Surnames beginning 'L'

The Cromwell Association Online Directory of Parliamentarian Army Officers . Originally published by British History Online, , 2017.

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Surnames beginning 'L'

Lacey, - - Lacey
Captain in the Blue regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel George Langham, junior) in Oct. 1646.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11.
Armies: London
Lacey, Richard Richard Lacey
In summer 1642 he became a captain in Holles’s short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. Like most of his fellow-officers and the regiment as a whole, little is heard of him after their shattering defeat at Brentford in Nov. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lacy [Lacey], - - Lacy [Lacey]
Captain. Lacy was captain of a company evidently raised in Dorset in May 1643, probably as part of foot regiment of Sir Walter Erle. In May Lacy took 200 men from Poole to take Wareham. Is this Barrett Lacy, lieutenant-colonel, or Captain Lacy in the Portland garrison in 1649? [See below.]
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.513.
Armies: Dorset
Lacy, - - Lacy
Captain. An officer serving in the Portland garrison, evidently part of the larger Weymouth garrison, reduced in an economy measure and his men passed to Captain Channing, 21 Dec. 1648.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 486, 492; Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 240.
Armies: Dorset
Lacy, Barrett Barrett Lacy
Lieutenant-Colonel in 1646-8, commanding at Wareham. [See above.]
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 246, 307-8, 326, 335-6.
Armies: Dorset
Lacy, Barrett Barrett Lacy
Lieutenant-Colonel. Commanded at Wareham, and raised a company at Portland, summer 1648.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, xxxi, xxxii, 527.
Armies: Dorset
Laidman, Henry Henry Laidman
Of Leeds and Kirkstall, Yorkshire (W. Riding). Cornet in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 113 [citing inter alia BL, Add Mss. 21,417, f. 7; 21,427, ff. 190, 203, 211].
Armies: Yorkshire
Laithropp, John John Laithropp
Ensign in Captain Mark Coe’s company in the Southwark auxiliaries regiment (Colonel James Houblon) on 16 Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 4, ff. 572r.-575r.
Armies: Southwark
Lambe, Cornelius Cornelius Lambe (died 1644)
Captain in Colonel Ralph Weldon’s regiment of Kentish foot from 30 Nov. 1643 until his death at the siege of Donnington Castle on 2 Aug. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 152.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Kent
Lambe, Francis Francis Lambe
Lieutenant in Robert Patterson’s, later Edward Horsman’s troop in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army in 1644.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.15.
Armies: Eastern Association
Lambert [Lambart], John John Lambert [Lambart] (baptised 1619, died 1684)
Of Calton township, Kirkby Malhamdale, Yorkshire (W. Riding). Linked by his marriage to Frances, daughter of Sir William Lister of Thornton-in-Craven, to the Fairfaxes.
By Apr. 1643 a colonel of foot and by Jan. 1644 he had a regiment of horse with which he went to Nantwich. He was an active commander in the northern campaigns, securing the western part of the clothing districts in early 1644 and playing a notable part at Marston Moor.
By 1645 he was Commissary-General of the Northern Army, and was temporarily in charge of the Northern Army when Sir Thomas Fairfax went south and before the appointment of Poyntz.
With the war ended in the north, in Jan. 1646 Lambert given Montague’s regiment of foot (after the latter resigned in Oct. 1645) in the New Model Army and served in the closing stages of the campaign in south-west England.
Prominent in army politics, in summer 1647 he was sent north to restore order in and to command the Northern Army. He played an important part in the second civil war, ensuring the security of Yorkshire, containing Scottish-royalist forces in Cumberland and Lancashire and, having joined Cromwell, prominent in the battle and wider campaign of Preston. In 1650-51 was Major-General and second-in-command to Cromwell in the invasion of Scotland, providing the tactics and leading the attack and victory at Dunbar and also leading the assault at Inverkeithing in summer 1651 which enabled Cromwell to throw most of his army across the Firth of Forth. His further activity in pursuit of the Scottish-royalists and in the battle and wider campaign of Worcester confirmed his military skill.
Political advance followed and, as a key supporter of Oliver Cromwell and an architect of the Protectorate, his standing was probably second only to Cromwell for much of the Protectorate, until he lost his military and political offices – though not his by now extensive properties – in spring 1657 following his opposition to kingship and to the new oath of allegiance. He regained senior military command and some political standing under the restored Rump in 1659 and played the leading role in crushing the Booth Rising in Cheshire, but he was on the losing side in the brief power struggle of winter 1659-60, failed to prevent Monck moving south and taking control of events, was already under arrest at the Restoration and spent the rest of his life in prison.
References: Oxford DNB; Jones, ‘War in the North’, 388; D Farr, John Lambert: Parliamentary Soldier and Cromwellian Major-General, 1619-1684 (2003); Jones, ‘War in the North’, 388; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 112.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Poyntz); New Model Army; Northern Army (Lambert)
Lampart, George George Lampart
Captain-Lieutenant of foot in Sir Thomas Myddelton’s Regt, as confirmed by Myddelton’s warrant ordering payment of £5 to him in that capacity, endorsed with his signed acquittance dated 5 Aug. 1645.
References: TNA, SP28/346, no. 228.
Armies: North Wales
Lancaster, Nathaniel Nathaniel Lancaster
Born in 1601 at Rainhill, Lancashire, like several of his family he entered the ministry, holding several livings in north Cheshire and Chester before, in 1638, becoming rector of Tarplorley in Cheshire. To the dismay of some of his parishioners, he enforced low church practices there. He supported the parliamentarian cause from the outbreak of civil war, quickly identified by Cheshire royalists as an enemy. From 1644 to 1646 he was chaplain and army clerk to Sir William Brereton. However, as a Presbyterian his relations with Brereton probably became strained, his account of the siege of Chester, A Most Exact Declaration of Chester’s Enlargement, downplayed Brereton’s role and in 1646 he was replaced as army chaplain by the Independent Samuel Eaton.
References: Oxford DNB; Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 395; TNA, SP28/224, ff. 32-3.
Armies: Cheshire
Lander, - - Lander
By late summer 1644, Cornet in Otway’s troop in William Purefoy’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 122.
Armies: Warwickshire
Lane, John John Lane
Merchant involved in colonial trade.
A godly activist in his parish of All Hallows Bread Street in 1642, and an active supporter of parliament in the war, contributing horses for the cavalry and sitting on the City’s gunpowder committee. In 1645-6 a Presbyterian petitioner.
Major in the Green regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Owen Rowe) in Oct. 1646, promoted its Lieutenant-Colonel (under Colonel Matthew Sheppard) by the Presbyterian militia committee in 1647, and put out later that year.
References: Marshall, Essex, 12; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317-8; Lindley, Popular politics, 68, 70, 72, 73, 139, 140, 143, 144, 206, 207, 231, 377, 378; A paire of spectacles for the Citie (1648), 9.
Armies: London
Lanford, Thomas Thomas Lanford
Lieutenant in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 26.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Langden, Thomas Thomas Langden
Captain in Sir William Springate’s regiment of Kentish foot by Sept. 1643, and serving there until its disbandment early the next year.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 120.
Armies: Kent; Waller (Southern Association)
Langford, - - Langford
Lieutenant in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Langford, George George Langford
Ensign in Thomas Grantham’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 41.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Langham, - - Langham
Captain in Colonel Randall Mainwaring’s Red regiment of foot at Olney, Bedfordshire, at the time of a skirmish there in Nov. 1643. Possibly George Langham, junior.
References: George Paine, A true relation of all the skirmishes between our forces and the Cavaliers at Owlny (1643), 3.
Armies: Bedfordshire
Langham, George, junior George Langham, junior
Colonel. Eldest son of George Langham senior and his wife, Thomazin, daughter of Richard Scales of London. Possibly the common councilman post-1642 and radical identified by Lindley (rather than his father).
Possibly Captain Langham of Randall Mainwaring’s Red regiment of foot, present at the skirmish in Olney, Bedfordshire, in Nov. 1643.
Admitted to the Company of the Artillery Garden (now the Honourable Artillery Company). Colonel of the Blue regiment (London Auxiliaries) by 22 Oct. 1646; purged from his command by the Presbyterian militia committee in summer 1647, described by the New Model Army’s informants as ‘a man of approved fidelitie in times of greatest difficulty’; replaced with the Army’s reported enemy Thomas Clarke.
Sat on the court which tried the duke of Hamilton and others for treason, 1649.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 269, 317; Vis. London 1633-5, 2.44; Lindley, Popular politics, 209; Clarke Papers, 1.155; Brenner, Merchants, 548.
Armies: London
Langham, George, senior George Langham, senior
Captain in the militia, and presumably the George Langham who was briefly colonel of a London-raised and generally London-based regiment of foot attached to the earl of Essex’s Army from Nov. 1642 onwards. If so, however, his service under Essex was brief, for Langham drew up his will in Mar. 1643 and was dead by Dec. 1644, probably earlier as command of his regiment passed to his former Lieutenant-Colonel, Samuel Carleton, in summer 1643. A Merchant Taylor.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 57, 79n; TNA, PROB11/192/109.
Armies: London; Earl of Essex
Langham, Samuel Samuel Langham
Lieutenant serving with Sir William Waller’s Army by 3 Nov. 1643.
References: Spring, Waller’s Army, 176.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Langley, John John Langley
At its muster in Nov. 1643, captain in Colonel Thomas Honeywood’s regiment of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the Army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.32.
Armies: Eastern Association
Langley, Thomas Thomas Langley
By spring 1645 lieutenant in the company of Lieutenant-Colonel Poynes in William Jephson’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 71.
Armies: Hampshire
Langley, Thomas Thomas Langley
Cornet in the troop formerly commanded by Captain John Juxon and by early 1644 de facto under Lieutenant Charteris in Edmund Harvey’s regiment of London horse, paid for 28 days’ service on 25 May 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/131, f. 19r.
Armies: London
Langridge, Anthony Anthony Langridge
Lieutenant in Sir William Waller’s regiment of foot by the time it was disbanded in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 155.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Langrish, Hercules Hercules Langrish
Son of Hercules Langrish and his wife Olymphas du Plessis; brother of Lucullus Langrish.
In the 1642 list of the earl of Essex’s Army, he is shown as captain of a troop of horse. Captain in George Melve’s regiment of dragoons in the earl of Essex’s Army by early Mar. 1643, perhaps succeeding Thomas Ayloffe, until at least late June 1643. By late July Langrish had transferred as captain in John Middleton’s regiment of dragoons.
References: TNA, SP28/5/205, 206, SP28/7/320, 452, SP28/9/216; Peacock, Army lists, 54.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Langton, Christopher Christopher Langton
Langton was a lieutenant in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642, but on 28 Nov. he was ordered to Yorkshire. He apparently became a captain and may have served as Major of John Holman’s regiment of foot. From 14 May 1644 to 31 July 1645 Langton was lieutenant-colonel of William White’s new regiment of foot, commanding the regiment during his Colonel’s absences in London as Lord Fairfax’s agent.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 388; Peacock, Army lists, 35.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax)
Larkin, - - Larkin
Captain in Valentine Walton’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army (commanded by James Hobart from spring 1645). He is possibly the Captain Larkin who later served in Okey’s New Model Army dragoon regiment.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.105.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army?
Lascelles, Francis Francis Lascelles (1612-1667)
Of Stank Hall, Winton township, Sigston parish and of Northallerton, both in Yorkshire (North Riding), son of William Lascelles and his wife Anne Daniel. A JP from 1640. He married the godly Frances, daughter of Sir William St Quintin of Harpham, baronet.
