Surnames beginning 'P'

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Surnames beginning 'P'

Packer, William William Packer (died c.1662)
Nothing is known of his birth, family, upbringing or early life. During the civil war he served initially as a junior officer in the troop of Valentine Walton, junior in Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. In spring 1644, by then a lieutenant in Cromwell’s regiment, he clashed with Crawford, who arrested him on grounds of disobedience, though it is more likely that Crawford objected to Packer’s (Baptist) religious views and was seeking to make a point. Cromwell strongly defended Packer and the latter seems to have continued serving in his regiment, succeeding as captain of the troop on Walton’s death at Marston Moor in July 1644.
With the formation of the New Model Army in spring 1645, Packer and his troop – originally earmarked for Whalley’s horse regiment – soon entered Fairfax’s regiment of horse, in which he continued to serve until the late 1650s, promoted to major in 1652. Thus in 1648 he was with the regiment at the siege of Colchester and in 1650-1 he was with Cromwell in Scotland; he played a key role in the battle of Dunbar.
During the Protectorate he became deputy major-general for a group of counties in the south-east Midlands and in 1656 he sat in the second Protectorate parliament. However in 1657 his opposition to the creation of a second, unelected parliamentary chamber was such that, following a tense meeting with him, Cromwell dismissed him from the army.
Packer was returned to but unseated from the third (Richard Cromwell’s) Protectorate parliament. The returned Rump not only restored Packer to the army but created him colonel of his old regiment, only to cashier him afresh in Oct. 1659. He supported the army’s seizure of power later in the month, but both that episode and Packer’s return to power were brief. He had already been arrested and imprisoned at the time of the Restoration. He lost the lands and property he had acquired after the civil war and spent much of the early 1660s in prison. In autumn 1662 he was transported to Dublin, to be incarcerated in Dublin Castle, but as nothing more is heard of him thereafter it seems likely that he died shortly after his arrival.
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.20; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 53, 61, 63, 72, 82, 92, 105.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Paine, George George Paine
Paine was a sea-captain, brother-in-law of Joseph Hawes and Nathaniel Hawes and in partnership with them and their brother-in-law Randal Mainwaring in the Virginian and West Indies tobacco and provisioning trades.
In 1642 he was a signatory to a petition to place the future Independent John Simpson as lecturer of St Dunstan’s in the East and the following year was appointed to the Committee of Thirty which replaced the parish’s closed vestry. In 1642 he was appointed to one of the ward committees for raising contributions for parliament.
Lieutenant in the Red regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Thomas Atkin) in summer 1642. In Sept. 1642 he was appointed captain in Randal Mainwaring’s regiment of foot, his rank and regiment in Nov. 1643 when he published A true relation of all the skirmishes between our forces and the Cavaliers at Owlny [Olney, Bedfordshire]. Sent in a letter from Captaine George Paine, (one of the Captaines of the Red Regiment) who was an eye-witnesse of every severall conflict, to a deare friend of his in London. Wherein each particular is exactly set downe, for the satisfaction of such as are desirous to know the truth; and to stop the mouth of blasphemous malignants.
References: Thrale 1642; Brenner, Merchants, 138, 183, 190, 325-7, 413-4, 430, 449; An ordinance and declaration of both Houses of Parliament (1642: Thomason Tract E119 [28]), 4.
Armies: London
Paine, Jervase Jervase Paine
Captain in the marquess of Hamilton’s regiment of foot in the earl of Northumberland’s Army, 1640.
By late summer 1642 he was a major in Sir William Fairfax’s regiment of foot in Essex’s Army. He was one of the officers who went with Fairfax to Yorkshire when the latter joined Lord Fairfax’s Army in Dec. 1642; Paine was promoted lieutenant-colonel in the new regiment of foot formed by Fairfax in the Bradford area.
Paine fought at Adwalton Moor (June 1643), and escaped after that defeat to Hull, where he stayed for the rest of the war.
In 1644 Paine was made lieutenant-colonel of John Mauleverer’s new garrison regiment at Hull.
In 1648 he claimed arrears of £137 14s.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 86, 43; Jones, ‘War in the North’, 397.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax)
Painter, Robert Robert Painter
Cornet in Major Francis Duett’s [Dowett’s] troop in Edmund Ludlow’s regiment of horse, between at least 31 Aug. 1644 and 25 Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 83.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Palaelogus [Paholigus, Paleologus], Theophilus Theophilus Palaelogus [Paholigus, Paleologus]
Captain-Lieutenant in the regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army commanded by Lord Oliver St John and then Thomas Essex in 1642-3. In 1643-4 he served as lieutenant-colonel in Francis Thompson’s regiment of foot.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Palgrave, - - Palgrave
By Apr. 1643 captain, by Sept. 1644 major, in (presumably his kinsman) Sir John Palgrave’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army; after Sir John Palgrave’s removal and the promotion of Lieutenant-Colonel Hoogan to command the regiment, Palgrave in turn was promoted in late 1644 to be the regiment’s lieutenant-colonel.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.77.
Armies: Eastern Association
Palgrave, Sir John Sir John Palgrave
Raised a regiment of foot in Norfolk in spring 1643, initially garrisoning Wisbech but then during the summer ordered first to reinforce Fairfax in besieged Hull and then to reinforce parliament’s garrison in Gainsborough. During summer 1644 Palgrave and his regiment garrisoned Lincoln. Perhaps in the light of its rather limited active role and its sometimes slack discipline – there were allegations of ill-discipline and desertion – in late 1644 Palgrave was replaced as commander by his former lieutenant-colonel; perhaps for the same reason Palgrave’s old regiment was not absorbed into the New Model Army but was disbanded in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.76.
Armies: Eastern Association
Palmer, - - Palmer
A captain of foot in Yorkshire. He was prominent in Sir Thomas Fairfax’s attack on Leeds in Jan. 1643, but there are no later references to him.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 397.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax)
Palmer, - - Palmer
Listed as lieutenant in Sir Anthony Irby’s regiment of dragoons in the Eastern Association Army raised at the outbreak of the civil war.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.45.
Armies: Eastern Association
Palmer, John John Palmer
Cornet in the earl of Essex’s own troop of horse in the latter’s army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 48.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Palmer, Laurence Laurence Palmer
A minister and a captain, probably of horse, in Hutchinson’s Nottinghamshire force, one of several officers portrayed by Lucy Hutchinson as repeatedly disloyal to and persistently undermining her husband.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 146-7, 159, 173, 174, 188, 189, 191, 208, 210, 212-13.
Armies: Nottinghamshire
Palmer, Peter Peter Palmer
Cornet in Arthur Goodwin’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Palmer, Robert Robert Palmer
Captain in Lord Mandeville’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Palmer, Thomas Thomas Palmer
At the beginning of 1644 but apparently no longer there by the summer, cornet in Hunt’s troop in William Purefoy’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 122.3
Armies: Warwickshire
Papworth, Edward Edward Papworth
Lieutenant in James Wemyss’s regiment of foot at the time of its disbandment in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 159.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Parens, David David Parens
Ensign in the company of Captain Francis Hanson in Samuel Jones’s regiment of Surrey foot by 20 Oct. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 65.
Armies: Surrey
Pargiter, Arthur Arthur Pargiter
Ensign in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 42.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Paris, - - Paris
Captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army on 10 May 1644; by 15 July 1644 he had been succeeded by Captain Tooley.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.63.
Armies: Eastern Association
Parker, - - Parker
At one point, but no longer by the beginning of 1645, lieutenant in the troop nominally commanded by Valentine Walton senior but actually by Thomas Ireton in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.54.
Armies: Eastern Association
Parker, - - Parker
By Apr. 1643 and still there in Mar. 1644 but gone by the end of Apr. 1644, captain in Sir John Palgrave’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.79.
Armies: Eastern Association
Parker, - - Parker
Ensign in Thomas Crosse’s troop in Francis Russell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.98.
Armies: Eastern Association
Parker, Charles Charles Parker
Ensign in Thomas Ballard’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 43.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Parker, Gilbert Gilbert Parker
By the beginning of 1644, captain in Sir Miles Hobart’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.44.
Armies: Eastern Association
Parker, Richard Richard Parker
Ensign in the regiment of foot of Oliver Lord St John/Thomas Essex, named in the published list of officers in the earl of Essex’s army, 1642.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.650; Peacock, Army Lists, 34.
Armies: Bristol
Parker, Richard Richard Parker
In summer 1642 he became a lieutenant in Holles’s short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. Like most of his fellow-officers and the regiment as a whole, little is heard of him after their shattering defeat at Brentford in Nov. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Parker, Richard Richard Parker
Lieutenant in the Orange regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel John Towse) in summer 1642.
References: Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Parker, Robert Robert Parker
Third captain in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot, raised for Lord Wharton’s Army for Ireland in 1642. Instead, served as captain in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 70, 40.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Parkinson, John John Parkinson
Lieutenant-Colonel of Lord Mandeville’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642, from or by 12 Aug.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36; TNA, SP28/1a/86, SP28/2b/362.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Parren, - - Parren
From Mar. 1644, shortly after Grenville’s defection, captain in the regiment of horse raised for Sir Richard Grenville but then commanded by Colonel Edward Cooke. By the end of 1644 he had left that regiment and transferred to the earl of Denbigh’s Army.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 60.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association); Earl of Denbigh
Parry, - - Parry
Captain of horse. Paid for himself and his troop in the Gloucester accounts on 12 Apr. 1643 by order from Sir William Waller.
References: TNA, SP28/129, Part 5, fol. 4r.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Parry, Owen Owen Parry
Captain in Henry Wentworth’s regiment of foot in the earl of Northumberland’s Army against the Scots in 1640.
