an attorney and so was his father.

Signed by John Mounson and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 4), William Saltmarsh of Strubby [near Wragby], co. Lincoln, gent, aged about 60

To Amcotts's libel:

1. The plaintiff was an esquire, and son and heir of Sir Richard Amcotts Knight of the Bath deceased. William Amcotts was 'generallie reputed to be' a J.P. for co. Lincoln. William Amcotts, his father, and their ancestors 'have beene accompted gentlemen descended having for a long time past beene Amcotts of Amcotts a towne in Lincolnshire, whereof William Amcotts is now lord or owner, and so have his ancestors beene for a long time heretofore.'

Signed by William Saltmarsh and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 5), Lucas Stampe of Aisthorpe, co. Lincoln, yeoman, aged about 45

To Amcotts's libel:

1. On a Friday at the beginning of June 1638, on a market day in Lincoln market, Leon Shuttleworh 'in the presence of divers honest witnesses', several times said that he 'was as good a gentleman, and a better gentleman then Mr Amcotts of Aistropp or anie Amcotts in the countrie and it bee answered then to Leon Shuttleworth that it was not so, and that Mr Amcotts was an ancient gentleman, and a Justice of Peace, Leon Shuttleworth replied, that he kept better men *then anie Amcotts did and better then anie* Amcotts was, and that if he was a Justice he was a drunken Justice'. Shuttleworth 'did speake the words severall times in disgrace and contempt of William Amcotts and his familie'.Mr Amcotts was not present at the speaking of these words.

To Shuttleworth's interrogatories:

3. He was Amcotts's tenant 'and doth weare his liverey sometimes as occasion is and he doth equallie favour both parties in this cause, and that if he was able to judge of the cause, he would give the victorie to him that hath right.'

4. He was summoned to testify and came at Amcotts's charge, from whom he had received 12d towards his charges and expected that 'Mr Amcotts will beare the rest.'

7. He had known Shuttleworth for seven years before the speaking of the words in the libel, which were spoken in the presence of 'Richard Rawlinson, Robte Hall, James Markham, William Greetham, and divers others, there being a great crowde and companie of people present.'

Signed by Luke Stampe and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 6), James Markham of Conisholme, co. Lincoln, tailor, aged about 24 years

To Amcotts's libel:

2-3. On a Friday at the beginning of June 1638 on market day in Lincoln market, Leon Shuttleworth said he 'was as good a man and a better gentleman than Mr Amcotts, or anie Amcotts in Lincolnshire (repeating the words three or fouer severall times over)'. Shuttleworth spoke the words to some of Mr Amcotts his servants, and he also saith that the words were spoken by Shuttleworth in contempt and disgrace of Mr Amcotts, and of his familie'. Mr Amcotts was absent in London at the time.

To Shuttleworth's interrogatories:

2. He was worth £10 'of his owne goods, his debts paid, and that he hath not beene taxed towards his Majesties Shipps, there having bene no taxation since he came forth of his apprenticeship.'

4. William Parkinson, servant to Mr Amcotts, did request him on Mr Amcotts's behalf, to testify and gave him 12d towards his charges, 'and promised him the rest should be borne.'

7. He had known Leon Shuttleworth for a year before the speaking of the words in the libel, which were spoken in the presence of 'Luke Stampe, William Greetham, Robte Hall, Mrs Coltman and divers others then present at the markett.'

10. William Parkinson, Amcotts's servant, asked him what he could depose of what Shuttleworth had said at Lincoln market against Amcotts, 'he saying that his Master was told that he was present at the speaking of them'.He told Parkinson that he was not present, 'and heard the words which he hath predeposed, and thereupon Parkinson sett them downe in writing.'