Lascelles was captain of foot in the Hull garrison by Nov. 1642, and the following month he was at the Fairfaxes’ base at Seby. He then fought at Guisborough and Yarm, suggesting that he was then in Francis Boynton’s regiment of foot. However, he soon moved to John Gifford’s regiment of foot, going on to become its lieutenant-colonel and (in June 1644) its Colonel. He was also captain of a troop of horse, 1644-5.
In winter 1643-4 Lascelles fought with Sir John Meldrum in the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, and was captured but soon released. He was at the siege of York, the battle of Marston Moor and the siege of Helmsley Castle (which surrendered in Nov. 1644). In 1645 he was at the sieges of Bolton Castle, Pontefract and Scarborough. Lascelles was a member of every North Riding committee from 24 Feb. 1643; in June 1645 he was added to the Northern Association committee for the North Riding; shortly after he was elected Recruiter MP for Thirsk. He fled to the army in 1647 and resumed his military career, taking part in the second siege of Pontefract. He was appointed a judge for the king’s trial in 1649, but refused to sign the death warrant. He was MP for the North Riding in the Nominated Asssembly and the first and second Protectorate Parliaments. In 1660 he was elected to the Convention Parliament as MP for Northallerton, but was discharged and declared incapable of holding public office and in 1662 was suspected of conspiring against the crown.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 388-9; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 95; HoP: The Commons, 1660-1690, 2.711; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax); Northern Army (Lambert)
Lascelles, Peregrine Peregrine Lascelles(1619-1658)
Of Stank Hall, Winton township, Sigston parish and later Lythe, Yorkshire (N. Riding), son of William Lascelles and his wife Anne Daniel and younger brother of Francis Lascelles.
From 20 Mar. 1643 to 6 June 1644 he was captain in John Gifford’s regiment of foot, promoted in June 1644 to lieutenant-colonel in the same regiment now under the command of his brother Francis, and serving with it until its disbandment in Jan. 1646.
After 1649 he was politically prominent because of his brother’s parliamentary position.
He was commissioned Major in a regiment of foot in the Yorkshire militia, 10 Apr. 1650.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 389; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 95; CSPD, 1650, 506.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Poyntz)
Lascelles, Robert Robert Lascelles (born 1617)
Of Eryholme, Yorkshire (North Riding), son of William Lascelles and his wife Anne Daniel and brother of Francis, Peregrine and Thomas Lascelles.
Either he or Thomas received a company of foot in the Hull garrison on 6 July 1643.
If he continued in parliament’s service, presumably he was in regiment of foot of Gifford/Francis Lascelles.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 389.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lascelles, Thomas Thomas Lascelles
Of Stank Hall, Winton township, Sigston parish, Yorkshire (West Riding), son of William Lascelles and his wife Anne Daniel and brother of Francis, Peregrine and Robert Lascelles. He was a captain and also a JP.
Either he or Robert received a company of foot in the Hull garrison on 6 July 1643.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 95; Jones, ‘War in the North’, 389.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lathome, Thomas Thomas Lathome
Commissioned captain in Henry Brooke’s Cheshire militia regiment of foot, 22 Aug. 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 509.
Armies: Cheshire
Latimer, Thomas Thomas Latimer
Lieutenant in Captain Richard Benson’s Company of firelocks in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot in Lord Wharton’s Army raised for service in Ireland in 1642. Instead, he went with Bampfield’s regiment as lieutenant into the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 70, 40.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Laugharne, Thomas Thomas Laugharne
Fourth son of John Laugharne (baptised 1587, died after 1644) of St Bride’s, Pembrokshire, and his wife Janet Owen, daughter of Sir Hugh Owen of Orielton, Castlemartin, Pembrokshire He was a younger brother of Rowland Laugharne. He was also linked by kinship and service to the earls of Essex and to the Merrick family. Sir John Merrick’s father married Thomas’s father’s sister.
In 1642 Laugharne was captain in his cousin Sir John Merrick’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
By Feb. or Mar. 1644 Laugharne was a Major, serving under his brother Rowland who was colonel and commander of the forces which took much of Pembrokshire from the royalists. He probably remained fighting under his brother in Wales 1644-6.
Like his brother, he changed his allegiance during the second civil war and, by then a lieutenant-Colonel fighting against New Model troops, Thomas Laugharne was killed at the battle of St Fagans on 8 May 1648.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 28; TNA, SP28/2b/505; Phillips, Wales, 147, 152, 369; Meyrick, Welsh visitations, 1.73, 137; Oxford DNB [biography of Rowland Laugharne].
Armies: Earl of Essex; Pembrokeshire
Laughton, John John Laughton
Captain. Captain of a company of the Bristol Trained Bands by 10 Oct. 1642. At some point, between 27 Feb. and 29 Apr. 1643, he gave up command of his company to go into the field.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.603-4.
Armies: Bristol
Lawe, William William Lawe
In Feb. 1645, ensign in Captain Van der Voone’s company in Sir Samuel Luke’s Newport Pagnell-based regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 95.
Armies: Bedfordshire
Lawrance, - - Lawrance
Captain in the Southwark Trained Bands regiment (Colonel John Hardwicke) in later 1643; Major of the same regiment on 22 Oct. 1646.
References: TNA, SP28/131, Part 13, f. 5r.; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 12.
Armies: Southwark
Lawrence, Adams [Adam] Adams [Adam] Lawrence (baptised 1622, died 1648).
Gentleman, fourth child and only son of Richard Lawrence (died 1626) and his wife Mary Adams (died 1644), of Linton, Cambridgeshire, baptised at Linton, 25 Feb. 1622 (Adams is the form used in the biography which prefaces his daughter’s published diary). In 1641 he married Elizabeth Cutts, daughter of Henry Cutts, of Clare, Suffolk, ‘a Person learn’d in the Law, yet a great Peace-Maker amongst his neighbours, and a zealous Promoter of the Interest of the Gospel’ (Mrs. Elizabeth Bury, 1).
Captain of a troop of horse in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army by autumn 1643: the tapster at the Red Lyon in Cambridge was paid £5 8s 2d for Lawrence’s troopers from 13 Oct. 1643 to 12 Feb. 1644. In Feb. 1645 his troop consisted of 95 men. He continued as its captain when the troop was one of those which went into Thomas Fairfax’s regiment of horse in the New Model Army.
Lawrence was killed on 13 June 1648 in an unsuccessful assault during the siege of Colchester.
The Lawrence family had in the past included members of the Family of Love. However, his friend Richard Baxter described him as the only ‘orthodox’ member of Cromwell’s regiment. In 1644 it was claimed before the committee for scandalous ministers that Lawrence had found 200 musket balls in Barham Hall, Cambridgeshire, which were said to have belonged to the fled minister.
Lawrence’s widow married Nathaniel Bradshaw, the minister of Willingham, Cambridgeshire (and very possibly also the officer of that name in Cromwell’s regiment), who was ejected at the Restoration. The spiritual diary of his Presbyterian daughter, Elizabeth Bury, was published with her funeral sermon, which was delivered by Isaac Watts: there her father was described as ‘a very graceful Person, of good character, and great Integrity’ (Mrs. Elizabeth Bury, 1).
References: Firth & Davies, Regimental history, 11, 16, 58, 62, 67; [IG: personal info of R.L. Stevens of Linton]; An account of the life and death of Mrs. Elizabeth Bury, who died, May the 11th 1720. Aged 76. Chiefly collected out of her own diary (Bristol, 1721), 1-3; M. Spufford, ed., The world of rural dissenters, 1520-1725 (1995), 25-26; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 51, 61, 72, 82, 92, 105.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Lawrence [Lawrance], Richard Richard Lawrence [Lawrance]
Captain of company in Colonel Robert Butler’s regiment of foot, Wareham garrison: dates certain (from his lieutenant’s arrears claim), 25 Sept. 1644-13 Apr. 1646. On 20 Oct. 1646, granted farm of Winterbourne Steepleton, sequestered from marquess of Winchester, for one whole year; on 22 Dec. 1647 granted south farm of same; on 22 May 1648 fined for obstructing tenancy of north farm; on 14 June 1648 arrest ordered for disobeying committee’s orders; on 14 Dec. 1648 the committee ordered Lawrence’s royalist uncle to explain why he has not paid off the debts for which Lawrence was bound, and for which the uncle’s sequestration was taken off.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee,42, 34, 306, 392, 403, 479.
Armies: Dorset
Lawrence, Thomas Thomas Lawrence
In summer 1642 he became a lieutenant in Holles’s short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. Lieutenant in Captain Nicholas Devereux’s company in John Middleton’s regiment of dragoons (pay warrant: 10 Nov. 1642) in the earl of Essex’s Army. Like most of his fellow-officers and the regiment as a whole, little is heard of him after their shattering defeat at Brentford in Nov. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37; TNA, SP28/3b/305.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lawson, John John Lawson (c. 1615-1665)
Of Scarborough, Yorkshire (North Riding) and already an active mariner by the time civil war broke out, though very little is known about his origins, family background or early life.
He quit Scarborough when Cholmley defected to the king in 1643 and moved to parliamentarian Hull, employing and commanding ships both to get supplies into the town and to blockade and attack royalist vessels serving Scarborough. He returned to his home town after the royalists surrendered in 1645 and exercised considerable power there, in spring 1646 commissioned as captain in command of a 100-strong garrison. He held that position for around five years, briefly withdrawing in 1648 when the governor of Scarborough again defected to the king before being quickly subdued.
Lawson’s real military contribution and the basis of his fame, however, lie in his achievements not as an officer of land forces but as a naval commander and admiral during the 1650s and first half of the 1660s. In that capacity he served both the republican and Protectoral regimes and the restored monarchy with considerable distinction, down to his death in 1665 from wounds sustained in a naval battle off Lowestoft during the second Anglo-Dutch war.
References: Oxford DNB.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lawson, Sir Wilfred, first baronet Sir Wilfred Lawson, first baronet (c. 1610-1688)
Son of William Lawson of Hesket and nephew of Sir Wilfred Lawson of Isel, Cumberland Educated at Cambridge and knighted by Charles I, he was an active parliamentarian in the civil war, though based and holding property in a county which was initially fairly solidly royalist. He reportedly established a parliamentarian outpost on St Herbert’s Island in Derwentwater and, although firmly rebuffed in an attempt on Carlisle in 1643, from 1644 became parliament’s commander-in-chief in Cumberland He held local office and represented the county or local borough seats in several parliaments, acquired a baronetcy from James II shortly before his death, and amassed substantial property in Cumberland
References: HOP, 1660-1690.
Armies: Northern Army (Fairfax)
Layett, Richard Richard Layett
Captain in service on 6 Aug. 1643 and still there in Nov. 1643; his accounts place him in Grenville’s/Cooke’s regiment of horse, which was not in existence at that point, but perhaps he was serving in a troop which later was incorporated into it or perhaps in a regiment of Cooke’s in the Western Association.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 50.
Armies: Waller; Waller (Southern Association)
Layfield, - - Layfield
Major in Sir John Norwich’s short-lived regiment of dragoons in the Eastern Association Army, listed as such in Nov. 1643 shortly before the regiment was transferred to Lord Grey of Groby and his Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.75.
Armies: Eastern Association
Layther, William William Layther
Lieutenant-Colonel in the Plymouth garrison at the time of Prince Maurice’s siege, Sept.-Dec. 1643. He may well be the same man as Lieutenant-Colonel Lowther.