Major in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot in his army raised for service in Ireland in 1642, continuing as major when instead it became Wharton’s regiment in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 79, 68, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Parry, Walter Walter Parry (died 1646)
Parry was a captain of horse in the Gloucester garrison by 12 Apr. 1643, when he received payment for himself and his troop by Waller’s order. He was still at Gloucester on 30 Oct. 1643. By 12 Feb. 1644 he and his troop had joined Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse, and he continued in the regiment when it transferred to the New Model Army with John Butler as its colonel. He was wounded at Naseby but recovered and rejoined the regiment. However, he was dead by early 1646 and his troop passed to Walter Bethell.
References: Spring, Waller’s army,55, 66; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, I, 82-3; TNA, SP28/129, Part 5, f. 4r.; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 7.717; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 51, 61.
Armies: Gloucestershire; Waller; Waller (Southern Association); New Model Army
Parsons, - - Parsons
Lieutenant in Sir Richard Onslow’s regiment of foot (the Surrey auxiliaries). He was at the siege of Basing House in June 1644 and was still in his company in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 114
Armies: Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Parsons, Laurence Laurence Parsons
Probably of a family from Leicesterhire, but which included important figures in the Irish administration such as Sir Laurence Parsons, second baron of the Irish exchequer, and his brother Sir William Parsons, lord chief justice (for whom see Oxford DNB). Laurence married (1) Frances, daughter of Piers Legh of Lyme, Cheshire, and (2) Anne, sister of the earl of Sussex and widow of the royalist Sir William Vavasour of Weston.
In autumn 1642 he was lieutenant of horse to Captain Aiscough and then to Thomas Hatcher, whom he accompanied to Yorkshire late in the year. In Mar. 1643 he was appointed captain of Lord Fairfax’s lifeguard, in which capacity he fought at Adwalton Moor and at the siege of Hull. In Apr. 1644 he became colonel of horse and served at the siege of York and at Marston Moor and, that winter, at the siege of Pontefract. His regiment was reduced on 23 June 1645 and shortly after he became quartermaster-general to the Northern Association Army of Sydenham Poyntz.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 397.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Poyntz)
Part, Thomas Thomas Part
Lieutenant in Captain Titus’s company in Thomas Ayloffe’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army at its disbandment in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.9.
Armies: Eastern Association
Partington, Thomas Thomas Partington
Commissioned captain in Robert Duckenfeild’s Cheshire militia regiment of foot, 22 Aug. 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 509.
Armies: Cheshire
Partridge, Alexander Alexander Partridge
By Jan. 1645 a captain in command of a troop of horse numbering 29 men, all ranks, serving with Sir Thomas Myddelton's brigade based in Montgomeryshire.
References: National Library of Wales, Chirk Castle Ms. 1/Biii, 93.
Armies: North Wales
Pasley, William William Pasley
Ensign. A neighbour of Adam Eyre’s in the Penistone area, Yorkshire (West Riding), and possibly by 1647 a local township or parish officer. He was one of the officers represented by Eyre in pursuit of their arrears and answering of debentures.
References: Eyre, 64, 86, 87, 92, 97.
Armies: Yorkshire
Pateson, William William Pateson
Of Ribby, Kirkham parish. A captain in Lancashire. In autumn 1643 he raised a company in one half of Kirkham parish as part of Alexander Rigby senior’s regiment of foot. In Dec. 1643 he marched to the relief of Liverpool and early in 1644 came up to the siege of Lathom House and later fought at Marston Moor. He was captured by, but escaped from, ‘the Northern men’ (presumably Langdale’s Northern horse) and made his way to the siege of Greenhalgh.
References: Warr in Lancashire, 42-3, 45, 47, 49-50, 59.
Armies: Lancashire
Patie, William William Patie
Lieutenant in company of Captain Churchill.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.505.
Armies: Dorset
Patrick, - - Patrick
Lieutenant in Major Calthorp’s company in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army on 1 Mar. 1644.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.13; TNA, SP28/14/20.
Armies: Eastern Association
Patrick, William William Patrick
Lieutenant to Captain Irby in John Browne’s regiment of dragoons in the earl of Essex’s Army 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 57.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Patrick, William William Patrick
The William Patrick who is listed as serving first as lieutenant in the regiment of dragoons raised by Sir Anthony Irby at the beginning of the war, and then as captain in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army in Aug.-Sept. 1643, may or may not be the same man as the Lieutenant Patrick who later served in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.22, 45.
Armies: Eastern Association
Patterson, Robert Robert Patterson
Captain in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army in spring 1644, when he was succeeded by Captain Edward Horsman.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.22.
Armies: Eastern Association
Paty [Patty], Joseph Paty [Patty]
Dorchester clothier. By order of the corporation on 11 Jan. 1643, to watch every third night and exercise once a week, with Josiah Terry as his lieutenant and John White as his ensign. Amongst civic offices, governor of freemen, 1623-4, 1631-2 and warden of the Company of Clothiers, 1630-1. Paty was rapidly replaced by John Whiteway, presumably because of Paty’s royalist inclinations; he was one of few Dorchester notables who went over to the royalist cause after the fall of the town.
References: Whiteway, Diary, 181; Underdown, Fire from Heaven, 201, 205-6.
Armies: Dorset
Paulet, - - Paulet
Captain in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 40.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pawder, Robert Robert Pawder
Captain in Lawrence Parsons’s regiment of horse in the Fairfaxes’ Northern Army, at least between 26 Apr. 1644 and 23 June 1645.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 397.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax)
Payard, Alexander Alexander Payard
In summer 1642 he became an ensign in Holles’s short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army. Like most of his fellow-officers and the regiment as a whole, little is heard of him after their shattering defeat at Brentford in Nov. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Payn, - - Payn
Lieutenant [of foot].
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 377.
Armies: Dorset
Payne, - - Payne
Captain. An officer in Gloucestershire who was paid £10 for his company on 21 Apr. 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 635.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Payne, Thomas Thomas Pyne
Noted as cornet in Erle’s troop of horse on pay muster, Sept. 1642. Probably Captain Thomas Pyne below. Captain of dragoons in Lyme garrison, Sept. 1643-1 Feb. 1644, and then captain of horse.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.527, 537.
Armies: Dorset
Payton, Sir Edward, second baronet Sir Edward Payton, second baronet (1587/88-1652?)
Born the eldest son of Sir John Payton (died 1616) of Isleham, Cambridgeshire; he was a nephew of Robert Rich, the future second earl of Warwick. He was knighted and subsequently inherited the baronetcy upon his father’s death and by inheritance or marriage he acquired property in Cambridgeshire, Suffolk, Norfolk and elsewhere, though he later claimed to have been impoverished by his civil war activities.
He was an MP in the later parliaments of James I and the early parliaments of Charles I and held local office in Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire. During the 1630s his political and religious views led him to diverge from some royal policies, as reflected in his later writings. He did not sit in the Short or Long Parliaments. In summer 1642 he became a captain in the earl of Peterborough’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army and fought at Edgehill, where he was captured. He later claimed to have fought at one of the battles of Newbury and at Naseby, but clear documentary proof is lacking and he does not appear in any of the New Model Army lists of officers (it is his son, Edward, who shows up as an officer, for a time lieutenant-colonel, in the earl of Denbigh’s forces in 1644; another son, Thomas, became a royalist fighting in Wales). He died sometime in the early 1650s, by that time a rather bitter republican.
References: Oxford DNB; Peacock, Army lists, 28; TNA, SP28/3b/511, SP28/4/295.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Peachey, William William Peachey
Ensign in Captain Seale’s company in Herbert Morley’s regiment of foot, between at least July and Dec. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 101.
Armies: Sussex; Waller (Southern Association)
Peake, Edward Edward Peake
A younger son of Edward Peake of Sandwich, Kent, and his wife Susanna, daughter of Thomas Fiser of Sandwich, who was alive (and under 13) in 1619: described by Everitt as ‘parochial gentry’ (Everitt, Kent, 163).
Captain in the regiment of Kentish horse which in Apr. 1644 was sent to join Waller’s Army on the order of the Committee of Both Kingdoms, and which returned home and disappeared after it mutinied in July. By 6 Aug. he was captain in Sir Michael Livesay’s regiment of horse, in which he served until Apr. 1645. He did not go with the regiment into the New Model Army. In 1647 he became a captain in Augustine Skinner’s [Skynner’s] Kentish regiment of horse. In 1650 he was appointed a sequestration commissioner, dying at some point in the 1650s.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 80; Vis. Kent, 1619, 48-9; Everitt, Kent, 163, 289, 290n.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Kent
Pearce [Pierce], - Pearce [Pierce]
Lieutenant. He served in Henry Stephens’s regiment of Gloucester townsmen raised in spring 1643. During the siege, he took part in a skirmish under Captain Evans on 7 Aug. 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 625-7; Bibliotheca, 208.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Pearse, Richard Richard Pearse
Possibly a captain at Dartmouth and/or Plymouth during the civil war.
Commissioned lieutenant-colonel of foot in the Devon Militia, 2 Mar. 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 504.
Armies: Devon
Pearson, Matthew Matthew Pearson
Gentleman, of Kilham, Yorkshire (East Riding), eldest son of John Pearson and Jane, daughter of Francis Philips of Marske.
In spring 1645 he was a captain in Sir William Constable’s regiment of horse serving in Cheshire.
However, he was a lieutenant by 10 Apr. 1650, when he was commissioned captain in a regiment of foot in the Yorkshire militia.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 397; Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 178, 522; CSPD 1650, 506.
Armies: Yorkshire
Peart, Francis Francis Peart
Of Lincolnshire. Captain-Lieutenant in Francis Boynton’s troop of horse, 9 June 1643 to 12 Oct. 1644, when he became a captain in the same regiment, and served as such until the regiment was reduced on 24 June 1645. He then became captain in Edward Rossiter’s Lincolnshire regiment of horse, raised as a detached force from the New Model Army.
He later reported that he had fought in Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Leicesterhire, Shropshire and Wales.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 397; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 1.163-4.