Signed by James Markham and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 7), John Little of Reepham, co. Lincoln, yeoman, aged about 44

To Amcotts's libel:

2-3. On a Friday at the beginning of June 1638 on market day in Lincoln market, Leon Shuttleworth 'in the presence of divers witnesses, did either saie that he was as good a man or *else did say that he was* a better man then Mr Amcotts of Aistropp. And Shuttleworth being told againe that Mr Amcotts of Aistropp was a gentleman of great worth in his countrie, and a knight's sonne, and a Justice of Peace, Shuttleworth replied what care I, I am as good a man, or a better man then he *(but whether of those speeches he remembreth not). And further said* if he be a Justice he is a drunken Justice.' Shuttleworth spoke the words, 'to the disgrace and disparadgment of Mr Amcotts and his familie'. Mr Amcotts was not then present, 'but as he heard in the south partes.'

Signed by John Little and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 8), Richard Rawlinson of Sudbrooke Holme, co. Lincoln, husbandman, born at Scampton, co. Lincoln and previously lived at Saxilby, co. Lincoln, aged about 48

To Amcotts's libel:

2-3. About three weeks before midsummer, in June 1638 in the public market of the city of Lincoln on market day, Leon Shuttleworth, 'in the presence of divers honest witnesses' said that he 'was a better gentleman then Mr Amcotts or any Amcotts in the countrie'. Shuttleworth spoke the words 'in disgrace of Mr Amcotts and his familie'. Mr Amcotts was not present at the speaking of the words.

Signed by Richard Rawlinson [his mark] and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 9), William Gresham of Aisthorpe, co. Lincoln, husbandman, aged about 50

To Amcotts's libel:

2-3. On a Friday at the beginning of June 1638 in the public market of the city of Lincoln on market day, Leon Shuttleworth 'in the presence of divers honest witnesses did manie times saie, that he was as good a man, and as good a gentleman and a better man and a better gentleman then Mr Amcotts of Aistropp or anie Amcotts in Lincolnshire. And that if Mr Amcotts was a Justice he was a drunken justice'. Shuttleworth spoke these words 'manie times in contempte and disgrace of Wm Amcotts, and his familie, and therebie endeavoured to provoke Wm Amcotts, but he saith Mr Amcotts was not present that time, but at London.'

To Shuttleworth's interrogatories:

2-3. He was Amcotts's cook and lived in his house 'but is able to live of himself and is worth sixscore pounds and more of his owne proper goods, his debts paid, and that he was taxed in the taxation of his Majestie shipp money viiii s which he paid, and answereth that he receaveth of the plaintiff 20 nobles per annum for his wages for his service: And that he favoureth both parties alike in this cause, and that he wisheth the victorie and would give it, if it were in his power to him that hath the right.'

7. He knew Leon Shuttleworth at the time of the speaking of the words in the libel, but did not know his name till then, upon which he enquired after Shuttleworth's name. The words of which he deposed were spoken by Leon Shuttleworth in his presence and that of Luke Stampe, 'one Little of Reapham', also 'two men of the *name of the* Wests, who are brethren, and manie more, it being in the full market time.'

9. Shuttleworth knew that he spoke the words to some of Mr Amcotts's servants. Shuttleworth 'did particularlie name Mr Amcotts of Aistropp, therbie denoteing the plaintiff in this cause.'

Signed by Wm: Gresham [his mark] and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 10), Seth Moyne of Cammeringham co. Lincoln, shepherd, born at Bardney, co. Lincoln, aged about 32

To Amcotts's libel:

2-3. On a Friday at the beginning of June 1638 on a market day in Lincoln market, Leon Shuttleworth, 'did publiquelie in the presence of divers honest witnesses saie as followeth, or to such effect, vizt, Will: Amcotts, what is Will: Amcotts? I am as good a man as Will: Amcotts myself.' He conceived that Shuttleworth 'did endeavour to provoke Mr Amcotts to quarrell with him, or else he would not have spoken the words so publiquelie in open markett as he did'. Mr Amcotts was not present at the speaking of the words.

