Surnames beginning 'H'

The Cromwell Association Online Directory of Parliamentarian Army Officers . Originally published by British History Online, , 2017.

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Surnames beginning 'H'

Hacke, Joseph Joseph Hacke
Captain. An officer under Colonel Thomas Morgan, possibly in his own regiments. He was present at the taking of Berkeley Castle in Sept. 1645, and took part in its spoliation.
References: HMC, Fifth Report, 356-7.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Hacker, Francis Francis Hacker (died 1660)
Although the date of his birth/baptism is unknown, he was the eldest son of Francis Hacker (died 1646) of East Bridgford and Coleton Bassett, Nottinghamshire. Almost nothing is known of his life before the outbreak of the civil war.
Although two of his brothers fought for the king, Francis was a committed parliamentarian. The precise details of his military career and regimental links are elusive, but in 1643-45 he was clearly active as a captain, later a colonel, of horse in Leicestershire and its environs; by late 1644 he was at least on paper parliament’s commander-in-chief in Leicestershire. He was captured by the royalists at Melton Mowbray in late 1643 and again when the king stormed Leicester in May 1645, though he was soon exchanged, reportedly having resisted attempts by his captors to get him to change sides.
He did not join the New Model Army in the mid-1640s, but his military career resumed in 1648, when he raised and commanded troops in Leicestershire to crush a minor royalist rising there.
He commanded the guard during the trial of Charles I and on the scaffold in Whitehall on 30 Jan. 1649, in effect supervising the execution.
In 1649 he was given command of a new regiment, probably raised in northern England, on the New Model Army payroll. He supported Cromwell’s Scottish expedition of 1650-1, in command of a regiment of horse, and he played a significant role in the battles of Dunbar and Worcester, returning to Scotland to assist in the mopping up operation in the early 1650s. He supported Oliver’s Protectorate, both in England and later in the 1650s again campaigning in Scotland.
In spring 1659 he supported military moves to end the Protectorate and recall the Rump, but he then threw his support behind the Rump and so broke with senior army colleagues when they sought to seize power in the closing weeks of 1659. As a consequence he was dismissed from the army, but he resumed his command when the Rump returned at the start of 1660 and he appeared to support Monck’s subsequent moves. However, he was deemed a regicide for his role in the trial and execution, was arrested shortly after the Restoration and was tried, convicted and executed in autumn 1660.
References: Oxford DNB; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 165.
Armies: Nottinghamshire; New Model Army
Hacket, Richard Richard Hacket
Admitted to the Company of the Artillery Garden (now the Honourable Artillery Company) in 1635.
Captain in the Blue regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Thomas Adams) from Apr. to at least Sept. 1642 (noted as third captain in the summer). By Sept. 1643 had defected to the king’s service; the royalist Richard Symonds noted that he had preceded Major William Underwood in the Blue regiment, ‘but left them for refuseing there oath of Associacon & is now in his Maties Service’.
He became an officer in Sir Marmaduke Rawden’s regiment of horse, was captured by the parliamentarians at Cirencester in 1643 (a newsletter then described him as ‘once a London Captaine and lived in Thomas Street’ (Certain Informations, 18-25 Sept. 1643, 277)); Symonds also noted that Hacket had had the company commanded in Sept. 1643 by Edward Bellamy.
References: Overton 1642; Thrale 1642; BL. Harl. 986, p. 27; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 133, 315-6; Lindley, Popular politics, 208, 249, 251.
Armies: London
Hacket, Simon Simon Hacket
Ensign in the White regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Isaac Penington) in summer 1642. Captain Hacket in Edmund Harvey’s regiment of London horse by 1 Dec. 1643 and still there 9 May 1644; indeed, he was probably still in the regiment when it was disbanded in spring 1645.
References: Thrale 1642; TNA, SP28/131, Part 6, ff. 1r.–2r.; CSPD, 1644, 155.
Armies: London
Hackluyt, Edmund [Edward] Edmund [Edward] Hackluyt
Lieutenant in Sir William Ogle’s regiment of foot in Northumberland’s Army against the Scots in 1640.
Lieutenant in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 85, 42.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hackwell, Robert Robert Hackwell
Nominated by the Commons captain of the Limehouse company in the newly-formed Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment on 27 Jan. 1643. But he is not found in later sources for the officers of the regiment.
A tax assessor for the parliamentarian war effort, and a member of the Tower Hamlets militia sub-committee, from which he was put out in 1647 during the Presbyterian coup.
References: JHC, 2.926; Lindley, Popular politics, 232.
Armies: Tower Hamlets
Hadfield, Thomas Thomas Hadfield
A captain in Derbyshire. In July 1648 he was ordered to raise a troop of horse for the defence of the county.
References: Turbutt, Derbyshire, 3.1086.
Armies: Derbyshire
Haggat, John John Haggat
Colonel. Commissioned colonel of horse in the Bristol militia, 3 Jan. 1651.
References: CSPD, 1651, 513.
Armies: Bristol
Haine, John John Haine
Captain in the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Ralph Harrison) in Oct. 1646, approved in the same rank by the Presbyterian City militia committee in 1647, and put out later that year after the failure of the Presbyterian coup: according to one pamphlet, ‘a Gentleman as fit for command as any in the City, a very knowing experienc’d Souldier, one who hath made as great proficiencie in the Art Militarie as any, and been very instrumentall in making many Souldiers; a man of very good parts, honest and conscientious’ (A paire of spectacles for the Citie, (1648), 11).
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317, 318; Marshall, Essex funeral, 12; A paire of spectacles for the Citie (1648), 11.
Armies: London
Haines, - – Haines (died 1645)
An officer in the Plymouth garrison, from at least 1644 to 1646. As captain, on 15 May 1644 he led a sally of 300 men against Cremill Point. As major, he was paid £3 14s. 8d. for satisfaction of a debt on 12 Apr. 1645. In Dec. 1645 he was ‘slaine in assaultinge St Buddox church’. On 29 Dec. Commissary Slade was reimbursed £10 for payments he had made to Captain James Pears for buying necessaries for the funeral; further payments for the funeral came to £36 18s. 5d.
References: Worth, History of Plymouth, 134; Worth, ‘Plymouth siege accounts’, 228, 235-6.
Armies: Devon
Haines [Haynes], Hezekiah Hezekiah Haines [Haynes] (died 1693).
Born a younger son of John Haines of Copford Hall, Essex, who emigrated to New England in the 1630s and became puritan governor of Massachusetts and Connecticut. Hezekiah returned to England in the late 1630s and fought for parliament in the civil war, succeeding James Harrington as captain in Edward Rossiter’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army; he may have progressed to captain. Although he does not appear as a New Model officer on the formation of that army, by summer 1647 he appears as a captain in Twistleton’s New Model horse regiment and in or by Oct. 1649 had become major in Fleetwood’s New Model horse regiment. As such he fought at the battle of Preston, in Cromwell’s Scottish campaign – he effectively commanded Fleetwood’s regiment at Dunbar – and probably at Worcester. During the 1650s he was stationed and acquired property in Essex and elsewhere in East Anglia – by the late 1650s he had inherited Copford Hall on the death of an elder brother – and was appointed to various local and national offices. In 1655 he became deputy major-general (under Fleetwood, who had heavy political duties in London) for East Anglia. He sat in the second Protectorate Parliament. He supported Fleetwood in 1658-9 and as such was dismissed from his military and other offices on the eve of the Restoration and arrested and imprisoned after it. He was released in 1662 and spent the rest of his life in Essex.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 2.92; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 94, 106.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Hakluyt, Francis Francis Hakluyt
A kinsman of the Harleys of Brampton Bryan, Francis was captain in the regiment of foot being raised by Edward Harley. Hakluyt wrote to the latter from Sudbury, Suffolk, 11 Oct. 1643, reporting his efforts in raising his company and asking for money. Eleven days later he wrote acknowledging the £10 that Harley had sent him, and frankly telling him that if he wanted to raise more men or lead those he had raised, he must send him more money. He was, he said, ‘an admiration to the gentlemen and officers of the cuntry because I have so long rested idly at one place without orders to advance’, and he was in danger of losing his men to the better-paid Suffolk Trained Bands (HMC, Portland Mss, 3.118). Other letters followed in Dec. complaining about the parlous state of the men as they were being shipped to serve in Plymouth.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 52; HMC, Portland Mss, 3.117-8, 120, 210.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Devon
Hale, - - Hale
By autumn 1643 and still there in Mar. 1645, shortly before the regiment was broken up, captain in Francis Russell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.99.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hale, John John Hale (1614-1691)
Born the eldest son of John Hale, a London grocer, but wealthy and from a cadet branch of a landed Hertfordshire family. By the mid-1630s he had married Anne Halswell, co-heir to her father’s property in Somerset and Devon. Via his wife, John acquired part of the estate of Bowringsleigh, West Alvington, Devon, and links to other members of the Devon gentry.
He took up arms for parliament at the outbreak of the civil war and in 1642 was listed as captain of a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army, from or by 12 Aug. 1642, when he was assigned £280 for mounting himself and his officers.
However, his military and other service during the 1640s seem not to have been extensive. He was more prominent during the 1650s, holding a string of offices in Devon and representing the county or boroughs within it in all three Protectorate Parliament and in the Convention, in which he was referred to as ‘Major Hale’, perhaps suggesting rather grander earlier military service. Although he did not sit in parliament again after 1660, he continued to play a role in county administration.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 55; TNA, SP28/1a/70; HoP: The Commons, 1660-1690, 2. 461.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hale, John John Hale
Began the civil war in the earl of Essex’s Army, serving as lieutenant in John Gother’s company in Richard Browne’s regiment of dragoons in autumn 1642 and, promoted to captain, commanding that company during the opening months of 1643, when it moved from being a Dragoon company to a foot company. He joined the Eastern Association Army in spring 1644 as a captain in Thomas Rainsborough’s newly-formed regiment of foot and was still there in Aug. 1644.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.89.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Eastern Association
Hales [Hayle], John John Hales [Hayle]
Captain of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642 and captain in John Middleton’s regiment of horse by Aug. 1643. In Apr. 1644 he became captain in James Sheffield’s regiment of horse, and by 2 Sept. 1644 had been promoted its major. However, he was no longer in the regiment when it transferred to the New Model Army.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 96.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Hales, Michael Michael Hales
Quartermaster in 1642 and lieutenant in 1643 in the troop of Captain John Hales in Middleton’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 104.
Armies: Essex’s Army; Waller (Southern Association)
Halford, - - Halford
A captain of Shropshire horse, captured in a skirmish with royalists from High Ercall in Feb. 1646.
References: Mercurius Veridicus, 21-28 Feb. 1646.
Armies: Shropshire
Halford, Elijah Elijah Halford
In spring 1644 and still there in autumn 1645, lieutenant in (presumably his kinsman) John Halford’s company in Godfrey Bosvile’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 31.
Armies: Warwickshire; Waller
Halford, John John Halford
By Nov. 1643 captain in and from spring 1645 major of Godfrey Bosvile’s Warwick-based regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 31.
Armies: Warwickshire; Waller
Halford, John John Halford
Chaplain to Colonel Henry Stephens’s Gloucester regiment of foot; he continued in this position under its later colonels, Massey and Morgan, until at least Sept. 1645. By the end of 1647 he had been replaced by Thomas Crompton.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 625-7; HMC, Fifth Report, 368-9.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Halford, Nicholas Nicholas Halford
Lieutenant in Captain Ambrose Tindall’s company in John Middleton’s regiment of dragoons in the earl of Essex’s Army (pay warrant: 10 Nov. 1642). By 3 June 1643 major of dragoons in the same army.
References: TNA, SP28/3b/305, SP28/7/341.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Halford, Nicholas Nicholas Halford
Not apparently one of the original lieutenants in the earl of Peterborough’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army, but by Dec. 1642 he was a lieutenant, probably in Captain George Blount’s or lieutenant-colonel Francis Fairfax’s company.
References: TNA, SP28/3b/399; SP28/4/244, 335.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hall, - - Hall
Appointed captain in Nottingham by the anti-Hutchinson faction in 1644 as part of their intrigues against Hutchinson’s governorship.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 206, 229.
Armies: Nottinghamshire
Hall, - - Hall
By Apr. 1644 until at least Jan. 1645, captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army. It is not clear if this is the same Hall who was a captain in Ayloffe’s regiment of foot during the opening months of 1644.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.64.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hall, - - Hall
By summer 1644, lieutenant in John Jenkins’s troop in Vermuyden’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.102.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hall, - - Hall
Captain in Thomas Ayloffe’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, named in a pay warrant covering Jan.-Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/25/377B.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hall, - - Hall
Ensign in Lieutenant-Colonel Roberts’s company in John Browne’s regiment of Trained Band Auxiliaries in Shepway Lathe, Kent, on 22 May 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 78.
Armies: Kent
Hall, Edmund Edmund Hall
Captain in Edward Harley’s regiment of foot by 11 Dec. 1643, when he was one of three officers signing a letter to his colonel from the Downs, complaining of lack of supplies for their men. By 25 Apr. 1644 he was at Plymouth, reporting a skirmish, whilst on the same day his fellow-officer Thomas Dutton was writing to Edward Harley and his father asking them to settle matters of precedence between the two men.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 52; HMC, Portland Mss., 3.120-2.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Devon
Hall, Francis Francis Hall
Lieutenant in the Colonel’s company in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot in Lord Wharton’s Army raised for Ireland in 1642. Later that summer he instead went with the regiment as captain or captain-lieutenant in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 69, 45.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hall, Robert Robert Hall
Lieutenant in the Henley-upon-Thames garrison under its governor, Thomas Bulstrode, in Apr. 1645, taking command of the company by late Aug. 1645 when Bulstrode and his successor had moved on to other positions.
References: TNA, SP28/127, Part 10, f. 109v.; JHC, 4.229.
Armies: Oxfordshire
Hall, William William Hall
In spring 1645 cornet in the late Captain Abercromby’s troop in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of horse, commanded by Colonel Stapleton. Unlike several other officers of that regiment, he did not transfer to the New Model Army.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 150.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Halliwell, James James Halliwell
Lieutenant in the company of Captain James Scolfeild in the regiment of foot of Colonel Ralph Assheton, junior in Lancashire. Arrears of £129 7s were owed to him in Sept. 1650.
References: TNA, E121/3/1.
Armies: Lancashire
Halliwell, Richard Richard Halliwell
Lieutenant of foot in Captain John Ratcliffe’s company in Richard Holland’s regiment of foot in Lancashire (possibly also later captain in the same regiment); captain of foot under Colonel John Lambert (presumably in Lambert’s Northern brigade) in 1647-8. Also trooper in Colonel Nicholas Shuttleworth’s Lancashire horse (presumably as a reformado, as this must be in 1645 or after). Arrears of £456 were owed him in Sept. 1650.
References: TNA, E121/3/1.
Armies: Lancashire
Halsall, Thomas Thomas Halsall
An officer in Lancashire. Sergeant and later lieutenant to Captain Adam Ireland; later to Captain Edward Aspinwall. From his officers, presumably from the Liverpool area.
References: TNA, E121/4/8.
Armies: Lancashire
Halsey, Thomas Thomas Halsey
An officer in the West Country. The earliest references to Captain Thomas Halsey’s troop are from Feb. 1643. Peachey and Turton consider that the troop probably served in Exeter at the beginning of the war, and then was part of the retreat through Somerset to Lansdown and Roundway, and on to London, returning to Plymouth in Sept. Certainly thereafter Halsey served in Plymouth from then to 1645-6. He was a captain in the Plymouth garrison at the time of Prince Maurice’s siege, Sept.-Dec. 1643. By 26 Jan. 1644 he had been promoted major of horse. On 24 Jan. and 15 Mar. 1644 he led sorties out of the town against royalist positions. He was still in the garrison in 1645-6.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 4.443-4; Worth, History of Plymouth, 110, 114-5, 134; Continuation.
Armies: Devon
Hamilton, Robert Robert Hamilton
In spring 1645 major in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of horse, commanded by Colonel Stapleton. Unlike several other officers of that regiment, he did not transfer to the New Model Army.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 150.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hamilton, William William Hamilton
In 1642 Hamilton was a captain in Ormonde’s Army in Ireland, first in Lord Lambert’s regiment and then in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment, in the latter commanding a company in the Drogheda garrison.
He was a major in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association by 13 Mar. 1644, in succession to Major Calthorp, its major on 1 Mar. He was most probably Crawford’s preferred candidate as his lieutenant-colonel over the Independent or Baptist Henry Warner in Mar. 1644, and as such the officer condemned by Cromwell as ‘a man notorious for wickedness, for oaths, for drinking’ (though he may have been describing Hamilton as a type) (Abbott, 1.277-8). Hamilton succeeded Warner as lieutenant-colonel after the latter’s death on 30 Oct. 1644, and continued as such until the regiment’s disbandment on 17 Apr. 1645.
He is very possibly the Captain William Hamilton commissioned as a trustee for the 1649 officers by the dukes of Albemarle and Ormonde on 7 July 1662, and just possibly the William Hamilton commissioned lieutenant in Lord Berkeley’s regiment in the Irish Army on 28 July 1662.
References: TNA, SP28/14/166, SP28/25/474, 492; HMC, Ormonde Mss., 1.124, 141, 240, 242; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.12.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hammond, John John Hammond
In 1642 captain of a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hammond, Robert Robert Hammond (1620/21-1654).
Born the eldest son of Robert Hammond (died 1621), a gentleman of Chertsey, Surrey. He was the nephew of Thomas Hammond, who became lieutenant-general of the ordnance in the New Model Army and was more distantly related to several other prominent parliamentarian families, including the Cromwells.
By 1642 he was fighting in Ireland, but he returned to England soon after and took up arms for parliament. From July 1642 to Mar. 1643 he was a captain at Hull and then from Mar. to Nov. 1643 he was a captain or captain-lieutenant in the earl of Essex’s Lifeguard, in which capacity he took part in the relief of Gloucester and the first battle of Newbury. In 1644 he became an officer in Edward Massey’s regiment of horse. He was drawn into a duel with the regiment’s major in summer 1644 in which Hammond killed him; he was subsequently exonerated at a court martial and promoted to major in his stead. In spring 1645 he became colonel of a New Model regiment of foot, in which capacity he and his regiment campaigned with the New Model in 1645-6, serving for a time as governor of Exeter and of Gloucester.
He broadly supported the army in its quarrel with parliament in 1647 but became increasingly uneasy. This may lie behind the decision to appoint him governor of the Isle of Wight in autumn 1647, whereupon he resigned his command of his New Model regiment. But his reassignment to a quiet backwater ended abruptly when in Nov. 1648 the king, having escaped from Hampton Court and perhaps thinking that Hammond was inclined to royalism, fled to the Isle of Wight. Although uneasy, Hammond remained loyal to parliament and held the king in increasingly tight captivity at Carisbrooke. But by autumn 1648 many of the New Model’s most senior officers were worried, probably not that Hammond would turn royalist and allow the king to escape, but that he might support parliament in its dealings with the king if it came to a renewed clash with the army. The New Model sent other officers both to secure the king and to arrest Hammond, though he was swiftly released and was rewarded for his military services. He was out of office for the next few years, but his friendship with Cromwell endured and in summer 1654 the Protector appointed him to his Protectoral council in Ireland. He fell sick shortly after crossing to Ireland and died in Dublin in Oct. 1654.
References: Oxford DNB; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 1. 346-53.
Armies: Ireland; Earl of Essex; Waller (Western Association; Massey Brigade; New Model Army
Hammond, Robert Robert Hammond
Captain in Colonel Richard Shuttleworth’s regiment of foot in Lancashire, also captain of a troop of horse in Lancashire. He was owed arrears of £1,387 16s 1d in Sept. 1650.
References: TNA, E121/4/8.
Armies: Lancashire
Hammond, Robert Robert Hammond
Colonel.
References: Oxford DNB; Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 1.346-56.
Armies: Gloucestershire; New Model Army
Hammond, Thomas Thomas Hammond (c. 1600-1658).
Born a younger son of Dr John Hammond, sometime physician at the court of James I, and into a wealthy Surrey family. Thomas was the uncle of Colonel Robert Hammond, parliament’s governor of the Isle of Wight and unhappy gaoler of Charles I in 1647-8, and the family as a whole was related to several other prominent parliamentarians, including the Cromwells.
He seems to have gained military, including artillery, experience fighting on the continent in the Thirty Years War. He began the civil war as captain of a troop of horse (under Urry and then Meldrum) in the earl of Essex’s Army, but he spent most of the war serving in the Eastern Association Army, as lieutenant-general of the ordnance and commanding his own regiment of firelocks which guarded the artillery train. On paper at least he was also a captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse by Apr. 1644 and until the reduction of that troop in Apr. 1645. He continued to serve as Lieutenant-General of the ordnance in the New Model Army. He was prominent in Army politics in the later 1640s, was named to and generally present at the trial of Charles I, though he did not sign the death warrant, and although he did not accompany Cromwell on his Irish expedition, he did go with Cromwell to Scotland in 1650. It wrecked his health, for he fell seriously ill in Scotland and retired from the army shortly afterwards. By then and subsequently he acquired considerable property in England and Ireland, but at the Restoration he was retrospectively attainted for regicide – he had died in 1658, around the same time as Oliver Cromwell – and his widow and children lost the property.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.38, 54; Holmes, Eastern Association, 151, 173, 176, 235, 240.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Eastern Association; New Model Army
Hampden, John John Hampden (1595-1643)
Born eldest son and heir of William Hampden (died 1597) of Great Hampden, Buckinghamshire, and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Henry Cromwell of Hinchingbrooke, Huntingdonshire.
He sat in the last parliaments of James I and the early parliaments of Charles I. Inside and outside parliament he became increasingly strident in his resistance to some of the king’s policies, including resisting the forced loan and ship money, leading to the notorious test case brought against him. He played a prominent role in both the Short and Long Parliaments and was tied by kinship and friendship to a network of other leading critics of royal government.