Armies: Yorkshire; Lincolnshire; Eastern Association; New Model Army
Pearte, Original Original Pearte
Possibly served for a time as lieutenant in Disney’s troop in Lord Willoughby’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. Captain in Edward Rossiter’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. He transferred with the regiment into the New Model Army in spring 1645 as a captain in Rossiter’s, later Twistleton’s, New Model regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.93, 109; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 52, 62, 73, 83, 94, 106.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pease, Thomas Thomas Pease
Lieutenant in Major John Allsupp’s company of the Red regiment (London Auxiliaries) when it mustered on 27 Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, f. 690r.
Armies: London
Pecke, Henry Henry Pecke
Captain in Herbert Morley’s regiment of foot, stationed at Arundel Castle in 1644 and marching into the West early in 1645. His company was disbanded when the regiment was reduced on 30 Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 100.
Armies: Sussex; Waller (Southern Association)
Peckham, Christopher Christopher Peckham
Captain in Ralph Weldon’s (later Robert Lilburne’s) regiment of foot by 10 Feb. 1644. In the failed attempt to form a regiment for Ireland under the regiment’s Lieutenant-Colonel Kempson, Peckham would have been the new regiment’s lieutenant-colonel. On 10 June 1647 Peckham and the other Kempson allies left the regiment, whilst the new regiment was still-born and dissolved on 21 July.
References: Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 2.452, 454-5; Spring, Waller’s army, 152.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Kent; New Model Army
Pedder, - - Pedder
Captain in Samuel Luke’s Bedfordshire regiment of dragoons in the earl of Essex’s Army (pay warrant: 10 May 1643).
References: TNA, SP28/7/313, 320.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Peeke, Peter Peter Peeke
Lieutenant in Weymouth garrison in 1646. In Oct. in dispute with Alderman Churchey of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis. Adjutant there by 21 Jan. 1647, when Dorset committee, ‘takieing into consideracon his spetiall service in severall offices from the beegining of these wars, for wch. Sd. Services hee hath receved very little pay in comparison of what is due unto him’ ordered payment of £20 in part-payment of arrears from before he received his commission as adjutant.
On 25 Mar. 1647 Lieutenant Peeke was ordered to be quartermaster of Weymouth garrison, and continued as such, with transfer to Major Heane’s company, 18 Apr. 1647. By 18 Mar. 1651, captain in the same garrison, when described as a clothworker of Weymouth.
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 318-20, 337; Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 162-3, 208.
Armies: Dorset
Pegler, Henry Henry Pegler
Captain. An officer serving under Thomas Morgan at Gloucester. He served at the taking of Berkeley Castle in Sept. 1645 and profited from its spoliation. Commissioned captain of foot in the Gloucestershire militia, 8 Feb. 1651.
References: HMC, Fifth Report, 356-7; CSPD, 1651, 513.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Peirce, Robert Robert Peirce
Ensign of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Lee’s company in the Red regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel Samuel Harsnett) when it mustered on 27 Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, f. 693r.
Armies: London
Pelham, - - Pelham
Captain of horse.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 386.
Armies: Dorset
Pelham, Robert Robert Pelham
From 1 Jan. 1645 he was captain of a troop of horse in the London-raised regiment of George Thompson previously commanded temporarily by Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Thorpe. He continued there under the regiment’s later colonels, Edward Popham and George Starre, until disbandment in Oct. 1646.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 136, 142.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Massey Brigade; London
Pell, - - Pell
Ensign in (presumably his kinsman) William Pell’s company in the regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army commanded first by Sir John Palgrave and then by Sir Thomas Hoogan.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.80.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pell, William William Pell
By spring 1644 and still there a year later when the regiment was disbanded, captain in the regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army commanded first by Sir John Palgrave and then by Sir Thomas Hoogan. He is probably the Captain Pell whose letters Sir Samuel Luke welcomed ‘as apples of gold’ in May 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.80; Luke, Letter Book, no. 619.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pemberton, Lewis Lewis Pemberton
Like several other officers in the Waller’s regiment (such as James Hillersdon and Edward Gravenor – did they transfer together?), Pemberton began the civil war as an officer – in his case ensign and later captain – in the regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army commanded first by Lord Oliver St John and then, following his death shortly after Edgehill, by Thomas Essex. But sometime during 1643 he transferred to Waller’s Army, becoming captain in Waller’s own regiment of foot (certainly by Nov. 1643) and succeeding his old Essex Army colleague Hillersdon as its Major by spring 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 154; Peacock, Army lists, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Pendock, Philip Philip Pendock
Captain in John Hutchinson’s Nottinghamshire-based regiment of horse, several times portrayed by Lucy Hutchinson as a rather unwilling, perhaps cowardly, officer. In the later 1640s he served as a captain in Francis Thornhaugh’s regiment of horse on the New Model Army payroll.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 188, 189, 208; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 164.
Armies: Nottinghamshire; New Model Army
Penington, Isaac Isaac Penington (c.1584-1661)
Colonel. Born c. 1584 in London, son of Robert Penington, a London merchant with property in Suffolk and Norfolk. Isaac rose to prominence in the Fishmongers’ Company, becoming its prime warden by 1640. By trade, however, he was a cloth merchant with commercial interests in the Levant and East Indies; he supported and part-financed naval and mercantile ventures and also acquired an interest in Whitefriars brewery. He purchased an estate at Chalfont St Giles, Buckinghamshire, but retained his London properties and interests.
Sheriff of London in 1638, alderman for Bridge Without in 1639 and MP for London in the Short Parliament and the Long Parliament, where he became very active in the godly and parliamentarian cause, working with John Venn as a key link between parliament and the City.
Lord mayor of London, 1642-3, and lieutenant of the Tower of London during much of the civil war.
Colonel of the White regiment, London Trained Bands, Apr. 1642, Sept. 1643; by 22 Oct. 1646 replaced by Thomas Player.
He played an active part in the trial of Charles I, though he did not sign the death warrant, and remained prominent during the Rump. In financial difficulties by the later 1650s, at the Restoration he escaped death but was imprisoned for life and he died in the Tower in 1661.
References: Oxford DNB; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660; Overton 1642; Thrale 1642; BL, Harl. 986, p. 9; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 316.
Armies: London
Penn, John John Penn
By spring 1645, at the time of its disbandment, captain in Lord Robartes’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 149.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pennyfeather, Thomas Thomas Pennyfeather
In 1643 he was lieutenant in Major Battersby’s troop in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse in Waller’s Army. In spring 1644, probably when Battersby left the regiment, he was promoted to captain. He entered the New Model Army in spring 1645, but initially in a different regiment – as captain in the New Model regiment of horse to be commanded by Sir Michael Livesey. But by May 1645 he had become captain in the equivalent of his old regiment of horse, commanded by Colonel Butler. He was still there as captain in 1649, by then under Colonel Horton. He campaigned with the regiment in Ireland in from 1649, promoted to major by the end of the year, but he died in Ireland sometime before Nov. 1651.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 54, 61, 64, 72, 82, 93, 105.
Armies: Waller; New Model Army
Peppiatt, William William Peppiatt
Ensign in the company of Captain Waynd [Wane] in the Blue regiment, London auxiliaries in summer 1647.
References: Clarke Papers, 1.154.
Armies: London
Pepys, Thomas Thomas Pepys
Although his name has various spellings, he generally spelt it Pepis. It is impossible to say whether he was related to Samuel; there are several Thomas Pepys in the Diary, of whom the most plausible to fit the bill is Thomas (1611-1675), son of Samuel’s father’s cousin Thomas, who seems to have been a puritan (and probably a Presbyterian) and by the 1660s a wealthy businessman, and who in the 1650s had served as JP and an assessment commissioner in Middlesex and Westminster, and was appointed a militia commissioner in Middlesex in Mar. 1660. At the Restoration he took out a pardon.
Whether or not this identification as a (distant) relative of the diariest is correct, the Thomas Pepys who was a parliamentarian officer in the civil war appears in several surviving pay warrants, generally issued by Sir Thomas Myddelton in spring 1644 to pay Captain Thomas Pepys (and alternative spellings, including ‘Peapes’, ‘Peepes’ and ‘Pepis’) money towards raising his company to serve in Sir William Myddelton’s regiment and for paying his 100 men in their march to Coventry. He was still serving with Myddelton in Mar. 1645.
References: The Diary of Samuel Pepys, ed. R. Latham and W. Matthews, 11 vols. (1970-1983), 10. 323; also Acts and Ordinances, 2.1074, 1373, 1437; TNA, SP28/346, nos. 133, 147, 283.
Armies: North Wales
Perkins, - - Perkins
Captain in the White regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel John Bellamy), in Oct. 1646.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11.
Armies: London
Perkins, - - Perkins
A captain in Sir Richard Onslow’s regiment of foot (Surrey auxiliaries) who led his company to the siege of Basing House in June 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 106.
Armies: Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Perren, - - Perren
Captain of a troop of horse which had been raised in Hampshire in Dec. 1643 for Sir Richard Grenville’s regiment and which became part of John Middleton’s regiment of horse in summer 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 97.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Perry, - - Perry
Captain.
Probably captain [?of foot] in the regiment of Colonel William Sydenham.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 272-3.
Armies: Dorset
Perry, - - Perry
Lieutenant. Lieutenant to Sergeant-Major Cheyney [Chomney] in Popham’s regiment of foot.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.555.
Armies: Somerset: Col. Alexander Popham’s Regt. of Foot
Perry, Henry Henry Perry
At its muster in Nov. 1643, though no longer in the regiment in summer 1644, captain in Sir Thomas Barrington’s regiment of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.32.