Signed by Seth Moyne [his mark] and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 11), Robert Hall of Thorpe le Fallows, co. Lincoln, husbandman, lived there 20 years, born at Ingham, co. Lincoln, aged about 38

To Amcotts's libel:

2-3. On a Friday at the beginning of June 1638 on a market day in Lincoln market, Leon Shuttleworth, 'did *publiquelie* in the presence of divers honest witnesses saie, that he was as good a gentleman as Mr Amcotts, and being told againe, that it was not so, for Mr Amcotts was a Justice of peace and a Knight of the Bathes sonne, Shuttleworth replied againe, that he was as good a gentleman as Mr Amcotts, and said a turd in Mr Amcotts teeth'. Shuttleworth 'by speaking the words did note and meane William Amcotts of Aistropp, the plaintiff in this cause, and did speak them in disgrace of him Mr Amcotts'. The 'words predeposed were provoking, but Mr Amcotts was not present.'

To Shuttleworth's interrogatories:

3. He was tenant to Amcotts, but 'favoureth both parties alike in this cause and that if it was in his power, he would give victorie in this cause, to whichever of the parties hath right.'

Signed by Robert Hall and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 12), William Darwin of Cleatham, in the parish of Manton, co. Lincoln, gent, born at Manton, aged about 63

To Amcotts's libel:

1. He knew the plaintiff was an esquire, and son and heir of Sir Richard Amcotts Knight of the Bath, and a J.P. for co. Lincoln. He knew the plaintiff's father and grandfather, that both had been justices for co. Lincoln, and that Mr William Amcotts had been a gentleman for 50 years and was descended from ancestors who had been gentlemen for 300 years. He knew Sir Richard Amcotts was a Knight of the Bath, because he was present at his creation and saw him in his robes which belong to that order. He remembered that Sir Thomas Mounson, knight and baronet, who was then Darwin's master, did put on Sir Richard Amcotts's spurs at that time. Leon Shuttleworth was an attorney at law as his father before him 'for he saith he knew them practise in the Court of Comon Pleas as atturneys for divers yeares but how longe he certainlie remembreth not.'

Signed by William Darwin and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 13), Thomas Pinchbecke of Butyate, in the parish of Bardney, co. Lincoln, yeoman, born at Tupholme, co. Lincoln, aged about 25

To Amcotts's libel:

2, 3. On a Friday in summer 1638 on market day in Lincoln market, Leon Shuttleworth, 'did publiquelie in the presence of divers honest witnesses speaking to some of the companie there, (but to whom Pinchbecke knoweth not), say, I am as good a man as thy Maister; *I know Justice Amcotts well enough* and I care not a turd for him, or I care not a fart for him (but whether of those he remembreth not, but saith he is sure it was one of them) or to such effect'. Shuttleworth spoke the words, 'in contempte and disgrace of Wm Amcotts. And that the speaking of the words might well provoke Mr Amcotts to anger, but he saith he doth not know that Mr Amcotts was present at the speaking of the predeposed words.'

Signed by Tho: Pinchbecke and by the three commissioners.

(Witness 14), Alexander Cusson of Ingleby, co. Lincoln, yeoman, born at Welton juxta Dunholme, co. Lincoln, aged about 69

To Amcotts's libel:

1. He knew the plaintiff was an esquire and the son and heir to Sir Richard Amcotts, Knight of the Bath. He also knew the plaintiff's grandfather, Alexander Amcotts, esq, who had been a J.P. in co. Lincoln, 'and that for all the time of his memorie, he knew the three parties predeposed of to come from a gentle family, and hath oftentimes crediblie heard it reported, that their elders and ancestors, have been gentlemen of a very good familie, for these three hundred yeares last. Shuttleworth was an attorney at law as his father had been.

Signed by Alexander Cusson and by the three commissioners.

11/35b, Notary public's certificate

Certificate in Latin signed by George Walker, notary public that the above examinations had been completed and were now being returned.

Dated 16 January 1638/9

Notary's mark.

Sentence / Arbitration

16/1d, Plaintiff's sentence

Shuttleworth had said 'that he was as good a man, and a better man, as good a gentleman, and a better gentleman than Amcotts of Aystrop, or any Amcotts in Lyncoln shire, and that if he were a Justice, he were a drunken Justice'.