In summer 1642 he was commissioned colonel of a regiment of foot, which he raised in and around his native Buckinghamshire. Having helped secure his own county and reinforced Coventry, he joined the earl of Essex’s Army, though he and his regiment, given a role guarding the artillery, played a limited role at Edgehill. He was more influential in Nov. in shoring up the parliamentarian position after other regiments had been routed at Brentford. In spring 1643 he supported Essex’s siege of Reading. In mid June he was badly wounded in a fairly minor cavalry skirmish at Chalgrove, either shot in the shoulder or injured when his own pistol exploded, and he died of his wounds, much lamented and mourned, a week later. His regiment of foot survived him under the command of Thomas Tyrrill.
References: Oxford DNB.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hampson, George George Hampson
In summer 1642 he became a lieutenant in Holles’s short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. Like most of his fellow-officers and the regiment as a whole, little is heard of him after their shattering defeat at Brentford in Nov. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hampson, Robert Robert Hampson
In Sept. 1642 lieutenant to Captain Blunt in the regiment of foot which formed part of the earl of Essex’s Army under the earl of Stamford and which then formed the core of Edward Massey’s garrison and army at Gloucester.
References: Peachey and Turton, War in the West, 6.646-7.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Gloucestershire
Hamroad, - - Hamroad
A captain of horse in Waller’s Army, Apr. 1644-Apr. 1645, probably in Waller’s own regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 144.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Hancock, John John Hancock
Of Odd Rode on the Staffordshire border; a clergyman.
Captain in Colonel Mainwaring’s regiment of foot in the Cheshire Army in Apr. 1645.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 331.
Armies: Cheshire
Hane, Joachim Joachim Hane
Fireworker and petardier in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 25.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hanmore, - - Hanmore
Captain in the regiment of dragoons of George Mills/Sir William Waller.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 147.
Armies: Waller; Waller (Southern Association)
Hannam, James James Hannam
Lieutenant in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642. By June 1643 captain in the same regiment (by then commanded by Edward Aldrich).
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30; TNA, SP28/9/39.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hannaway, Richard Richard Hannaway
Cornet in Captain John Unite’s troop in John Fiennes’s regiment of horse in Oxfordshire, Nov. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/139, Part 19, f. 206.
Armies: Oxfordshire
Hannaway, Thomas Thomas Hannaway
By the beginning of 1644, lieutenant in Wells’s troop in William Purefoy’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 121.
Armies: Warwickshire
Hannay, Hercules Hercules Hannay
Hannay was a captain in Sir Thomas Myddelton’s brigade, from 1 June 1644 in command of a company of dragoons, and, from 12 Dec. – when, presumably, his unit converted to horse – until 3 June 1645, in command of a troop of Harquebusiers. In Jan. 1645, based in Montgomeryshire, Hannay’s troop mustered 40 officers and men. That Easter he was captured and held prisoner at Chirk Castle, although a dispatch from fellow officer, John Jones, based at Red Castle, Montgomeryshire, reporting that,‘Captain Hanna having received £5 [presumably payment] is taken prisoner, some say willingly’ (Dore, Brereton letter books, 1, 240), appears uncharitable; upon his release, presumably exchanged, Hannay rejoined Myddelton’s brigade and served until early June 1645, when, along with the remainder of Myddelton’s units, he transfered his troop to colonel (acting major-general) Thomas Mytton’s forces when Mytton assumed Myddelton’s command for North Wales. Hannay served in Mytton’s North Wales campaign until mid Nov. 1646.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 240; TNA, SP28/41, Part 4, ff. 472-3, 476, 480, 482; National Library of Wales, Chirk Castle Ms. 1/Biii, 93.
Armies: Northamptonshire, North Wales
Hanson, Francis Francis Hanson
Captain in Samuel Jones’s/John Fielder’s regiment of Surrey foot by 12 Sept. 1643 and until the regiment was reduced in Apr. 1645. From 18 July 1645 to May 1646 he was captain of a company in a London regiment of dragoons.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 65; TNA, SP28/135/1.
Armies: Surrey; Waller (Southern Association); London
Harbin, Robert Robert Harbin (1588/89-1659)
Colonel. Of Newton Surmaville, in parish of Yeovil. Reference to him commanding the parliamentarian garrison of Sherborne in 1642 and present at its retaking by Alexander Popham the following year. Son of John Harbin, sheriff of Dorset in 1623, and described by Underdown as a merchant’s son. A parliamentarian committeeman who lapsed into royalism or neutralism, taking out a royal pardon early in 1644. An assessment commissioner in 1647 (implying his distance from John Pyne’s more radical position) and his position during the war was considered sufficiently ambiguous to merit inclusion in the 1652 Act of Oblivion which pardoned all offences committed before the battle of Worcester.
References: Somerset Visitation, 1672, 150-1; Somerset Visitation, 1623, 46; Underdown, Somerset, 37, 47, 69, 124, 142, 159.
Armies: Somerset
Harbottle, - - Harbottle
Down to the reduction of the regiment in spring 1644, captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of dragoons in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.59.
Armies: Eastern Association
Harcus, James James Harcus (died 1643)
Captain-Lieutenant. Lieutenant in the earl of Stamford’s regiment of foot in 1642. In Jan. and Apr. 1643 he is not listed as a company commander in the Gloucester garrison, but by Aug. 1643 he was captain-lieutenant of the earl of Stamford’s company. He was active in sorties against the royalist positions during the siege, on 6, 11 and 12 Aug. On 15 Aug., when the royalists moved their positions, ‘valiant James Harcus, Captain-Lieutenant to the earl of Stamford was slain in the Fryar’s orchard, as he was too venturously looking what execution a grenado had done, which he then threw into the enemies trenches’.
References: Peacock, Army Lists, 29; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 644, 646; Bibliotheca, 208, 212-3, 215.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Gloucestershire
Hardcastle, Henry Henry Hardcastle
Put in as lieutenant in Captain Edward Wallis’s company in the Red regiment, London Trained Bands, by the ‘Presbyterian’ militia committee. According to a hostile report, he said ‘hee would prove that Sir Thomas Fairfax was a Rogue, a Raschall, and base fellowe’.
References: Clarke Papers, 1.154.
Armies: London
Harding, - - Harding
A chaplain in the army besieging Chester in 1645-6. In May Dr Harding was a prisoner in Dublin Castle, whose release on exchange Sir William Brereton negotiated.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1, 340, 343, 2, 512-3.
Armies: Cheshire
Harding, Hugh Hugh Harding
Ensign in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 26.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Harding, William William Harding
Of Poole. Captain in Weymouth garrison in 1646. In Oct. was in dispute with Alderman Churchey of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis. On 25 Mar. 1647 captain-lieutenant in the Weymouth garrison, when it seems that he was being reduced, followed by further order, 23 Apr. 1647 of six weeks’ pay upon reducement. On list of reduced officers, 20 Apr. 1648. By 18 Mar. 1651 lieutenant-colonel in the Weymouth garrison.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 208, 254, 386, 486. Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 319-20, 337.
Armies: Dorset
Hardinge, Henry Henry Hardinge
Captain, 4 Dec. 1646. Allowed towards satisfaction of arrears of pay in parliament’s service £25 arrears of rent which he owed to a ‘delinquent’ landlord.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 96.
Armies: Dorset
Hardmeat, Richard Richard Hardmeat
Lieutenant in the White regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Isaac Penington) in summer 1642.
References: Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Hardres, Sir Richard Sir Richard Hardres
Son or close kinsman of Sir Thomas Hardres (died 1628) of Upper Hardres, Kent. By spring 1645 he was colonel of St Augustine Lathe’s Kentish Trained Band regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 84.
Armies: Kent; Waller (Southern Association)
Hardstaffe, Edward Edward Hardstaffe
A captain of horse in the Fairfaxes’ Northern Army during the siege of Hull; his service was noted on 11 Oct. 1643. He was later a major (regiment unknown).
In 1648 Hardstaffe claimed arrears of £1,527 12s 6d.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 386; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 90.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax)
Hardware, John John Hardware
Captain in Sir William Brereton’s regiment of foot by 30 Apr. 1645.
Of a puritan family with Chester links, of Peel near Tarvin.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1, 324, 329.
Armies: Cheshire
Hardwicke, John John Hardwicke
'A soap-boiler living in Southwark at the Sign of the 3 Holy Water Sprinklers’ (Symonds).
Major of the Southwark Trained Bands regiment (Colonel Edward Hooker) in Sept. 1643, but either soon after – or just possibly already by 5 June – colonel of the same regiment. By Oct. 1646 colonel of the same regiment.
As a soapboiler, opposed to royal monopolists, but he was also an opponent to the removal of altar rails.
‘John Hardwick moved from protesting against the forcible removal of altar rails from St Saviours Southwark in 1641, to acting as an assessor and a promoter of the weekly pay in 1642-43, and from 1647 onwards he was to be in radical company as a member of the Southwark militia committee and was later a member of the high court of justice for the trial of royalists’ (Lindley, Popular politics, 66).
On 2 Aug. 1647 he delivered the fatal blow to the failing Presbyterian attempt at a coup when he allowed himself to be persuaded to deliver up London Bridge to John Disbrowe’s troop of horse.
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 65; TNA, SP28/131, Part 13, f. 5 r. & v.; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 1, 11; Lindley, Popular politics, 64, 65, 66, 240; Acts and Ordinances, 1.1010, 1123, 2.195, 365.
Armies: Southwark
Hardy, John John Hardy
Ensign in Thomas Ballard’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 43.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hardy, Richard Richard Hardy
An officer in and possibly colonel and commander of a Scraye Lathe Kentish Trained Bands regiment of foot which supported Waller at the siege of Arundel Castle in late 1643.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 84.
Armies: Kent; Waller (Southern Association)
Hardy, Robert Robert Hardy
Captain in Sir John Seaton’s/George Melve’s regiment of dragoons in the earl of Essex’s Army from or by late Nov. 1642 until at least late June 1643.
References: TNA, SP28/5/204, 206, 452.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hardy, Robert Robert Hardy
Lieutenant of horse. Dorset committee order of 6 May 1647 for payment of £80 to Hardy. He served parliament in Dorset as lieutenant in Captain Hill’s troop under the command of Colonel Sydenham in the Weymouth garrison, maintaining himself and horses upon his own charge from 28 [recte 8] Feb.-15 Mar. 1646. He also had two horses impressed at the time of the siege of Weymouth.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 269-70.
Armies: Dorset
Harecourt, - - Harecourt
Ensign in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 42.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Harley, Edward Edward Harley (1624-1700)
Colonel. Third but eldest surviving son of Sir Robert Harley (baptised 1579, died 1656) of Brampton Bryan, Herefordshire, and his wife Brilliana (baptised 1589, died 1643), daughter of Edward Conway, first Viscount Conway and first Viscount Killultagh, of Ragley, Warwickshire.
Captain of horse, regiment of Sir William Waller by June 1643; colonel of foot regiment of Waller, by 15 Nov. 1643-5. A colonel in the New Model Army, Apr. 1645-May 1647, he was never really in sympathy with its Independency and radicalism. Governor Monmouth 12 Oct.-19 Nov. 1644, Canon Frome, Herefordshire 31 July 1645-6. Commander, forces of Herefordshire and Radnorshire 15 Jan. 1646; col. of foot Herefordshire 30 June 1648.
MP for Herefordshire from Nov. 1646, Harley moved steadily from being a colonel of the New Model to being its enemy, and by June 1647 had been included in the army’s target of Eleven Members it wanted purged from the Commons. He survived that assault, but was secluded from sitting further at Pride’s Purge of Dec. 1648. Harley found favour at the Restoration, being appointed colonel of horse 1660-1; governor Dunkirk May 1660, confirmed 14 July 1660-1. Colonel of militia foot, Herefordshire 1668-82. Knighted in 1661, he sat in parliaments after 1660 for New Radnor and Herefordshire.
References: See Oxford DNB; Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 1.359-64, 2.697-8.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Gloucestershire; New Model Army
Harley, Robert Robert Harley (1626-1673)
Younger son of Sir Robert Harley (died 1656) of Brampton Bryan, Herefordshire, and his wife Brilliana, Lady Harley, the civil war defender of Brampton Bryan Castle down to her death in 1643, and thus he was younger brother of Colonel Edward Harley.
Robert joined Waller’s regiment of horse in 1642-3, initially serving as lieutenant in his elder brother’s troop, but when Edward left in Aug. 1643, commissioned to raise and command a regiment of his own, Robert succeeded him as captain. He remained with the regiment until summer 1644, when he became major in Massey’s regiment of horse, serving with Massey until the end of the civil war.
He became colonel of a regiment of horse in the Dunkirk garrison at the Restoration.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 147.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Massey Brigade
Harlock [Hurlock], George George Harlock [Hurlock]
In summer 1642 he became a captain in Holles’s short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. Like most of his fellow-officers and the regiment as a whole, little is heard of him after their shattering defeat at Brentford in Nov. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Harper, - - Harper
Down to Aug. 1643, major in Sir Thomas Barrington’s regiment of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.32.
Armies: Eastern Association
Harper, Thomas Thomas Harper
Quartermaster to Colonel John Towse, the Orange regiment, London Trained Bands, in summer 1642.
References: Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Harpur, Edward Edward Harpur
Ensign in Captain Edward Alcocke’s company in Henry Bradshaw’s Cheshire militia regiment of foot which fought at the battle of Worcester.
References: Earwaker, East Cheshire, 2.64-8.
Armies: Cheshire
Harpur, Edward Edward Harpur
Ensign in Captain Richard Grantham’s company in Henry Bradshaw’s militia regiment in the Cheshire brigade at the battle of Worcester, 3 Sept. 1651.
References: Earwaker, East Cheshire, 2.64-8.
Armies: Cheshire
Harrington, James James Harrington
Captain in Edward Rossiter’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. Possibly the same man as John Harrington.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.92.
Armies: Eastern Association
Harrington, James James Harrington
Captain of dragoons. Variously placed with Popham’s regiment of dragoons and Cole’s regiment of dragoons,
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.560-2.
Armies: Somerset: Colonel Popham’s Regt. of Dragoons and Cole’s Regt. of Dragoons; Col. William Strode’s Regt. of Foot
Harrington, Sir James Sir James Harrington (1607-1680)
Baronet in succession to his father (from 1653). Born 1607 at Merton, Oxfordshire, son and heir of Sir John Harrington of Ridlington, Rutland. M. Katherine, daughter of Sir Edmund Wright of Swakeleys, Middlesex, alderman and sometime lord mayor of London, in 1632. Briefly imprisoned in 1639 for opposing the muster of troops for the Scots War.
‘Lives at Highgate’ (Symonds).
Colonel of Westminster Liberty Trained Bands regiment in Sept. 1643 and Oct. 1646. According to the Oxford DNB, major-general of a London brigade of 4,000 men raised in London and Westminster in 1643 and in that capacity fought at the (second) battle of Newbury.
Recruiter MP for Rutland from 1646, played a minor role in the trial of Charles I, and active within the Rump 1648-53 and at its return in 1659-60. Fled to the continent at the Restoration and died there in 1680.
References: Oxford DNB; BL, Harl. 986, p. 55; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 12.
Armies: Westminster
Harrington, John John Harrington
In autumn 1643, captain in Lord Willoughby’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. Possibly the same man as James Harrington.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.109.
Armies: Eastern Association
Harris [Hares], John John Harris [Hares]
Ensign to Captain Alexander Elliot in Myddelton’s North Wales Army, as attested by surviving pay warrants of 16 Apr. and 23 May 1644 for £5 and £3.
References: TNA, SP28/346, nos. 116, 174.
Armies: North Wales
Harris, - - Harris
Evidently an officer in the Gloucester garrison who paid Henry Watt £1 8s. towards his arrears of pay for the period 1 Apr. 1644-21 Jan.1648.
References: TNA, SP28/129, Part 6, fol. 2.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Harris, Thomas Thomas Harris
Captain. Commissioned captain of foot in the Bristol militia, 3 Jan. 1651.
References: CSPD, 1651, 513.
Armies: Bristol
Harrison, Humphrey Humphrey Harrison
Commissioned captain in a regiment of foot in the Yorkshire militia.
References: CSPD, 1650, 506.
Armies: Yorkshire
Harrison, James James Harrison
By 1643 captain in Skippon’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army and still there in spring 1645. He transferred to the New Model Army and became a captain in Skippon’s New Model regiment of foot, serving with the regiment for the rest of the 1640s.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 44, 55, 148.
Armies: Earl of Essex; New Model Army
Harrison, Ralph Ralph Harrison
Uncle and, through the marriage of his daughter Catherine in 1646, father-in-law of the regicide Thomas Harrison.
‘Wollen Draper in Watling Street’ (BL, Harl. 986, p. 18).
Captain in the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Sir John Wollaston) in Apr. 1642; shortly after noted as second captain; major of the same regiment in Sept. 1643; colonel of the same regiment in Oct. 1646, but displaced by the Presbyterian militia committee in 1647 (replaced by Laurence Bromfield). Reinstated after the failure of the Presbyterian coup. According to a hostile pamphlet on the purging of Presbyterian officers, Harrison was ‘a silly weak old man (God knows) fitter to eat Pie and Custard, then lead a regiment; a man of no estate, and merely for the profits, which he must raise indirectly and dishonestly too, takes it; a fellow that carried himselfe like a Fool and a Coward at Cherriton; onely the Colonell Harrison (being forced to marrie his daughter, having That same before-hand) is his Sonne in Law, that’s desert enough’ (A paire of spectacles for the Citie, (1648), 10).
References: Overton 1642; Thrale 1642; BL, Harl. 986, p. 18; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317-9; Marshall, Essex funeral, 12.
Armies: London
Harrison, Thomas Thomas Harrison (1616-1660)
Born Newcastle under Lyme, younger son of Richard Harrison, a prosperous butcher of the town who was several times its mayor.
He began the war in the earl of Essex’s Lifeguard, but soon transferred to the Eastern Association. Major in the regiment of horse in the Eastern Association commanded by Colonel Francis Russell, then Colonel Vermuyden and then, from Mar. 1644, by Colonel Charles Fleetwood. He was the regiment’s major by spring 1644, fighting at and giving an account of Marston Moor, and continued to serve in that capacity in 1645-7 once the regiment had transferred to the New Model Army. In June 1647 – by which time he had been elected a Recruiter MP to the Long Parliament – he was promoted to replace Sheffield as colonel and commander of a New Model Army horse regiment. He served under Lambert in the North in 1648. He was in charge of the guards which brought Charles I back to London in late 1648 and was an active regicide.
He did not accompany Cromwell to either Ireland or Scotland in 1649-51, instead holding high office in the army left behind in England and Wales. In summer 1651 he rendezvoused with Cromwell’s forces and fought at the battle of Worcester.
His radical religious zeal, tending towards Fifth Monarchy, already apparent in the 1640s, became more marked in the early 1650s. As a result he and Cromwell began to drift apart. While he actively supported the ejection of the Rump and broadly supported the Nominated Assembly, of which he became a co-opted member, he opposed its resignation and replacement with the very different Protectoral regime. Harrison’s military and political career ended at this point – he was removed from the army and ordered to retire to Staffordshire. He was under suspicion throughout the Protectorate and was repeatedly arrested, questioned and (briefly) imprisoned. At the Restoration he was swiftly arrested, held in the Tower, tried, condemned and executed.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.34; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 51, 61, 72, 82, 93, 106.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Eastern Association; New Model Army
Harrison, William William Harrison
Lord Fairfax’s treasurer from 24 Nov. 1642. He also had a commission as captain, probably in Lord Fairfax’s own regiment of foot. He later acquired a troop of horse, again probably in Lord Fairfax’s own regiment of horse.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 386.
Armies: Yorkshire
Harrold, - - Harrold
Ensign in Edward Rous’s Worcestershire regiment of foot, receiving ammunition for his company, Aug. 1645. Presumably a kinsman (or son?) of Captain Harrold [Thorrold, Horrold].
References: TNA, SP28/138, Part 17, f. 24r.
Armies: Worcestershire
Harry [Harie, Harit], - - Harry [Harie, Harit]
Captain of a company of Dorset foot: brief evidence from June 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.510.
Armies: Dorset
Harsnett, Samuel Samuel Harsnett (died 1652?)
Colonel. The name suggests that he was related to his namesake (baptised 1561, died 1631), bishop of Norwich and archbishop of York, though as the latter died a childless widower not his son.
A member of the Grocers’ Company, taking apprentices in 1637, 1641 (his son and namesake) and 1649.
Of Bartholomew Lane near the Royal Exchange, a 1638 rating list specifies ‘Legge Alley’ in the parish of St Bartholomew Exchange. A ratepayer there from at least 1624; as well as frequently named as an auditor of the parish accounts and elected sideman (1629), questman (1629, 1630), churchwarden (1631), overseer of the poor (1640, 1646, 1647, 1650-52).
An Irish Adventurer advancing money for the reconquest of Ireland. Elected common councilman, Broad Street Ward, Dec. 1641 (and elected despite the alderman’s attempt not to put his name to the wardmote’s vote), he was a signatory to the petition of sixty-six common councilmen of July 1642 denouncing the conservative lord mayor Sir Richard Gurney. He was appointed to several wartime City committees: the committee for horse, the Salters’ Hall sub-committee for volunteers (1643), and from there to the militia committee. In Dec. 1644 he helped get elected Richard Venner, with whom he worked as parish officer in several years before and after the war; for instance, in Jan. 1643 they were two of the eleven men appointed by the vestry to settle the rates, and in Mar. 1646 they were elected as fellow-overseers of the poor. In Dec. 1645, as the religious and political splits widened, the Independent Harsnett was defeated in the wardmote election by Captain John Jones, who was elected alongside Venner, both Presbyterians.