Armies: Eastern Association
Perry, Hugh [?] Hugh? Perry
An officer called Perry was lieutenant in William Cross’s troop in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse, Aug.-Nov. 1643. He was still in the regiment at Cropredy Bridge (June 1644). He may be the Hugh Perry who was a lieutenant at the relief of Taunton in Dec. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 66.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Perry, James James Perry
By his own account, Perry was an officer in parliament’s service. He was a lieutenant in the garrison at Farnham, Surrey, at some point between 30 Sept. 1644 and 1646. Whilst at Farnham, he seized goods in the house of one Christmas, which (he later claimed) were destined for the enemy at Winchester, which were duly distributed amongst the hungry soldiers of the garrison. Christmas’s brother or son then sued him for £8 worth of the contribution which the plaintiff claimed belonged to him. In Oct. 1646 Perry, by now a captain, petitioned the Lords for relief from the threat of prosecution and outlawry. The Lords ordered all proceedings against Perry to be stayed.
References: HMC, Sixth Report, 136; JHL, 8.514.
Armies: Surrey
Peters, James James Peters
Lieutenant in George Thompson’s regiment of horse in Mar. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 141.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Peto, John John Peto
Ensign in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642. Presumably related to the regiment’s lieutenant-colonel, Sir Edward Peyto [Peto].
References: Peacock, Army lists, 34.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Petoe, - - Petoe
Cornet in William Lygon’s Worcestershire regiment of horse (entries dated Aug. and Oct. 1645).
References: TNA, SP28/138, Part 16, ff. 33v., 38r.
Armies: Worcestershire
Pettitt [Petit, Petty], Myles Myles Pettitt [Petit, Petty]
Lieutenant-Colonel. ‘Woollen draper dwelling against Holborn Conduit’ (Symonds, Harl. 986, p. 45). Third captain of the Orange regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel John Towse) in Sept. 1643, commanding the Snow Hill & St Sepulchre’s Company. Rank uncertain for the next few years, but after the Presbyterian purge in 1647 which removed its colonel, Rowland Wilson, he became lieutenant-colonel (under Colonel Nathaniel Camfield); after Wilson’s re-instatement became, or reverted to being, major in the same regiment. As lieutenant-colonel he had (by his own account) crossed swords with Alderman Gibbs, chairing the militia committee, which told him that the committee had appointed him lieutenant-colonel and that ‘hee must fight against all mallignants, sects and sectaries and all Godly persons that shall come to oppose the Citty; to which the Lieutennant Collonell replyed, Gentlemen, I thought you had all of you professed Godlynesse, for my part I doe, and thereupon shall not engage against any godly man. Whereupon Mr. Alderman Gibbs or some other of the Militia then answered, that their meaning was, that if any out of pretence of Godlynesse shall come to oppose them that hee should fight against such’ (Clarke Papers, 1.152-3).
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 45; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 318-9; Clarke Papers, 1.152-3.
Armies: London
Pettus, Thomas Thomas Pettus
By the beginning of 1645 lieutenant in Robert Shephard’s company in Sir Miles Hobart’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.42.
Armies: Eastern Association
Petty, - - Petty
Lieutenant in Captain Pym’s troop in John Dalbier’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Petty, Maximillian Maximillian Petty (1617-c. or after 1661)
Probably born 1617, the younger son of John Petty of Stoke Talmage, Oxfordshire, into a minor gentry family. Apprenticed to the Grocers’ Company in London during the 1630s and made free in 1642. He was distantly related to several far more prominent parliamentarian families, including the Hampdens and the Ingoldsbys.
His military service during the main civil war of 1642-6 is not entirely clear and is largely omitted from his Oxford DNB entry. He appears in the published list of the earl of Essex’s Army as cornet in the troop of horse of Captain Adrian Scrope raised in July-Aug. 1642. He may well have fought at Edgehill and was certainly present at the siege of Reading the following spring. By 23 Oct. 1642 he had been promoted lieutenant in Scrope’s troop and received its pay between then and 20 May 1643.
By 24 May 1643 Petty was lieutenant in Charles Pym’s troop of horse (very possibly Scrope’s under a new Captain) in the earl of Essex’s Army, receiving its pay then and on 17 Apr. 1644.
In early Oct. 1644 as a lieutenant he was granted fourteen days’ arrears because he had been taken prisoner by the enemy (probably during Essex’s campaign in the South West) and stripped of all his clothes, besides his hard usage in his imprisonment.
That may well have been the end of his military career.
On 5 May 1647 Petty submitted his accounts, primarily as lieutenant to Scrope’s troop.
His wider renown, however, rests upon what happened after the main civil war was over, when Petty became a prominent Leveller, to the fore in army politics during summer 1647 and at the ensuing Putney Debates, taking a radical line on the future of the king, the House of Lords and the franchise. Towards the end of 1648 he was one of the prominent Levellers with whom Ireton and other senior officers opened discussions, ostensibly designed to prepare a new Agreement of the People. As Levellerism faded in the 1650s, so Petty fades from the historical record, only to appear once again in London republican circles before and after the Restoration. References to him disappear after 1661 and it is possible that he died around that time.
References: Oxford DNB; Peacock, Army lists, 54; TNA, SP28/2b/288, 451, SP28/3a/255, SP28/7/57, SP28/14/283, SP28/19/9, SP28/144, Part 10, ff. 69r.-76r.; C. Thompson, ‘Maximilian Petty and the Putney debate on the franchise’, Past and Present, 88 (1980), 63-9; G.E. Aylmer, ‘Gentleman levellers?’, Past and Present, 49 (1970), 120-5.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pew, John John Pew
Lieutenant in Major Gabriel Holmes’s company in the Earl of Manchester’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army by Jan. 1644.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.62.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pewsadee [Pewjadee], Hans Hans Pewsadee [Pewjadee]
Lieutenant of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army, on 1 Oct. 1644 given £10 by Essex’s special order, as he had done very good service and lost several horses to the enemy. He was either a Fleming or, more probably, lieutenant in Christopher Fleming’s troop in Hans Behre’s regiment of horse.
References: TNA, SP28/18/105.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Peyto, Edward Edward Peyto (1625-1658)
Of Chesterton, Warwickshire, eldest son of Sir Edward Peyto (c. 1591-1643) of Chesterton, Warwickshire, and his wife Elizabeth (died after 1658), daughter of Sir Adam Newton of Charlton, Kent.
Lieutenant-Colonel of the earl of Denbigh’s own regiment of horse and captain of a troop in that regiment, from 23 Mar. 1644 (the date of his commission) to 2 Apr. 1645. In a pay warrant (4 Apr. 1644), Denbigh referred to Peyto as ‘my Cozen Paytoe’ (TNA, SP28/131, Part 12, f. 21). In fact, Peyto’s actual captaincy was much briefer than his formal term in the post: it lasted a mere two weeks, after which, ‘for want of further supply some of them ran away with horses and arms. And the rest for the like reason, and having liberty from the said earl of Denbigh for their better preferment were dispersed under several commanders’ (Hughes, Warwickshire, 230).
Thomas Pierce, the royalist and anti-Calvinist minister who preached Peyto’s funeral sermon, put Peyto’s parliamentarianism down to ‘the over great influence of his Fathers persuasion upon his own’ (T. Pierce, The Lifelessness of Life, 1659, dedication). Nevertheless, he was regarded as reliable enough supporter of the republican regime to be commissioned colonel of foot in the Warwickshire militia, 9 July 1650. However, in the 1650s he was only intermittently active in local government.
Peyto was elected MP for Warwickshire in the second Protectorate parliament. Although listed as one of those MPs prevented from sitting by the Council of State, he was named to a few committees; his distrust of the Protectorate is signalled by his attempt to insert a clause in the assessment bill for the Spanish war that no money was to be levied without parliament’s consent.
References: Oxford DNB ; Hughes, Warwickshire, 223, 230, 296, 301, 334n., 355, 357, 359; TNA, SP28/136, Part 34; CSPD 1650, 507; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Earl of Denbigh; Warwickshire
Peyto, Sir Edward Sir Edward Peyto (c. 1591-1643)
Of Chesterton, Warwickshire, son of William Peyto (born before 1564, died c. 1609) and his wife Elianor, the daughter of Sir Walter Aston of Tixall, Staffordshire. He married Elizabeth (died after 1658), daughter of Sir Adam Newton of Charlton, Kent, and niece of Sir Thomas Puckering of Warwick. Knighted 1611. Father of Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Peyto.
An improving landlord, with interests in brick-making and woad-growing; he had an income of at least £500 per annum before the war. He was also a man of scholarly and architectural interests, and had 600 books in his library. He was never a JP, and was frequently absent from the county in the 1630s. He was an active militia commissioner in Warwickshire under the Militia Ordinance in summer 1642.
Peyto was made lieutenant-colonel of Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642, and ‘in general he acted as an inspiring second in command to Brooke during the latter’s frequent absences from the county’ (Hughes, Warwickshire, 138). In Aug. he successfully held Warwick Castle against the earl of Northampton’s raw troops, defying the royalist summons to surrender with a red flag and a Bible and winding sheet to symbolize his willingness to die for the Gospel.
Peyto acted as lieutenant-general of artillery in Essex’s Army, very possibly succeeding Philibert Emmanuel de Bois by 21 and 23 Oct. 1642, when he claimed £300 for carriages for the train of artillery. He was certainly explicitly described as lieutenant-general of the ordnance on 11 Nov. 1642. On 2 Dec. 1642 payment was made for delivery to Peyto of 100 dozen arrows with quivers. From pay warrants to Aug. 1643, he was evidently active in this position. He was also captain of a company of firelocks (in pay warrants, Aug. 1643).
Peyto was appointed to the Warwickshire county committee in 1643. He died on 21 Sept. 1643.
References: Oxford DNB [Peyto family]; Hughes, Warwickshire, 46-7, 138, 145, 153, 168, 171, 190; Peacock, Army lists,34; TNA, SP28/2b/430, SP28/3b/308, SP28/4/127, 153, 243, SP28/8/84, 141-2, 240; SP28/9/217, 226.