£100 damages were awarded and the cause was taxed at 20 marks.

No date.

Signed by Arthur Duck and Maltravers.

16/1l, Plaintiff's bill of costs

Trinity term, 1638: £3-3s-4d

Vacation: £2-4s-0d

Michaelmas term, 1638: £7-4s-10d

Vacation: £18-3s-4d

Hilary term, 1638/9: £4-18s-8d

Easter term, 1639: £4-16s-8d

Trinity term, 1639: £22-4s-8d

Total: £61-13s-6d

Taxed at 20 marks

Signed by Arthur Duck and Maltravers.

Submission

13/3t, Submission

On Thursday 15 August at the house of the Mayor of Lincoln and in the presence of four or five of the aldermen of the city 'standinge bareheaded shall with an audible voyce say as followeth':

'Whereas I Leon Shuttleworth stand convicte by sentence diffinitive in the court military given by the right honorable Henry Lord Maltravers, Lieutenant to the right honorable Thomas Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Earl Marshall of England to have spoken certaine scandalous speeches against William Amcotts of Aistrope, Lincs, esq, and to have saide that I was as good a man, and a better man, as good a gentleman and a better gentleman than Amcotts of Astrop or any other Amcotes in Lincolnshire and that if he were a justice he was a drunken justice, I doe hereby acknowledge myselfe to be heartily sorry for my such hastie and inconsiderate speeches; and I doe confesse that Mr Amcottes is a worshipful gentleman and a better man than myself; and I doe hereby promise hereafter to demeane myself with all due respects to Mr Amcottes and all the gentrie of this kingdome and never to offende the like hereafter.'

Signed by Maltravers 'brought me 12 July 1639'

'This submission being made, Leon Shuttleworth is to certifie the court militarie of the performance thereof the first court day of Mich term under the hand of the Mayor of Lincoln aforesaid'.

'The words of this submission doe agree with the sentence given in this cause.'

Signed by Humphrey Terrick.

4/31, Certificate of submission

'To the right honourable Thomas Earl of Arundel and Surrey Earl Marshall of England and to the right honourable Henry Lord Maltravers Lieutennant to the Earle.

Right Honourable: being requested by Leon Shuttleworth of the City of Lincoln, an attorney in his Majesties the Court of Common Pleas at Westminster, to certify your Honours of the performance of an order of submission enjoyned to be made by him upon the fifteenth day of August last before the Maior of the City of Lincoln and in his presence, and in the presence of fower or five of the Aldermen of Citie with him, standing bareheaded upon a conviction by sentence in Court Military given by Henry Lord Maltravers against Leon Shuttleworth for speaking certaine scandalous speeches against William Amcotts of Aistropp in the County of Lincoln esq. These are to signify to your lordship that Leon Shuttleworth at the day and place menconed in the order of submission in the presence of me Edmund Broughe maior of the Citie of Lincoln and in the presence of fower of the aldermen of City did fully in all things performe the order. All which at the request of Leon Shuttleworth and according to the direction of the order in all humble manner I signifie to your Lordships this xxviiith of September 1639 and rest at your Lordships service: Edward Bronys maior'.

Summary of proceedings

Dr Eden acted as counsel for Amcotts and Dr Exton for Shuttleworth. On 6 November 1638, Alexander Emerson paid a bond of £100 to the King on Shuttleworth's behalf. On 20 November 1638, Dr Eden was ordered to prove Amcotts's gentility. Two years later on 10 October 1640, Shuttleworth was ordered to pay £20 in part settlement of the damages and Dr Duck accused him of non payment, petitioning for a penalty for his attachment.On 4 December 1640, Dr Exton petitioned on behalf of Shuttleworth.