Major in the London Auxiliaries 1643; a lieutenant-colonel by 13 Oct. 1643 when he was a collector of the parish contribution of a City loan of £100,000 to the Scottish army; colonel of the Red regiment, London Auxiliaries, by 27 Apr. 1644 and 22 Oct. 1646. He was evidently removed from command in late June when the militia committee asked senior officers to oppose the New Model Army. He was appointed by parliamentary ordinance to the Independent-dominated militia committee of 23 July 1647.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 83, 86-7, 317; Lindley, Popular politics, 183, 193, 175, 194, 195, 215, 231, 314, 360, 381; C. Webb, Grocers’ Company Apprenticeships (2007), 26, 149, 202; Freshfield, Exchange, 1.85, 94, 131, 136, 143, 146, 2.4, 5, 10, 17, 28, 37,42-4; JHC, 5.256.
Armies: London
Hart, - - Hart
Captain of a Bristol Trained Band by 1 and 15 July 1643, but probably not much earlier, as he is not mentioned in references to the various captains on 29 Apr. and 5 June.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.604-5.
Armies: Bristol
Hart, James James Hart (died 1651)
An officer in the regiment of foot initially commanded by Ralph Weldon, and later by Robert Lilburne and Sir Arthur Hesilrige. He was ensign in the company commanded by Cornelius Lambe, promoted lieutenant when Lambe died and was succeeded by James Fenton. By Jan. 1649, by when the regiment was stationed in the North East and commanded by Hesilrige – and by when Fenton had left – Hart had been promoted captain. In Aug. 1650 he was captain of one of the five companies taken from Hesilrige’s regiment to form half of a regiment of foot created for George Monck in the coming invasion of Scotland. Hart ‘led on the forlorne [hope] of lieutenant generall Monkes regiment on the west side’ in the storm of Dundee on 1 Sept,. 1651, and was killed in the assault.
References: Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 2.460, 535-6; Spring, Waller’s army, 153.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Kent; New Model Army
Hart, John John Hart
Lieutenant in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 40.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hartley, William William Hartley
In Feb. 1645, lieutenant in Captain Drapes’s company in Sir Samuel Luke’s Newport Pagnell-based regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 95.
Armies: Bedfordshire
Hartopp, Sir Edward Sir Edward Hartopp
Son of Sir Edward Hartopp, first baronet (1572-1655) of Buckminster, Leicesterhire
Edward junior was knighted in 1634 and campaigned in Leicesterhire during the civil war, in 1644 leading a body of horse north to Nottinghamshire to support Hutchinson’s beleaguered hold on the county town.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 175, 177.
Armies: Leicestershire; Nottinghamshire
Hartridge, George George Hartridge
Lieutenant in the earl of Peterborough’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 28.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Harvey [Harby], Richard Richard Harvey [Harby]
By spring 1644, and through to the disbanding of the regiment in spring 1645, captain of a company in Sir Miles Hobart’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army. He probably then served briefly in Hammond’s New Model Army foot regiment, though he was no longer there in late summer 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.43; Holmes, Eastern Association, 162, 235, 239; TNA, SP28/171.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Harvey, - - Harvey
When the Plymouth garrison was stripped of troops to join Essex’s march into the West, according to one report only Harvey’s horse were left. He may be Robert Harvie.
References: Worth, History of Plymouth, 118.
Armies: Devon
Harvey, Edmund Edmund Harvey (c.1601-1673)
Born c.1601, son of Charles Harvey, a London merchant. He was apprenticed, 1619, and became a freeman of the Drapers’ Company, 1627. Became a prosperous London silk merchant.
Captain of horse in the White regiment, London Trained Bands, Oct. 1642. Colonel by May 1643, until after Oct. 1644. He may have been with Essex’s Army sent to relieve Gloucester in summer 1643. His regiment went to Cornwall with the earl of Essex’s ill-fated expedition of 1644. Later, c. 1650, captain of militia horse, Middlesex
He acquired property in Suffolk during the war years and was active there as a war-time county administrator. Elected recruiter MP for Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire, 1646, and became prominent in the Long Parliament and Rump; active at the trial of Charles I, though he did not sign the death warrant. He acquired much property during the later 1640s, giving rise to accusations of corruption and embezzlement which, in turn, led to his arrest and prosecution 1655-7 and loss of public office. He escaped execution at the Restoration, but imprisoned at Pendennis Castle from 1661 and died there in 1673.
References: Oxford DNB; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 110-1, 205-6, 208; TNA, SP28/7, ff. 59, 173; CSPD, 1650, 512. HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660(forthcoming).
Armies: Earl of Essex; London
Harvie, John John Harvie
Captain in the regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army commanded by Lord Oliver St John and then Thomas Essex in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Harvie [Harvy], Matthew Matthew Harvie [Harvy]
Ensign in Weymouth and Melcombe Regis garrison. Petitioned for payment of arrears of £74 13s. 0d., 21 Jan. 1647.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 161-2.
Armies: Dorset
Harvie, Robert Robert Harvie
Lieutenant in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 42.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Haselwood, John John Haselwood
Lieutenant in Sir Jacob Astley’s regiment of foot in the earl of Northumberland’s Army against the Scots in 1640.
Captain in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 76, 45.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Haslells, - - Haslells
Lieutenant in Thomas Player’s troop in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.55.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hassell, Manfred Mansfield Hassell
Fourth son of Thomas Hassell of Conisthorpe, Yorkshire (North Riding) and his wife Juliana, daughter of Lancelot Mansfield of Cumberland, esquire.
He served as an officer in Richard Sandys’s regiment of horse from 20 May 1644 to at least spring 1645 and probably longer.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 386 [citing TNA. SP28/267/647].
Armies: Yorkshire
Hastings, Ferdinando, styled Lord Hastings, later 8th Baron Hastings and 6th earl of Huntingdon Ferdinando Hastings, styled Lord Hastings, later eighth Baron Hastings and sixth earl of Huntingdon (1608-1656)
Born the eldest son and heir of Henry Hastings, seventh Baron Hastings and fifth earl of Huntingdon, of Ashby de la Zouch, Leicestershire. As such, Ferdinando was generally known by the courtesy title of Lord Hastings, until his father’s death in Nov. 1643, whereupon he became eighth Baron Hastings and sixth earl of Huntingdon in his own right.
He sat at an MP but rarely spoke in two of the early parliaments of Charles I. Although his father was still alive, he was summoned to the Lords in the opening sessions of the Long Parliament in respect of his father’s barony. In summer 1642 he took command of a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army, but his military career was very brief and inglorious, as he and his men reportedly fled from Edgehill in panic. He withdrew to his native Leicestershire and by the end of 1643, by now having succeeded his late father as earl, he sought shelter in the royalist garrison of Ashby de la Zouch, then under the command of his royalist younger brother. Indeed, most of the Hastings family were committed royalists from the outbreak of the civil war and by the end of 1643 Ferdinando seems to have reverted to family type. Despite later pleas that he had merely been seeking refuge from violent parliamentarian soldiers, in fact he accepted office from the king in 1644 and had for a time been present at Oxford. He compounded after the civil war, further reducing his weak financial position, so that at one stage he was briefly imprisoned for debt.
References: HoP: The Commons, 1604-1629, 3.573-4.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hastings, Thomas Thomas Hastings
Ensign in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 26.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hatch, Joseph Joseph Hatch
Captain. An officer under Colonel Thomas Morgan, possibly in his own regts. He was present at the taking of Berkeley Castle in Sept. 1645, and took part in its spoliation.
References: HMC, Fifth Report, 356-7.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Hatch, Thomas Thomas Hatch
Ensign in Captain John King’s company in the Westminster auxiliaries regiment (Colonel James Prince) at muster on 13 May 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 5, f. 592r.
Armies: Westminster
Hatcher, Henry Henry Hatcher
In 1642 listed as lieutenant in Anthony Mildmay’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hatcher, Thomas Thomas Hatcher (c.1589-1677)
Born the eldest son and heir of Sir John Hatcher (died 1640) of Careby in Lincolnshire, one of the leading and wealthiest non-peerage families in the county. He was an MP in 1624 and 1628-9 and in the Short and Long Parliaments, where he broadly supported reform. He was also very active in county government in Lincolnshire and also Nottinghamshire and Rutland during the 1630s and 1640s.
In summer 1642 he became captain of a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army, in Oct. 1642 leading his men north to join with and fight under the Fairfaxes in Yorkshire.
Having helped negotiate the military alliance with the Scots in 1643, he spent much of 1643-4 away from Westminster, campaigning and as an administrator in Lincolnshire and the North. Holding the rank of colonel, he was governor of Lincoln 1644-5, until his direct military career ended with the Self-Denying Ordinance. He continued to sit intermittently in the House both before and after Pride’s Purge, but in mid-1649 he went abroad for a time, ostensibly for health reasons. He was elected to all three Protectorate Parliaments and to the Convention in 1660.
References: Oxford DNB; HoP: The Commons, 1660-1690, 2. 511-2.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Northern Association
Hatfield, John John Hatfield
Of Hatfield, Yorkshire (West Riding), a parliamentarian captain in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 111 [citing TNA, E121/3/1, no.57; E121/4/8, no. 30].
Armies: Yorkshire
Hathaway, George George Hathaway
Sergeant in Major John Yates’s/Edmund Jordan’s/Robert Wood’s Surrey regiment of foot by June 1644. By 18 Sept. 1645 he was lieutenant of the same company and was later promoted captain.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 68.
Armies: Surrey
Haughton, Robert Robert Haughton
According to Sir John Gell, Haughton was a Lancashire man. ‘As he appears to have arrived at the rank of colonel early in the war and to have been serving in counties where he had no land, it is likely that he was a professional soldier’ (Dore, Brereton letter books, 1.404).
In 1643 Haughton raised a regiment of Derbyshire and Staffordshire foot to garrison Burton-upon-Trent, and was nominated to the Staffordshire county committee on 30 May 1643.
Colonel Haughton became associated with the pro-Brereton faction in Staffordshire. At Burton his lieutenant-colonel was Sir John Gell’s enemy Thomas Sanders, and many of his officers, Staffordshire men serving in Gell’s Derbyshire horse, preferred Brereton’s godliness and commitment to their then colonel.
In May 1645 Brereton wanted Haughton himself to take command of the troops at Stafford in the absence of his ally Captain Stone. However, a few days later Brereton received a letter from him at Leek, saying that he was on the march to London.
When the grand jury at the Staffordshire quarter sessions of Michaelmas 1645 proposed that the county should appoint commanders-in-chief for the horse and foot, recommending the anti-Brereton Simon Rugeley as one of them, the county committee countered that they had already petitioned for such officers, naming Colonel John Bowyer and Colonel Haughton. Haughton was evidently to command the foot.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1.403-4, 450, 525-6; Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 343, 352.
Armies: Staffordshire
Haward [Howard], Arnold Arnold Haward [Howard]
In the listing of summer 1642 he is shown as lieutenant in Pym’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hawes, Nathaniel Nathaniel Hawes
Captain-Lieutenant in the Green regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel John Warner) in Apr.-summer 1642.
Probably Nathaniel Hawes (1620/1-1701), son of Andrew Hawes of London, Citizen and Fishmonger of London, cheesemonger, and his third wife Mary Bloyre, daughter of a Frenchman. Nathaniel was made free of the Fishmongers’ Company in 1643 by patrimony, and followed his father’s occupation. Common councilman, Billingsgate Ward, 1658, 1660, 1668-80; deputy, Billingsgate ward, 1680-3. By the 1680s a leading City Tory, and whilst reading back that political outlook by almost forty years is a very uncertain exercise, it would be consistent with his early disappearance from Trained Bands in 1642-3.
References: Overton 1642; Thrale 1642; Vis. London 1633-5, 1.368; Woodhead, Rulers, 86; De Krey, Restoration, 423.
Armies: London
Hawfield, Humphrey Humfrey Hawfield
Ensign. ‘Of the new companies’ at Weymouth, 1651.
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 337.
Armies: Dorset
Hawford, William William Hawford
In Mar. 1645, cornet in Captain Bladwell’s company in Sir Samuel Luke’s Newport Pagnell-based regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 95.
Armies: Bedfordshire
Hawker, - - Hawker
Lieutenant in John Browne’s regiment of Trained Band Auxiliaries for Shepway Lathe, Kent.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 86.
Armies: Kent
Hawkesworth, Joseph Joseph Hawkesworth (died 1669)
Hawksworth was the second heir of Alice (1596-1679), who had previously been married to Henry Bolt of Market Harborough; Joseph and Alice had one daughter, Mary (died 1662).
Hawkesworth had been a secretary and estate manager to Robert, second Lord Brooke before the war.
Colonel William Purefoy (as commander-in-chief in Warwickshire and Staffordshire) commissioned him captain of a troop of 80 horse in his regiment, 25 Apr. 1643; the county committee promoted him major in the same regiment 15 Nov. 1644.
Hughes suggests that Hawkesworth’s troop was ‘probably the best paid and best led of the regiment’ (Hughes, Warwickshire, 199), whilst he was an effective and determined commander, burning down the earl of Middlesex’s mansion at Milcote rather than risk it falling to the enemy. He was also evidently a man of strong religious commitments.
By Nov. 1645 Major Hawkesworth was with Sir William Brereton’s Army before Chester, in command of the regiment (now William Colmore’s) in the field. Brereton praised the actions of Hawkesworth and the Warwick regiment at the battle of Denbigh (1 Nov. 1645): the major had performed very brave service whilst his soldiers were valiant man and very well armed (Dore, Brereton letter books, 2.242). When Colemore came to take command of the regiment, the soldiers were openly disrespectful and mutinous towards him, and Hawkesworth was implicated in their behaviour (at least in the eyes of the Warwickshire county committee). The reasons for this conflict are unclear, although one of the reasons may be the attempt to replace an experienced and popular cavalry commander with an undistinguished officer whose former command had been of infantry. Although Hawkesworth was summoned before the committee, he and the regiment stayed before Chester. Attempting to compose the difference between Hawkesworth and the committee, Brereton on the one hand advised Hawkesworth to swallow any perceived injuries, reminding him that there many of the committee who highly honoured him and affected him, and who truly feared God and were guided by the same principles by which the major was steered (Dore, Brereton letter books, 2.444). On the other hand, he commended Hawkesworth to the committee for both his godliness and his courage (Dore, Brereton letter books, 2.439).
In 1648 the county committee appointed Hawkesworth to the command of a horse troop.
On 7 Feb. 1649 Fairfax commissioned Hawkesworth captain of foot in an unspecified regiment. The same day Fairfax appointed him governor of Warwick Castle, and he remained in that post throughout the 1650s.
Commissioned colonel of foot in the Warwickshire militia, 9 July 1650, and captain of a troop of Warwickshire horse, 28 May 1655.
Hawkesworth’s accounts give a different, but also fuller, chronology to that above up to 1649: captain of horse in Purefoy’s regiment, 25 May 1643-31 Mar. 1644; captain and major, 1 Apr. 1644-29 May 1647; captain, 29 May 1647-17 Mar. 1648; captain, 2 June 1648-9 June 1649.
Hawkesworth was a JP from Mar. 1650 to July 1652, and again from Sept. 1653 to 1660; he was most active from Oct. 1656 to July 1660. He was also an assessment commissioner in the 1650s. He and some of his officers acquired some of the former royal estates at Kenilworth Castle. According to one later account, Hawkesworth ‘seated himself in the Gatehouse of the Castle and drained the famous Pool, consisting of several hundred acres of ground’ (‘Hawkesworth Papers’, 21).
MP for Warwickshire in the second and third Protectorate Parliaments.
Hawkesworth carried the standard at the funeral of Francis, third Lord Brooke in 1658, and his commitment to the family was such that on the eve of the Restoration the fourth Lord Brooke thought that he could persuade him to hand over control of Warwick Castle to the moderate officers of the militia ‘by reason of his long dependence upon my Lord Brooke, and some considerable engagements of money which he is in for the soldiers, that his Lordship will clear him of’ (Hughes, Warwickshire, 334). But, as Brooke and Lord Conway recognised, in every other way he was opposed to their aims to establish their authority. By May 1660 Brooke had removed him from the governorship.
After the Restoration Hawkesworth was harassed over sequestered estates he had been granted. By 1663 he was living at Feckenham, Worcestershire, administering the estate of his orphaned grandchild there. By 1668 he was living at Lubenham, Leicesterhire, where he was buried on 17 May 1669.
References: ‘The Hawkesworth Papers, 1601-60’, ed. E. Carey-Hill, Trans. Birmingham Arch. Soc., vol. 54 (1932 for 1929), 18-52; Hughes, Warwickshire, 196, 199-200, 205-6, 214n., 218, 269, 272, 273, 295-8, 300-1, 305, 330-1, 333-4, 340, 354, 357; Dore, Brereton letter books, II, 7, 24, 195, 241-2, 262, 313-5, 434-7, 439, 443, 444, 446-7; CSPD 1650, 507; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Warwickshire
Hawkins, John John Hawkins
At its muster in Nov. 1643, captain the earl of Warwick’s regiment of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the Army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.31.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hawkins, John John Hawkins
Ensign in the Colonel’s company in Samuel Jones’s regiment of Surrey foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 65.
Armies: Surrey
Hawkins, Leonard Leonard Hawkins
Ensign in Lieutenant-Colonel Adam Cunningham’s company in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot in Lord Wharton’s Army raised for Ireland in 1642. He went instead with the regiment, probably in the same company, into the earl of Essex’s Army later that summer, as ensign in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 69, 45.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hawkridge [Hawkbridge], John John Hawkridge [Hawkbridge]
A captain in Sir William Brereton’s regiment of horse at the siege of Chester. He raised his troop in summer 1644. Dore suggests that he may have come over from Ireland, as this was about the time Michael Jones and Chidley Coote, who had also served in Ireland, joined Brereton. Nor does his name appear to be local to Cheshire. However, Dore also concedes that he is not listed as an officer in the earl of Ormonde’s Army, 1641-3.
Hawkridge was with Brereton in Apr. and May 1645 (on 16 May he sat on a council of war). He does not appear to have served with Brereton in Staffordshire the following year.
A John Hawridge appears in the later 1640s in the New Model Army regiment of horse then commanded by Nathaniel Rich, and it is possible but far from certain this was the same man.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1, 267-8, 324, 437, 2, 111, 595; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 143.
Armies: Cheshire; New Model Army?
Hawys, Francis Francis Hawys
Lieutenant in Nathaniel Rich’s troop in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.51.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hay, John John Hay
By spring 1645, Captain-Lieutenant in the Colonel’s own troop in John Dalbier’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 49.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Hay, Robert Robert Hay (died 1643)
A lieutenant in the Cheshire forces, he was killed in an abortive attack on Cholmondeley House, 11 Apr. 1643, and buried at Nantwich eight days later (the delay apparently because the parliamentarian forces were unable to carry his body from the battlefield).
References: Civil war in Cheshire, 49-50.
Armies: Cheshire
Hayes, John John Hayes
Colonel of the Red regiment, London Trained Bands, appointed by the Independent militia committee in 1647. Earlier he had been in the same regiment, junior to his now lieutenant-colonel, Peter Cushin.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 319; A paire of spectacles for the Citie (1648), 9.
Armies: London
Hayes, John John Hayes
Ensign.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 212, 377.
Armies: Dorset
Hayes, William William Hayes
Corporal and quartermaster in the troop of Captain Edward French in the Lancashire regiment of Colonel Richard, and later Colonel Nicholas, Shuttleworth. Arrears of £167 7s 10d were due to him in May 1653.
References: TNA, E121/5/5.
Armies: Lancashire
Hayhurst, Samuel Samuel Hayhurst
A captain in the Lancashire regiment of foot of Alexander Rigby.
References: Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 294.
Armies: Lancashire
Hayle [Hale], John John Hayle [Hale]
By spring 1645, major of James Sheffield’s regiment of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army. Unlike several officers of the regiment, he did not then transfer to the New Model Army.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 150.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hayle [Hale], Michael Michael Hayle [Hale]
By spring 1645, lieutenant in the troop of (perhaps his kinsman) Major John Hayle/Hale in James Sheffield’s regiment of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army. Like several officers of the regiment, he then transferred to the New Model Army, becoming lieutenant in another troop in the equivalent New Model regiment of horse.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 150.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hayley, John John Hayley
Ensign in the regiment of foot commanded successively by Henry Bulstrode and Adam Cunningham, serving for a time in Lieutenant-Colonel Fortescue’s troop.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 48.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Hayley, Leonard Leonard Hayley
Ensign in the regiment of foot commanded successively by Henry Bulstrode and Adam Cunningham, in whose troop he served for a time.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 48.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Hayne, John John Hayne
Commissary-General to Sir William Waller’s Western Brigade (dated references, 26 June and 23 July 1643).
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 7.718.
Armies: Waller
Haynes, - - Haynes
A captain in the earl of Denbigh’s regiment of foot based at Wem, Shropshire. Led a party of 30 firelocks at the taking of Shrewsbury on 22 Feb. 1645. Probably the captain ‘Heanes’ shot and killed in a skirmish around Leigh Hall, Shropshire, shortly afterwards and buried at St Chad’s, Shrewsbury, on 15 Mar. 1645.
References: Warws. RO, C2017/C10/43; A More Exact and Particular Relation of the taking of Shrewsbury, than hath hithero been published. With the manner and performance thereof by Lieutenant Colonell William Reinking (1645).
Armies: Earl of Denbigh; Shropshire
Haynes, Thomas Thomas Haynes
Lieutenant in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hayward, Abel [Arnold] Abel [Arnold] Hayward
Lieutenant in Alexander Pym’s troop of horse, sallying out from Exeter against royalist raiders and in Jan. 1643 in Exeter with Pym during the first siege. However, by Apr. he had deserted, taking 20 horse with him. A captain in the royalist garrison at Barnstaple, he was hanged in summer 1644 when the parliamentarians took the town, for which the royalists hanged a sea captain in retaliation. There was probably an existing family connection between Hayward and the Pyms. A James Hayward, grazier (identified by Conrad Russell as a later parliamentarian captain) had taken a substantial lease from John Pym of much of his land in Wollavington, Somerset.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.657-8, CSPD, 1644, 351.