Peyto, John John Peyto
Captain in Ralph Weldon’s regiment of foot by 11 Nov. 1644, but no longer there by Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 153.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Kent
Pharig, John John Pharig
In spring 1644 lieutenant in Lieutenant-Colonel Crompton’s company in the Westminster Auxiliaries Tranded Bands regiment (Colonel James Prince).
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 161.
Armies: Westminster
Phelps, John John Phelps
Cornet in Captain Samuel Gardner’s troop in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse when it transferred to become a troop in John Butler’s regiment of horse in the New Model Army. In spring 1647 he was elected one of the agitators for the officers of Butler’s regiment. He is possibly the Captain John Phelps who was given command of a troop in Valentine Walton’s regiment of horse (formerly John Disbrowe’s) when parliament was weeding out politically untrustworthy officers in Jan. 1660.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 55, Firth and Davies,Regimental history, 1.82-3, 208-9.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); New Model Army
Philliott, - - Philliott
Cornet to Captain Robert Tuthill’s troop of horse in Staffordshire. Tuthill was captain of the troop from 1 June 1644 to 26 Sept. 1646, and when he presented his accounts Philliott was owed £158 in arrears.
References: Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 334.
Armies: Staffordshire
Phillips, - - Phillips
Captain of dragoons in Kent by 30 Nov. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 70.
Armies: Kent; Waller (Southern Association)
Phillips, - - Phillips
Captain of Okeford Fitzpaine. Order of 9 May 1649 for relief of his 6 children. He suffered much for parliament and died a prisoner of the royalists.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 528.
Armies: Dorset
Phillips, Griffantius Griffantius Phillips
Captain. A Welshman. Described as of Gloucestershire and as a captain in Herefordshire in Jan. 1648. He and Godfrey Ellis bought crown lands in Hertfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Northamptonshire. In 1645 he was granted part of Sir John Wintour’s concession in the ironworks in the Forest of Dean.
References: Gentles, ‘Debentures’, 320; Warmington, Glos. 95, 101, 161-2, 169; Bibliotheca, cxxiv, cxxvii.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Phillips, Hugh Hugh Phillips
Ensign in Cholmley’s probably short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36-7.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Phillips, Richard Richard Phillips
In 1645 ensign in the colonel’s company in John Barker’s/Thomas Willoughby’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 22.
Armies: Warwickshire
Phillips, Richard Richard Phillips
In spring 1645 lieutenant in the regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army commanded successively by Colonels James Holborne and William Davies. Unlike Davies himself and a few of his other officers, he did not transfer to the New Model Army.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 149.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Philpot, Bartholomew Bartholomew Philpot
Captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, I.68.
Armies: Eastern Association
Phippes, Robert Robert Phippes
By trade a physician in Coventry. In Aug. 1642 Phippes was captain of a volunteer company. When the royal army approached the city, he took a hardline posititon, defying the king and saying that he could only enter with a personal escort.
With the formation of Colonel John Barker’s regiment of Coventry foot, Phippes became its lieutenant-colonel (certainly by Dec. 1642) and retained the position throughout the war, to 1645 or beyond.
A county committeeman, Phippes fell out with other members in the summer of 1643, and only attended meetings rarely thereafter; in 1644 he was an ally of the earl of Denbigh. Although politically Phippes seems to have withdrawn, and he was willing to moderate the powers of the county committee, he retained his command.
Phippes was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of foot in the Warwickshire militia on 27 June 1650.
References: Hughes, Warwickshire, 148, 180, 197, 200, 224, 228, 334n, 360, 362-3; CSPD 1650, 507; TNA, SP28/136, Parts 19, 53B, f. 105r.
Armies: Warwickshire
Phipps, James James Phipps
A captain in the earl of Denbigh’s Army. Pay warrants and receipts (23 Aug. 1643, 13 Nov. 1643, 25 Mar. 1644).
References: TNA, SP28/131, part 12, ff. 9, 30, 18.
Armies: Earl of Denbigh
Phipps, Lawrence Lawrence Phipps
Lieutenant and by 1645 captain in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army and still there when the regiment and army were disbanded.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 147.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pickering, John John Pickering (baptised 1615, died 1645).
Born Titchmarsh, Northamptonshire, second son of Sir John Pickering (died 1628). Younger brother of Sir Gilbert Pickering.
In 1641-3 he served as an emissary and diplomat of the Long Parliament in its dealings with the Scots.
During winter 1643-4 he was commissioned to command and he raised a short-lived regiment of dragoons in the Eastern Association Army, which campaigned at Hillesden House but which was apparently disbanded or broken up in spring 1644.
More importantly, in Mar. 1644 he was commissioned to command and he raised a regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, which served in the siege of York and in the campaign and battle of Marston Moor, before helping to capture a string of minor royalist bases in southern Yorkshire during summer 1644; he rejoined the main Eastern Association Army for the campaign and second battle of Newbury. Having supported Cromwell in his accusations against the earl of Manchester, Pickering spent winter 1644-5 in and around Abingdon. Although some in parliament disliked his radical religious outlook and his regiment was noted as being well below strength, both he and his regiment did transfer to the New Model Army in spring 1645. He fought at Naseby, Sherborne and Bristol and under Cromwell in his autumn 1645 expedition to capture Devizes, Winchester and Basing. Pickering succumbed to illness while serving with his regiment in Devon in Nov. 1645; his regiment survived him, command passing to John Hewson.
References: Oxford DNB; Holmes, Eastern Association, 163, 176, 236, 238; G. Foard, Colonel John Pickering’s regiment of foot, 1644-45 (1994) ; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 49, 60.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Pickering, John John Pickering
Of Morley, Yorkshire (West Riding), a parliamentarian captain and a JP in Yorkshire who kept a surviving notebook in the 1650s.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 104.
Armies: Yorkshire
Pidgeon, John John Pidgeon
Sometime quartermaster of Oliver Cromwell’s troop of horse, he served as lieutenant in Ralph Margery’s troop in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. He may be the John Pidgeon who in 1647 was serving as a lieutenant in Pye’s New Model Army regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.23; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 125.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Piece [Price], Richard Richard Piece [Price]
Lieutenant in the company of Captain Philip Stevens in Sir William Waller’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 154.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Pierrepont, Francis Francis Pierrepont (1614?-1658)
Of Holbeck Woodhouse, Nottinghamshire. Third son of Robert Pierrepont, first earl of Kingston (1584-1643) and his wife, Gertrude Talbot (1587/8-1649), the daughter and coheir of Henry Talbot. He married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Thomas Bray of Eyam, Derbyshire. His father was a reluctant royalist; his elder brother William a middle-group MP in the Long Parliament (see Oxford DNB for his father and brother).
At the turn of 1642-3, Pierrepont raised a regiment of foot in Nottinghamshire. John Hutchinson had already raised a company, and three other companies were raised from Nottingham townsmen. The regiment, however, seems never to have been fully formed, and when Hutchinson was commissioned to raise another foot regiment in Oct. 1643, some of its soldiers were incorporated into the new regiment and some remained with Pierrepont. Even though she refers to his ‘vainglorious pride’ and he opposed her husband in some respects, Lucy Hutchinson generally portrays him in a fairly positive light, referring to his ‘excellent good nature…full of love to all men’.
MP for East Retford in the Short Parliament and recruiter MP for Nottingham in 1645. He was not excluded at Pride’s Purge but did abstain.
References: Vis. Notts., 1662-64, 32; Wood, Nottinghamshire; Underdown, Pride’s Purge, 382; HoP:The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming); Hutchinson, Life, 108-10, 111, 114, 131, 154, 176-7. 253.
Armies: Nottinghamshire
Piers, Sir Thomas Sir Thomas Piers
In 1643-4 he was major commanding one of the four troops of horse which comprised the Kentish horse, present at the siege of Arundel Castle.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 78.
Armies: Kent; Waller (Southern Association)
Pierson, - - Pierson
Cornet in John Hutchinson’s Nottingham-based regiment of horse, captured in 1644 in the aftermath of Hutchinson’s successful raid on Shelford when, against orders, he lagged behind drinking.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 189.
Armies: Nottinghamshire
Pigot, Sir Thomas Sir Thomas Pigot
Captain in Thomas Grantham’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
The only Sir Thomas Pigot in the standard lists of knights and baronets is Sir Thomas Pigott of Buckinghamshire, knighted at Whitehall on 18 Apr. 1604.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 41; Shaw, Knights, 2.131.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pigott, George George Pigott
Waggon-master to Colonel Alexander Rigby’s regiment of foot, also a trooper in Major Edward Robinson’s troop, both in Lancashire. By Jan. 1648 Pigott was in Colonel Edward Rossiter’s regiment of foot. Arrears of £24 18s were still owed to him in May 1659.
References: TNA, E121/3/1.
Armies: Lancashire; New Model Army
Pigott, Richard Richard Pigott
Of Northwich, Cheshire and probably schoolmaster of Witton School and a future master of Shrewsbury.
Captain in John Leigh’s regiment of foot in Sir William Brereton’s Cheshire Army before Chester on 30 Apr. 1645.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 331; TNA, SP28/224.
Armies: Cheshire
Pike, Nathaniel Nathaniel Pike
Ensign in Mark Grimes’s company in Edward Montagu’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.69.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pilkington, Lyon Lyon Pilkington
Lieutenant in the regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army commanded by Lord Oliver St John and then Thomas Essex in 1642-3.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pilston, - - Pilston
A cornet in the Cheshire forces. He is named in a pay warrant of 25s for the discharging of his fees, signed by deputy-lieutenants William Massey and William Marbury.
References: TNA, SP28/125, f. 355.
Armies: Cheshire
Pim, - - Pim
A captain in Staffordshire. On 5 Feb. 1644 the Staffordshire county committee ordered that Pim have 40s to bear his charges in the discharging of his quarters and delivering up the soldiers’ arms he received.
References: Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 49.