References: Worth, History of Plymouth, 110.
Armies: Devon
Le Hunt, Richard Richard Le Hunt
He probably began the civil war as ensign in Sir Anthony Irby’s regiment of dragoons in the Eastern Association Army. Captain in the regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army commanded by Colonel Francis Russell, then Colonel Vermuyden and then, from Mar. 1644, by Colonel Charles Fleetwood. He was a captain in the regiment (under Russell) by Feb. 1644 and continued to serve in that capacity once the regiment had transferred to the New Model Army, though apparently only briefly, for he seems to have left under a cloud, accused of corruption, very shortly after Naseby. However, that was not the end of his military career, for he later served as an officer in Wales and Ireland.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.34, 45; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 51, 61-2, 72.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Lea, - - Lea
Lieutenant [of horse]. May be the same man as Captain John Lea, above.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 377.
Armies: Dorset
Lea, John John Lea (died 1661)
Of Bridport. Captain in regiment of Sir Walter Erle, 1643 [4 Nov. 1646: Dorset committee ordered payment of £4 14s. 0d. to a Dorchester widow upon whom soldiers had been quartered belonging to Captain Lea and Captain Smith, under the command of Sir Walter Erle: given reference to Erle and place, this has to be before Aug. 1643 when the town surrendered to the royalists].
Later captain of foot in Colonel Thomas Ceely’s regiment.
Possibly the Captain Lay who captured Wareham in Nov. 1643 (as suggested by Bayley).
MP for Bridport, 1659.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 55, 568, 114; Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 119-120; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.515; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Dorset
Lea [Lee, Leigh], John John Lea [Lee, Leigh]
Of Stafford. A certificate from 1645 confirms that he was one of Brereton’s captains of dragoons, from 7 Nov. 1642 until at least 12 Nov. 1643; he was probably captain of one of the troops raised in London which Brereton took north. He fought in the campaigns in Cheshire in 1643, including the battle near Nantwich on 29 Jan. and the taking of Eccleshall Castle, and was ‘once shot through the body’. Wounds, or possibly a falling out with Brereton (his certificate was signed by three of Sir William’s enemies), may explain his apparent early departure from the army. He does not appear to have fought any further in the civil war, but he did later serve as a sequestration commissioner and a captain in the horse militia.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 204-5.
Armies: Cheshire
Lead, John John Lead
Ensign in Captain Thomas Cutlett’s company in the Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment on 18 Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 5, f. 580 r. & v.
Armies: Tower Hamlets
Leadbeater, John John Leadbeater
A captain in Sir William Brereton’s Army in Cheshire, confirmed by a surviving warrant to pay Captain John Leadbeater, his officers and soldiers 14 days’ pay. Dore notes that two incidents link Leadbeater with Gawsworth in Cheshire but no firmly-proved links can be found, suggesting either that his family was humble/obscure or that he was a recent in-comer to the area.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books,1. 331; TNA, SP28/346, f. 52.
Armies: Cheshire
Leavens, John John Leavens
Of Knowsthorpe, Yorkshire (West Riding), a parliamentarian lieutenant in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 115 [citing TNA, E121/4/8, no. 30; BL, Add. Ms. 21427, f. 186].
Armies: Yorkshire
Lee, - - Lee
Possibly William Lee (died 1650) of Pinchinthorp, Yorkshire (North Riding), captain of foot early in 1643 and badly wounded at Leeds.
Probably the Captain Lee of 1643 was the Lieutenant-Colonel Lee who was active at siege of Pontefract in 1645 and captured on 13 Mar. He probably served in Sir Thomas Mauleverer’s or Richard Thornton’s regiment of foot.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 389.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lee, Benjamin Benjamin Lee
Ensign in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lee, Henry Henry Lee
Lieutenant-colonel of the Red regiment, London auxiliaries (Colonel Samuel Harsnett) when it mustered on 27 Apr. 1644 (but no longer there on 22 Oct. 1644). Possibly quartermaster to the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands, in 1642.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, f. 693r.
Armies: London
Lee, Henry Henry Lee
Quartermaster to the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Sir John Wollaston).
Very possibly Henry Lee, lieutenant-colonel of the Red regiment, London Auxiliaries, in 1644.
References: Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Lee, Henry Henry Lee
Lieutenant in Samuel Luke’s troop in Sir William Balfour’s regiment of horse in spring 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 20.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Lee, John John Lee
In spring 1645, at the point the regiment was being absorbed into the New Model Army, lieutenant of William Dingley’s troop in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.52.
Armies: Eastern Association
Lee [Leigh], Richard Richard Lee [Leigh]
Captain in an Aylesford Lathe regiment in the Kent Trained Bands by Aug. 1642, and possibly still there in 1648. By June 1643 his company was garrisoning Rochester, and that summer he was threatened by the royalist rising in the county. Everitt identifies him as Richard Lee, senior, in which case he is probably Richard Lee of Great Delce, Kent, son of Richard Lee of the same (died 1618) and his wife Mary, daughter of John Sherley, serjeant-at-law. In 1619 he had a son, Richard Lee, then aged two, who might be the captain. The latter was a royalist plotter in the 1650s.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 74; Everitt, Kent, 193, 196; Vis. Kent, 1619, 56.
Armies: Kent
Lee, Thomas Thomas Lee
Lieutenant in Thomas Grantham’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 41.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lee, Walter Walter Lee
‘A haberdasher in Ludgate at the Signe of the Sun & bowle, broke Westm[inster] Windowes’ (BL, Harl. 986, p. 21).
Second captain in the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Sir John Wollaston) in Sept. 1643 (although not a captain a year before); Major of the same Yellow regiment (by then under Colonel Ralph Harrison) by Oct. 1646. He was promoted to lieutenant-colonel by the Presbyterian militia committee in 1647 but was displaced by the Independent militia committee later that year.
In Dec. 1642 a victim of crowd violence by peace petitioners at the Guildhall, who jeered at him as a ‘Windsor reformado, roundheaded rogue’ (Lindley, Popular politics, 339). Lindley identifies him as a parish zealot in the early 1640s. A prominent Presbyterian in 1646-7, in Dec. 1646 his shop was found to be the source of a rumour of the threat from the New Model Army.
According to the Presbyterian A paire of spectacles for the Citie (1648), 10, ‘a man of Estate and Quality, an honest, godly, valiant man, a man that did as good service at Cherriton as any man in the Brigade, a man that from principles of Honesty and Piety leads the life of a Christian in sincerity’.
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 21; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317-8;Lindley, Popular politics, 208, 339, 371, 378; A paire of spectacles for the Citie (1648), 10.
Armies: London
Lee, William William Lee
A captain in John Booth’s Lancashire regiment.
References: Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 285.
Armies: Lancashire
Leet, William William Leet
By spring 1645 – probably from 1643 – a captain in Harry/Henry Barclay’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. Like many of his fellow-officers in that regiment, he then transferred to the New Model Army, as captain in what became Edward Harley’s New Model Army regiment of foot, though only very briefly, as he resigned later in spring 1645.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 47-8, 150.
Armies: Earl of Essex; New Model Army
Legard, Charles Charles Legard
Of Anlaby, Yorkshire (East Riding). Captain in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 100 [citing TNA, E121/4/1, no. 38].
Armies: Yorkshire
Legard, Christopher Christopher Legard (baptised 1615, died in or before 1663)
Fifth son of John Legard (1576-1643) of Ganton. Early service obscure, but by early 1645 captain in Lord Fairfax’s regiment of horse. However, when his troop went to serve under Sir William Brereton in Feb. 1645 he did not go with it, and instead it was commanded by his Lieutenant Richard Rokeby.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 390.
Armies: Yorkshire
Legard, Christopher Christopher Legard (born 1592)
Of Anlaby, Yorkshire (East Riding), eldest son of Robert Legard (of the senior branch of the family) and his wife Anne Daniel. He married a daughter of William Rokeby and was hence brother-in-law to Thomas Rokeby. He was a cousin to Sir John Hotham, Sir Thomas Remington and the brothers Sir Hugh Cholmley and Sir Henry Cholmley.
Legard’s house was pillaged in summer 1642. By then he was lieutenant-colonel to Sir John Hotham at Hull. He was temporarily suspended from his command after Hotham’s arrest, but was cleared after appearing before the Hull committee in July 1643. Early in 1645 he was promoted Colonel. He was present at the sieges of Scarborough Castle in 1645 and 1648 (on 17 Dec. 1648 he was a commissioner for its surrender), but resigned his commission in 1649.
In June 1645 he was put on the Northern Association committee for the East Riding.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 390; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 100; JHL, 10.639-40.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax); Northern Army (Poyntz); Northern Army (Lambert)
Legard, John John Legard (1573-1643)
Of Ganton, Yorkshire (E. Riding), esquire, eldest son of John Legard (died 1587) of Ganton and his first wife Margery Frank. Father of Christopher Legard and possibly also of Henry Legard. His sister Susanna married Sir Richard Cholmley of Whitby, father of Sir Hugh Cholmley and John Cholmley, whilst his daughter Frances married Sir John Hotham. His second son Richard was a royalist.
He served at Scarborough under Cholmley, which he held in Nov. 1642 with a garrison of 112 men. In Mar. 1643 he broke the news of Cholmley’s defection, reporting how he had been imprisoned. He went to Hull, where he served, possibly in Francis Boynton’s regiment of foot, until his death in Dec. 1643.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 390; Yorks. Vis., 2.401-2; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 99.
Armies: Yorkshire
Legard, Richard Richard Legard
Of Ganton, Yorkshire (East Riding). A captain in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 99 [citing TNA, SP23/135/394].
Armies: Yorkshire
Legard, Robert Robert Legard
Of Anlaby and Hull, Yorkshire (E. Riding), a younger son of Robert Legard of Anlaby and his second wife Frances, daughter of William Bernard, Hull mayor and merchant and father of Leonard Bernard. Robert was a younger half-bro. of Colonel Christopher Legard of Anlaby. Robert married Ursula, daughter of John Rodes of Barlborough, Derbyshire, uncle of Sir Edward Rodes.
He raised a troop of horse in 1642 and was busy collecting money in the East Riding in spring 1643. He escorted Sir John Hotham from Beverley to Hull after the latter’s arrest.
In summer 1643 he was drafted into Sir Henry Foulis’s regiment of horse (later the regiment of Sir William Fairfax and Matthew Alured); he went into Lincolnshire with the regiment in 1643 and was still in it in early 1645.
In June 1645 he was put on the Northern Association committee for the East Riding.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 390, Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 100.
Armies: Yorkshire
Legard, William William Legard
Of Beverley, Yorkshire (East Riding), alderman of Beverley. The younger son of the second marriage of Robert Legard of Anlaby and hence half-bro. to Christopher Legard and brother to Robert Legard.
A captain in Hull by Aug. 1642, but only got his own company in early 1643 (he was deprived of it in late 1643, probably temporarily, because of suspected sympathy for Hotham).
According to Firth and Davies, lieutenant-colonel to Thomas Morgan in Flanders. Other sources claim that he was killed in 1659 fighting for the king of France.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 390; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 97.
Armies: Yorkshire
Legh, Henry Henry Legh
Captain in Sir John Seton’s regiment of dragoons, named as one of the officers to whom London volunteers should resort at the end of Sept. 1642; it is not certain whether he eventually marched north with the force.
References: Lancashire military proceedings, 41.
Armies: Lancashire
Leicester, William William Leicester
By Jan. 1645 a captain in command of a company of 23 dragoons serving with Sir Thomas Myddelton’s brigade based in Montgomeryshire.