Armies: Somerset
Hayward, Peter Peter Hayward
Captain in the regiment of dragoons in the earl of Essex’s Army which was commanded by Sir John Seaton and then George Melve in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 57.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Haywood [Howard], William William Haywood [Howard]
Cornet in Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Thorpe’s troop in George Thompson’s regiment of horse, 10 Aug. 1644-30 Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 136.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Hazard, Henry Henry Hazard
Lieutenant-Colonel. Commissioned captain of foot in the Bristol militia, 3 Jan. 1651.
References: CSPD, 1651, 513.
Armies: Bristol
Hazzard, Henry Henry Hazzard
By 1644, when he was based at Poole, and still in the regiment in spring 1645, captain in James Wemyss’s regiment of foot which had been raised to guard Waller’s artillery. Like its colonel, Hazzard had a specialist interest in artillery, having been master of ordnance in the Bristol garrison in 1643 before the town fell to the royalists.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 159.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Heane, James James Heane
Colonel. [See James Haynes.]
Armies: Dorset
Heane [Hayne, Haynes], James James Heane [Hayne, Haynes]
Governor of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, Sept. 1647 to (at least) Oct. 1651. Heane was a prisoner-of-war, escaping from Portland Castle in Nov. 1644.
Claim for arrears of James Heane, gentleman [in margin: ‘Major Haine’] 17 Nov. 1646.
7 Sept. 1643-27 Dec. 1643: captain of foot company in Somerset under Colonel Bingham.
27 Dec. 1643-10 Dec. 1644: captain of troop of horse under Colonel William Sydenham.
10 Dec. 1644-5 May 1645: lieutenant-colonel of foot under colonel [Lacy] Butler.
Also claim noted 15 Dec. 1647 for Major James Heynes, who has served in garrison of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, 25 Jan. 1647-20 Oct. 1647, as major of a regiment of foot and captain of a company in the same regiment.
25 Mar. 1647: Colonel Sydenham’s company for the garrison of Weymouth assigned to command of Major Haynes.
10 Sept. 1647. Colonel Heane is appointed governor of Weymouth.
Governor there until at least Sept. 1651.
In Oct. 1651 he led the military forces which took Jersey.
17 Mar. 1655. Governor of Jersey, with a commission to raise a regiment of horse in Kent (and received from Oliver Cromwell the buff coat taken when the earl of Thanet’s son was captured).
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 229, 327, 335, 337; Clarke Papers, 2.228-232; Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 73-4, 208, 302-3; Clarke Papers, 3.28.
Armies: Dorset
Heapy [Hepey], Richard Richard Heapy [Hepey]
Heapy was a lieutenant in the Liverpool garrison when it fell to Prince Rupert on 7 June, 1644, almost certainly in the Lancashire regiment of foot of John Moore; later he was captain in Moore’s regiment.
In Sept. 1645 Heapy complained against Colonel John Holcroft to the Commons, alleging against him false imprisonment and obstructing his raising troops for Ireland:
‘The humble Petition of Captain Richard Hepey was this Day read.
Ordered, That it be referred to the Committee of Examinations, to examine the whole Business concerning Captain Hepey; and concerning his Detaining and Imprisonment in Lancashire: And the said Committee of Examinations are to meet upon this Business this Afternoon: And have Power to give the said Captain Hepey Damages for his Imprisonment and Losses, if they shall see Cause. Ordered, That colonel [Peter] Egerton do forthwith deliver, or cause to be delivered, the Men, Horse, and Arms, in Lancashire, appearing to be justly belonging to Captain Hepey; to be by the said captain transported into Ireland, for the Service of that Kingdom: And that he be accommodated with Conveniences’ (JHC,4.281).
By Jan. 1647 Heapy was in Ireland, as major in the regiment of foot that Moore had raised for service there. He was also at some point in Ireland captain of a troop of horse.
References: HMC, Part 10, App. 4, 102, 77-8, 90; Moore Mss., 168; TNA, E121/5/7 (Duckenfeild, 6/5/1651); JHC, 4.281.
Armies: Lancashire; Ireland
Hearte, - - Hearte
Captain in Thomas Rainsborough’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.90.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hearte, Henry Henry Hearte (died 1644)
Lieutenant. He was buried at Nantwich on 16 Mar. 1644. This was a few weeks after the main battle there, so he may have been an officer of Sir William Brereton’s Cheshire Army, or in Sir Thomas Fairfax’s Yorkshire contingent, or just possibly he was a royalist casualty.
References: Cheshire tracts, 258.
Armies: Cheshire or Yorkshire?
Heath, - – Heath
Captain. ‘Of the new companies’.
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 337.
Armies: Dorset
Heathcock, - - Heathcock
Captain killed in an explosion of the enemy powder store at the storming of Abbotsbury House, Nov. 1644.
References: Christie, Shaftesbury, 1.63.
Armies: Dorset
Heathwaite, Humphrey Humphrey Heathwaite (died 1644)
Captain in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of foot, from 29 Aug. 1643 until his death on 5 Oct. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 58.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Hebron, - - Hebron
A major serving in the siege of Exeter, taken at Topsham, 19 June 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 4.438.
Armies: Devon
Helemrowe [Holmeraw], - - Helemrowe [Holmeraw]
Captain in the Southwark Trained Bands regiment (Colonel John Hardwicke) in late 1643 and on 22 Oct. 1646.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, ff. 694 r. & v.; TNA, SP28/131, Part 13, f. 5v.; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex, 12.
Armies: Southwark
Hemens, John John Hemens
In Sept. 1642 lieutenant to Captain Crispe in the regiment of foot which formed part of the earl of Essex’s Army under the earl of Stamford and which then formed the core of Edward Massey’s garrison and army at Gloucester.
References: Peachey and Turton, War in the West, 6.646-7.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Gloucestershire
Hemert, Walraven Walraven Hemert
Lieutenant in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 45.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Henbury, Steven Steven Henbury
Ensign in Captain Henry Pinckney’s company in the Red regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel Samuel Harsnett) when it mustered on 27 Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 5, f. 690r.
Armies: London
Hender, William William Hender
A Cornish family name. William does not appear in the 1620 Visitation record of the Henders of Bottreaux Castle (if of that family, perhaps not born then). A William Hender of Tintagel married Joane Plumleighe in 1633/4. An Edward Hender, servant to Lord Robartes, received money for the regiment in Sept. 1642.
Ensign in Lord Robartes’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642. By the time the regiment was disbanded, he was captain-lieutenant of the Colonel’s company. He was one of the officers whom the Lords failed to get appointed to the New Model Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 38; Temple, ‘New Model Army’, 71-2; Vis. Cornwall, 217, 317; TNA, SP28/2a/68.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Henley, Henry Henry Henley
Captain.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.550.
Armies: Somerset: Col. John Pyne’s Trained Band Regt.
Henley [Henlie], Henry Henry Henley [Henlie] (c. 1612-1696)
Of Leigh, Winsham, Somerset and Colway, Lyme Regis, Dorset. MP for Somerset 1653, Dorset 1654, Lyme Regis, 1659, 1661, 1679 (Mar. and Oct.), 1681. Sheriff of Dorset, 1649. A committeeman in Dorset and Somerset (in the latter he was an ally of John Pyne’s). Captain of a Company of foot, possibly Trained Band, possibly volunteer and possibly Somerset rather than a Dorset company. On 7 Feb. 1643 summoned by Edward Popham and John Pyne to serve at Taunton. On 29 Apr. 1643 paid £15 10s. 0d. for the service of his company at Sherborne.
References: HoP: The Commons, 1660-1690, 2.524; Underdown, Somerset; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.510; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Dorset
Henley, Hugh Hugh Henley
Henley raised a company of foot in Leyland Hundred for the regiment of Alexander Rigby senior in 1643. Probably Hugh Hindley.
References: Warr in Lancashire, 43.
Armies: Lancashire
Herbert, - - Herbert
An officer at Plymouth in late 1642/early 1643, when he was paid £123 8s. 8d. for 208 men and the balance of his account and on 11 Apr. 1643, £185 7s. 4d.
References: TNA, SP28/128, part 19, f. 4v; part 20, f. 4r.
Armies: Devon
Herbert, Peter Peter Herbert
In summer 1645, lieutenant in Captain Ward’s company in John Barker’s/Thomas Willoughby’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 23.
Armies: Warwickshire
Herbert, William William Herbert
An officer in and probably colonel and commander of a Scraye Lathe Kentish Trained Bands regiment of Auxiliaries which supported Waller at the siege of Arundel Castle in late 1643.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 84.
Armies: Kent; Waller (Southern Association)
Herbert, William William Herbert
Major in Sir John Merrick’s regiment of foot both in the earl of Northumberland’s Army deployed against the Scots in 1642 and in Essex’s Army in 1642.
Just possibly he was the Colonel William Herbert of a regiment of Kentish Auxiliaries and second-in-command of the Kentish Brigade at the capture of Arundel Castle (Jan. 1644), though the identification is uncertain.
Not originally a New Model Army officer, but in summer 1645 was appointed colonel of a regiment of foot after Colonel Walter Lloyd was killed at Taunton. Later that year Herbert, ‘as he valiantly led on his men to storm, was shot through the hat’ (Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 1.385); he commanded one of the four trench works at the siege of Oxford in 1646.
In 1647 Herbert promised to be able to get his regiment to engage for service in Ireland, but despite his assurances the regiment refused to leave the main army to march for Chester. Herbert formed a regiment of foot, drawing on some of his officers, one of three regiments alleged to be used by the Presbyterians against the New Model Army. Herbert was replaced as colonel of the New Model regiment by Robert Overton.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 81, 28; Spring, Waller’s Army, 84;Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 1.385-7; JHL, 9.219.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)?; New Model Army
Herby, John John Herby
Lieutenant-Colonel who at some stage appears to have had command of a (possibly very short-lived) regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.39.
Armies: Eastern Association
Heritage, William William Heritage
Lieutenant to the company that lay in garrison at Adlington, Cheshire, under the command of Colonel Robert Duckenfeild. His accounts as such survive and cover at least Feb. to Nov. 1643, and he there vouched for Duckenfeild’s service from the raising of his first foot company.
References: TNA, SP28/128, part 11, ff. 1r.-2r.
Armies: Cheshire
Herne, - - Herne
Captain in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 57.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Herring, Henry Henry Herring
In May 1643 Herring was a captain in Waller’s Western Army. If not then, certainly later, he was a captain in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army,56; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 7.717.
Armies: Waller; Waller (Southern Association)
Hesilrige, Sir Arthur, second baronet Sir Arthur Hesilrige, second baronet (1601-1661)
Born the second son but by the time of his father’s death eldest surviving son and heir of Sir Thomas Hesilrige, first baronet (died 1630) of Nosely, Leicestershire. After a brief first marriage and having succeeded to his father’s baronetcy and extensive estates in Leicestershire and elsewhere in the Midlands, in 1634 he married the sister of Robert Greville, second Baron Brooke (who died in 1643 fighting for parliament at Lichfield).
He opposed several aspects of Charles I’s Personal Rule during the 1630s and via Brooke became linked with a network of opponents of royal government focused on Saye and Sele.
He was elected to the Short and Long Parliaments and in the latter was very active in seeking reform in 1641-2. In Jan. 1642 he was one of the five MPs whose arrest on treason charges was unsuccessfully sought by the king.
At the outbreak of the civil war he raised and commanded a troop of horse which formed part of the earl of Essex’s Army and fought in the campaign and battle of Edgehill. In 1643 he joined Waller’s Army as his second-in-command, as colonel with his own regiments of horse – heavily-armoured cuirassiers – and of foot. In 1643 he fought with Waller at the battles of Lansdown and Roudnway Down – he was wounded at both – and in 1644 at Cheriton and the second battle of Newbury. But he also remained quite active in the House of Commons durng the war years, where he strongly supported the conflict with the king and became associated with the war group.
He resigned his military command in spring 1645, in line with the Self-Denying Ordinance. He was one of the radical political Independents who supported the New Model in its clashes with parliament later in the 1640s.
At the end of 1647 his military career resumed, when he was appointed governor of Newcastle upon Tyne and empowered to raise – in part to pull together from some existing northern units – further troops to defend Newcastle and its region, in 1648 to secure the North and to quell renewed royalist activity there – he led the operation to recover Tynemouth Castle – and in 1650 to support Cromwell’s Scottish expedition; he was with Cromwell in Edinburgh in autumn 1648 and was again with him for part of the 1650-1 campaign. Accordingly at the beginning of 1648 he succeeded Robert Lilburne as colonel of his New Model Army regiment of foot. Hesilrige was away from London and had no direct part in Pride’s Purge and the regicide, though he may have had reservations about both those developments.
Although he remained governor of Newcastle until the mid-1650s, he was in London quite frequently in the early 1650s and was active in the Rump. He opposed its ejection by Cromwell in spring 1653.
He was a strong and prominent republican opponent of the Protectorate. He was elected to all three Protectorate Parliaments and when allowed to take his seat – he was effectively barred after the first week of the first Protectorate Parliament and throughout the long first session of the second – he was an outspoken critic of the regime. He was one of the leaders of the restored Rump in summer 1659 and soon regained military command; he lost that position when the Rump was again ejected in autumn 1659 and he was opposed to the group of senior officers who took control. He returned to London and retook his seat in 1660 when the Rump again returned and he supported Monck during the opening weeks of the year, though in the hope of restoring a republic. He certainly did not favour the return of monarchy and the Stuarts. At the Restoration he was exempted from pardon, arrested and held in the Tower. He died there early in 1661, before being brought to trial for treason.
References: Oxford DNB.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller; New Model Army
Hesketh, Hugh Hugh Hesketh
Commissioned captain in Colonel Gilbert Ireland’s militia regiment of foot in Lancashire, 16 Aug. 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 509.
Armies: Lancashire
Heslam, - - Heslam
A captain commanding one of the companies of Shropshire foot at the siege of Lichfield in spring 1646, ordered to march to Worcester on 26 May 1646.
References: Carr and Atherton, Brereton Staffs., 280; TNA, Sp28/134.
Armies: Shropshire
Hewatt, - - Hewatt
Lieutenant. Petitioned for payment of arrears (£102 18s. 0d.) as officer in garrison of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, 21 Jan. 1647.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 161-2.
Armies: Dorset
Hewet, William William Hewet
Lieutenant. Lieutenant in the earl of Stamford’s regiment of foot in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army Lists, 29; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 646.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Hewett, William William Hewett
In Sept. 1642 lieutenant to Captain Ferrer in the regiment of foot which formed part of the earl of Essex’s Army under the earl of Stamford and which then formed the core of Edward Massey’s garrison and army at Gloucester.
References: Peachey and Turton, War in the West,6.646-7.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hewitt, Tobias Tobias Hewitt
In 1642 a captain serving in one of the three regiments of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.33.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hewley, John John Hewley (baptised 1619, died 1697)
Of Wistow, son of John Hewley (died c. 1630) of Wistow, Yorkshire (West Riding) and his wife Sarah Wolriche.
From 24 May 1644 down to 24 June 1645, when it was reduced, he was captain in John Savile’s regiment of foot. His company was then moved to John Bright’s regiment of foot. Still a captain of foot in June 1646.
JP for the West Riding, 1646-60, and the North and West Ridings, 1663-80, and counsel for York corporation.
MP for Pontefract in 1659, and for York in the three Exclusion Parliaments. Knighted in 1663.
Although he conformed, after the Restoration he kept first an Independent and then a Presbyterian chaplain.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 386; Yorks. visitation, II, 208; HoP: The Commons, 1660-1690, 2.542-3; Oxford DNB [Sarah Hewley]; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 120; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Yorkshire
Hewson, John John Hewson (died 1662/3?)
Little is known about his birth, parentage or early life, but he seems to have been of quite humble stock and by the 1630s he was working as a cobbler or shoemaker in London; a royalist later sneered that he was before the civil war a brewer’s clerk.
He began the civil war as a captain in the earl of Essex’s regiment of foot. In spring 1644 he became lieutenant-colonel in John Pickering’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, transferring at that rank when the regiment joined the New Model Army in spring 1645 but becoming the regiment’s colonel and commander upon Pickering’s death in late 1645.
He was prominent in Army politics in the later 1640s. In 1648 he played a leading role in crushing royalist insurrection in Kent and restoring order there; he fought at the battle of Maidstone. He supported and was involved in Pride’s Purge and was an active regicide. He supported Cromwell’s Irish campaign, in the course of which he was wounded and lost an eye, and stayed there as governor of Dublin until 1656, when his religious exuberance was not to the taste of the new chief administrator of Ireland, Henry Cromwell, and he was ordered back to England. He had returned to England for a time in 1653 to take his seat in the Nominated Assembly. He was an MP in both the first and second Protectorate Parliaments and, despite his strong opposition to kingship in 1657, he became a member of the Other House. He supported Fleetwood and Lambert in 1659, but was deprived of office by the returning Rump and Long Parliament and fled to the continent at the Restoration. He died there in 1662 or 1663.
References: Oxford DNB; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 49, 59, 71, 81, 91, 103.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Eastern Association; New Model Army
Heydon, William William Heydon
Ensign in Captain Henry Carew’s company in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot in Wharton’s army raised for service in Ireland in 1642; later that summer he went instead with the regiment as ensign in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army, in which he served until 19 Jan. 1643, evidently the date of the regiment’s final disbandment.
He is possibly the Lieutenant William Heydon who appears in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1644. When he received 28 days’ pay in Oct. 1644, it was noted that he had been desperately wounded at Fowey, was not yet fully recovered and had also been plundered of all his apparel and necessaries.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 68, 31; TNA, SP28/5/192, SP28/19/22.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Heys, Walter Walter Heys
In 1642, probably at and from its formation, lieutenant in Lord Robartes’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Heyward, Joshua Joshua Heyward (died 1644)
Lieutenant in Captain Thomas Smith’s company in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the Midlands Association Army from 18 Jan. to 15 Mar. 1643. He was one of several officers of Brooke who after the latter’s death became an officer in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of foot, in which he served as captain from 29 Aug. 1643 until his death on 24 Apr. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 58.
Armies: Lord Brooke; Waller (Southern Association)
Heywood, - - Heywood
Captain in Hutchinson’s Nottinghamshire-based force, shot and killed in late 1644 by the royalist garrison at Thurgarton.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 218.
Armies: Nottinghamshire
Heywood, Peter Peter Heywood (died 1657)
Of Heywood, Lancashire. Eldest son of Robert Heywood (died 1645) of Heywood and his wife Margaret, daughter and coheir of John Ashton of Penketh, esquire. He married Alice, daughter of John Greenhalgh of Brandlesholme, Lancashire, and widow of Theophilus Holt of Grisslehurst, Lancashire, esquire.
Parliamentarian captain and royalist spy. According to John Rosworm, Heywood ‘was a captain in Lancashire for the Parliament, was often in our private consultations; and by holding intelligence with the Enemy, did us much mischief. He went oft to Chester, Oxford and other Garrisons of the Enemie, discovering our secret results. This being at length found out, and proved against him, he was secured by the Committee: and yet without the consent of the rest of the Committee, contrary to an ordinance touching such cases, released by College Holland; two of his friends also being bound for his appearance, which never were questioned, though he presently upon his enlargement went to the Enemy, and was afterwards thought the onely fit instrument to work me to his treacherie’ – that is, in 1644 Prince Rupert and Lord Byron used Heywood as an intermediary to try and persuade Rosworm to betray Manchester (Lancashire military proceedings, 230).
References: Vis. Lancs., 1664, 139; Lancashire military proceedings, 230.
Armies: Lancashire
Heywood, William William Heywood
A captain in Nicholas Shuttleworth’s Lancashire regiment of horse.
References: Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 296 [citing TNA, E121/3/1].
Armies: Lancashire
Hickman, Henry Henry Hickman
Lieutenant in the Blue regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Thomas Adams) in summer 1642.
References: Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Hickman, Thomas Thomas Hickman
Captain in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 34; TNA, SP28/11/369.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hickman, Thomas Thomas Hickman
In 1642 he is listed as cornet in the troop of horse of Lord Willoughby in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 49.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hide, - - Hide (died 1643)
Lieutenant in Captain Walter Parry’s troop at Gloucester by 14 Oct. 1643. £4 was paid for his funeral on 15 Nov. 1643.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 99; Peachey and Turton, VII., 717.
Armies: Gloucestershire; Waller
Higden, William William Higden
Lieutenant in Captain Edward Scott’s troop in the Kentish horse from 11 Jan. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 79.
Armies: Kent; Waller (Southern Association)
Higgins, Henry Henry Higgins
Lieutenant in Henry Hazzard’s company in James Wemyss’s regiment of foot in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 159
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Higgon, Edward Edward Higgon
Captain of the troop of horse in the Chichester Rape Trained Bands. In Nov. 1642 he and Henry Chitty, having obtained parliament’s permission to fortify Chichester, had procured arms and ammunition from Portsmouth; both men were forced to flee the town a few days later when it was seized for the king.
Higgon was early appointed a sequestration commissioner.
A few months after Cowdray House fell to Waller, Higgon was ordered by the Commons, on 1 Apr. 1644, to send up the plate and treasure there to London. On 11 Apr. 1644 the troop was put at Waller’s disposal; on 25 May Colonel Stapley was ordered to take command of the troop for the time being and on 7 June he was ordered to appoint a new captain and send the troop to Henley upon Thames.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 124; Thomas-Stanford, Sussex, 42-7, 83, 120.
Armies: Sussex; Waller (Southern Association)
Higinbottome, - - Higinbottome
Captain of a troop of horse in the regiment of Colonel John Moore in Lancashire. Identified as such from arrears owed to one of his troopers.
References: TNA, E121/5/7 (Duckenfeild, 6/5/1651).