Armies: Staffordshire
Pinckney, - - Pinckney (died 1644)
A captain, he defected from the royalists to the earl of Denbigh’s Army, bringing with him 100 Welshmen. He was made major of Colonel Simon Rugeley’s Staffordshire regiment. In May or June 1644 £3 4s was given him out of county funds ‘to pay pyoneers’. He fought at the battle of Tipton Heath in June but was killed leading the Staffordshire foot at the storming of Cholmondeley House (near Whitchurch), early in July 1644.
References: Newes from Prince Rupert, whose forces being discovered by the Earle of Denbigh, 6; CSPD 1644, 236; Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 316; Great victories obtained by the Earle of Denbigh (1644).
Armies: Earl of Denbigh; Staffordshire
Pinckney [Pinkney], Eswell Eswell Pinckney [Pinkney] (died 1644)
A major in the Cheshire Army, reportedly ‘a brave commander’, killed in the capture of Cholmondeley House on 8 July 1644 and buried at Nantwich the following day.
References: Cheshire tracts, 137-8, 258.
Armies: Cheshire
Pinckney, Henry Henry Pinckney
Captain in the Red regiment, London Auxiliaries (Colonel Samuel Harsnett) when it mustered on 27 Apr. 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, f. 694 r. & v.
Armies: London
Pinckney, James James Pinckney
Holding the rank of captain (though whether he held a regimental or field command is not clear), he served under Sir Samuel Luke at Newport Pagnell in 1644-5 and acted as collector for the garrison. As such, he appears frequently in Luke’s letter books and several letters to and by him survive there.
References: Luke Letter Books, especially nos. 279, 1023, 1540, 1554, 1560.
Armies: Bedfordshire
Pincock, William William Pincock
Lieutenant. In 1642 he was an ensign in the earl of Stamford’s regiment. By the siege of Gloucester in Aug. 1643 he had been promoted lieutenant. He led a party of 50 musketeers in a sally on 18 Aug.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 644, 646; Peacock, Army Lists, 30; Bibliotheca, 216-7.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Pinder, Martin Martin Pinder
General quartermaster of the City of London, and quartermaster to Colonel Thomas Atkin (the White regiment, London Trained Bands). In 1644 a colonel and a commissioner ordered to reside in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Thrale 1642; CSPD, 1644, 263, 270, 368, 449.
Armies: London; Earl of Essex
Pinson, George George Pinson
Ensign in Weymouth garrison, 18 Mar. 1651.
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 337.
Armies: Dorset
Piper, John John Piper
Lieutenant in Sir William Waller’s regiment of foot when it was disbanded in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 155.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Pitches, - - Pitches
In Apr. 1645, on the eve of the regiment’s breaking up, lieutenant in Dayne’s troop in Francis Russell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.95.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pitchford, John John Pitchford
By 1644 he was lieutenant in Christopher Bethal’s troop in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. He continued in that role in spring 1645 when Bethal’s troop became part of Colonel Edward Whalley’s regiment of horse in the New Model Army and in Sept. 1645, when Bethal was killed at the siege of Bristol, he succeeded him as captain. He left the army in 1648.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.23; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 74, 84, 95.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Pitman, John John Pitman
Formerly cornet in Captain Gulston’s troop, transferred as cornet to Captain Jacob Taylor’s county troop, 15 Oct. 1646, and in May left to command remnant of ten troopers needed for policing.
On 18 Mar. 1651 listed as lieutenant in the new companies stationed at Weymouth.
26 Jan. 1647: Ordered to arrest named malignants.
6 May 1647: The county troop, formerly commanded by the sheriff, is to be disbanded; Cornet Pitman is to command the 10 men left to help the county treasurer and excise commissioners collect money.
19 May 1647: Order to eject delinquent minister and place new incumbent in vicarage.
By 18 Mar. 1651 lieutenant in the Weymouth Garrison.
See also John Pitman, lieutenant in Gulston’s and then Taylor’s troops.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 26, 169, 377, 273; Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 337.
Armies: Dorset
Pitman, John John Pitman
Captain in Richard Norton’s Hampshire regiment of horse in 1643 and probably until its disbandment.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 103.
Armies: Hampshire; Waller (Southern Association)
Pitman [Pytman], William William Pitman [Pytman]
15 Oct. 1646: lieutenant of horse. Pitman had been lieutenant in Captain Gulston’s troop of horse in the Weymouth garrison, now transferred to Captain Jacob Taylor’s county troop.
On 16 Jan. 1647 he and Captain Taylor ordered to pursue malignants.
On 18 Apr. 1647 he was ordered to place clergyman in vicarage and remove previous incumbent.
Lieutenant William Pitman is evidently the Lieutenant Pitman on the Apr. list of reduced officers, as in May 1647 Taylor’s troop was discharged, leaving ten troopers under Cornet John Pitman, cornet in both Gulston’s and Taylor’s troops.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 25, 169, 236.
Armies: Dorset
Pitson, James James Pitson
A scout in early 1644 in Waller’s Army, becoming scoutmaster general by 27 Oct. 1644. He was possibly in a lieutenant in Edward Cooke’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 60.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Pittfold, Sebastian Sebastian Pittfold
Quartermaster.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 122, 377.
Armies: Dorset
Pitts [Pills], Robert Robert Pitts [Pills]
Lieutenant in Captain Searl’s foot company, 21 Jan. 1643, 1 July 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.556-7.
Armies: Somerset: Capt. Searl’s Foot Company; Col. William Strode’s Regt. of Foot
Place, Edward Edward Place
Of Skelton Grange, Yorkshire (North Riding). An early recruit to the Northern Army who fought at Leeds, Adwalton Moor and in Lincolnshire with Sir John Meldrum. He was captured at Gainsborough (Oct. 1643) and again at Newark (Mar. 1644), but quickly released on both occasions. He fought at Selby (Apr. 1644), took part in the siege of York and fought at Marston Moor (July 1644). By Feb. 1645 he was a captain in Sir William Constable’s regiment of horse, going with it to Cheshire.
When the regiment was reduced, he transferred to Christopher Copley’s regiment of horse, in which he served for some time. He was commissioned captain in a regiment of foot in the Yorkshire militia, 10 Apr. 1650.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 397-8; CSPD, 1650, 506.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Poyntz)
Plant, Timothy Timothy Plant
Ensign in Staffordshire. Named in ‘A list of soldiers under the command of Lieutenant Collonel Gent’, in the 1662 returns of active parliamentarians: the list is mixed with those for Stafford.
References: ‘Active Parliamentarians, 1662’, 58.
Armies: Staffordshire
Plater, Thomas Thomas Plater
In 1644 ensign in Captain Spensley’s company in Sir John Palgrave’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, still there in early 1645 by which time Sir Thomas Hooton had succeeded Palgrave as the regiment’s commander.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.78.
Armies: Eastern Association
Platt, John John Platt
In spring 1645 lieutenant in the late Captain Abercromby’s troop in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of horse, commanded by Colonel Stapleton. Unlike several other officers of that regiment, he did not transfer to the New Model Army.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 150.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Player, Thomas, junior Thomas Player, junior (died 1686)
Only son of Thomas Player senior, ensign in the White regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Isaac Penington) in summer 1642.
Player went on to have a significant political career after the Restoration, like his father knighted in summer 1660, and playing a prominent role in City politics and financial affairs during the 1660s and 1670s; he served as MP in the three ‘exclusion’ parliaments of 1679-81 and was very active in support of proposals to exclude James duke of York. As such and after the failure of exclusion, he fell from favour and lost office during the closing years of his life.
References: Oxford DNB; Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Player, Thomas, senior Thomas Player, senior (died 1672)
Probably born Canterbury, Kent, but his origins and early life remain obscure. Apprenticed to the Haberdashers’ Company in 1611, by the 1630s he was a London hosier of St Leonard Eastchape, later described by Symonds as ‘A hosyer & whole Saleman for narrow wares living upon new Fish Street Hill’ (1643: BL, Harl. 986, p. 12).
Captain in the White regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Isaac Penington) in Apr. 1642 (second captain by summer 1642); first captain in the same regiment in Sept. 1643, he may have been with Essex’s force sent to relieve Gloucester. He was present at the battle of Cheriton, when the regiment formed part of Richard Browne’s London brigade (29 Mar. 1644). Colonel of this same White regiment, London Trained Bands in Oct. 1646, displaced in favour of Joseph Vaughan by the Presbyterian militia committee in 1647, but reinstated later that year.
Indeed, Player was a survivor, who continued in his role as a London administrator and financier between the 1640s and the 1660s, during both the Protectorate and the restored Stuart monarchy – he was knighted by Charles II in summer 1660 – down to his death in 1672.
References: Oxford DNB; Overton 1642; Thrale 1642; BL, Harl. 986, p.12; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317-9; A paire of spectacles for the Citie (1648), 9.
Armies: London; Waller (Southern Association)
Player, Thomas Thomas Player
Captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.55.
Armies: Eastern Association
Playford, Samuel Samuel Playford
For a few weeks in spring 1644, captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army. Then, probably from the formation of the regiment in Apr./May 1644, he became captain in Colonel Rainsborough’s regiment of foot in the same army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.66, 89.
Armies: Eastern Association
Ploughman, Matthew Matthew Ploughman
In 1642 lieutenant in William Pretty’s troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 49.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Plumley, Samuel Samuel Plumley
Lieutenant, Colonel William Strode’s regiment of foot.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.559.
Armies: Somerset: Col. William Strode’s Regt. of Foot.
Plummer, Thomas, junior Thomas Plummer, junior
Captain in the Kent Trained Bands.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 78.
Armies: Kent
Plummer, Thomas, senior Thomas Plummer, senior
Captain in the Kent Trained Bands.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 78.