References: National Library of Wales, Chirk Castle Ms. 1/Biii, 93.
Armies: North Wales
Leigh, - - Leigh
A major in Lancashire. Leigh fought at the first defence of Bolton in Feb. 1643, when the royalists were driven off. His horse was shot from under him and he was shot in the arm. Possibly Major in Sir Ralph Assheton’s regiment of foot.
References: Lancashire military proceedings, 81-2.
Armies: Lancashire
Leigh, - - Leigh
A lieutenant in the Lancashire forces at the siege of Chester, present in records for Dec. 1645 and Jan. 1646.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 382, 396, 510.
Armies: Lancashire
Leigh, Edward Edward Leigh (1603-1671)
Of Rushall Hall, Staffordshire, and Shamwell, Leicesterhire.
Second but eldest surviving son of Henry Leigh (1587-1630), gentleman, of Rushall Hall, Staffordshire, and his first wife, Anne (died 1611), daughter of Anthony Lisle of Wootton in the Isle of Wight. He married Elizabeth Talbot (died 1707) in 1629.
A committed puritan and author of religious works.
He raised a troop of horse for parliament, and served in the defence of Lichfield Close in Apr. 1643. He went on to serve as colonel of a regiment of foot at Stafford.
A Staffordshire county committeeman man, named to it on 22 Feb. 1643. In its politics he was pro-Denbigh, and in Sept. 1644 presented a Staffordshire petition in the earl’s support to the Commons, and published the speech he then made.
Elected MP for Stafford in Oct. 1645 (by one vote), when Brereton hoped that, though brought in by ‘the worse party’, Leigh might be won over as a ‘religious gent’ (Dore, Brereton letter books, 2.216, 218). Leigh was removed at Pride’s Purge.
References: Oxford DNB; Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 62, 362, 2.127, 215-8; Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, passim; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Staffordshire
Leigh, Goddard Goddard Leigh
Captain in Cholmley’s probably short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36-7.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Leigh [Lee], John John Leigh [Lee]
Major in the Westminster auxiliaries regiment (Colonel James Prince) at muster of 13 May 1644 (when the regiment was serving with Sir William Waller) and in Oct. 1646.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 4, ff. 538r.-539r.; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11.
Armies: London; Waller (Southern Association)
Leigh [Legh], John John Leigh [Legh]
Of Norbury Booths, Knutsford, ‘a substantial squire of ancient descent’. Aged 12 in 1613, son of William Leigh (died 1641) and his wife Dorothy Shakerley of Shakerley and Holme. Captain by 1643 and perhaps for a time governor of Northwich. Colonel of a regiment of foot in Sir William Brereton’s Cheshire Army by 30 Apr. 1645.
A close collaborator of Brereton in the 1640s; hostile to the Protectorate because of his radical principles; sheriff at the time of Booth’s Rising.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 161, 329;Morrill, Cheshire, passim.
Armies: Cheshire
Leigh, Jude Jude Leigh
Captain in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Leighton, - - Leighton
Captain of a trained band company for Bramber Rape garrisoning Cowdray House, Sussex, until 7 Dec. 1643.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 124.
Armies: Sussex
Leighton, David David Leighton
Captain in Christopher Potley’s regiment of foot until early 1644, when he became the regiment’s Lieutenant-Colonel, leading his troops at the battle of Cheriton. He was with the regiment when it served in the West in 1644-5, at some point before its reduction in spring 1645 succeeding Potley as Colonel.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 113.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Leighton, Eliziar Eliziar Leighton
Major of a troop of horse at Plymouth, dated references Sept. and Dec. 1643. Peachey and Turton suggest that this troop was probably raised in London from survivors of Devon units which had been at Roundway or from south-eastern recruits, and sailed to Plymouth with Colonel William Gould. In Nov. 1643 he was captured when a sortie he was leading pushed too far forward. Within the year he was free and promoted to colonel. On 3 Dec. 1644, the Commons approved the decision of the Committee of the West, who had imprisoned Colonel Leighton for challenging Colonel John Luttrell, and left final judgment to it. He may have been demoted, as in Mar. 1645 it was Captain Leighton who was one of the petitioners who presented a petition from Plymouth to the Commons. On 9 Apr. 1645 he was paid £30 remaining due to him of £50 ordered to be paid to him in part-payment of arrears before he left for London, ‘and wch. by reason of the exigencie of the garrison could not be pd.’.
On 24 Dec. 1645 the Lords recommended to the Commons that Leighton be appointed colonel of the horse at Plymouth, which became the Plymouth regiment in Massey’s Brigade.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 4.446; Worth, History of Plymouth, 228; Worth, ‘Plymouth siege accounts’, 228; JHC, 3.712-3; JHC, 4.72-5, 384-5; Temple, ‘Massey Brigade’, 442.
Armies: Devon; Massey Brigade
Leighton, Thomas Thomas Leighton
Captain in Arthur Aston’s regiment of foot in Northumberland’s Army against the Scots in 1640.
Major in Rochford’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642, from or by 9 Sept., until its disbandment in May or June 1643.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 79, 32; TNA, SP28/2a/209, SP28/7/294.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Leighton, Titus Titus Leighton (died 1643)
Ensign in Thomas Lunsford’s regiment of foot in the earl of Northumberland’s Army against the Scots in 1640.
Reformado lieutenant of foot on 2 Aug. 1642. Shortly afterwards became captain in Sir William Fairfax’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army, coming north with Fairfax at the end of the year to join Lord Fairfax’s Army.
In July 1643 Leighton was at Hull; there he became Major to Sir Henry Foulis’s regiment of horse on 13 Aug. 1643.
On 28 Aug. 1643 he was killed in Sir Thomas Fairfax’s retreat to Beverley.
References: TNA, SP28/1d/481; Peacock, Army lists, 84, 44; Jones, ‘War in the North’, 389.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Northern Army (Fairfax)
Leighton, Walter Walter Leighton
An officer of the small regiment of reformado horse commanded by Major James Baker which came up from London to the siege of Chester in late 1645.
On 27 Nov. 1645 he was one of the officers who signed a letter to Brereton explaining the mixture of social slighting and lack of pay and secure quarters which had led the men to disobey a direct order to march.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 275.
Armies: Reformado; London; Cheshire
Leighton, Walter Walter Leighton
Captain in the regiment of horse of Robert Burghill/Jonas Vandruske.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 139.
Armies: Waller; Waller (Southern Association)
Lenerick, - - Lenerick
Captain-lieutenant of the Colonel’s own troop in Sir John Gell’s regiment of horse, killed in 1643 in the operation to drive the royalists out of and away from Nottingham.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 144.
Armies: Derbyshire; Nottinghamshire
Leonards, Leonard Leonard Leonards
Recommended by the Commons on 25 Oct. 1642 that the earl of Holland, Lord lieutenant of Middlesex, appoint Leonards Captain, under the lieutenant of the Tower, of a company drawn from St Katherine’s and East Smithfield, ‘he being earnestly desired and recommended by all the Inhabitants, as a Man very worthy of that Trust’ (JHC, 2.823). This became part of the Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment but at some point passed to Christopher Gore, captain by Oct. 1646. At the muster of Apr. 1644 the company was still described as Leonards’s, but the officer at the muster was Gore, his lieutenant.
References: JHC, 2.823; TNA, SP121A, Part 6, ff. 602r.-603r.
Armies: Tower Hamlets
Lestead, - - Lestead (died 1643)
A major in Cheshire, killed in an abortive attack on Cholmondeley House, 11 Apr. 1643.
References: Cheshire tracts,49-50.
Armies: Cheshire
Leventhorp, Edward Edward Leventhorp
Early in 1642 lieutenant to Captain William St Leger in his troop of horse in Lord Wharton’s army intended for Ireland. Instead, later that year he became captain in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army, and still captain on 13 Jan. 1643.
References: Peacock, Army Lists, 68, 25; TNA, SP28/5/100.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Leverett, John John Leverett
Captain in Thomas Rainsborough’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.90.
Armies: Eastern Association
Levett, Willliam William Levett
Major of the Tower Hamlets auxiliaries regiment in Oct. 1646; promoted by the Presbyterian militia committee in 1647 to be lieutenant-colonel of the Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11; TNA, SP28/46, Part 1, f. 34r.
Armies: Tower Hamlets
Levington [Lemmington], Patrick Patrick Levington [Lemmington] Chaplain to James Kerr’s [Carr’s] regiment of foot, 29 Aug. 1643-20 Feb. 1644. Chaplain to Colonel Hans Behre’s regiment of horse from 1 July 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 26.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Lewinger [Longer], - - Lewinger [Longer]
Captain in Lord Willoughby’s regiment of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army and the Eastern Association Army. He probably transferred as lieutenant in Blethin’s company when the regiment transferred to the New Model Army, by 1649 promoted to captain in the same regiment, by then commanded by William Constable.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.107; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 102.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Eastern Association; New Model Army
Lewis, Roger Roger Lewis
Lieutenant in Francis Blethin’s company in Edward Montagu’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.72.
Armies: Eastern Association
Lewis, William William Lewis
Captain of Dorset volunteer foot company, references 8 Nov. 1642-31 July 1643. Apparently present at Sherborne in Nov. and Dec. 1642-Feb. 1643 stationed at Dorchester where it was supported by contributions from the town.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.507.
Armies: Dorset
Leyfield [Lafield], Thomas Thomas Leyfield [Lafield] (died 1648)
Of Sutton Coldfield, Warwickshire, a man of modest wealth, whose inventory at death amounted to £70.
A captain of horse in Warwickshire, whose troop formed part of the Tamworth garrison during the first civil war (accounts for Aug. 1644-Aug. 1645). He sat on the council of war there on 27 Oct. 1644. On 12 Mar. 1645 he was ordered to collect the weekly assessment for part of Edingdale, Staffordshire. Governor of Maxstoke Castle, Warwickshire, Oct. 1645-May 1646.
References: Hughes, Warwickshire, 187n., 188, 196, 199n.; TNA, SP28/139, Part 17; Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 202, 270.
Armies: Warwickshire; Staffordshire
Lidcott, Thomas Thomas Lidcott
In 1642 listed as captain of a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Liddiatt, - - Liddiatt
A captain in the earl of Denbigh’s Army: on 10 May 1644 he was paid £1 to buy a hat and boots for one of the general’s trumpeters.
References: TNA, SP28/147, part 3, f. 470r.
Armies: Earl of Denbigh
Lilburne, Henry Henry Lilburne (baptised 1618, died 1648)
Third son of Richard Lilburne (baptised 1583, died 1667) of Thickley Punchardon, County Durham and his wife Margaret Hixon (died 1619), daughter of Thomas Hixon, Keeper of the Standing Wardrobe at Greenwich; younger brother of Robert Lilburne and John Lilburne. He married in 1647 Anne Rushworth, sister of John Rushworth, secretary to Sir Thomas Fairfax and author of Historical Collections (for whom see Oxford DNB).