Armies: Lancashire
Hilderson, John John Hilderson
Captain in the regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army commanded by Lord Oliver St John and then Thomas Essex in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hill, - - Hill
Captain of troop of horse under Colonel Sydenham in Weymouth garrison. Known dates 8 Feb.-15 Mar. 1646.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 269.
Armies: Dorset
Hill, - - Hill
Lieutenant. Wounded in explosion at taking of Abbotsbury House, Nov. 1644. ‘Lieutenant Hill, who went a volunteer and was sent in to get out the soldiers [who were plundering the house], was blown up with the rest, yet since we have taken him strongly [sic] out of the rubbish and hope to preserve him’.
References: Christie, Shaftesbury, 1.63-4.
Armies: Dorset
Hill, - - Hill
Captain in the Aylesford Lathe volunteer regiment.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 75.
Armies: Kent
Hill, Nathaniel Nathaniel Hill
Cornet in Walter Parry’s troop of horse by 27 May 1643. Nathaniel Whapley [Whapled, Warples] had succeeded him as cornet by 6 Oct. 1643.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 56; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 7.717.
Armies: Gloucestershire; Waller
Hill, Richard Richard Hill (died in or before 1646)
Captain-Lieutenant (from 29 Aug. 1643) and then captain (from 20 Apr. 1644) in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s/James Holborne’s regiment of foot. When the regiment was reduced into the New Model Army under Sir Hardress Waller he remained a captain. He was dead by 5 Oct. 1646, leaving a widow, Eleanor.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 59; Temple, ‘New Model Army’, 56.
Hill, Thomas Thomas Hill
In spring 1644, lieutenant in Henry Slade’s company in Godfrey Bosvile’s Warwick-based regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 31.
Armies: Warwickshire; Waller
Hill, William William Hill
A corporal and gentleman of the arms in Captain Devereux’s company in Colonel Thomas Essex’s regiment of foot in 1642; later captain in Robert Burghill’s/Jonas Vandruske’s regiment of horse in Waller’s Western Association Army.
The two William Hills in Waller’s armies may be the same man.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 140.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Bristol;Waller
Hill, William William Hill
Hill served in Waller’s Army as a captain of horse from 28 Mar. 1643 to 11 Dec. 1643. Although at the latter date he was allowed to leave the army after ‘behaving like a gentleman and a soldier’ (Spring, Waller’s army,112), in fact he continued in Waller’s Army as captain-lieutenant in Christopher Potley’s regiment from 14 Mar. to 10 Sept. 1644; he was then promoted to captain (possibly upon Potley’s giving up the command of the regiment, in which case he would have continued to command the same troop), and retained that command until the regiment was reduced in Apr. 1645.
The two William Hills in Waller’s armies may be the same man.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 112-3.
Armies: Waller; Waller (Southern Association; Somerset
Hill, William William Hill
Of Tewkesbury. Captain. Captain of dragoons. On 1 Nov. 1642 the Commons ordered that he receive money from the collectors in Gloucester for the raising and pay of 100 dragoons and officers according to the establishment of the earl of Essex. On 18 Nov. he was paid £320 for raising a company of 100 dragoons. On 24 Mar. 1643 he received a gratuity for his service at Highnam House.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 631.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Hillersdon, John John Hillersdon
He fought in the second Scots War of 1640 in the English army of the earl of Northumberland. At the start of the civil war he was a captain in the regiment of foot commanded initially by Lord Oliver St John and, following his death from wounds sustained at Edgehill, by Colonel Thomas Essex, becoming major of the regiment by spring 1643. Sometime in 1643, probably during the summer, he transferred to Waller’s Army and became major of his regiment of foot, though he seems to have left the regiment by or in spring 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 154.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Hilliard, John John Hilliard
Lieutenant in Captain William Clerke’s company in John Hampden’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1643, and still in the regiment on 2 Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, 28/11/369, SP28/14/219.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hills, Daniel Daniel Hills
During 1644, ensign in Elias Batchelor’s company in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.65.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hillyard [Hilliard], Kynaston [Kimpton] Kynaston Hillyard [or Kimpton Hilliard]
Captain in Heane’s regiment, who gave an account of the taking of Jersey in Oct. 1651 to his brother-in-law William Clarke. The heraldic Visitation of 1623 has him as aged 7 that year. Underdown notes that he was married and a householder by the time he enlisted.
References: Clarke Papers, 2.228-32; Vis. Dorset, 1623 (Addenda), 39; Underdown, Fire from Heaven, 206-7.
Armies: Dorset
Hillyard, Kynaston Kynaston Hillyard
Captain.
See above, reduced list, 20 Apr. 1648.
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 337.
Armies: Dorset
Hilton, - - Hilton
An officer in Ralph Assheton junior’s regiment of foot, sitting at court martials on 10 Apr. 1645. However, Dore suggests that the name may be a mistranscription for Hulton (i.e. Edward Hulton).
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1, 188-9.
Armies: Lancashire
Himber, William William Himber
Lieutenant in James Farmer’s troop in Sir William Balfour’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 20.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Hincksman, Daniel Daniel Hincksman
Ensign successively to Lieutenant-Colonel Dobson in Waller’s Army; to Captain John Gorges’s company in Sir William Waller’s regiment of foot (later dragoons); and to Colonel Stevens’s company in Beeston Castle, Cheshire.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 150.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Cheshire
Hinde, John John Hinde
Not a captain in Oct. 1646, but in 1647 the Presbyterian City militia committee approved him as captain in the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Laurence Bromfield).
A signatory in 1642 of a petition in support of the Militia Ordinance, and later that year an activist and commissary for horse. In 1645-6 he put his name to Presbyterian petitions.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 318; Lindley, Popular politics, 144, 207, 230-1, 378.
Armies: London
Hinde, Thomas Thomas Hinde
Ensign in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 34.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hindley, Hugh Hugh Hindley
Captain of a troop of horse, and possibly also of a company of foot, under Colonel Alexander Rigby; these positions identified from arrears owed to Henry Smith, trooper, in May 1659. In early Feb. 1644 he and his troop fought a skirmish with the Lathom House garrison prior to the beginning of the first siege.
References: TNA, E121/4/8; Lancashire military proceedings, 162.
Armies: Lancashire
Hinton, Daniel Daniel Hinton
Lieutenant in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 34.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hippisley [Hippesley], Richard Richard Hippisley [Hippesley]
Lieutenant to Captain Thomas Hippisley in Alexander Popham’s regiment of foot in 1643. Peachey and Turton suggest that he was also a captain (presumably later or else there were two men of that name). There is a Richard Hippisley, an elder brother of Thomas, aged 16 in 1623. Underdown identifies Richard Hippisley of Cameley as one of three Somerset officers who urged a counter-assault to recapture the breach made in the walls of Bristol by Rupert’s men.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.553, 555; Somerset Visitation, 1623, 52; Underdown, Somerset, 63.
Armies: Somerset: Col. Alexander Popham’s Regt. of Foot
Hippesley [Hippisley, Hippersley], Thomas Thomas Hippesley [Hippisley, Hippersley]
Captain. Of Cameley. A younger son of John Hippesley (died 1613), and his wife Elizabeth Organ, he was aged 10 in 1623. He was presumably either the younger brother or cousin of John Hippisley who helped confront the royalists at Chewton Mendip in summer 1642 and became a parliamentarian committeeman (both possible men were aged 19 in 1623).
References: Vis. Somerset, 1623, 52; Underdown, Somerset, 37, 47.
Armies: Somerset: Col. Alexander Popham’s Regt. of Foot
Hitchcock, Miles Miles Hitchcock
Lieutenant in Thomas Grantham’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 41.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hitchcock, William William Hitchcock
Woollen draper dwelling in Watling Street (Symonds, BL, Harl. 986, p. 22).
Lieutenant in the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Sir John Wollaston) in summer 1642; Third captain in the same regiment by Sept. 1643.
References: Overton 1642; Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Hoare, - - Hoare
Lieutenant in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hobart, James James Hobart
Lieutenant-Colonel in Valentine Walton’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, succeeding Walton as colonel in spring 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.104.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hobart, Sir Miles Sir Miles Hobart
Before the civil war he was a senior officer, probably a colonel, in the Norfolk militia. In the Eastern Association Army he commanded a regiment of dragoons, which saw service at the siege of Reading in spring 1643, and a regiment of foot, raised in his native Norfolk, and which for a time garrisoned Wisbech and which took part in the sieges of Burleigh House, Crowland and Newark, where they suffered a surprise attack, losing prisoners, and possibly mutinied when under pressure from Prince Rupert, though the regiment continued and saw action at Marston Moor and the second battle of Newbury in 1644. Hobart did not transfer to the New Model Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.41; Holmes, Eastern Association, 74, 75, 162, 176, 236, 238.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hobson, - - Hobson
Ensign in Henry Chitty’s company in Anthony Stapley’s/Algernon Sidney’s Sussex regiment of foot by 20 June 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 122.
Armies: Sussex; Waller (Southern Association)
Hobson, John John Hobson
Probably of Dodsworth, Yorkshire (West Riding).
A captain of foot in the Hull garrison under Sir John Mauleverer in spring 1645.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 386.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax)
Hobson, Paul Paul Hobson (died 1666).
Little is known about his birth, background, parentage or early life, but he was reputedly a tailor in Buckinghamshire before the civil war. In 1643-4 he was prominent in Baptist circles in London. By 1644 he was a captain of a troop in Colonel Charles Fleetwood’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army, replacing Captain Clement Arminger. In summer 1645, when Hobson was present in or attached to the Leicester garrison, Sir Samuel Luke had Hobson and another officer arrested for illegal and subversive preaching and sent them to Fairfax, but Fairfax took their side and not only ordered their release but had Hobson accompany his south-western campaign, perhaps more as a preacher/chaplain than a military man, and it is perhaps in that capacity that he was with Fleetwood’s regiment and the New Model at Bristol, Exeter and elsewhere in 1645-6. However, his formal military career resumed in the later 1647, for he appears as major of Robert Lilburne’s New Model Army regiment of foot, by 1649 promoted to lieutenant-colonel of the regiment (by then commanded by Hesilrige). As such, he served under Hesilrige at Newcastle upon Tyne and became his deputy governor. He played a supportive role in Cromwell’s Scottish campaign, including conveying Scottish prisoners from Dunbar to captivity in northern England. He left the army shortly afterwards and instead devoted himself to promoting Baptism in Newcastle and County Durham. After the Restoration he returned to London but was viewed with suspicion as a political and religious subversive and spent much of his final years in prison.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.35; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 89, 101; Luke Letter Books, nos. 735, 737, 754, 755, 757, 759, 1411, 1612, 1614.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Hobson, Thomas Thomas Hobson
Lieutenant in Robert Phippes’s company in John Barker’s/Thomas Willoughby’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 22.
Armies: Warwickshire
Hobson, William William Hobson
A grocer in Southwark.
Captain in the Southwark auxiliaries regiment in Sept. 1643; of him and all the other captains in the Trained Bands regiment, noted by Symonds: ‘all these violent ○ [i.e. Roundhead]’.
In late 1643 he received £13 8s. from the Southwark militia sub-committee to pay the Auxiliaries for guarding the forts.
By 16 Apr. 1644, Major in the Southwark auxiliaries regiment.
Symonds’s description would fit the religious and administrative activist, common councilman and Independent William Hobson but probably not his residence, as the latter was noted in 1641 as a mercer of Ave Maria Lane and was deputy for Farringdon Ward, 1642-7, not a resident of Southwark.
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 66; TNA, SP28/121A, Part 5, ff. 656r.-666r.; SP28/131, Part 13, f. 5v.; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 94-5; Lindley, Popular politics, 139, 159, 141-3, 184, 153-4, 191, 215, 222, 267, 360, 365, 387-91; Brenner, Merchants, 369, 456, 484, 513-4 [Lindley and Brenner both discuss the Hobson who is probably not the captain]
Armies: Southwark
Hodges, - - Hodges
Major in the Blue regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel George Langham junior) in Oct. 1646.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11.
Armies: London
Hodgetts, Henry Henry Hodgetts
An ensign in Staffordshire. Presented by the constable of Sedgeley in 1662 as a former active parliamentarian.
References: ‘Active Parliamentarians, 1662’, 65.
Armies: Staffordshire
Hodgson [Hudson], Francis Francis Hodgson [Hudson]
Captain in Lord Rochford’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army by or from 6 Sept. 1642. By 30 Oct. 1643 he had transferred as captain to the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot; he had also been wounded at the first battle of Newbury.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 32; TNA, SP28/2a/207, SP28/10/37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hodgson, John John Hodgson (1617/18-1684?)
Of apparently quite humble origins and probably from Yorkshire (West Riding). He began the war as an ensign in a unit of foot serving with and under Major Forbes, but he was captured when Bradford fell to the royalists in summer 1643 and, although soon released, he also suffered a period of illness. By the beginning of 1644 he was back in active service in the Fairfaxes’ Northern Army and he fought under Sir Thomas at the battle of Nantwich. By 1644-5 he was an officer in Colonel John Bright’s regiment. According to his own autobiographical account, he was prominent in army politics in 1647, ensuring that the Northern Army broadly supported the New Model. He fought as a lieutenant, generally under Lambert, in the northern campaign of summer 1648, including at the battle of Preston, and was with Lambert’s regiment in Cromwell’s Scottish campaign of 1650-1, fighting at and providing a fairly detailed account of the battle of Dunbar. Shortly after he was given command of a company in Cromwell’s regiment of foot which was dispatched south into Lancashire to bolster control there, in which capacity he first helped mop up Scottish units after the battle of Worcester and then took part in the reconquest of the Isle of Man. For much of the remainder of the 1650s he was a lieutenant in Lambert’s Yorkshire-based regiment of horse, although unqualified acting as an army medic and living with or close to his family – by now he had married and had children – in the property he acquired at Coley Hall near Halifax. Apparently a Quaker by the end of the 1650s, he neither actively supported nor opposed Lambert’s attempt to resist Monck. He lived on certainly to 1684, under suspicion and often arrested and imprisoned on account of his political and religious views.
References: Oxford DNB; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 110; Greaves and Zaller, BDBR, 2. 98.
Armies: Yorkshire
Hodson, Benjamin Benjamin Hodson
Lieutenant of Pioneers in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 25.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hoghton [Houghton], Richard Richard Hoghton [Houghton]
Of Hoghton Tower near Blackburn, Lancashire, eldest son of Sir Gilbert Hoghton. Most of the family, including his father and his two younger brothers, Gilbert and Roger, were firm and active royalists. But by 1644 Richard had become active in Lancashire in the parliamentarian cause, in 1644-5 named to a string of Lancashire committees and also appointed colonel of a new or existing regiment, though his active military career in the field seems to have been very limited. He later became Recruiter MP for Lancashire but was excluded at Pride’s Purge, was suspected of supporting Derby and the Scottish-royalists in 1651 and certainly supported Booth’s Rising in 1659.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 146-7.
Armies: Lancashire
Hoghton, Samuel Samuel Hoghton
Lieutenant of foot in the Lancashire regiment of Colonel Richard (later Colonel Nicholas) Shuttleworth. He bought former crown lands at Limestones in the Scarrs and Banks of Burnley and Colne for £33 10s on 13 Dec. 1655, when described as a gentleman, ‘erstwhile of Lancashire’.
References: Gentles, ‘Debentures Market’, 299.
Armies: Lancashire
Holborne, James James Holborne (died 1687)
Not the same man as, or indeed related to, either of the two James Holbornes, who usually spelt their surname Houblon, who were of recent French descent and who were living in London and commanded London-based regiments at the time of the civil war.
This James Holborne was a Scotsman who, probably following military service on the continent, began the civil war in the earl of Essex’s Army as colonel of a regiment of foot raised in 1642 as part of the largely abortive second/reserve army under the earl of Warwick. (Holborne may well have served in the Netherlands: he does not appear as having served in the Swedish army, and to the complaint that he had displaced local gentry officers, Warwick conceded that he had brought in professionals from the Dutch service.) Colonel of that regiment of foot, which served in the earl of Essex’s Army, by 3 Nov. 1642, his was one of two regiments which drove back the royalist relief force for Reading at Caversham Bridge in spring 1643 and fought at the first battle of Newbury in Sept.
Holborne was still colonel on 24 Apr. 1644, but he was one of several officers who left Essex’s Army after falling out with his Commissary-General Hans Behr, who ‘had affronted colonel [John] Middleton and the Scots nation’ (Juxon, Diary, 53).
Accordingly, in May 1644 he had joined Waller, rising to become his major-general. In summer 1644 Waller at least on paper gave Holborne command of his (Waller’s) own regiment of dragoons, though in fact that regiment continued to serve with and under Waller. However, in late 1644 Holborne was given command of a brigade sent westwards to relieve Taunton. Possibly in preparation for this expedition, around the same time Holborne was given command of the bulk of Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of foot, at least part of which was (probably temporarily) mounted and converted to dragoons (although at the same time part of Hesilrige’s regiment was deployed to reinforce Lyme). Holborne was also commissioned at the end of 1644 to raise further and fresh horse in Somerset Holborne continued to campaign in the West during the opening months of 1645, commanding a force consisting of a brigade of Waller’s army alongside local Dorset and Somerset troops, but he declined to serve in the New Model Army and his military contribution to the English civil war ended in spring 1645.
In Jan. 1647 Holborne was appointed major-general of the Scottish ‘New Model’ army (the reduced army establishment following the return of the Scots from England), with command of a regiment of 800 foot (the Lowland regiment), with which he marched with David Leslie against the highland royalists that summer. He was opposed to the Engager party, set on a war to re-establish the king’s authority in England: in Mar. 1648 he was a signatory to the anti-Engager Tailors’ Hall petition, and following the Engager coup he refused the offer of the rank of major-general and resigned his colonelcy.
In 1649-51, with the shift in Scottish politics, he was again major-general. In summer 1650 he garrisoned Stirling, quelling a mutiny and raising troops in Stirlingshire and Clackmannanshire. He also displayed his radical kirk leanings, supporting the minister James Guthrie and presenting the anti-royalist West Kirk Declaration to the Committee of Estates. He acted as a brigade commander at the battle of Dunbar (3 Sept. 1650), after which rumour accused him of having ordered all but a few men in each regiment to put out their matches and so left them vulnerable. His radical kirk sympathies made him sufficiently suspect to lead to his being deprived of the command of Stirling Castle in late 1650 for fear that he would betray it to the English. In July 1651 he commanded the army routed at Inverkeithing by John Lambert. Again, rumour accused him of treachery, and he was so distrusted within the army that he was barred from holding any command thereafter.
In 1659 Holborne stood surety for the good behaviour of Lord Lorne (Argyle’s eldest son).
Holborne married Elizabeth Inglis (died 1705), daughter of William Inglis of Otterstone, Fife. In 1649 he bought Menstrie Castle, near Stirling.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 67-8, 149-50; Davies, ‘Essex’, 39, 40, 43, 47; TNA, SP28/3a/20, SP28/3b/396, 471, SP28/14/428; Peachey and Turton, Old Robin’s Foot, 11; D. Stevenson, Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Scotland, 1644-1651 (1977), 82, 102, 105, 108, 146, 196, 198, 201, 205; Furgol, Covenanting Armies, 253-4, 322-3; Holburne Museum of Art, Bath, website (www.bath.ac.uk/holburne/muse/, accessed 13 October 2009); HMC, 6th. Report, 632; CSPD, 1644-1645, 425.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Holcroft, Jeffrey Jeffrey Holcroft
Probably Geoffery Holcroft (born 1614/15) of Hurst, eldest son of Thomas Holcroft and his wife Winifred Tonge. He married Elizabeth, daughter of William Spateman of Astley, Lancashire; brother of Thomas Holcroft.
A captain in Lancashire. An undated petition to Colonel John Moore (probably before Moore stood down under the Self-Denying Ordinance, but certainly before 1647), from the inhabitants of North Meols, complains that Captain Jeffrey Holcroft entered their town with a troop, and forcibly took from them two fowling and ten birding pieces.
References: HMC, Tenth Report, App. 4, 96; Vis. Lancs, 1664, 145.
Armies: Lancashire
Holcroft, John John Holcroft (died 1656)
Of Holcroft, Lancashire. MP for Liverpool in the Short Parliament, and recruiter MP for Wigan from May 1646. Mayor of Liverpool, 1644-5.
One royalist account dismissed him as a man ‘of decayed fortunes and much indebted’ (Lancashire military proceedings, 33), and indeed the family sold off land worth more than £1,000 in the early seventeenth century. He was a deputy-lieutenant in 1642.
Whilst James Stanley, Lord Strange (shortly to be seventh earl of Derby), who had come to Manchester to implement the king’s commission of array, was being feasted on 15 July 1642, Captain John Holcroft, Sir Thomas Stanley and Thomas Birch, commissioners under the Militia Ordinance, marched into town, striking up their drum, and attempted to raise parliamentarian recruits, leading to a vicious skirmish.
By Mar. 1643 he was a lieutenant-colonel, commanding the forces at Lancaster who were forced back into the castle by Derby’s men.
By the late 1640s Holcroft was increasingly alienated from the political trend of events and had to vindicate himself from charges that he had approached the king for a pardon and compared parliament to the tyrants of Athens as described in Sir Walter Ralegh’s History of the World. Rather, ‘he hath to the uttermost of his power in all companies and upon all occasions laboured to vindicate the reputacion of the Parliament and demonstrate the justice of theire proceedings and cause’ (Moore Mss., 207).
Holcroft was secluded at Pride’s Purge; he only attended five quarter sessions after Charles I’s execution and was dropped from the bench in 1650.
References: Lancs. military proceedings, 30-4, 85; Blackwood, Lancashire gentry, 59, 73; Moore Mss., 207; Underdown, Pride’s Purge, 70; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming); Gratton, Lancs. war effort, passim.
Armies: Lancashire
Holcroft, St John St John Holcroft
At some point before spring 1644, when he left the army, captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of dragoons in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.58; Holmes, Eastern Association, 201.