Notes

William Amcotts of Aisthorpe was the son and heir of Sir Richard Amcotts and Jane, daughter of Vincent Fulnetby. Soon after Shuttleworth's submission, Amcotts died on 4 September 1639. He was buried at Aisthorpe on 14 September 1639. His son, also named William Amcotts, was aged 14 at his father's death. Leon Shuttleworth was probably the Leonard Shuttleworth of the city of Lincoln (1594-1645) who was the eldest son of Edmund Shuttleworth, mayor of Lincoln, in 1609.

R. Maddison (ed.), Lincolnshire Pedigrees (Publications of the Harleian Society, 50, 1902), vol. 1, p. 16, vol. 3, p. 873.

For another summary of the case, see G. D. Squibb, Reports of Heraldic Cases in the Court of Chivalry, 1623-1732 (London, 1956), pp. 34-5.

Documents

  • Initial proceedings
    • Libel: 11/27b (no date)
  • Plaintiff's case
    • Letters commissory for the plaintiff: 11/27a (1638)
    • Defence interrogatories: 11/27c (no date)
    • Plaintiff depositions: 11/35a (8 Jan 1639)
    • Notary public's certificate: 11/35b (16 Jan 1639)
  • Sentence / Arbitration
    • Plaintiff's sentence: 16/1d (no date)
    • Plaintiff's bill of costs: 16/1l (Tri 1639)
  • Submission
    • Submission: 13/3t (12 Jul 1639)
    • Certificate of submission: 4/31 (28 Sep 1639)
  • Proceedings
    • Proceedings before Maltravers: R.19, fos. 454r-468v (6 Nov 1638)
    • Proceedings before Maltravers: R.19, fos. 400v-412v (20 Nov 1638)
    • Proceedings before Maltravers: 1/9 (28 Jan 1639)
    • Proceedings before Arundel: 1/6, fos. 1-9 (23 Feb 1639)
    • Proceedings: 1/11, fos. 56r-64v (10 Oct 1640)
    • Proceedings before Maltravers: 1/11, fos. 79r-87v (4 Dec 1640)

People mentioned in the case

  • Amcotts, William, esq (also Amcotes, Amcottes)
  • Amcotts, Sir Richard, knight (also Amcotes, Amcottes)
  • Broughe, Edmund, mayor
  • Cusson, Alexander, yeoman
  • Dalison, William, esq (also Dallison, Dalyson)
  • Darwin, William, gent
  • Dethick, Gilbert, registrar
  • Duck, Arthur, lawyer
  • Eden, Thomas, lawyer
  • Emerson, Alexander, esq
  • Exton, Thomas, lawyer
  • Fulnetby, Vincent
  • Gresham, William, husbandman (also Greetham)
  • Hall, Charles, esq
  • Howard, Henry, baron Maltravers
  • Howard, Thomas, earl of Arundel and Surrey
  • Lawrence, Thomas, gent
  • Little, John, yeoman
  • Markham, James, tailor
  • Monson, Sir John, knight (also Mounson)
  • Monson, Sir Thomas, knight (also Mounson)
  • Moyne, Seth, shepherd
  • Pinchbecke, Thomas, yeoman
  • Rawlinson, Richard, husbandman
  • Saltmarsh, William, gent (also Saltmarshe)
  • Shuttleworth, Leon, attorney
  • Stampe, Lucas, yeoman
  • Stuart, Charles I, king
  • Walker, George, notary

Places mentioned in the case

  • Lincolnshire
    • Aisthorpe
    • Bardney
    • Burton-juxta-Lincoln
    • Butyate
    • Cammeringham
    • Cleatham
    • Conisholme
    • Greetwell
    • Ingham
    • Ingleby
    • Manton
    • Reepham
    • Saxilby
    • Scampton
    • Strubby
    • Sudbrooke Holme
    • Thorpe Le Fallows
    • Welton-juxta-Dunholme
  • Middlesex
    • Westminster

Topics of the case

  • assizes
  • apparel
  • chivalric order
  • comparison
  • drunkenness
  • justice of the peace
  • Knight of the Bath
  • livery
  • market place
  • office-holding
  • other courts
  • provocative of a duel
  • scatological insult
  • ship money
  • spurs
  • undermining before subordinates