On 6 June 1644 Henry was commissioned captain in his brother Robert Lilburne’s newly-raised regiment of horse and was promoted Major two weeks later. In Aug. he and his cousin Thomas Lilburne were ordered to block the Tees to prevent royalists escaping into Yorkshire, and in Oct. he took 40 prisoners in an action at Scarborough. He remained in Yorkshire until 1646, when he went south with his brother and became captain and (in July 1647) lieutenant-colonel in Robert Lilburne’s New Model Army regiment of foot, although he returned north with Robert to settle the unrest in the Northern Army. Back south, he was a speaker at the Putney debates where his stance was that of ‘a sceptical maverick’, challenging some of the more radical voices (Gentles, New Model Army, 215). On 1 Nov. he commented, ‘That hee never observed that the recovery of our liberties which wee had before the Normans was the occasion of our taking uppe armes, or the maine quarrel; and that the Norman Lawes are nott slaverie introduced upon us, but an augmentation of our slaverie before’ (Clarke papers, 1.368). He is probably (and was so believed to be by his brother John Lilburne) ‘E.R.’ who on 9 Nov. sent a letter warning Charles I of a (highly improbable) plot by the army agitators against his life, which gave the king a public pretext for his escape from army captivity at Hampton Court two days later.
Henry was appointed deputy-governor of Tynemouth Castle where, on 9 Aug. 1648, he declared for the king. He was killed two days later in the subsequent attack by Sir Arthur Hesilrige and his head displayed on the castle gate.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 390; Vis. London, 1687, 2.491, 496; Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 1.264, 2.456; P. Gregg, Free-born John (1961), 364, 205, 247; I. Gentles, The New Model Army in England, Ireland and Scotland, 1645-1653 (1992), 215; C.H. Firth, ed., The Clarke papers, 1.368); A. Woolrych, Soldiers and Statesmen: The General Council of the Army and its debates, 1647-1648 (1987), 82, 229, 249, 271-5; Hill and Watkinson, Major Sanderson’s war, 179.
Armies: County Durham; Northern Army (Fairfax); Northern Army (Poyntz); Northern Army (Lambert); New Model Army
Lilburne, John John Lilburne (c.1615-1657)
Born c. 1615 at Sunderland, son of Richard Lilburne of Thickley Punchardon near Bishop Auckland. Elder brother of Henry Lilburne, younger brother of Robert Lilburne.
In 1630 he was apprenticed to a puritan London clothier and as the decade progressed his own godly views strengthenedIn 1637-8 he clashed with the government and was whipped, pilloried and for a time imprisoned by order of Star Chamber for his involvement in publishing seditious material.
Released in late 1640, he fought for parliament from the outset and began the civil war as captain in Lord Brookes’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army, probably captured and briefly held prisoner by the royalists when they attacked and mauled Brookes’s and Holles’s regiments in their storming of Brentford in Nov. 1642, before transferring to the Eastern Association Army in autumn 1643 and becoming Major in command of a company within Edward King’s regiment of foot. However, like many others, he fell out with King and by spring 1644 he was serving as lieutenant-colonel in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of dragoons; he effectively took command of that regiment of dragoons at that point and led it during the campaign and battle of Marston Moor and then in taking a string of royalist bases in southern Yorkshire and campaigning in the East Midlands in autumn 1644. He did not join the New Model and so left the army in spring 1645.
Lilburne’s fame lies, of course, not in his military career of 1642-5, but in his political ideas and activism and in his later role as a Leveller and radical thinker and writer and in the various accusations, trials and sufferings which resulted in the late 1640s and early 1650s.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.47.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Eastern Association
Lilburne, Robert Robert Lilburne (1614-1665)
Second son of Richard Lilburne (baptised 1583, died 1667) of Thickley Punchardon, County Durham and his wife Margaret Hixon (died 1619), daughter of Thomas Hixon, Keeper of the Standing Wardrobe at Greenwich; brother of Henry Lilburne and John Lilburne.
Little is known of his life before the outbreak of the civil war. He began the war as an officer – initially Cornet in Lord Brooke’s troop, later lieutenant in Richard Crosse’s troop – of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army, 1642-3. He returned north in 1644, raising a regiment of horse in his native County Durham and campaigning in the Fairfaxes’ Northern Association Army. Although not initially appointed to the New Model Army, at the end of 1645 Colonel Ralph Weldon was appointed governor of Plymouth and a few months later Lilburne succeeded him as colonel of his New Model regiment of foot. He was prominent in army politics during 1647, though by the end of the year he had again gone north, this time appointed governor of Newcastle upon Tyne. As such, he effectively relinquished command of his (soon to be mutinous) New Model foot regiment and instead took command of a northern-based New Model horse regiment. As such he campaigned in 1648 with Lambert and in support of Cromwell to crush the Scottish-royalist army in the campaign and battle of Preston and then he helped mop up remaining royalist bases, notably Pontefract. However, he was in London in early 1649 and was a regicide.
He spent much of the first half of the 1650s campaigning in Scotland, initially in support of Cromwell’s expedition and then as commander of the army in Scotland crushing resistance in the Highlands. He became governor of York and in 1655-7 was deputy Major-General (to the absent Lambert) in Yorkshire and County Durham. He was elected to all three Protectorate Parliaments, though his return to the third was challenged. In 1659 he helped crush Booth’s Rising and supported the army’s seizure of power in the autumn, but in early 1660 he and his old colleague Lambert proved ineffective in halting Monck’s march south. He surrendered at the Restoration and although convicted of treason, was spared execution; instead he spent his last years in prison in Plymouth and on an island in Plymouth Sound.
References: Oxford DNB.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Northern Army; New Model Army
Lilburne, Robert Robert Lilburne
Almost certainly not the Robert Lilburne (1614-65) who was a regicide and deputy Major-General and was elder brother of the Leveller leader, but a separate and different man. This Robert Lilburne was lieutenant, later captain, in Edward King’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.46.
Armies: Eastern Association
Lilburne, Thomas Thomas Lilburne (died 1665)
Of Offerton, County Durham, eldest son of George Lilburne (baptised 1578, died 1699), esquire, and his first wife Isabel Chambers of Cleadon; first cousin to Robert Lilburne, John Lilburne and Henry Lilburne. George was a leading coal magnate, merchant and mayor of Sunderland, 1635-8 and 1640-2.
He was made captain in Robert Lilburne’s newly-raised regiment of horse on 25 May 1644. In Aug. 1644 he and his cousin Henry Lilburne were sent to guard the passages into Yorkshire to royalists escaping from County Durham. He served in both the first and second civil wars. ‘He was known … as a good officer and disciplinarian of his troops’ and was careful of his men when they were in contact with civilians’ (Jones, ‘War in the North’, 391). In Sept. 1647 his and John Sanderson’s troops were sent into Liddesdale to pursue moss-troopers.
Lilburne was loyal to Oliver and Richard Cromwell, and feared the army intrigues against the latter. MP for County Durham in 1656 and for Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1659. He continued to serve in Robert Lilburne’s regiment, but was displaced after the fall of the Protectorate. He was re-instated when his regiment turned against their colonel and John Lambert, and he brought his troop into the field with Fairfax in Yorkshire in early 1660. He was briefly promoted Major, but was reduced back to captain in July; the regiment was disbanded in Nov. 1660.
Lilburne was involved in various purchases of crown lands, and by 1660 was apparently sole owner of the manor of Holm Cultram, Cumberland He died 25 Mar. 1665, described by his memorial inscription in Houghton-le-Spring church as ‘one of the instrumental persons in his majesty’s happy Restoration’ (Vis. London, 1687, 2.496).
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 391; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 1.264, 266, 273-7; Vis. London, 1687, 2.492, 496; Gentles, ‘Debentures Market’, 308.
Armies: County Durham; Northern Army (Fairfax); Northern Army (Poyntz); Northern Army (Lambert); New Model Army
Linch, - - Linch
At the time the regiment was broken up in spring 1645, captain in Francis Russell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.98.
Armies: Eastern Association
Linch, John John Linch
Lieutenant in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 42.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lincoln, Maurice Maurice Lincoln
Alderman of Hull, Yorkshire (E. Riding) and a lieutenant of the watch there.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 91.
Armies: Yorkshire
Linde, - - Linde
A cornet in Waller’s Southern Association Army, captured at the battle of Cropredy Bridge (29 June 1644).
References: Spring, Waller’s army, App. 2, p. 3.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Lindsey [Lyndsey], John John Lindsey [Lyndsey]
Probably started the civil war as lieutenant in Captain Thomas Hammond’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642. Lieutenant in Captain Adam Lawrence’s troop in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army by 13 Aug. 1643, and still there in Jan. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.21; TNA, SP28/13/59, SP25/23/153.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Eastern Association
Line, - - Line
In spring 1645 captain-lieutenant in Colonel John Browne’s Shepway Lathe Kentish trained band regiment of auxiliaries.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 86.
Armies: Kent
Ling, Carax Carax Ling
Listed as cornet in James Temple’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 50.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Ling, Nicholas Nicholas Ling
Lieutenant in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 34.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lingwood, Lionel[?] Lionel[?] Lingwood
By spring 1644 and still there in Mar. 1645, shortly before the regiment was broken up, captain in Francis Russell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. He was intended to be a captain in the regiment upon its transfer to the New Model Army, but he chose not to serve.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.97; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 46-7.
Armies: Eastern Association
Lisle, Henry Henry Lisle
Of Gisborough, Yorkshire. Commissioned captain in a regiment of foot in the Yorkshire militia.
References: CSPD, 1650, 506.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lister, - - Lister
Ensign in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 42.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lister, - - Lister
Gentleman, a younger son of Sir William Lister of Thornton-in-Craven, Yorkshire (North Riding), and a royalist until the surrender of York, when he changed sides. He became captain in Sir Richard Sandys’s regiment of horse and was captured by the royalists in Sept. 1644 when Sir John Mayney beat a force under Sandys near Brotherton.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 392.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lister, - -Lister
Of Manningham township, Bradford parish, Yorkshire (West Riding). A captain in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 106.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lister, Christopher Christopher Lister
Of Thorenton-in-Craven, Yorkshire (North Riding). He is possibly the third son of Sir William Lister (died 1650) of Thornton-in-Craven, who married Winifred, daughter of Sir Richard Fletcher and widow of Sir Richard Dacres. Alternatively, he might also possibly be Christopher Lister (died 1668), second son of Sir William’s eldest son William Lister (died 1642) of Thornton-in-Craven, admitted Gray’s Inn 13 Aug. 1639; MP for Westmorland in the first and second Protectorate Parliaments. Whatever his parentage, he was a captain in Yorkshire. His is probably the Christopher Lister who later in the 1640s became a captain in Lilburne’s newly-formed northern regiment of horse on the New Model Army payroll.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 119; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 164.
Armies: Yorkshire; New Model Army
Lister, Hugh Hugh Lister (1621/2-1666)
Fourth son of Sir John Lister (died 1640), knight, of Hull and his wife Elizabeth Armyn of Hull. He was possibly Ensign Lister in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in 1642, and was by early 1645 captain in the same regiment, now commanded by Simon Needham. In Feb. 1645 he carried money from Hull to Scarborough to pay the soldiers.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 391; Yorks. Vis., 341-2.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lister [Lyster], Thomas Thomas Lister [Lyster] (baptised 1615, died 1642)
Of Lower Hall, Westby, in Gisburn township, parish of Gisburn, Yorkshire (W. Riding), esquire, eldest son of Thomas Lister (died 1619) and his wife Jane Heber. He married Catherine, daughter of Sir Richard Fletcher of Hutton, Cumberland). A ward of the crown. At his majority he bought Westby Lower Hall and its demesnes. He was admitted to Gray’s Inn, 7 May 1640.