Armies: Eastern Association
Holcroft, Thomas Thomas Holcroft
Probably the second son of Thomas Holcroft (died 1638) of Hurst and his wife Winifred Tonge, and younger brother of Captain Jeffrey Holcroft.
Captain in John Booth’s regiment of foot in Lancashire.
One reference in Exchequer records to him is ambiguous, placing him in Colonel Booth’s regiment only - George Booth in Cheshire or John Booth in Lancashire? (TNA, E121/5/7 (Duckenfeild, 6/5/2651)). But an entry in Cheshire papers, making clear that he was in the Warrington garrison, places him certainly in John Booth’s regiment (TNA, SP28/225, ff. 51-2: payment to John Jackson for stocking of muskets belonging to the company of Captain Thomas Holcrofte by Bucklow sequestrators, warrant of 28 Mar. 1644, signed by Colonel John Booth, governor of Warrington; acquittance signed 3 Apr. 1644.)
References: Vis. Lancs., 1664, 145; TNA, E121/5/7 (Duckenfeild, 6/5/2651); TNA, SP28/225, ff. 51-2.
Armies: Lancashire
Holcrofte, Charles Charles Holcrofte
Lieutenant in Captain Henry Carew’s company in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot raised for service in Ireland in 1642. Later that summer he went as captain-lieutenant of the Colonel’s company in Wharton’s regiment of foot into the earl of Essex’s Army. Although not originally named as such, he became lieutenant of Wharton’s troop of horse (perhaps after the early disbandment of Wharton’s regiment); in May 1644 he claimed for the pay of Wharton’s late troop. By 17 July 1644 he was serving in the troop of Lieutenant-Colonel Richard Graves in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of horse – in fact commanded by Colonel Stapleton – and by that regiment’s disbandment in spring 1645 he had become captain-lieutenant of Stapleton’s own troop. Like several officers in that regiment, he then transferred to the New Model Army regiment of horse initially commanded by Graves, continuing as captain-lieutenant until he left the regiment and the army in 1647.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 68, 31; TNA, SP28/2a/206, SP28/15/112, SP28/17/92; Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 53, 64, 74, 84, 150.
Armies: Earl of Essex; New Model Army
Holden, Benjamin Benjamin Holden
Captain in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s/James Holborne’s regiment of foot. He served in Waller’s Oxford campaign in summer 1644 and was at Wareham, Dorset in Nov. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 59.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Holford, John John Holford
There were several Captain Holfords active in Cheshire during the first civil war, as shown by surviving military and pay warrants:
24 Nov. 1645: Pay Captain Holford, officers and troopers one month’s pay upon the list to be given Captain John Whitworth (TNA, SP28/224, f. 75).
4 Nov. 1646: Pay Captain Holford, officers and troopers one month’s pay upon the list to be given Captain John Whitworth, his officers and troopers, for gratuity promised them at the taking of Chester (TNA, SP28/224, f. 175).
One of them was probably John Holford, who was then commissioned captain of foot of Thomas Croxton’s Cheshire militia regiment of foot, 22 Aug. 1650. In July 1651 he was paid £25 to conduct to Chester the 100 men impressed within Cheshire for service in Ireland (TNA, SP28/224, f. 330).
References: CSPD, 1650, 510. TNA, SP28/224.
Armies: Cheshire
Holford, Richard Richard Holford
Dore identified that there seemed to be a captain Richard Holford, brother of Captain John Holford, active in Cheshire.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 327.
Armies: Cheshire
Holford, Thomas Thomas Holford
Dore identified that there seemed to be a captain Thomas Holford also active in Cheshire.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 327.
Armies: Cheshire
Holland, Richard Richard Holland (1595-1661)
Of Denton, eldest son of Edward Holland (died c. 1630) of Heaton and Denton and his wife Anne, daughter of Edmund Gamull, alderman of Chester. He married Katherine, daughter of William Ramsden of Longley, Yorkshire. He had an annual income of at least £600 per annum.
Recruiter MP for Newton (from Mar. 1646) and MP for Lancashire in 1654 and 1656.
Holland was colonel of a regiment raised in Salford Hundred, who took his tenants to the aid of Manchester in 1642. He was governor of Manchester in 1643 (and from John Rosworm’s account effectively if not formally governor during the siege the year before). In Feb. 1643 he was one of the commanders of the force which took Preston. At the beginning of Apr. 1643 he led the Manchester forces that took Wigan, marching away that night upon the approach of the earl of Derby’s relieving force. Rosworm had a low opinion of Holland’s commitment and courage, accusing him of being too willing to surrender Manchester to Derby’s forces and abandoning Wigan too easily (‘alas who can settle a trembling heart?’), only to be shielded from Rosworm’s accusations before the committee of examinations by his powerful friends at Westminster (Lancashire Military proceedings, 227). Rosworm alleged that Holland subsequently suspended part of his pay on the pretext that he had failed to take the Covenant.
However, Fairfax praised the actions of Holland’s regiment at the battle of Nantwich of Jan. 1644 and Holland was one of the three most active county committeemen, 1643-8. He strongly opposed the regicide and the republic.
References: Blackwood, Lancashire gentry, 49, 52, 83-4; Vis. Lancs., 1664, 146; Lancashire military proceedings, 21, 45, 52,60, 74, 90, 154, 161, 181, 222-3, 226-8, 230, 333; Warr in Lancashire, 9, 36; Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 388-9 and passim; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Lancashire
Holland, Thomas Thomas Holland
Captain in Sir William Waller’s regiment of foot (later of dragoons), 29 Aug. 1643 to 26 Apr. 1645, when it disbanded.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 150.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Holles, Denzil Denzil Holles (1598-1680)
Born a younger son of John Holles, first earl of Clare (died 1637), who held property in both Nottinghamshire and London. By inheritance and via a series of lucrative marriages, Denzil became very wealthy.
MP in the last parliament of James I and the early parliaments of Charles 1. in which he became an increasingly prominent critic of some aspects of royal government. He spent the 1630s out of favour and out of office, living near Dorchester, Dorset.
He was an MP in both the Short and Long Parliaments, again sometimes outspoken in criticising Charles I’s government, and he was one of the five MPs whose arrest the king sought in Jan. 1642.
Although continuing to argue for some sort of compromise settlement, in summer 1642 he accepted the necessity for war and was commissioned colonel of a regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army, which he helped to raise in and around London. He and his fledgling regiment supported the earl of Bedford in Somerset and Dorset, but were mauled around Sherborne and Holles had to rebuild his regiment with further recruits. He joined Essex in time for the battle of Edgehill, where he and his regiment stood their ground well, but in early Nov. they were caught in Brentford when Rupert stormed the town and much of his regiment was killed, wounded or captured. The regiment was disbanded at that point, with surviving elements being added to other regts., and Holles’s rather brief military career also came to an end.
He remained an active and prominent politician, arguing for a compromise settlement and thus associated with the peace group in parliament, several times accused of making secret approaches to the king. In 1646-7 he opposed the New Model Army’s programme and in turn became one of the New Model’s main targets. In summer 1647 he fled to Normandy and although he returned to England and retook his seat during 1648, he again fled ahead of Pride’s Purge. He spent the next few years in Normandy, before returning to England in the mid-1650s and living quietly in Dorset. He retook his seat in the Long Parliament in Feb. 1660, welcomed Charles II and the Restoration and was rewarded with a seat on the Privy Council and a peerage, becoming first Baron Holles. He served for a time as ambassador to France, but by the later 1670s, and the likely succession of a Catholic, was supporting limitations on royal powers and possible exclusionist policies.
References: Oxford DNB.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hollingworth, Arthur Arthur Hollingworth
Ensign in the Red regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Thomas Atkin) in summer 1642.
References: Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Hollys, Maccabeus Maccabeus Hollys
Alderman and merchant of Hull. Lieutenant of the watch in Hull.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire Parliamentarians’, 91.
Armies: Yorkshire
Holman, John John Holman
Apparently from Surrey
In 1640 Holman was a captain in Henry Wentworth’s regiment of foot in Northumberland’s Army against the Scots. By June 1642 he was captain of foot in the forces raised to defend Hull; shortly after he went south and became major in Thomas Grantham’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
By Nov. 1642 Holman had returned north and had joined Lord Fairfax, who made him lieutenant-colonel to his own regiment of foot on 16 Nov. Holman was at the storming of Wakefield (21 May 1643) and at the siege of Hull during summer 1643. On 16 Oct. 1643 he was commissioned colonel of foot, a position he held until he went south on 7 July 1644 (it is not known whether he freely resigned his commission or was deprived of it).
By Feb. 1645 Holman was colonel in the Abingdon garrison.
He is perhaps the John Holman esquire who was on the Surrey assessment committee in 1657.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 386; Peacock, Army lists, 41, 79.
Armies: Yorkshire; Earl of Essex; Northern Army (Fairfax);
Oxfordshire
Holmes, - - Holmes
Captain in Richard Holland’s regiment of foot in Lancashire.
References: TNA, E121/5/7 (Duckenfeild, 6/5/1651).
Armies: Lancashire
Holmes, Abraham Abraham Holmes (died 1685)
Hopper identifies him as of Halifax, Yorkshire (West Riding), though other sources suggest he may have originally been of County Durham or even of Sussex.
Holmes may have served in Robert Lilburne’s regiment of Harquebusiers in the Fairfaxes’ Northern Army in 1644-5. In or by 1646 he had become captain in the New Model Army regiment of foot originally commanded by Ralph Weldon, and from 1646 by Lilburne. Holmes became captain in succession to John Francklin in Lilburne’s New Model regiment of foot, and later Major and lieutenant-colonel in the regiment, serving under Sir Arthur Hesilrige in and around Newcastle in 1648-50 and then joining Monck’s regiment in Scotland. A radical, his subsequent political career included becoming a New Model Army agitator, a committed republican and later a Rye House Plotter and Monmouth rebel (for which he was executed).
References: Oxford DNB; Greaves and Zaller, Seventeenth-century radicals, 2.107-8;Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 109; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 2. 456, 459, 479-80, 535-6, 539-41; Peacock, Army lists, 106; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 79, 89, 101..
Armies: Northern Army; New Model Army
Holmes, Gabriel Gabriel Holmes
From 1 June to 14 Aug. 1643 he served as major, commanding a foot company in John Fiennes’s regiment of foot, which he brought away after the fall of Bristol and gave up its command at Brentford on 14 Aug. 1643. He then served with the earl of Manchester; from Aug. 1643 to Jan. 1645 he was Major in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.606-7; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.61; Holmes, Eastern Association, 98, 146, 235, 238; TNA, SP28/42.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Bristol; Eastern Association
Holmes, John John Holmes
In autumn 1643 lieutenant in Thomas Brundell’s troop in Sir John Norwich’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.73.
Armies: Eastern Association
Holt, Hugh Hugh Holt
Captain of Pioneers in Sir William Brereton’s Army at the siege of Chester in 1645. On 16 May he advised on the lack of readiness of a mine. On 11 Nov. he was paid £5 for overseeing workmen: ‘Hee is Captaine of the Pioneers nowe making the Line about the Towne’ (TNA, SP28/224, f. 52).
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 327, 437; TNA, SP28/224, f. 52; Carr and Atherton, Brereton Staffs., 345.
Armies: Cheshire
Holt, Joseph Joseph Holt
Captain of the company of firelocks/dragoons in Sir William Brereton’s regiment of foot in Brereton’s Cheshire Army by 30 Apr. 1644. Dore considers that Holt was very probably a professional soldier.
At the battle at Whitchurch, near Denbigh, on 1 Nov. 1645, where Mytton’s force defeated Sir William Vaughan’s royalists, Holt and Captain Finch, ‘stout and resolute men’, commanded the dragoons who, with the forlorn hope, forced a pass through a lane flanked by enemy fire (Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 194).
With the fall of Chester, Holt and his company received gratuities for their part in the siege.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 325, 328, 504-5, 2. 193-4, 384, 511;
TNA, SP28/224, f. 202
Armies: Cheshire
Holt, Peter Peter Holt
A captain in Ralph Asshton’s Lancashire regiment.
References: Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 282.
Armies: Lancashire
Honeywood, - - Honeywood
In May 1643 captain serving in one of the three regiments of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the Army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.33.
Armies: Eastern Association
Honeywood, Sir Thomas Sir Thomas Honeywood (1587-1666)
Born a younger son of Robert Honeywood, esquire, of Betchworth Castle, Surrey. During the 1630s he inherited Marks Hall, Essex, and was knighted.
A zealous puritan and firm parliamentarian, his main role during the civil war and after was as an administrator, helping to run Essex for parliament. However, he was also appointed colonel of a regiment of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the Army was involved; Honeywood was active in the field and led his men at Reading and Greenland House. He was active again in 1648 in limiting and quelling royalism in much of Essex and he joined Fairfax at the siege of Colchester. In 1651 he also led a regiment of Essex (presumably Trained Band) foot to Worcester, which supported Fleetwood’s regular troops. He was MP in the first and second Protectorate Parliaments and became a member of the Other House in 1657. He was pardoned but lost local office at the Restoration.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.32.
Armies: Eastern Association
Honywood, Sir John Sir John Honywood
Of Evington in Elmstead, Kent. Son of Sir Thomas Honywood of Elmstead. He married Mary, daughter of Thomas Godfrey of Lydd, Kent. Captain of a company in the Aylesford Lathe (Trained Band) regiment, who led it to the siege of Arundel Castle in Dec. 1643. In the early phase of the civil war he was one of those moderate figures from the leading county families who sat alongside more militant figures on the Kent county committee. By 1648 he was a signatory to the petition for a personal treaty between king and parliament, for the disbandment of the army and against the arbitrary government of the county committee which sparked the rising of that year in the county.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 74; Everitt, Kent, 144, 147, 153-4, 156, 244; Vis. Kent, 1663-68, 82.
Armies: Kent
Hoogan, Henry Henry Hoogan
Captain, later – probably from summer 1644 – major, of a company in Sir Miles Hobart’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.41.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hoogan, Sir Thomas Sir Thomas Hoogan
Lieutenant-Colonel in Sir John Palgrave’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army down to late 1644, when he replaced Palgrave as the regiment’s commander, remaining in that role until the regiment was disbanded in spring 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.77; Holmes, Eastern Association, 238.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hooke, Benjamin Benjamin Hooke
Captain in Rochford’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army by 13 Sept. 1642, and until its disbandment in May or June 1643.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 32; TNA, SP28/1a/ 299 [4], SP28/9/127.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hooke, Thomas Thomas Hooke
Captain. Captain in the Bristol Trained Bands. On 14 Apr. 1644 he was allowed £4 9s. to pay his officers for several training exercises until he left his company.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.604-5.
Armies: Bristol
Hooker, - - Hooker
Captain in Richard Turner’s regiment of horse, late 1643-early 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 136.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Hooker, - - Hooker
Captain in Colonel Richard Turner’s regiment of London horse, from Sept. 1643 until its reduction in Mar. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/132, Part 2, f. 1v.
Armies: London
Hooker, Edward Edward Hooker
Colonel. ‘A Stiller of Strong Waters living at St Mary At Hill Neare Billingsgate’ (Symonds, BL, Harl. 986, p. 63).
Captain in the Red regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Thomas Atkin) from Apr. 1642 to at least Sept. 1643 (Fourth captain in early summer 1642, Second captain by Sept. 1643). Colonel of Southwark Trained Bands regiment in Aug./Sept. 1643 according to the royalist report copied by Richard Symonds.
Noted by Symonds as committing to prison on 14 Aug. 1643 one Mr Newbery, and commanding the regiment at the muster of 26 Sept. However, John Hardwicke may already have succeeded him by 5 June.
Symonds, p. 47, has a cross-reference to this entry, crossed out (perhaps as an error, or as no longer true) under the Tower Hamlets regiment, to ‘Captain Hooker a Vinegar man one of these Captaines’.
By Oct. 1646 colonel of the Red regiment, London Trained Bands, and was retained as such by the Presbyterian militia committee the following year, but put out by the Independent militia committee later that year.
A Presbyterian satire in response to his dismissal described him as ‘a valiant prudent godly and faithfull captain … a man that stood up with the first and acted with the best, for the safety of King, Parliament, Kingdome and City, but he indeavoured not to be a Slave to Slaves, had a sword in his hand, and being assaulted by a company of Thieves and rascals, was loath to yield, but indeavoured to defend himselfe’ (A paire of spectacles for the Citie (1648), 9).
References: BL, Harl. 986, pp. 5, 63, 47; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317-8; A paire of spectacles for the Citie (1648), 9; TNA, SP28/131, Part 13, f. 5 r. & v.
Armies: London
Hooker, Ralph Ralph Hooker
Lieutenant in the troop commanded first by Robert Sparrow and then by Thomas Neville in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. He might be the Ralph Hooker who later in the 1640s served as lieutenant in Thomas Neville’s troop in Rich’s New Model Army regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.55; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 125.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army?
Hooper, William William Hooper
By spring 1644 ensign in Lingwood’s troop in Francis Russell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.97.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hope, Richard Richard Hope
Cornet in the troop commanded successively by George Thompson, Robert Thorpe and Robert Pelham in the regiment of horse of George Thompson/Edward Popham/George Starre until its disbandment in Oct. 1646. He was later a captain in Colonel Solomon Richard’s regiment in the Irish service.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 137.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Massey Brigade
Hope, Robert Robert Hope
Possibly the son of John Hope, mayor of Derby in 1638-9, or a member of the Hope family of Grangefield, Sutton-on-the-Hill, Derbyshire.
According to one source, for which the date is highly dubious, on 13 July 1643 Barton and Captain Hope, ‘two martial ministers of Nottinghamshire or Derbyshire coming to Peterborough, break open the Vestery and take away a Fair Crimson Satten Table Coth and several other things’ (Calamy Revised, 33). This is possibly the Derbyshire Hope, but the date cannot be right, and there is no evidence that Hope was ever ordained.
Hope served as lieutenant in Robert Greenwood’s troop of horse in the regiment of horse raised by Thomas Sanders in Derbyshire and whose colonel was Sir John Gell. In June 1644 Sanders appointed him as captain in the regiment. In Mar. 1645 Hope was one of its captains serving with Sir William Brereton in Cheshire, one of those godly officers who resented being forced to return to Derbyshire because Gell was starving them of supply. In Apr. 1646 Brereton ordered Hope and the Derbyshire horse to form part of the force holding the passes to Tamworth against relief from the royalist bases of Oxford and Newark. By early May Hope was back in Derby.
Captain in the Derbyshire militia, serving in the Preston campaign in 1648.
By 1653 captain in the regiment of horse of Thomas Sanders. He was an enthusiastic supporter of Cromwell’s expulsion of the Rump.
In May or June 1659 he transferred to William Packer’s regiment of horse. In Apr. 1660 was caught up in Lambert’s last-ditch attempt to save the Republic, and was captured between Leicester and Nottingham as he went to join him. He remained an object of suspicion after the Restoration and was arrested by the earl of Devonshire in 1661.
References: Dore, Brereton Letter Books, 1.522-5; Carr and Atherton, Brereton Staffs., 122-3, 208; Turbutt, Derbyshire, III; Slack, ‘Gell and Sanders’, 36; Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 1.284-5, 288, 290, 2.75, 78; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 164-5.
Armies: Derbyshire; New Model Army
Hopkins, John John Hopkins
In Nov. 1645, ensign in John Halford’s company in Godfrey Bosvile’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 31.
Armies: Warwickshire; Waller
Hopton, James James Hopton
From summer 1643 until late 1644, captain in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse in Waller’s Army.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 66.
Armies: Waller
Hopton, Sir Richard Sir Richard Hopton
Colonel [?]. On 30 Sept. 1642 the earl of Essex commissioned him to raise troops from the trained bands and volunteers of Herefordshire. He is probably the ‘Sir Hopton,’ who, having promised to raise 1,000 Dragoons at 4 days’ notice came to Ledbury in Dec. 1642 with drum and colours to raise levies to no great effect. He went away and was later reported to have joined the royalists at Worcester.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.631.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Horsey, John John Horsey
Captain in Colonel Thomas Tyrrell’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in late Aug. 1643. He was captain in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot by 18 July 1644. He became captain in Colonel Thomas Rainsborough’s New Model Army regiment of foot and was killed at the siege of Sherborne in autumn 1645.
References: TNA, SP28/9/212, SP28/17/97, SP28/19/21; JHC, 4.76; Temple, ‘New Model Army’, 58-9.
Armies: Earl of Essex; New Model Army
Horsfall, Markham Markham Horsfall
Of Underbank, Stansfield, Yorkshire (West Riding), a parliamentarian lieutenant in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 111.
Armies: Yorkshire
Horsman, Edward Edward Horsman
There were two Horsmans who were officers in the Eastern Association and it is not always easy to untangle the careers of the two.
Edward was probably the officer who in spring 1644 replaced Robert Patterson as captain of a troop in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse within the Eastern Association Army, continuing in that role until the troop was absorbed into the New Model Army, at which point Horsman may have left the army, though one of the Horsmans, either Edward or Robert, was in spring 1645 appointed a captain in Whalley’s New Model Army horse regiment, but he was no longer there by the time of Naseby. By 1650 either Edward or Robert was a major in the Northamptonshire horse militia.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.22; 2.73; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 53.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army?
Horsman, Robert Robert Horsman
There were two Horsmans who were officers in the Eastern Association and it is not always easy to untangle the careers of the two.
Robert was probably the officer who served in 1643-4 as captain (and for a time as governor of Rockingham Castle) in Sir John Norwich’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. He may have left the army at the time of the formation of the New Model, though one of the Horsmans, either Edward or Robert, was in spring 1645 appointed a captain in Whalley’s New Model Army horse regiment, but he was no longer there by the time of Naseby. By 1650 either Edward or Robert was a major in the Northamptonshire horse militia.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.22; 2.73; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 53; Luke Letter Books, nos. 834, 1118.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army?