Armies: Kent
Plumtree, Huntingdon Huntingdon Plumtree
A ‘doctor of physcis, an inhabitant of Nottingham, who had learning, natural parts and understanding enough to discern between civil righteousness and injustice; but he was a horrible atheist, and had such an intolerable pride that he brooked no superiors, and having some wit, took the boldness to exercise it in the abuse of all the gentlemen wherever he came’. So thought Lucy Hutchinson. A captain, probably of horse, in her husband’s Nottingham-based froce, one of several officers portrayed by her as repeatedly disloyal to and persistently undermining her husband.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 105-6. 111, 127-8, 145, 190-2, 196, 204.
Armies: Nottinghamshire
Pockley, John John Pockley
Of Burton Agnes, Yorkshire (East Riding), a parliamentarian captain in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 98 [citing TNA, E121/4/8, no. 30].
Armies: Yorkshire
Poe, Anthony Anthony Poe
Presumably a relative of the Captain William Poe who commanded a troop in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army from Feb. 1643 until Feb. 1645. Anthony Poe served as lieutenant in that troop until he succeeded William Poe as its captain in Feb. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.24.
Armies: Eastern Association
Poe, William William Poe
Captain of a troop in Oliver Cromwell’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army from the raising of that troop in Suffolk in Feb. 1643 until Feb. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.24.
Armies: Eastern Association
Ponsonby, Henry Henry Ponsonby
By 4 Nov. 1644 lieutenant in Captain Charles O’Hara’s company in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army. By the time of the regiment’s disbandment on 17 Apr. 1645 he had become a captain.
References: TNA, SP28/25/111; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.16.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pont, Abraham Abraham Pont (died 1645)
Pont first served as captain in Lord Brooke’s troop of reformadoes in the latter’s Association Army. He then took service with the Warwickshire forces. In May 1643 he commanded just 10 troopers, with a full complement of officers; by Oct., after Benjamin Lovell had been forced to hand over his 37 to him, he commanded about 60.
Pont died on 28 Jan. 1645. Captain John Cotton succeeded him in command of the troop.
References: TNA, SP28/136, Part 18, ff. 2v., 13r.; SP28/136, Part 25, ff. 2 r. and v.; Hughes, Warwickshire, 187, 194-8, 206.
Armies: Lord Brooke; Warwickshire
Pont, John John Pont
A captain in Staffordshire, captured by royalists but released on exchange in Feb. 1644.
References: Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, passim.
Armies: Staffordshire
Poole, - - Poole
Of Kirkgate, Leeds, Yorkshire (West Riding), a parliamentarian captain in Yorkshire.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 114.
Armies: Yorkshire
Poole, - - Poole
Captain-Lieutenant of the colonel’s company of the regiment of foot of Samuel Jones/John Fielder from at least Feb. 1644, and possibly Dec. 1643.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 74; SP 28/135/1, accounts of Colonel Samuel Jones.
Armies: Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Poole, James James Poole
Ensign in Michael Searl’s company in Strode’s regiment of foot.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.559.
Armies: Somerset: Col. William Strode’s Regt. of Foot
Pope, Gabriel Gabriel Pope
A captain in (presumably his kinsman) Roger Pope’s Shropshire regiment of foot.
References: TNA, E121/5/7/44A.
Armies: Shropshire
Pope, Roger Roger Pope
Perhaps of a Shrewsbury family, he was son-in-law of Thomas Mytton and became lieutenant of Mytton’s own troop in his regiment of horse, leading part of the troop at the capture of Shrewsbury in Feb. 1645. Reported as leading ‘eight score horse and dragoons’ from Oswestry against royalist-held Holt in Sept. 1645. He was an acting colonel of foot by Nov. 1645, when Captains Kynaston and Sadler with their Shrewsbury companies joined him at Oswestry as his lieutenant-colonel and major respectively. On 10 Nov. the Commons approved his commission as colonel ‘to command the regiment of foot newly raised’ and those of his officers. He was a signatory for the surrender of Anglesey in June 1646.
References: Colonell Mitton’s Reply to Lieutenant Colonell Reinking’s Relation of the taking of Shrewbury (1645); Perfect Passages, 1-8 Oct. 1645; Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 903; JHC, IV, 337; J.R. Phillips, Memoirs of the Civil War in Wales and the Marches (1874), II, 316.
Armies: Shropshire
Popham, Alexander Alexander Popham (1604/05-1669).
Colonel. Second but first surviving son of Sir Francis Popham. Of Littlecote, Wiltshire and Wellington, Somerset MP for Bath in Short and Long parliaments (he continued to sit in the Rump), and also in the first protectorate, Convention and Cavalier parliaments. Nominated in 1657 to the Other House. His regiment probably formed in Somerset in late Jan. 1643, and was usually stationed in Bristol from mid-Feb. with expeditions to Sherborne (Apr.) and Frome (May), after which some companies were stationed at Keynsham between Bristol and Bath. However, in July at least half the regiment was sent to reinforce Waller and ‘was probably more or less destroyed’ at Roundway. Remaining companies present at Bristol, and may well have formed core of Popham’s succeeding regiment of foot, 1644-5. Later colonel of a regiment of horse in the Somerset militia 1650, and of foot, 1651.
References: Oxford DNB;Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.553-5; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Somerset
Popham, Edward Edward Popham (c. 1610-1651)
Colonel. Fifth son of Sir Francis Popham of Littlecote, Wiltshire and Wellington, Somerset and a younger brother of Alexander Popham. A naval officer before the civil wars, serving as a lieutenant in the ship money fleet of 1636 and as captain of the Fifth Whelp in 1637, and as a captain in 1639. An officer in Alexander Popham’s regiment 1642-3, 1644-5; colonel New Model Army 1645; general-at-sea 24 Feb. 1649 and 28 Feb. 1651 until his death. MP for Minehead from Nov. 1645 until his death on 19 Aug. 1651.
References: See Oxford DNB.
Armies: Somerset
Popham, Francis Francis Popham
Younger son of Sir Francis Popham of Littlecote, Wiltshire, and Wellington, Somerset, and younger brother of Alexander Popham.
Popham’s military career was more on water than on land – he had served in the fleet in the 1630s, reaching the rank of captain, and his naval career resumed later in the 1640s, and he was an admiral by the time of his death in 1651. But he played an active role on land for parliament during the man civil war. In 1642 he helped secure Somerset for parliament and commanded both horse and foot units there in 1643. In summer 1644 he was commissioned to raise in his native Wiltshire a new regiment of horse, which served mainly in and around Somerset during 1645, though he and his regiment may have been with Waller at the second battle of Newbury in autumn 1644. He played a prominent role in the relief of Taunton and then fought with and under Massey during the closing year of the war; during this period he also took command of the regiment of horse formerly commanded by Richard Turner and George Thompson.
References: Oxford DNB [Sir Francis Popham; Alexander Popham]; Spring, Waller’s army, 117-18, 140.
Armies: Somerset; Wiltshire; Waller; Waller (Southern Association); Massey Brigade
Popley [Papley], Robert Robert Popley [Papley]
By Nov. 1643 and still there at the regiment’s transfer to the New Model Army in spring 1645 (though he appears not to have entered the New Model), major of Edward Montagu’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.69.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pordage, Robert Robert Pordage
Captain in an auxiliary regiment of the Kent Trained Bands by Feb. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 78.
Armies: Kent
Porter, Henry Henry Porter (born 1612/3; alive in Apr. 1665)
Of Lancaster, son of James Porter (died 1613) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of William Trenchard of Skirton, Lancashire. His grandfather had been vicar of Lancaster. He married Anne, daughter of Henry Asshurst of Ashurst and sister to John Asshurst. Lieutenant in John Booth’s regiment of horse, captain of a troop of horse under the Lancashire deputy-lieutenants and captain of a foot company in the Lancaster garrison. Owed arrears of £1,406 13s in Sept. 1650. In May 1648 Porter was one of the signatories to the pro-Presbyterian, anti-New Model Army petition of the Lancashire officers. He was also lessee of sequestered royalist property in the county.
References: Vis. Lancs., 1664, 234; TNA, E121/4/8; Lancashire military proceedings, 248-50; Blackwood, Lancashire gentry, 95; Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 438.
Armies: Lancashire
Porter, Samuel Samuel Porter
Captain of a troop in Cromwell’s regiment of horse within the Eastern Association Army, probably from the raising of the troop in Sept. 1643 until its absorption into the New Model Army in spring 1645, whereupon he initially remained as a captain in Edward Whalley’s New Model horse regiment and fought at Naseby though he had left the regiment by July 1645. However, his military career was not over and he later shows up as a captain in Colonel Henry Ireton’s New Model horse regiment during its service in Ireland in 1650.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.16; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I. 53, 63.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Potley, Christopher Christopher Potley
Apparently a veteran of service in the Thirty Years War, by late 1643 he had become major-general of foot in Waller’s Southern Association Army. In Aug. 1643 he had also been given command of a new regiment of foot. He and his regiment probably fought with Waller at the siege of Arundel at the end of the year and at the battle of Cheriton in Mar. 1644, during his Oxford campaign of summer 1644 and at the battle of Cropredy Bridge in June. He and his men then served in the West, with and under Middleton, including at the relief of Taunton, though at some point, probably early in 1645, Potley gave up his command and returned to Sweden and the command of his regiment passed to his lieutenant-colonel, David Leighton.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 119.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Potte, Samuel Samuel Potte
He was briefly captain of the troop of horse of Richard Grenville after the latter defected early in 1644. He later commanded what was evidently an independent troop of horse raised in Hampshire, which was present at the siege of Basing House in 1644. On 20 Dec. 1644 the troop was incorporated into Edward Cooke’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 50.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Hampshire
Potter, Henry Henry Potter
Not a captain in Oct. 1646, but approved by the Presbyterian City militia committee in 1647 as a captain in the Yellow regiment, City Trained Bands (Colonel Laurence Bromfield).
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 318.
Armies: London
Potter, Vincent Vincent Potter
Captain in Purefoy’s regiment of horse based in Warwickshire. He was in place by the beginning of 1644 and still there in summer 1645, not long before the regiment was broken up.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 122.