Captain of foot in the Northern Army by Oct. or Nov. 1642, and fought at the battle of Wetherby in Nov. He was buried at Gisburn, 19 Nov. 1642.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 391; Yorks.Vis., 2.139; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 108.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lister [Lyster], William William Lister [Lyster] (died 1642)
Of Thorneton-in-Craven and Midhope, Yorks (North Riding), eldest son of Sir William Lister (died 1650) and his wife Mary Bellasis (whom he had married in 1610). Sir William was MP for East Retford, 1646-8. William’s sister Frances (died 1676) married John Lambert, whilst his brother Martin married Catherine, a daughter of Sir William Fairfax of Steeton.
William was admitted to Gray’s Inn, 5 Mar. 1629. He married Catherine, daughter of Sir Richard Hawkesworth of Hawksworth, who after his death married John Bright.
Captain of foot by Oct. 1642, he fought at Bradford and Leeds (Oct.), Wetherby (Nov.) and was killed at Tadcaster (6 Dec.). ‘Captain Will’m Lister, a valiant and gallant Gentleman, who was shot with a Musketbullet in the Head’ (JHL, 5.493-6).
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 391; Yorks.Vis., 2.136; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 119; JHL, 5.493-6.
Armies: Yorkshire
Littler, - - Littler (died 1644)
Captain in Colonel Leigh’s regiment of foot in Cheshire. Died early 1644 and succeeded as captain by William Wright.
References: BL, Harl. Ms. 2128, f. 166r.
Armies: Cheshire
Livesay [Livesey], Sir Michael Sir Michael Livesay [Livesey], first baronet (1614-1665?)
Son and heir of Gabriel Livesay of Hollingborne, Kent, a modest but established gentry family. Created baronet in the late 1620s and a JP by the late 1630s, but as a strong puritan he became a fierce opponent of the king and a leading light in Kentish parliamentarian circles. He raised a regiment of horse in Kent at the outbreak of the civil war, which helped secure his own county and neighbouring Sussex, which in 1643 supported Waller in operations at Farnham and Arundel and which during 1644 fought under Waller in his Oxfordshire campaign and at the battles of Cheriton and Cropredy Bridge. In the wake of the latter, his regiment became mutinous and began to disperse, though most or all of the regiment seems to have fought under Waller again at the second battle of Newbury and then went west with Waller until it returned to Kent in spring 1645.
Despite his extensive military service in south-eastern and southern England and his role on the Kent county committee, Livesay was accused of cowardice and of encouraging the mutinous nature of his regiment by some fellow parliamentarians. He left the army in spring 1645, though most of his regiment survived and was absorbed into Henry Ireton’s New Model Army regiment. Later in 1645 Livesay was elected MP for Queenborough, Kent, where he supported the political Independents and the army interest; having been active again in Kent, Surrey and Sussex, quelling disturbances and royalism and ensuring loyalty to parliament in 1647-8, he became a regicide and a radical member of the Rump. He was probably disenchanted by the Protectorate, though he retained local office in Kent, served in the recalled Rump in 1659 and fled to the continent at the Restoration; he died there, probably in the mid-1660s.
References: Oxford DNB
Armies: Kent; Waller; Waller (Southern Association)
Llewellin, William William Llewellin
Lieutenant in Sir William Fairfax’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 44.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lloyd, Andrew Andrew Lloyd
Of Ashton Hall, near Oswestry, Shropshire, from a modest gentry family and ‘a smallish landowner’, according to Carr and Atherton. By 1643 a member of the Shropshire county committee and by or from mid-1643 captain in Thomas Mytton’s regiment of horse, described as commanding a ‘broken troop’ at Wem in Feb. 1644 according to the royalists. Based at Oswestry in summer 1644. By the time of the taking of Shrewsbury in Feb. 1645, he was colonel of a regiment of Shropshire horse, described as 300-strong when it took part in the fight at Stokesay in June 1645, and of a regiment of foot, companies from which garrisoned Bridgnorth in 1646. Governor of Bridgnorth after town and castle fell to parliament in spring 1646. In 1648 he gathered parliamentarian volunteers at Wem and in Aug. was appointed to raise and command a regiment of militia foot in Shropshire. A very active committeeman, named to all Shropshire county committees, 1643-8.
References: Carr and Atherton, Brereton Staffs., 93, 175; BL, Add. Ms. 18981, f. 69; Warws. RO, C2017?c10/4; JHL, X, 425; National Library of Wales, Aston Hall estate records, D1 Ms. 2468; More Exact and Particular Relation of the taking of Shrewsbury, than hath hithero been published. With the manner and performance thereof by Lieutenant Colonell William Reinking (1645); Intelligence from Shropshire of Three Great Victories obtained by the Forces of Shrewsburie (1645);
Armies: Shropshire
Lloyd, Henry Henry Lloyd
Captain. An officer at Bristol during its siege. Noted as being there on 27 July 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.610.
Armies: Bristol
Lloyd, Jeffrey Jeffrey Lloyd
Ensign in Rochford’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 32.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lloyd, John John Lloyd
Captain in Sir John Merrick’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. He was one of those captains in the regiment who fought with and under Waller in summer 1643.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 28.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Lloyd, John John Lloyd
Captain in Sir Thomas Myddelton’s North Wales Army, confirmed by surviving pay warrants and receipts of spring 1644 for his own pay and that of his lieutenant and ensign.
References: TNA, SP28/346, nos. 39, 51, 122.
Armies: North Wales
Lloyd, John John Lloyd
Ensign in Sir William Fairfax’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 44.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lloyd, John John Lloyd
Ensign in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642; captain of the same regiment by June 1643 and still there in Oct. 1644. Not one of the captains who transferred to the New Model Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 26;TNA, SP28/9/1, SP28/19/21.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lloyd, Luke Luke Lloyd (1609/10-1695)
Of Bryn, Flint. (detached) (died 1695, aged 85). A Puritan and minor squire, who maintained a garrison at Willington, near Bryn, for Myddelton. Surviving pay warrants of spring 1644 (and later) direct payment to him, holding the rank of Captain, to defray his expenses in maintaining forces in the area and for horses. In 1645 he was taken prisoner, with 20 of his troop and imprisoned in Holt Castle by Major Francis Manley, elder brother of the parliamentarian John Manley, and granted parole to negotiate his exchange in Oct. 1645. On 26 Apr. 1646 he wrote a letter of complaint to Brereton about the depredations of Brereton’s Captain Walker, governor of Ridley, and his soldiers. Commissioner for the propagation of the gospel in Wales (1650). In his later years Philip Henry was his pastor; Henry described him as ‘the glory of our little congregation…a man of great courage and resolution…his charity and moderation known to all men…a pattern of piety and primitive christianity’. He married the half-sister of Colonel Roger Whitley, royalist governor of Aberystwyth (for whom see Oxford DNB).
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 300, 2. 97-8, 155, 389; TNA, SP28/346, nos. 90, 91, 164, 283.
Armies: North Wales
Lloyd [Floyd], Walter Walter Lloyd [Floyd]
Captain in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642. In spring 1645 he became lieutenant-colonel of the New Model Army regiment of foot initially and briefly commanded by Aldridge, by May succeeding Aldridge as its Colonel, only to be killed at Taunton a few weeks later.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex; New Model Army
Lobb, John John Lobb
Present at the siege of Portsmouth in Aug. 1642 and serving as deputy governor of the town and Major of the foot serving there from early 1643. He was one of those officers who were incorporated into the Portsmouth-based regiment of foot which served under William Jephson in 1644-5, again as Major.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 71.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Hampshire
Locke, - - Locke
Captain in Randall Mainwaring’s Red regiment of foot, briefly captured in a skirmish at Olney, Bedfordshire, in Nov. 1643.
References: George Paine, A true relation of all the skirmishes between our forces and the Cavaliers at Owlny (1643), 3.
Armies: London
Locke, Richard Richard Locke (born c. 1610)
Captain-lieutenant. Son of Roger Locke, gentleman, who became free as a Bristol merchant on 1 Feb. 1632. He was captain-lieutenant to Colonel Andrew Charlton in the Bristol Trained Bands in 1643:
‘That dewring the time Collonell Nathaniell Fines was governor of Bristoll until the time the Cittie of Bristoll was taken in by the King the saide Lock served under Collonell Charelton deceased as his Captain Liuetenant faithfully And iustlie without takeing or demanding any paie or recompence for such his service, which could not bee undergon butt by great expence and charge, hee having two hundred men under his charge which weare twice everie weake upon dewtie’ (Merchants and Merchandise, 133).
In 1654 he pleaded his heavy financial losses. Twice during the siege of Bristol in 1643 his ships had been commandeered by the governor to cover the approaches to the town. He suffered from both sides; the royalist Sir John Pennington pressed two of his ships whilst parliamentarian frigates captured some of his ships, and his property was burnt or plundered by royalists in 1645.
References: Merchants and Merchandise, 150-5.
Armies: Bristol
Lodge, John John Lodge
Commissioned captain in a regiment of foot in the Yorkshire militia.
References: CSPD, 1650, 506.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lodge, William William Lodge
Of Sherborne. On 7 Jan. 1647, claimed for arrears of pay 13 Dec. 1644-20 Feb. 1646. Quartermaster to troop of horse of Captain-Lieutenant Riddout [Rideout] and Captain Mooreton.
From 20 Feb. 1646-28 Aug. 1646 [26 weeks], lieutenant to troop of horse of Captain Thomas Hughes.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 132-3.
Armies: Dorset
Loftus, Samuel Samuel Loftus
Fourth captain in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot in Lord Wharton’s Army raised for Ireland in 1642. He went instead with the regiment into the earl of Essex’s Army as captain in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 70, 45.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Loftus, Thomas Thomas Loftus
Cornet in Edward Kightley’s troop in the earl of Essex’s army.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 7.709; Peacock, Army lists, Army lists, 52.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lomax, Gervase Gervase Lomax
Captain of a company of foot in Francis Pierrepont’s and then John Hutchinson’s Nottingham-based regiment of foot. Later possibly promoted to major in that regiment.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 110-11, 124, 129, 196, 208, 213.
Armies: Nottinghamshire
Lomax, Jarvis Jarvis Lomax
By Oct. 1643 and still there in Aug. 1644, captain of a company in a regiment of foot which served under Oliver Cromwell and later under Colonel Francis Russell in their capacity as governors of the Isle of Ely and later under Colonel Valentine Walton senior, which probably originated as an auxiliary regiment of the Cambridgeshire militia.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.29.
Armies: Eastern Association
Long, - - Long
Captain in Nathaniel Fiennes’s regiment of horse at Bristol in 1643. Probably Captain William Long, captain of a troop in Essex’s army in 1642.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.611.
Long, - - Long
By the beginning of 1645, lieutenant in Azariah Husbands’s company in John Pickering’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.85.
Armies: Eastern Association
Long, Robert Robert Long
Second captain in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot in his army raised for Ireland in 1642; he went as captain in Wharton’s regiment in the earl of Essex’s Army from or by 23 Aug. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 68, 31; TNA, SP28/2a/90.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Long, Thomas Thomas Long
During late winter and early spring 1644, lieutenant-colonel in Edward Montagu’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.69.
Armies: Eastern Association
Long, Sir Walter, first baronet Sir Walter Long, first baronet (c.1591-1672)
Born the younger son of Henry Long (died 1612), who was an affluent clothier and landowner of Whaddon, Wiltshire. He gained experience of naval expeditions against the Algerian corsairs, but by the early 1620s he was back in England, following the deaths of his father and then his elder brother having inherited the family’s by then debt-ridden estate. He was an MP in the early parliaments of Charles I and soon became a critic of some aspects of the government, especially the role of the duke of Buckingham. He supported the Petition of Right and played a leading role in the tumultuous events in the Commons at the end of the 1629 session, leading to his arrest and imprisonment in the Tower until 1633.