Horton, Edward Edward Horton
Ensign in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642. Perhaps a kinsman of the regiment’s lieutenant-colonel, Jeremy Horton. There are two ensigns of this name in the published list of Essex’s officers in this regiment, possibly in error, but the number of ensigns with both names seems to match that of the companies.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Horton, Jeremy Jeremy Horton
Horton was Lord Wharton’s lieutenant-colonel of his regiment and sergeant-major-general in his army raised for service in Ireland in summer 1642. When the regiment was instead carried over into the earl of Essex’s Army, he remained lieutenant-colonel of Wharton’s regiment of foot in 1642.
Sergeant-Major-General of the brigade commanded (until his death at Edgehill) by Charles Essex; a surviving pay warrant covers three months from 10 Dec. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 31, 68;TNA, SP28/5/90.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Horton, Thomas Thomas Horton (1603-1649)
Born the second son of William Horton (died 1638) of Gumley, Leicesterhire, a modest landowning family with close connections to the Hesilriges.
Little is known of Thomas’s early life. At the outbreak of civil war he was an officer, probably cornet, in Hesilrige’s troop of horse and as such accompanied him into the earl of Essex’s Army and fought in the campaign and battle of Edgehill. He went with Hesilrige into Waller’s Army in 1643-4, initially as captain-lieutenant and by spring 1645 major of Hesilrige’s regiment of horse. As such he fought at Lansdown and Roundway Down, Cheriton and the second battle of Newbury. He transferred with the bulk of the regiment into the New Model Army, as major of what was supposed to be Middleton’s New Model regiment of horse but became Butler’s. He fought and was quite badly wounded at the battle of Naseby. In summer 1647 he succeeded Butler as colonel and he and his regiment were then dispatched to South Wales. Thus in spring 1648, ahead of the arrival of Cromwell and his New Model brigade, Horton played a key role in containing the rising in that region, engaging and defeating a large rebel army at St Fagans in early May. Tenby Castle surrendered to him at the end of the month.
He was an active regicide. He and his regiment were chosen to be part of Cromwell’s Irish expedition. He crossed to Dublin in Aug. 1649 but almost immediately sickened and died.
References: Oxford DNB.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller; New Model Army
Hoskins, John John Hoskins (died 1645)
Captain in Sir Michael Livesay’s regiment of Kentish horse; his troop mutinied at Abingdon against Waller in summer 1644, after the defeat at Cropredy. He went with the core of the regiment when it came under Henry Ireton in the New Model Army. He was killed at Naseby.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 81.
Armies: Kent; Waller (Southern Association); New Model Army
Hoskins, John John Hoskins
Lieutenant in Lord Mandeville’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hotham, Durant [Durand] Durant [Durand] Hotham (1616/1617-1691)
Fifth son of Sir John Hotham with his second wife Anne Rokeby; John Hotham was his half-brother.
Hotham was admitted to Christ’s College, Cambridge, on 7 May 1632, aged fifteen, graduated BA in 1637 and proceeded MA in 1640. On 6 Jan. 1641 he was admitted to the Middle Temple.
On 10 Aug. and 6 Sept. 1642 Hotham received monies for each of the troops of horse of Captains John Hotham and John Alured in the earl of Essex’s Army. On three occasions (25 June, 26 Aug. and another occasion) he received £2,000 for the Hull garrison.
In Dec. 1644 Hotham defended his father at his court martial.
References: Oxford DNB; TNA, SP28/1a/18, 19, 239, SP28/1d/405.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Yorkshire
Hotham, John John Hotham (1610-1645)
Eldest son of Sir John Hotham of Scarborough, Yorkshire (East Riding), and his first wife Katherine Rodes; Durant Hotham was his half-brother.
Generally known as ‘Captain’ Hotham. In Jan. 1642 he went north from Westminster to secure Hull for parliament, pending the arrival of his father as governor, garrisoning it with East Riding Trained Bands. In late July 1642 he was commissioned captain of a troop of horse by the earl of Essex, but he was effectively his father’s second-in-command at Hull. In Sept. he marched into the West Riding, and in early Oct. captured Cawood, contrary to the neutrality pact Lord Fairfax had negotiated with local royalists.
Hotham was appointed lieutenant-general of the Northern Army in Dec. 1642, but was at odds with the Fairfax dominance, and shortly after opened negotiations with the royalist earl of Newcastle. In Apr. 1643 he accepted the position of general of the parliamentarian forces in Lincolnshire. In June 1643 he was arrested by Cromwell, and although he escaped to Hull the double-game between king and parliament played by him and his father resulted in his arrest at the end of the month, and his execution on 1 Jan. 1645.
References: Oxford DNB; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 101; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming); A. Hopper, ‘“Fitted for desperation”: honour and treachery in Parliament's Yorkshire command, 1642-1643’, History, vol. 86 (2001), 138-54; A. Hopper, ed., The Papers of the Hothams, Governors of Hull during the Civil War, Camden Soc, 5th ser., 39 (2011).
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax); Lincolnshire
Hotham, Sir John, first baronet Sir John Hotham, first baronet (1589-1645)
Of Scarborough and Fyling Hall, Yorkshire (East Riding).
Second but only surviving son of John Hotham of Scorborough and his third wife Jane, daughter and coheir of Richard Legard of Rysome, Yorkshire.
He married (1) in 1607 Katherine, daughter of Sir John Rodesof Barlborough, Derbyshire; (2) in 1614 Anne, daughter and heir of Ralph Rokeby; (3) Frances, daughter of John Legard of London and Yorkshire; (4) in 1631 Katherine (died 1634), daughter of Sir William Bamburgh, first baronet, of Howsham, Yorkshire, and widow of Sir Thomas Norcliffe of Langton, Yorkshire; (5) in 1635 Sarah, daughter of Thomas Anlaby of Etton, Yorkshire.
Father of John Hotham (1610-1645) and William Hotham.
Knighted 1617; created baronet 1622.
MP for Beverley, 1625, 1626, 1628 and in the Short and Long Parliaments.
Governor of Hull, 1628-39 and 1642-3. In 1642 he defied the king and denied him entrance to the town, but then and in the following year intrigued about handing it over to the royalists. In 1643 he was arrested and sent to the Tower; on 7 Sept. he was expelled from the Commons. He was executed on 3 Jan. 1645.
References: Oxford DNB; HoP: The Commons, 1604-1629, 4.796-800; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming); Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 101; A. Hopper, ‘“Fitted for desperation” : honour and treachery in Parliament's Yorkshire command, 1642-1643’, History, vol. 86 (2001), 138-54; A. Hopper, ed., The Papers of the Hothams, Governors of Hull during the Civil War, Camden Soc, 5th ser., 39 (2011).
Armies: Yorkshire
Hotham, William William Hotham (born c. 1616)
Fourth son of Sir John Hotham (1589-1645) of Scarborough, Yorkshire (East Riding) and younger brother of John Hotham. Captain in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 101; Yorks. Vis., 3.261.
Armies: Yorkshire
Houblon [Holborne], James James Houblon [Holborne] (1592-1682)
Possibly major in the Orange regiment, London Auxiliaries in Oct. 1646.
The forename is not given in the source: it might be Peter Houblon, but the City connection perhaps makes his uncle James Houblon more likely.
James Houblon was the son of Peter/Pierre Houblon (died 1593), a refugee from the area of Lille. James was a merchant and patriarch of a family of merchants trading with southern Europe (which included Sir John, first governor of the Bank of England) and an elder of the French Church in Threadneedle Street July 1643-Dec. 1646. He was also an interloper into the East India trade.
In 1638 he was probably in St Benet Sherehog, and after the Restoration he can be linked to Bearbinder Lane and St Mary Woolchurch.
In June 1644 Houblon had the keeping of arms, ammunition and other provisions for the army in Ireland stored in Bucklersbury and Smart’s Quay in London; the Committee of Both Kingdoms ordered him to deliver these to the Committee for Citizens’ Adventurers to be sent to Ireland.
Gilbert Burnet preached his funeral sermon (which emphasized his piety and sense of the unity of the Reformed Protestant tradition) and Samuel Pepys composed the epitaph on his funeral monument.
He also had experience of volunteer military training: his funeral sermon recalled how in the mid-1630s he was nearly killed by an explosion whilst at a training event near Moorfields.
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 66; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 94, 95, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11; G. Burnet, A sermon preached at the funeral of Mr James Houblon (1682); Oxford DNB [biography of Sir John Houblon]; The diary of Samuel Pepys, ed. R. Latham and W. Mathews, 11 vols. (1970-83), 10.193; Woodhead, Rulers, 93-4; Dale, 1638, 41; French Church Letter Books, esp. 92; The Transcript of the United Parishes of S. Mary Woolnoth and S. Mary Woolchurch Haw, eds. J.M.S. Brooke & A.W.C. Hallen (1886), xxxiv; A.A. Houblon, The Houblon family: its story and times (2 vols. 1907); Brenner, Merchants, 175, 193; CSPD, 1644, 210.
Armies: London
Houblon [Holborne], James James Houblon [Holborne] (baptised 1616, died 1644)
Baptised in the French Church, Threadneedle Street, 16 Dec. 1616. Son of Pierre/Peter Houblon and his wife Marie du Quesne; nephew of James Houblon (1592-1682) and brother of Pierre Houblon.
Possibly the Captain Hobland described by Richard Symonds as a dyer in Southwark, a captain in the Southwark regiment and a violent roundhead. The modern family history describes him as a merchant of Southwark and notes the horses he contributed for the parliamentary cause in 1642-3.
Colonel of the Southwark auxiliaries regiment by late 1643 and when it mustered on 16 Apr. 1644. He commanded it as part of the London brigade with Sir William Waller in his expedition against Oxford, in which his regiment fought at Cropredy. He fell sick at the end of June 1644, and died at the beginning of July at Northampton. His regiment returned to London with the colours and his body for burial.
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 66; TNA, SP28/121A, Part 3, ff. 339r.-343r.; R. Coe, An exact diarie. Or a breife relation of the progresse of Sir William Wallers army since the joyning of the London avxilliaries with his forces: which was the twelfth of May 1644. untill their returne homeward on Thursday the 11 of Iuly (1644), p. 7; A.A. Houblon, The Houblon family: its story and times ( 2 vols. 1907), 1.357, 106-7; French Church Registers, 105.
Armies: Southwark
Houblon [Holborne], Peter Peter Houblon [Holborne] (baptised 1615)
Baptised in the French Church, Threadneedle Street on 26 Mar. 1615. Son of Pierre/Peter Houblon and his wife Marie du Quesne; nephew of James Houblon (1592-1682) and brother of James Houblon (baptised 1616, died 1644). He married Mary, daughter of Curtis Dingley. When his son and namesake appeared in the French Church marriage records, he as father was recorded as ‘Pierre, natif de Southwark’.
Possibly captain in the Southwark regiment, Trained Bands in Sept. 1643 [as Hobland], in which case he was a dyer in St Olave’s, Southwark, though this may be his brother James. He was possibly Major in the Orange regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel Thomas Gower) in Oct. 1646, but this may be his uncle James.
He was possibly the Captain Peter Houblon named to the Blue regiment, London Trained Bands, in Dec. 1659, but on balance this is more likely to be his cousin (1623-92), the son of James Houblon, who appears in Restoration parish registers of St Antholin, Budge Row, London, both as Peter and Captain Houblon.
Noted by Symonds of him and all the other captains of the Trained Bands regiment: ‘all these violent [symbol of circle: i.e. Roundheads]’ (BL, Harl. 986, p. 66).
Houblon, Houblon Family, facing p. 101, reproduces a 1651 portrait of him in armour, so at some point he no doubt had a military career.
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 66; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 94, 95, 117; French Church Registers, 1.97, 2.29; A.A. Houblon, The Houblon family: its story and times (2 vols. 1907), vol. 1; St Antholin Registers, 93-5, 101, 106.
Armies: Southwark
Hoult, - - Hoult
Of Bury, Lancashire. One of the captains defending Bolton against the first royalist assault early in 1643.
References: Lancashire military proceedings, 81.
Armies: Lancashire
How, - - How
Lieutenant. An officer at the siege of Bristol, mentioned for his actions on 27 July 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.610.
Armies: Bristol
Howard, - - Howard
Ensign in Glisson’s troop in Francis Russell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.98.
Armies: Eastern Association
Howard, John John Howard
Captain, who trained Poole volunteers, July 1642.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.517.
Armies: Dorset
Howard, William William Howard
Lieutenant in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Howe, John John Howe
Lieutenant in Captain Edward Stearne’s company in Thomas Ayloffe’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army by the time of its disbandment in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.10.
Armies: Eastern Association
Howorth, William William Howorth
Possibly William Howorth, third son of Edmund Howorth (died c. 1620) of Lancashire, who died without issue at some point before 1664. His younger brother Theophilus married a daughter of Henry Asshurst, sister of John Asshurst.
Trooper and captain-lieutenant under Captain Henry Butterworth in the Lancashire regiment of horse of Colonel Nicholas Shuttleworth, owed arrears of £56 6s 4d in Sept. 1654.
References: TNA, E121/3/1; Vis. Lancs., 1664, 156.
Armies: Lancashire
Hoyle, Edmond [Edward] Edmond [Edward] Hoyle
It is not entirely clear if Edmond and Edward Hoyle were one and the same person or two separate men.
Clothier, of Ovenden township, Coley parish, Yorkshire. He may have been a kinsman of the puritan divine Joshua Hoyle who probably served in Lord Fairfax’s Lifeguard by 1644; he may also have been related to Thomas Hoyle, mayor (1632-3, 1644) of York and MP in 1628 and the Long Parliament.
Edward was lieutenant of Lord Fairfax’s Lifeguard, serving under van Strobella, early in the war.
From 25 May to 7 Sept. 1644 he was captain in Hugh Bethell’s regiment of horse, in which he fought against Montrose in County Durham and at Marston Moor. From Sept. 1644 until at least June 1645 he was lieutenant again in Lord Fairfax’s Lifeguard. Fairfax recommended him for a place in the New Model Army to Sir Thomas Fairfax.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 387; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 110 [citing TNA, SP28/266/part ii/49; SP28/266/part iii/113, 117-8; WR Sess Recs., II, 170-1].
Armies: Yorkshire
Hubbard, - - Hubbard
Captain of an auxiliary regiment in the Kent Trained Bands in 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 78.
Armies: Kent
Hubbard, Peter Peter Hubbard
By summer 1643, ensign in the Colonel’s company in John Barker’s/Thomas Willoughby’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 22.
Armies: Warwickshire
Hudson, Benjamin Benjamin Hudson
In 1644-5, captain and commander of the parliamentarian garrison based in Bedford.
References: Luke Letter Books, nos. 62, 826, 860, 878, 879, 1156, 1292.
Armies: Bedfordshire
Hudson, Thomas Thomas Hudson
Ensign in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 40.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hudson, Thomas Thomas Hudson
‘A Skinner in Southwarke’ (BL, Harl. 986, p. 64).
According to the royalist report of that month, lieutenant-colonel of the Southwark [Auxiliaries] regiment (Colonel Edward Hooker) by Sept. 1643, although this report is much vaguer on south of the River Thames compared to the City, and Houblon may have been its colonel by then.
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 64; TNA, SP28/131, Part 13, f. 5v.
Armies: Southwark
Huggins, Henry Henry Huggins
Ensign in Thomas Ballard’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 43.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hughes [Hughs, Hues], Thomas Thomas Hughes [Hughs, Hues]
On 26 Jan. 1647 the Dorset committee recorded that Hughes had served parliament in Dorset as a commissary for 51 weeks, and as captain and governor of Lulworth Castle for 78 weeks.
He claimed nothing for his time as commissary, when he and his family had free quarter, but had received neither pay nor free quarter as captain and governor.
Commissary of Wareham garrison (under Colonels Starr and Bruen). In Sept. 1644, took cattle into Wareham garrison.
13 Dec. 1644-20 Feb. 1646 (37 weeks) [sic] the period when William Lodge was lieutenant in Hughes’s troop of horse.
[1645] Ordered as governor of Lulworth Castle to contain the royalists at Corfe Castle.
24 May 1646: then commander of Lulworth Castle.
21 Oct. 1646: payment towards discharge of his engagement at demolition of Corfe Castle.
26 Nov. 1646: Hughes was to impress carts for wrecked alcohol washed up at Lulworth and now in Hughes’s custody in Lulworth Castle.
24 Feb. 1648: Payment to Hughes of £5 for his service in billeting troops in Blandford Division on recalcitrant tax-payers to extract money for payment of troops.
27 Apr. 1648: Granted share in sequestered rectory of Stalbridge.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee,168, 309, 33, 82, 132 311, 297, 338, 352, 390.
Armies: Dorset
Hughes, George George Hughes (1603/04-67)
The son of a Welshman, born in Southwark.
Matriculated Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 28 June 1620, aged 16; BA 1623, MA 1625; incorporated Cambridge 1627; BD 1633. Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.
After suspension from lectureship at All Hallows, Bread Street, chaplain to Lord Brooke.
Vicar of Tavistock, Devon, 1638.
Elected vicar of Plymouth, St Andrew’s, by the town corporation on 21 Oct. 1643 (though taking refuge in Coventry in Feb. 1644).
Chaplain in the Plymouth garrison. Paid £10 on 10 Apr. 1645. Commissioned chaplain to the island and fort of Plymouth in Nov. 1647, and still in that post in Nov. 1649.
In May 1647 he preached a fast sermon before Parliament.
‘The leading Presbyterian in the county’ and the driving force behind clerical organization and the Devon Association of ministers in the 1650s (Calamy Revised, 281).
Ejected in 1662, and in 1665 imprisoned on St Nicholas Island, Plymouth, for nine months.
References: Worth, ‘Plymouth siege accounts’, 228; Calamy Revised, 281-2; Laurence, Army Chaplains, 137.
Armies: Devon
Hughes, John John Hughes
Lieutenant in Thomas Ballard’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 43.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hughes, Robert Robert Hughes
Ensign in Major Owen Parry’s company in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot in Wharton’s army raised for service in Ireland in 1642; later that summer he went instead with the regiment as ensign in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. He was wounded at Edgehill, and in 1643 was paid for arrears up to 19 Jan. 1643.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 68, 31; TNA, SP28/5/193.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hughes, William William Hughes
Lieutenant in Captain John Gifford’s troop in Waller’s regiment of horse in June 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, 7.717.
Hull, William William Hull
Of Bispham, Poulton-le-Fylde parish, Lancashire. One of the captains commissioned by Alexander Rigby to raise a company of foot in Bispham and Poulton-le-Fylde.
References: Warr in Lancashire, 42.
Armies: Lancashire
Hulse, Thomas Thomas Hulse
A captain in Sir William Brereton’s regiment of foot in his Cheshire Army by 30 Apr. 1645. Of a family with branches in Nantwich and Norbury. In Apr. 1645 he was at Cholmondeley Castle with his company, evidently under the joint command of Captain Anthony Brereton. Later governor of Beeston after its recapture in Nov. 1645.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 254.
Armies: Cheshire
Hulton, Edward Edward Hulton
Of Hulton, Salford Hundred, Lancashire. Second son of William Hulton of Hulton and his wife Catherine, daughter of Robert Hyde of Norbury, Cheshire, esquire. He died a bachelor, before 1664.
Captain, apparently in Colonel Alexander Rigby’s regiment of foot in Lancashire.
References: Vis. Lancs., 1664, 159; Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 189.
Armies: Lancashire
Hume, George George Hume
By spring 1643, lieutenant in the Major’s troop in Sir William Balfour’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 19.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Humphreys, - - Humphreys
Captain in Thomas Ayloffe’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army by 19 Sept. 1643. In Apr. 1645 his company became part of the garrison at Phillis Court, near Henley, Buckinghamshire.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.10.
Armies: Eastern Association
Humphreys, - - Humphreys
A captain serving with Sir William Waller’s Army by 7 June 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, app. 2, p. 3.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Humphreys, John John Humphreys
By Aug. 1644, major in John Birch’s newly-formed regiment of foot raised in Kent for Waller’s Southern Association Army. He later became the regiment’s lieutenant-colonel in succession to John Reymond.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 28.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Kent
Humphries, - - Humphries
Ensign in Captain Nicholas Moore’s company in Sir William Waller’s regiment of dragoons in Sept. 1643. Although the common surname precludes any certainty, he may be the Newman Humphries who in spring 1645, by which time what was left of the regiment was being broken up, was lieutenant in the Major’s troop of what was left of John Dalbier’s regiment of horse which was part of the earl of Essex’s Army but which served with and under Waller for part of the war.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 145; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 151-2.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Earl of Essex?
Humphries, - - Humphries
Lieutenant in James Burrill’s, later William Puckle’s company in Sir Miles Hobart’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.42.
Armies: Eastern Association
Hungerford, Anthony Anthony Hungerford
A captain of foot in the earl of Denbigh’s Army (pay warrant, 16 Mar. 1644), in a company which by July 1644 was serving in Shropshire. By the end of 1644 he was governor of Stoke upon Tern in Shropshire and perhaps formally transferred to the Shropshire county forces by spring 1645. By autumn 1645 he was governor of Stokesay Castle, recently captured from the royalists. In summer 1646 he was promoted major (under Colonel Humphrey Mackworth) of the then four standing companies in Shropshire. In Mar. 1647 he was ordered to raise a regiment of foot for service in Ireland. He quickly raised 600 men, mainly from former soldiers in Shropshire, and he crossed from Chester to Dublin in the spring, with another company joining his regiment over the summer.
References: TNA, SP28/131, part 12, f. 16, SP28/42, part 2, ff. 294, 296, 300; Warws. RO, C2017/C10/3b, C2017/C10/41, C2017/C10/116; Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 123; CSPD, 1645-1647, 528-9; The Kingdomes Weekly Intelligencer, 27 Apr.-4 May 1647; The Moderate Intelligencer, 15-22 Apr. 1647.