He was an MP in the Long Parliament and in 1642 actively supported the war effort. He became a captain in Sir William Balfour’s regiment of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army in summer 1642, commissioned on 29 July, and he commanded the troop at least until Dec., though he was reportedly wounded at Edgehill.
A pay warrant for late July 1643 places his troop by then in James Sheffield’s regiment of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army. The troop was no longer there by summer 1644.
Long became colonel of a regiment by June 1643 until at least mid-Oct., perhaps as late as the beginning of May 1644 (he was paid for his regiment on the former date; other pay warrants to the latter date call him colonel but only pay him for his troop).
He was active in trying to bolster the parliamentarian position in his native Wiltshire and in Shropshire, where his second marriage had brought him connections and land. However, in the words of the Oxford DNB, ‘it is uncertain whether he saw further action’.
In the later 1640s he became a prominent political Presbyterian, and thus one of the eleven MPs targeted for removal from the Commons or worse by the New Model Army. He fled to the continent and probably had connections with royalists in exile. He returned to England in 1659, supported the Restoration and was rewarded with a baronetcy.
References: Oxford DNB;Peacock, Army lists, 55; TNA, SP28/2a/161, SP28/3a/142, SP28/4/372, SP28/7/282, SP28/9/76, SP28/10/246, SP28/15/103; HoP: The Commons, 1604-1629; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 [forthcoming]
Armies: Earl of Essex; Wiltshire
Long, William William Long
Captain in Sir Henry Foulis’s regiment of horse in Yorkshire from early in the war, and still in the regiment (now under Sir William Fairfax) in Lincolnshire in Dec. 1643. He was present at the battle of Nantwich in Jan. 1644.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 392.
Armies: Yorkshire
Longhey [Longkey], Robert Robert Longhey [Longkey]
Lieutenant in Captain Henry Turner’s company in the Westminster auxiliaries regiment (Colonel James Prince) at its muster, 13 May 1644. The name may be Longkey.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 4, ff. 536r-537v.
Armies: Westminster
Lookar, John John Lookar
Lieutenant in Thomas Ballard’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 43.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lou, Thomas Thomas Lou
Lieutenant in Lyme garrison who in 1650 signs a petition for maimed soldier. His surname may be a misreading of signature.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.516.
Armies: Dorset
Lovekyn, Thomas Thomas Lovekyn
Captain-lieutenant in the Colonel’s company in Valentine Walton’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army; by the beginning of 1644 he had been promoted to captain and continued to serve in the regiment in 1645-6, when it was commanded by James Hobart.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.104.
Armies: Eastern Association
Lovell, Benjamin Benjamin Lovell (born 1607/08)
Graduated BA from Merton College, 11 Apr. 1627; proceeded MA from St Edmund Hall, 1630. Ordained priest, 11 Dec. 1628. Schoolmaster of Horley, Oxfordshire, 1629; curate of Alkerton, Oxfordshire, in 1631 and of Shutford chapel, Swalcliffe parish (Oxon.) in 1634-5. Rector of Preston Bagot (Warws.) from 1636.
He married (1) Mary Godwin (died 1658); their children included the naturalist Robert Lovell (1630?-1690) and Sir Salathiel Lovell (1631/32-1713), for both of whom see Oxford DNB.
For some months in 1643, probably from about Easter, Lovell commanded a troop of horse in Warwickshire. On 17 Oct. 1643 he was forced to hand over his troop to Major Abraham Pont on the orders of Colonel William Purefoy. The troop took part in the taking of Tamworth Castle.
He became rector of Lapworth, Warwickshire, in 1643, where he resisted paying the sequestered minister's wife her due out of the revenues of the parish. In 1646 he was threatened with the loss of the living unless he did so, and by May 1649 owed her two years’ arrears. Benjamin Lovell conformed at the Restoration, remaining rector of Lapworth, and was still alive in 1677.
References: TNA, SP28/136, Part 35; SP28/136, Part 32; Alumni Oxonienses; Clergy of the Church of England database, www.theclergydatabase.org.uk; Oxford DNB [Salathiel Lovell].
Armies: Warwickshire
Lovell, Edward Edward Lovell
Ensign in Rochford’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 32.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lovell, Henry Henry Lovell
Captain in the regiment of foot of the earl of Peterborough in the earl of Essex’s Army, 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 28.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lovell, Henry Henry Lovell
Ensign in the regiment of foot of Oliver Lord St John/Thomas Essex, named in the published list of officers in the earl of Essex’s army, 1642.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.650; Peacock, Army Lists, 34.
Armies: Bristol
Lowe [Lower], - - Lowe [Lower]
Captain in Sir John Merrick’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. He was one of those Captains in the regiment who fought with and under Waller in summer 1643.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 28.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Lowe, Alexander Alexander Lowe
Ensign in Captain Holmes’s company in Colonel Richard Holland’s regiment of foot in the Manchester garrison.
References: TNA, E121/5/7 (Duckenfeild, 6/5/1651).
Armies: Lancashire
Lowe, John John Lowe
A lieutenant in Alexander Rigby’s Lancashire regiment of foot.
References: Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 295.
Armies: Lancashire
Lowe, William William Lowe
Ensign in Captain William Johnstone’s company in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army at the time of its disbandment on 17 Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.15.
Armies: Eastern Association
Lowenger, - - Lowenger
A Dutchman with a company in the Hull garrison, who served in the West Riding in late 1642 under Captain John Hotham. He was based in Cawood Castle until Mar. 1643, when he went to Beverley. He raised a troop of horse and went into Lincolnshire with his foot and horse with John Hotham. In June 1643 he acted as an agent provocateur to entrap the Hothams; unaware of this, the Commons ordered his arrest on 6 July, although he was later released and his property restored.
Later promoted Major, serving under Lord Willoughby of Parham in Lincolnshire.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 392.
Armies: Yorkshire
Lower [Lowther], William William Lower [Lowther]
Lieutenant in Sir Jacob Astley’s regiment of foot in the earl of Northumberland’s Army against the Scots in 1642.
Fifth Captain, of firelocks, in Lord Kerry’s regiment of foot in Lord Wharton’s Army raised for service in Ireland in summer 1642, instead becoming Major in Thomas Ballard’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. He reportedly defected to the King early in the war.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 76, 69, 43.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lownes, - - Lownes
He is presumably the Captain Lowance who in Sept. 1643 took over as joint-governor of Cholmondeley. On 29 Oct. 1644 (with Croxton) led his foot company in a raid from Nantwich on Farndon.
References: BL, Harl. 1999, f. 61r.; Cheshire tracts, 138, 150.
Armies: Cheshire
Lowser, - - Lowser
Captain in the Kent Trained Bands.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 78.
Armies: Kent
Lowther, - - Lowther
Lieutenant-colonel in Colonel James Wardlaw’s regiment at Plymouth. His lieutenant recorded as serving 28 Mar. 1643-28 Mar. 1644. He may well be the same man as William Layther.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 3.360.
Armies: Devon
Lowther, Robert Robert Lowther
Captain of Shropshire forces and commander of the garrison at Wrockwardine church, Shropshire in late 1645, successfully beating off a royalist assault on 19 Dec. 1645.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 394.
Armies: Shropshire
Lowthian [Lothian, Louthiane], James James Lowthian [Lothian, Louthiane]
(He spelt his name as Louthian).
Evidently a Scottish professional soldier. Lowthian came north with Sir William Brereton in Jan. 1643 as his Sergeant-Major. He rallied the troops at Hopton Heath (19 Mar. 1643). Captured in the early stages of the siege of Nantwich (Dec. 1643), he had been exchanged by the time of the battle of Montgomery (18 Sept. 1644). There, Sir John Meldrum reported, ‘The Cheshire foot, with their Officers, carried themselves more like Lions than Men, especially Major Lowthian, who commanded as Major General’ (JHL, 6.715).
In 1645 Lowthian was Sir William Brereton’s Adjutant-General at the siege of Chester. On 20 Sept. 1645 he and Colonel Michael Jones led the forces which captured the eastern suburbs of Chester up to the city walls; five days later, whilst the king’s and Poyntz’s armies were clashing on Rowton Heath, Lowthian and his foot repelled a royalist sally out of Chester.
On 17 July 1646 the Commons ordered:‘That Adjutant-General Louthian shall have the Sum of Two hundred Pounds bestowed upon him for his good Service to the Parliament at Lichfield, and other Places: and that the Sum of Five hundred Pounds more be paid unto the said Adjutant-Gneral Lowthian, by the Committee of Goldsmiths-Hall, upon Account’ (JHC, 4.621).
Lowthian remained in the Chester garrison. In 1648 he was appointed colonel of the ‘Standinge Regimt. of this County’ (also called the ‘Regt. of foote now called upon Service, and raised for the safety of Cheshier’); the regiment was mustered on 19 Aug. and 2 Sept. (TNA, SP28/224, ff. 308, 31). With this force he served under Mytton, suppressing the rising in North Wales and marching into Anglesey. In late Aug. 1648 he and the sheriff of Cheshire, Roger Wilbraham, took the surrender of the fleeing Scottish Army at Warrington. On 7 Oct. the Commons awarded him £1,000 out of the sequestrations of North Wales rebels involved in the second civil war.
Lowthian seems to have disappeared from the local rcords, playing no part with the Cheshire forces in the Worcester campaign. In May 1657 he was still seeking payment of arrears from the Commons.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 103; Civil war in Cheshire, 43; TNA, SP28/224, ff. 267, 308, 317, 318; VCH, Cheshire, 5.i.115-25; JHC, 4.139, 621, 5.688-9, 6.43-4, 46, 7.539; JHL, 6.715, 609, 10.533.
Armies: Cheshire
Lowton, Henry Henry Lowton
A lieutenant in John Moore’s Lancashire regiment of foot.
References: Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 292.
Armies: Lancashire
Lucas, Robert Robert Lucas
A captain in George Doddington’s Lancashire regiment.
References: Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 287; CSPD, 1655, 58..
Armies: Lancashire
Luddington, William William Luddington
A Lincolnshire gentleman, initially serving on the Lincolnshire committee of the Eastern Association. By 26 Sept. 1644 he was a captain in Chrsitopher Copley’s regiment of horse, raising and arming 50 troopers at his own expense. He turned his troop over to Copley on 24 June 1645 under the provisions of the Northern Association Ordinance, claiming £525 in expenses.
Possibly the Mr Luddington of Sculcoates in 1654 appointed a Hull ejector.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 392.
Armies: Yorkshire
Ludlow, - - Ludlow
Captain in Richard Norton’s Hampshire regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 103.
Armies: Hampshire; Waller (Southern Association)
Ludlow, Edmund Edmund Ludlow (1616/17-1692)
Son of Sir Henry Ludlow, MP for Wiltshire in the Long Parliament. At the beginning of the war he enlisted as one of the 100 gentlemen forming the Life-Guard of the earl of Essex, and was present at the skirmish at Worcester (23 Sept. 1642) and at the battle of Edgehill (23 Oct. 1642). Invited by Sir Edward Hungerford to raise a troop in his regiment, Ludlow returned to Wiltshire in late Apr. 1643, after the fall of Reading, ‘with three more of the life-guard, two whereof were to be officers in my troop, and the third in another troop of the same regiment’ Appointed governor of Wardour Castle after its capture in May 1643, where he was besieged for three months before it fell. In early summer 1644 he was released upon an exchange of prisoners, and on 10 May 1644 was made major in Sir Arthur Hesilrige's regiment of horse in Waller’s army. On 30 July 1644, Waller gave him a colonel's commission, sending him into Wiltshire to raise a regiment of horse, whilst parliament made him sheriff around the same time, and although he fought at second Newbury (Oct. 1644), Basing House (Nov. 1644) and Taunton (Dec. 1644), his main efforts were in winning control of Wiltshire. In early Jan. 1645 Langdale surprised Ludlow’s regiment and Ludlow only escaped with difficulty. Hesilrige pushed for him to be an officer of the New Model Army, but the Wiltshire committee claimed that that he could not be spared. Ludlow was elected MP for Wiltshire in May 1646. Subsequent military career as colonel of horse, Wiltshire militia, 10 Apr. 1650; lieutenant.-general. of horse in Ireland from 2 July 1650; and commander-in-chief, Ireland, July 1659. Colonel regiment of foot, June, July 1659.
References: Oxford DNB; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
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Armies: Wiltshire: Sir Edward Hungerford’s Regt. of Horse; Ireland
Ludlow, Gabriel Gabriel Ludlow (died 1644)
Cornet in Edmund Ludlow’s regiment of horse, probably in the Colonel’s troop. He served in the garrison at Wardour Castle and was killed at the second battle of Newbury.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 82.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Ludlow, William William Ludlow (born 1618/19)
Cousin of Edmund Ludlow and son of Henry Ludlow of Hill Deverill and Tadley; MP for Old Sarum in 1659. Cornet to Captain Edmund Ludlow, and wounded in an ambush in autumn 1643 when Ludlow’s troop was stationed in the lands between Poole and Southampton: ‘being brought to Southampton, and his wounds searched, the bullet that went in at his belly was found at the chine of his back, with a piece of the waistband of his breeches, which being cut out, he wonderfully recovered to be in some measure serviceable to the publick’. Still cornet in Edmund Ludlow’s troop in Jan. 1644. Late in 1644 he was put in command of the garrison of Falston Manor, Wiltshire and ‘with his troop somewhat restrained the excursions of the King’s party from their garrison thereabouts’. When Falston was slighted in late 1645, Ludlow took his force to garrison Langford Castle. On 4 May 1646, the Commons resolved on the slighting of Castle Hill and fortifications at Devizes and also Langford castle. Force to be left in Wiltshire was to consist of 100 horse under Captain William Ludlow, governor of Devizes, with 150 foot garrisoning.
References: Memoirs of Edmund Ludlow ed. C.H. Firth, 2 vols. (1894), 2.69, 117, 124;
HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Wiltshire: Sir Edward Hungerford’s Regt. of Horse
Ludlow, William William Ludlow (born 1618/1619)
Cousin of Edmund Ludlow and son of Henry Ludlow of Hill Deverill and Tadley; MP for Old Sarum in 1659. Cornet to Captain Edmund Ludlow, and wounded in an ambush in autumn 1643 when Ludlow’s troop was stationed in the area between Poole and Southampton; ‘being brought to Southampton, and his wounds searched, the bullet that went in at his belly was found at the chine of his back, with a piece of the waistband of his breeches, which being cut out, he wonderfully recovered to be in some measure serviceable to the publick’. Still Cornet in Edmund Ludlow’s troop in Jan. 1644. Late in 1644 he was put in command of the garrison of Falston Manor, Wiltshire, ‘who with his troop somewhat restrained the excursions of the King’s party from their garrison thereabouts’. When Falston was slighted in late 1645, Ludlow took his force to garrison Langford Castle. On 4 May 1646, the Commons resolved on slighting of Castle Hill and fortifications at Devizes and also Langford Castle. Parliament directed that the force to be left in Wiltshire should consist of 100 horse under Captain William Ludlow, governor of Devizes, with 150 foot garrisoning Malmesbury.
References: Ludlow, Memoirs1.69, 117, 124; Spring, Waller’s army, 82.
Armies: Wiltshire; Waller; Waller (Southern Association)
Lufkin, - - Lufkin
A captain in Coventry regiment of foot (Colonel John Barker), evidently early in the first civil war, as his successor, Captain Matthew Randall, commanded the company from Dec. 1642.
References: TNA, SP28/136, Part 15; Part 21.
Armies: Warwickshire
Luke, Oliver Oliver Luke
In Nov. 1644, lieutenant in the Colonel’s own company in Sir Samuel Luke’s Newport Pagnell-based regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 95.
Armies: Bedfordshire
Luke, Sir Samuel Sir Samuel Luke (1603-1670)
Born the eldest son of Sir Oliver Luke (died c.1650) of Woodend, Cople, Bedfordshire. Via his parents, he was linked to several other parliamentarian families, including the Fleetwoods and the Barringtons, and more distantly the Cromwells and the Fienneses. He married and was knighted during the 1620s and by the 1630s was active in the county government of Bedfordshire.
He was eleted to both the Short and the Long Parliaments, though in both cases his return was disputed and there was a delay before he could take his seat. Like his father, he strongly supported parliament in the civil war, in 1642 raising and commanding a troop of horse which formed part of the earl of Essex’s Army and was present at the campaign and battle of Edgehill.
In 1643 he was commissioned colonel of a regiment of dragoons or horse, with which he campaigned around the fringes of Oxfordshire over the next few months; in his absence his regiment was mauled by Prince Rupert at Chinnor in June but he was present alongside Hampden at Chalgrove.
He became Scoutmaster General of Essex’s Army and campaigned with part of the Army in the Home Counties in the late summer and early autumn; he took part in the operation to recover Newport Pagnell in late Oct. 1643 and was appointed Governor.
From that point until he eventually stood down in June 1645 in line with the Self-Denying Ordinance, Luke combined the role of Scoutmaster with the governorship of what became the major parliamentarian garrison at Newport Pagnell. As such, he had interests in and often contributed to parliamentarian operation over a wide area of the south and east Midlands, from Leicesterhire and Northamptonshire, through Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Berkshire, and around Oxfordshire; even developments as far away as Warwickshire and Gloucs. concerned him. His geographically wide-ranging interests and involvement in the war across a large part of the Midlands, his fears for his own garrison, often under-manned, short of supplies and thus in danger, he thought, together with his energy and industry in the parliamentarian cause, are all revealed by his voluminous surviving correspondence from his time as governor of Newport Pagnell, one of the major sources for the civil war in that region.
His opposition to radicalism and radical religious practices evident during his period as Governor, including his arrest in June 1645 during the closing days of his governorship and his subsequent (unsuccessful) pursuit of two Baptist-inclined New Model officers (Hobson and Beaumont) who preached in Newport Pagnell, had already earned the distrust of many in the New Model and of the political Independents. He was seized by soldiers in 1647 but released on Fairfax’s orders and he was arrersted again at Pride’s Purge, though he was released before the end of Dec. 1648. He played no part in public events or national politics for the next ten years or more, living in retirement on his Bedfordshire estates. He sat in the Convention Parliament in 1660.
References: Oxford DNB
Armies: Earl of Essex; Bedfordshire
Lukeman, - - Lukeman
In summer 1644, during the doomed campaign in the South West, captain in John Dalbier’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Lumsden, James James Lumsden (died 1644)
Captain in James Kerr’s [Carr’s] regiment of foot, 29 Aug. 1643-15 Mar. 1644; captain in Sir William Waller’s regiment of foot, 25 Mar. 1644 until his death on 15 Apr.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 25, 150
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Lundy, Richard Richard Lundy
By spring 1645, when it was disbanded, captain in the regiment of foot by then commanded by Edward Aldridge in the earl of Essex’s Army. He transferred at that rank and in that regiment, initially under Aldridge, into the New Model Army.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 48-9, 149.
Armies: Earl of Essex; New Model Army
Lune [Lunn], - - Lune [Lunn]
By early 1645 lieutenant in Captain Cromwell’s company in John Pickering’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.86.
Armies: Eastern Association
Luttrell, John John Luttrell (1610-45)
Of Santon Court, near Barnstaple, Devon. Colonel. Eldest son of John Luttrell (1584-1617) and his wife Frances, daughter of Sir Edward Gorges of Wraxall. He married Rachel (died 1653), daughter of Francis Hardy. A friend of Robert Bennet.
Luttrell was a captain by early 1643, possibly in Sir Samuel Rolle’s Devon Trained Band regiment (which was also Bennet’s regiment early in the war). In Apr. 1643 his actions at Sourton Down were noted.
In the summer of 1644 Luttrell landed from South Wales to organize the rising against the royalists at Barnstaple as Essex’s army approached. The town rose on 26 or 27 June, and Luttrell was a leader in repelling Colonel Digby’s attempt to retake the town on 1 July. Essex commissioned Luttrell to raise a volunteer regiment of foot, probably the 374 men whom he commanded at Barnstaple, where he was appointed governor. On 15 July the Commons appointed him high sheriff of Devon. In Aug. he attacked the nearby royalist stronghold at Appledore, Cornwall, but had to withdraw when a royalist relieving force approached. He evidently marched out when the town surrendered on 17 Sept. 1644.
Colonel Eliziar Leighton challenged Luttrell to a duel: on 3 Dec. 1644, the Commons approved the decision of the Committee of the West, who had imprisoned Colonel Leighton for challenging Colonel Luttrell, and left to it final judgment.
Luttrell was killed at Milverton, Somerset, on 28 Jan. 1645. Captain William Mercer wrote a broadside elegy for him:
‘O! Devon, Devon, doe nothing but weep.
Because thy keeper Luttrell lyes asleep’.
References: Vis. Devon, 539, 541; Cotton, Barnstaple, 255-7, 277-9, 328, 299, 335; Andriette, Devon, 213; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 3.327; JHC, 3.712-3; W. Mercer, An Elegie on the Death of the thrice valiant and worthy Colonell John Luttrell (1645).
Armies: Devon
Luxford, Thomas Thomas Luxford
Captain in Herbert Morley’s regiment of foot from its formation in Mar. 1644 to its reduction on 30 Apr. 1645. He was apparently at the unsuccessful siege of Basing House in 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 100.
Armies: Sussex; Waller (Southern Association)
Lvereier[?], - - Lvereier[?]
Lieutenant in Captain Samuel Bosa’s reformado troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army in Nov./Dec. 1642.
References: TNA, SP28/4/175.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lydcott, - - Lydcott
Successively captain and then Major in Nathaniel Whetham’s Northampton-based regiment of horse, who seems to have taken command of part or all the regiment towards the end of the war, including at the siege of Banbury. As such, he appears frequently in Sir Samuel Luke’s letter books, and several letters to and by him survive there.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 164; Luke Letter Books, especially nos. 125, 134, 311, 414, 478, 956, 1105, 1114, 1195.
Armies: Northamptonshire
Lyeathcock, Humphrey Humphrey Lyeathcock
Ensign in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 34.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Lygon, William William Lygon
Of Madresfield Court, Worcestershire, by Mar. 1645 he was a colonel empowered to work with Rous in raising troops in Worcestershire and Warwickshire to strengthen parliament’s hold on Worcestershire
Lynn, - - Lynn
In May 1643, captain serving in one of the three regiments of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the Army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.33.
Armies: Eastern Association
Lysle, Edmund Edmund Lysle
Ensign in Captain Thomas Bowman’s company in the Isle of Wight foot regiment of Thomas Carr.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 24.
Armies: Isle of Wight
Lysley, John John Lysley
Captain in Colonel Richard Shuttleworth’s regiment of foot. Owed £321 17s 1d in Sept. 1650.
References: TNA, E121/4/8.
Armies: Lancashire