Armies: Earl of Denbigh; Shropshire; Ireland
Hungerford, Sir Edward Sir Edward Hungerford (1596-1648)
Only son of Sir Anthony Hungerford of Stock, near Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire and later of Black Bourton, Oxfordshire, and his first wife Lucy, daughter of Sir Walter Hungerford of Farleigh Castle, Somerset and widow of Sir John St John of Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire. He was MP for Chippenham in the Short and Long Parliaments (and also in 1621); also MP for Wootton Bassett (1614), Wiltshire (1624), Bath (1625) and Cricklade (1628). He executed the militia ordinance in Wiltshire and was made commander-in-chief of the Wiltshire forces on 31 Jan. 1643, triumphing in his feud with Sir Edward Bayntun. Colonel of regiments of horse, foot and dragoons.
References: Oxford DNB; Keeler, Long Parliament, 101-2; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming); Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.540-7.
Armies: Wiltshire: Sir Edward Hungerford’s Regt. of Foot
Huniburne, Lancelot Lancelot Huniburne
Master Gunner in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 25.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hunnings, John John Hunnings
Lieutenant (changed by insertion to captain-lieutenant) of Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Zachary’s Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment when it mustered at Whitechapel on 18 Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 5, ff. 576r.-577v.
Armies: Tower Hamlets;London
Hunt, - - Hunt
Lieutenant in Captain Lionel Rawlins’s company in Sir Richard Onslow’s regiment of foot (the Surrey Auxiliaries).
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 114.
Armies: Surrey
Hunt, - - Hunt
Captain in the Yellow regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel John Owen) in Oct. 1646.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11.
Armies: London
Hunt, - - Hunt
A captain in Lord Brooke’s Army before Stratford-upon-Avon in 1643.
Possibly Thomas Hunt of Coventry, possibly Robert Hunt (died 1650), connnected to Brooke through the Providence Island Company.
References: A True Relation of the Death of Lord Brooks (1643), sig. A2r.
Armies: Lord Brooke
Hunt, - - Hunt
Captain in the Isle of Wight regiment of foot commanded by Thomas Carr; on 22 Mar. 1644 it was ordered that he should be arrested and sent out of the island.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 24.
Armies: Isle of Wight
Hunt, - - Hunt
Ensign in Sir Richard Onslow’s regiment of foot (Surrey Auxiliaries) by 24 Feb. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 107.
Armies: Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Hunt, Goodier Goodier Hunt
In summer 1644, lieutenant in Hunt’s troop in William Purefoy’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 122.
Armies: Warwickshire
Hunt, Henry Henry Hunt
A captain in charge of one of the companies of Shropshire foot at the siege of Lichfield in spring 1646, ordered to march to Worcester on 26 May. Probably an officer in Humphrey Mackworth’s regiment of foot.
References: Carr and Atherton, Brereton Staffs., 188, 280.
Armies: Shropshire
Hunt, John John Hunt
By Jan. 1643 and continuing until Aug. 1646, captain in Godfrey Bosvile’s Warwick-based regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 31.
Armies: Warwickshire; Waller
Hunt, John John Hunt
Captain in Colonel John Fiennes’s regiment of horse in Oxfordshire, summer 1644-summer 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 54.
Armies: Oxfordshire
Hunt, John John Hunt
Captain. An Oxfordshire esquire who served first as captain of horse under Nathaniel Fiennes; later as captain of foot under Colonel Ingoldsby.
References: Gentles, ‘Debentures’, 300.
Armies: Bristol
Hunt, John John Hunt
On 13 Feb. 1643 Hunt was lieutenant in the company of Major John Lobb in the Portsmouth garrison regiment of Sir William Lewis.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 71.
Armies: Hampshire
Hunt, Richard Richard Hunt (died 1643)
‘A Confectioner in Bearebinder lane’ (BL, Harl. 986, p. 7). Sometime sergeant to Captain Ditchfeild (Capt. Edward Ditchfield, captain in the Trained Bands in 1639). By Sept. 1643 he was a captain in the Red regiment, London Trained Bands, formally Fourth captain but at the first battle of Newbury acting as Third captain. He was killed there.
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 7.
Armies: London
Hunt, Robert Robert Hunt
Captain in Cholmley’s probably short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36-7.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hunt, Robert Robert Hunt
Lieutenant-Colonel serving in Cheshire. Warrants survive, one of 17 Dec. 1644 to pay Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Hunt £20 (forename from his signature), another of 20 Dec. 1645 for the governor of Hooton (Wirral) to pay him £16, in regard he has not had any pay for a long time.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 186; TNA, SP28/125, f.149, SP28/225, f. 570r.
Armies: Cheshire
Hunt, Thomas Thomas Hunt
An officer in Staffordshire. He was captain of a troop of horse of (when he recorded their names) 43 men. He seems to have been stationed near enemy lines. In Jan. 1644 he was assigned various towns for the support of his troops, but then had Newcastle-under-Lyme also added because several of the places which had been assigned him were in enemy hands.
By the account of the royalist newsbook Mercurius Aulicus, in Jan. 1645, whilst governor of Tamworth, he challenged Colonel Bagot at Lichfield to meet him half-way between the two towns, only to be pursued back to the gates of Tamworth. The newsletter claimed to publish the challenge, ‘in such pure Reformation language as we would willingly have concealed, but that you may see what clean spirit they practise by, take here a Copy of it… Bagot thou sonne of an Egiptian hore meete mee halfe the way to morrowe morning the halfe way betwixt Tamworth and Litchfeald if thou darest, if not I will whippe thee when soever I meete thee’.
With the further gloss that Hunt ‘doubtlesse by the genius and language of his Challenge, is fitted for Ordination into the new Presbytery’, the passage is as much a comment on his presumed low social status and ignorance (Mercurius Aulicus, 12-19 Jan. 1645, 1345-6).
Hunt was a captain of foot in the Staffordshire forces at the siege of Chester, 1645-6.
References: Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, lxiii, lxxi, 23, 27, 31, 36-7, 42, 86, 143, 185, 338; Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 382., 396, 510; Mercurius Aulicus, 12-19 Jan. 1645, 1345-6.
Armies: Staffordshire
Hunt, Thomas Thomas Hunt
Confusingly one of three parliamentarian officers of this name active in the West Midlands region during the main civil war, but this Thomas Hunt was very much Shropshire-based.
Captain of volunteers in the Shrewsbury area by July 1642, on 2 Aug. he trained his recruits, described as ‘300 orderly men’. Hunt fled and his recruits were disarmed and disbanded at the royalist take-over of the county in late summer 1642. In 1643 captain of a company of foot and a troop of horse in Thomas Mytton’s regiments. By the autumn, captain in Wem garrison and present during the siege of 17-18 Oct. Still based as Wem in June 1644, when commissioned by the earl of Denbigh captain of a troop of horse comprising ‘four score harquebusiers’ and officers to be raised within the West Midlands Association. In Oct. he was further commissioned by the earl of Essex as colonel of a regiment of horse and a troop of scouts to be raised in Shropshire. As colonel, he took part in the capture of Shrewsbury in Feb. 1645 and also in the siege of Caus Castle in June. In 1645 he continued to command at least a troop of horse as well as a regiment of foot. Appointed to all the county committees relating to Shropshire 1643-8 and was elected Recruiter MP for Shrewsbury.
References: JHL, V, 221-2. 269-70; Warws. RO, C2017/C9/18, 2017?c9/133; Shropshire Archives, Hunt Collection, 366/1, 366/179, 366/181; Shropshire Archives, 3365/167; A More Exact and Particular Relation of the taking of Shrewsbury, than hath hithero been published. With the manner and performance thereof by Lieutenant Colonell William Reinking (1645); HMC, 13th Report, Appendix 1, 141-3; Kingdom’s Weekly Intelligencer, 24 June-1 July 1645.
Armies: Shropshire
Hunt, Thomas Thomas Hunt
Of Coventry. Brother of Lieutenant Goodere Hunt. He was described by the hostile Mercurius Aulicus as ‘a broken mercer’.
In the early stages of the war Hunt was a lieutenant, commissioned by Colonel John Bridges (governor of Warwick Castle), and commanding 40 dragoons and foot. He is probably (despite the rank) the Captain Hunt named as in Brooke’s force before Stratford-upon-Avon in Feb. 1643. In Apr. 1643 he was amongst the forces ordered to secure Kenilworth Castle and its doubtfully loyal governor. Later captain of dragoons in Warwickshire and governor of Astley, Warwickshire.
In Sept. 1646 Hunt was commissioned captain of a troop of 60 harquebusiers in Chidley Coote’s regiment of horse, raised in 1646 for service in Ireland, and in spring 1648 was commanding a troop stationed in and around Drogheda. He continued to serve after its defeat by Inchiquin, when it served in Ulster, and a debenture survives for payment for his service in Jan.-June 1649.
Possibly the Captain Thomas Hunt who was a captain of foot in Thomas Reade’s regiment of foot in 1656, when his company was stationed at Inverlochy, and was retained as captain in 1659 in a regiment loyal to Monck.
Will proved (Lichfield), 18 Oct. 1661.
References: Hughes, Warwickshire, 196, 208; Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 2.564-6, 643; CSP Ireland,1633- 1647, 517, 548, 565, 569, 601, 611; TNA, SP28/253B (examination of Captain Thomas Hunt); A True Relation of the Death of Lord Brooks (1643), sig. A2r.
Armies: Lord Brooke; Warwickshire; Ireland
Hunter, Thomas Thomas Hunter
Of Rosecoat, Lonsdale Hundred, Lancashire.
Captain in George Dodding’s regiment of foot in Lancashire, owed arrears of £603 17s 11d (6 Sept. 1650) and £58 7s 10d (12 Sept. 1650).
References: TNA, E121/4/8, E121/5/5; Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 287.
Armies: Lancashire
Hunter, William William Hunter
Lieutenant-Colonel of Lord Robartes’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army by mid-Sept. 1642. He was still its lieutenant-colonel in Apr. 1644 when he was paid £200 for recruiting the regiment. By Oct., after the Cornish campaign, he was appealing for payment of arrears: he had long been in the parliament’s service in the place he was in, he claimed, diligent in his duty and had received several wounds and losses. When the Lords wished totally to reject the proposed officers of the New Model regiment of foot of John Pickering in Apr. 1645, they proposed appointing en bloc the officers of Robartes’s regiment, with Hunter as colonel. The idea was dropped and Hunter does not seem to have entered the New Model.
Further identification is uncertain, but he is possibly Lieutenant-Colonel Hunter commanding the Clydesdale foot by Feb. 1647 when it was ordered into Ulster by the Scottish Estates.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37; TNA, SP28/2b/343, SP28/14/291, SP28/19/16; Furgol, Covenanting armies, 91; Temple, ‘New Model Army’, 71.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Huntington, Robert Robert Huntington (c.1616-1684)
From an obscure background, possibly of Battisford, Suffolk, and little is known about his birth, parentage or early life. On the eve of the civil war he was a merchant in and freeman of Great Yarmouth.
By summer 1644, he was a captain in Vermuyden’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army; he transferred with his troop in that regiment to the New Model Army, promoted to major and serving until the late 1640s in what later in 1645 became Cromwell’s horse regiment. He fought at Naseby and in much of the south-western campaign of 1645-6, though he was with Cromwell in the expedition to capture Devizes, Winchester and Basing in autumn 1645. In 1647 he was appointed by Fairfax to take control of the king after his seizure by Joyce at Holdenby and he subsequently acted as an intermediary between the New Model and Charles. It is possible that this role led to his subsequent falling-out with Cromwell when he became aware of Cromwell’s and the Army’s hardening line towards the king. He suddenly resigned in summer 1648, in the midst of the second civil war, writing an explanation, subsequently published, explaining that he did so because of Cromwell’s hypocrisy and the officers’ double-dealing in their relations with the king. As such he was under suspicion and out of office and spent the next few years living in Oxfordshire, working as a merchant and rebuffing royalist approaches. In the changed circumstances of 1659-60 he became major in the Oxfordshire and Berkshire militia and he supported Monck. He returned to local office and was rewarded with property in Windsor Great Park at the Restoration and during the 1660s and 1670s became a senior customs and excise official.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 2.101; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 52, 62, 73, 83, 94.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Huntley, - - Huntley
A captain who was captured at Cirencester on 2 Feb. 1643. He was still a prisoner on 16 May, when the royalist general, the earl of Forth, threatened to execute him in retaliation if Nathaniel Fiennes executed the conspirators Robert Yeamans and George Bowcher.
References: Seyer, Bristol, 378.
Armies: Bristol
Hurle, John John Hurle
Cornet. Cornet in Captain Walter Baskerville’s troop of horse in Gloucestershire, 9 Apr.-31 May 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.630.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Hurlock, George George Hurlock
Lieutenant (Bringer-Up) in the Colonel’s company in the Blue regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Thomas Adams) in summer 1642.
Captain in Colonel Denzil Holles’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Amy by 30 July 1642 until its disbandment on 22 Nov. 1642, probably then serving for a time as a captain in Skippon’s regiment of foot.
References: Thrale 1642; Peacock, Army Lists, 39; TNA, SP28/5/110; SP28/3a/208.
Armies: London; Earl of Essex
Hurst, John John Hurst
Lieutenant in Lieutenant-Colonel George Crompton’s company in the Westminster auxiliaries regiment (Colonel James Prince) on 13 May 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 5, ff. 590 r. & v.
Armies: Westminster
Husband, - - Husband
Captain in Francis Russell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.99.
Armies: Eastern Association
Husband, Martin Martin Husband
Captain of a company in a regiment of foot which served under Oliver Cromwell and later under Colonel Francis Russell in their capacity as governors of the Isle of Ely and later under Colonel Valentine Walton senior, which probably originated as an auxiliary regiment of the Cambridgeshire militia. He was serving as captain in that regiment in Feb. 1644 and Mar. 1645 and still there when Walton became colonel.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.29.
Armies: Eastern Association
Husband, Martin Martin Husband
Captain. Captain of a company which was stationed in Gloucester in Apr. 1643, when it was ordered not to be sent to Fiennes at Bristol: on 7 Apr. Husband departed the service, probably returning to Gloucester where he was a witness at the trial of the royalist plotter Yeamans and commanded a fort at Bristol when it was stormed on 26 July 1643. He may have served in one of the foot or mounted regiments of the Fiennes brothers, and later gave evidence at the trial of Nathaniel Fiennes.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.632; State Trials, 4.21.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Husbands, - - Husbands
By summer 1644, captain in Thomas Rainsborough’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.89.
Armies: Eastern Association
Husbands, Azariah Azariah Husbands
Began the civil war as a junior officer in Lionel Copley’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army, but by spring 1644 was captain in John Pickering’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army and initially he continued to serve in that capacity when the regiment transferred to the New Model Army in spring 1645, but he soon became a captain in Sidney’s/Rich’s New Model horse regiment and was still there in 1649.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.85; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 49, 59, 62, 73, 83, 95, 107.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Eastern Association; New Model Army
Hutchinson, - - Hutchinson
Lieutenant-Colonel in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hutchinson, George George Hutchinson
Captain in Edward Cooke’s regiment of foot, which existed from Aug. 1643 to May 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 29.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Hutchinson, John John Hutchinson (baptised 1615, died 1664)
Elder son of Sir Thomas Hutchinson (1589-1643) of Owthorpe, Nottinghamshire, and Margaret, daughter of Sir John Byron; brother of Lieutenant-Colonel George Hutchinson. He married Lucy Apsley (1620-1681), daughter of Sir Allen Apsley, lieutenant of the Tower, in 1638.
Hutchinson had already raised a company when he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel in the regiment of foot of Francis Pierrepont, 9 Jan. 1643. He was commissioned and promoted colonel on 3 Oct. 1643 to raise another regiment of foot (Pierrepont’s regiment had never really formed as a unit); he later claimed arrears as colonel to 16 Dec. 1646. Governor of Nottingham Castle from 4 Jan. 1643 according to his claim for arrears, although Sir John Meldrum and the Nottinghamshire committee formally appointed him governor of the castle on 29 July 1643, in reaction to the commission that the deputy recorder, James Chadwick, had covertly obtained from Lord Fairfax. At the committee’s request the governorship was extended to include the town and so ratified by Fairfax and the Commons (20 Nov. 1643). However, the boundaries of his relationship with, and over, the town became entwined in persistent and often bitter clashes with urban and Presbyterian interests. The bitterness is well-caught in the hardly measured Life written by his wife, by Seddon in Oxford DNB and in ‘Colonel Hutchinson and the disputes between Nottinghamshire parliamentarians, 1643-45’, Transactions of the Thoroton Society , 98 (1994) provides an excellent account of these disputes, which involved clashes over the range of his powers over the town and the county horse, his toleration of sectaries and personal differences and ambitions.
MP for Nottinghamshire in the Long Parliament from 16 Mar. 1646 and for Nottingham in the Convention Parliament of 1660.
A regicide, out of office during and perhaps hostile to the Protectorate, he submitted at the Restoration and, although heavily fined, he escaped worse punishment. Arrested on suspicion of complicity in a plot of 1663, he died in prison the following year.
References: Oxford DNB (John Hutchinson and Lucy Hutchinson); Hutchinson, Life; Seddon, ‘Colonel Hutchinson’; TNA, SP28/133, Part 2, f. 108r.
Hutchinson, Symon Symon Hutchinson
Captain-Lieutenant to Colonel William Willoughby’s Ratcliff Precinct company in Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment in 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 4, f. 541r.
Armies: Tower Hamlets; London; Waller (Southern Association)
Hutton, George George Hutton
Cornet in Horatio Carey’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 50.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hutton, George George Hutton
Cornet in Major Thomas Rippon’s own troop, raised in Lancashire for service in Scotland, Sept. 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 334.
Armies: Lancashire
Hutton, Robert Robert Hutton (c. 1620-1680)
Of Houghton Hall, Houghton-le-Spring, County Durham. Eldest son of Robert Hutton and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Fulthorpe of Tunstall. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Shadforth of Eppleton, County Durham and his wife Margaret Blakison, son of the Long Parliament MP for Newcastle-upon-Tyne and regicide John Blakiston (for whom see Oxford DNB).
Hutton served on every Durham committee from 24 Feb. 1643 to Oct. 1644. He was a captain in Robert Lilburne’s regiment of horse in the Northern Army, raised in County Durham in 1644, by 7 Sept. By June 1647 he had gone south with his colonel and was a captain in Robert Lilburne’s regiment of foot (formerly Michael Weldon’s) in the New Model Army. He stayed in the regiment when it came north at the end of 1647 to be stationed at Newcastle with Sir Arthur Hesilrige as its colonel. In Aug. 1650, he transferred to the regiment of horse that Hesilrige was then raising. He served in the same regiment under Hesilrige and then James Berry until he deserted the regiment. He was dismissed the army in Oct. or Nov. 1659, having rejected Berry’s support for Lambert.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 387; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 239, 246, 248, 250, 264, 456, 459-60; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 89, 101.
Armies: County Durham; Northern Army (Fairfax); New Model Army
Hutton, Thomas Thomas Hutton
Captain in George Dodding’s regiment of foot in Lancashire, owed arrears of £788 7s 2d in Sept. 1650.
References: TNA, E121/4/8.
Armies: Lancashire
Hyde, Edward Edward Hyde (died 1669)
Of Hyde and Norbury, Cheshire.
In Sept. 1642 Hyde raised soldiers for parliament: his neighbour William Davenport of Bramhall noted that several of his tenants had enlisted with him. Hyde was one of the neighbouring gentry who came to the aid of Manchester to resist the earl of Derby. At the beginning of Feb. 1643 Captain Hyde went to join Sir William Brereton as the latter gathered his forces at his newly-established headquarters at Nantwich. He fought at the first battle of Middlewich (13 Mar. 1643).
Hyde was a signatory of a letter from Brereton’s council of war at Nantwich, 11 Feb. 1643, demanding contribution of £300 from Mr. Jodrell; and of an order from his council of war for soldiers to forebear plundering, 16 Jan. 1644. However, by May 1645, when Brereton condemned him as lukewarm, Hyde apparently had resigned his commission. A deputy-lieutenant and became a member of the anti-Brereton faction.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 14, 158-9, 361-2. 348-54, 371-2, 378-9, 383-4, 387-8, 489, 2. 170-1, 270; Lancs. military proceedings, 45, 52; Civil war in Cheshire, 36, 243, 250; Morrill, Cheshire, 52, 79, 80, 83, 185-6, 218, 288, 295, 310.
Armies: Cheshire
Hyde, Joseph Joseph Hyde
In 1642 he is listed as lieutenant in Chichester’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 54.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Hyde, Lawrence Lawrence Hyde
Probably eighth son of Robert Hyde (died in or before 1642) of Norbury, Cheshire; his mother was Robert’s second wife Anne (died 1638), daughter of Robert Hyde of Hatch, Wiltshire. In 1656 he married Dorothy, daughter of Sir Richard Brooke (died 1632) of Norton, Cheshire, and sister of Colonel Henry Brooke (a step-brother married an older sister of his wife’s).
Cornet in Captain Robert Wynne’s troop in Colonel Henry Brooke’s regiment of horse in Cheshire. As such, signed an acquittance, dated 13 July 1646, for £5, the gratuity for his part in the siege of Chester. It followed a letter from his Brooke, urging its payment, recommending ‘his quallitie and Fidelitie’, and adding in a postscript that Mr Atkinson living in Northwich has stolen a nag from my cornet (i.e. Hyde). Hyde later settled in Ireland, at Ballough Loughlan Castle.
References: TNA, SP28/224, ff. 152r.-153v.; Earwaker, East Cheshire, 2.46; Vis. Cheshire, 1613, 45-6; Vis. Cheshire, 1663, 56-7.
Armies: Cheshire
Hyde, Richard Richard Hyde
Ensign in Captain John Andrewes’s company in the Red regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel Samuel Harsnett), when it mustered on 27 Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 5, f. 621 r. & v.
Armies: London