Armies: Warwickshire
Poulton, Thomas Thomas Poulton
At the start of the war, captain-lieutenant in Pierrepont’s fairly short-lived Nottinghamshire regiment of foot, and then captain of a company formed from some remnants of that regiment in John Hutchinson’s regiment of foot.
References: Hutchinson, Life, 111, 154, 161-2.
Armies: Nottinghamshire
Povey, Allen Allen Povey (died 1642?)
Lieutenant in Colonel Thomas Lunsford’s regiment of foot in the earl of Northumberland’s army against the Scots in 1640; lieutenant in Captain Horatio Carey’s company in Colonel William Bampfield’s regiment of foot appointed for Philip Lord Wharton’s proposed expedition to Ireland in early 1642.
Captain in Colonel Denzil Holles’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army later in 1642. He was probably killed when the regiment was smashed by Prince Rupert’s attack on Brentford on 12 Nov. Ten days later, when the remnants of the regiment were paid off, reference was made to three captains lately deceased, and he was not amongst those still alive.
References: Peacock, Army Lists, 39, 70, 84; TNA, SP28/5/110.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Powell, - - Powell
In spring 1644 he was made major in Colonel Edward Apsley’s short-lived and abortive regiment of foot in Waller’s Southern Association Army.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 15.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Powell, Robert Robert Powell
Of the Park, near Whittington, Shropshire, referred to as a ‘gent.’ when he joined Mytton at Oswestry in July 1644 and for whom Mytton requested a commission from the earl of Denbigh to allow Powell to raise and command a body of horse or foot. Powell travelled to London in mid July to raise horse in and around the capital. By Nov. 1645 he was a colonel operating with the Shropshire horse in Cheshire and supporting the siege of Chester. In Oct. 1646 he was appointed high sheriff of Shropshire.
References: Warws. RO, C2017/C10/6, C2017/C10/16; Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 204; JHC, IV, 707-9.
Armies: Shropshire
Pownall, Henry Henry Pownall
Lieutenant in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 42.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pownall, Henry Henry Pownall
Lieutenant in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
Apparently of Yorkshire and evidently of gentry stock.
Lieutenant to Captain Simon Needham in Sir William Constable’s regiment of foot in Essex’s Army, he went north with Constable in autumn 1643 (by when he was probably a captain), and served in Constable’s regiment of foot there.
Pownall was probably promoted major when Needham was made colonel of Constable’s foot (Jan. 1645) but accepted a captaincy when the regiment was incorporated into John Bright’s (Dec. 1645). In Nov. 1648 the regiment, now part of Lambert’s northern foot, fought at Preston, where Pownall and his Lieutenant John Hodgson led the forlorn hope against Sir Marmaduke Langdale’s division.
Pownall served in George Gill’s/Matthew Alured’s/Thomas Talbot’s regiment of foot, raised in 1650, and was its major by 1653, and probably from its formation. In 1653-6 his company was garrisoning Kirkwall, Isle of Orkney, although the regiment was largely stationed in the west and south of Scotland.
According to Cornet Baynes in Jan. 1655, ‘It’s known sufficiently how well he hath discharged his place as major, and what care hath been done upon him ever since the regiment was raised. He hath been a constant drudge to it, and for 15 months bye past had the whole charge of it. His honesty and faithfulness is undoubted’ (Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 2.465).
Pownall was promoted to lieutenant-colonel when Thomas Talbot was promoted to colonel of the regiment in June 1655. He was demoted to major again in 1659 when the officers of the regiment were changed by the committee for nominating officers, against Monck’s wishes. In late 1659, Pownall and other officers of the regiment sided with Monck against Lambert.
In 1655 Cornet Baynes, contemplating marriage with his daughter, reflected that, ‘I do indeed wish Lev. Colo. Ponn. Daughter had a little more breeding, and had either no mother, or one as good as her father…I profess I do as much love the L. Colo., and respect him as any (that’s not related to me)’ (Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 2.465).
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 398; Peacock, Army lists, 42; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 2.464-5, 467, 470, 525; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 161.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax); Northern Army (Poyntz); Northern Army (Lambert); New Model Army
Pownall, Ralph Ralph Pownall
Commissioned captain in Henry Brooke’s Cheshire militia regiment of foot, 22 Aug. 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 509.
Armies: Cheshire
Poynes, - - Poynes
By May 1645, though gone by Aug. 1645, lieutenant-colonel in the Portsmouth-based regiment of foot commanded by William Jephson in 1644-5.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 71.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Hampshire
Poyntz, John John Poyntz
Captain of Dorset volunteer company which is recorded in references 8 Nov. 1642-3 Aug. 1643. The company was at Sherborne in Nov. 1642. From Apr. 1643 onwards he was part of force blockading Portland, and on 4 May was signatory to summons for the town to surrender. The company was still in existence in June 1643.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.509.
Armies: Dorset
Poyntz [Poynts], Sydenham [Sednam] Sydenham Poyntz [Sednam Poynts] (baptised 1607)
Baptised 3 Nov. 1607, fourth son of John Poynts of Reigate, Surrey, and his wife Anne Skinner. Abandoning a London apprenticeship, he became a professional soldier in 1625, serving in the English regiments in the Netherlands and then extensively in Europe. Although he returned to England briefly in the mid-1630s, he may well have continued serving abroad until the latter half of the English civil war.
Perhaps only a few months after his return, on 27 May 1645 parliament appointed him colonel-general of the Northern Association Army. He was nominated governor of York and led the Northern Association forces against the royalist forces at the battle of Rowton Heath or Moor (Sept. 1645). In autumn 1645 he sometimes brutally helped mop up remaining royalist outposts in Nottinghamshire and then played a leading role in the final siege of Newark.
An ally of the Presbyterians, he was at odds with his own troops and with the New Model Army. In summer 1647 he was seized, taken to Reading and accused of plotting a second civil war, and upon his release resigned, replaced in his northern command by Lambert. He fled to the Netherlands after the failure of the attempted counter-revolution in London. He returned to the Netherlands in the late 1640s and probably ended up in the West Indies, though his last years are obscure and the date of his death unknown.
References: Oxford DNB.
Armies: Northern Army (Poyntz)
Prescott, - - Prescott
Lieutenant in Captain Nicholas Moore’s company in Sir William Waller’s regiment of dragoons in Sept. 1643.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 150.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Presson, Roger Roger Presson
Lieutenant in Captain Charles O’Hara’s company in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army by 13 Apr. 1644.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.16.
Armies: Eastern Association
Preston, John John Preston
Captain, under Colonel John Pyne.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.550.
Armies: Somerset: Col. John Pyne’s Trained Band Regt.
Preston, Robert Robert Preston
Captain-Lieutenant of the colonel’s company in Thomas Ayloffe’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army at its reduction in Apr. 1645, replacing William Watson, who had held that position on 30 Aug. 1644.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.7.
Armies: Eastern Association
Preston, Roger Roger Preston
Ensign in Henry Hazzard’s company in James Wemyss’s regiment of foot at the time of its disbandment in Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 155.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Pretty, Oliver Oliver Pretty
Brother of Henry Pretty. Cornet in John Okey’s troop in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse, which he had probably left by Aug. 1644. From 1646 he was a lieutenant in the regiment of horse commanded by Francis Thornhagh and by 1655 by William Goffe, by then in the troop of Captain Prime (or Prince) Goffe, commending Pretty as ‘an honest man’, wrote to John Thurloe in Dec. 1655 asking him to intercede with Cromwell for Pretty to succeed as captain after Prime’s resignation. He was confirmed as captain by the committee for the nomination of officers in June 1659, but replaced by Monck later that year.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 65; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, I, 286, 288-9; Thurloe State Papers, IV, 294.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Poyntz; Post New Model.
Pretty, William William Pretty
Captain of a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army from or by 9 Aug. 1642; promoted major by 9 Nov. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 49; TNA, SP28/1a/23, SP28/3a/258.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Price, - - Price
Officer in Samuel Jones’s and later John Fielder’s Surrey regiment of foot, initially a lieutenant who served under the regiment’s lieutenant-colonel, Jeremy Baines, at the siege of Reading in spring 1643, by early 1645 succeeding Samuel Claridge as a captain within the regiment.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 74.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Surrey
Price, John John Price
Ensign in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 40.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Price, Richard Richard Price
He is probably Richard Price of Gunley (died 1675), the son of Edward Price (died 1643) of Gunley, Montgomeryshire and his wife Bridget, daughter of John ap Richard. Singled out in 1649 for his sufferings by Oliver Cromwell in a letter to Lenthall, urging parliament to make reparation for his sufferings: ‘I have been thoroughly acquainted with the sufferings of Captain Richard Price for his affection to the Parliament from the beginning, how faithfully he hath served, and how useful he still is in the county where his estate lies, being the only man in the country proclaimed rebel by the late King and his estate whilst in your service sequestered’ (Abbott, Cromwell Writings and Speeches, 2, 89; Phillips, Wales, 2.301). He was named in a parliamentary ordinance of 10 Aug. 1649 as one of five officers whose losses and arrears are to be paid from first £2,000 raised by sequestration (Firth and Rait, II, 212). Exactly what those services during the civil war had been are not entirely clear and his military record is obscure. In spring 1644 Sir Thomas Myddelton authorised payment to him, as Captain Richard Pryce, of £7 10s for a horse which he had sold to him for the service of the state and a year later he was paid a further £2. He was probably the Richard Price, holding the rank of captain, who fought at Denbigh in 1646 and served as captain in the Welsh militia in 1650.
He was sheriff of Montgomeryshire in 1650-1 and custos rotulorum thereafter. A Fifth Monarchist, an elder of Vavasour Powell’s congregation and commissioner for the propagation of the gospel. MP for Anglesey in the Nominated Assembly. Appointed a militia commissioner for the six North Welsh counties on 26 July 1659 and appointed colonel commanding all the militia forces in North Wales on 10 Aug. 1659, in which capacity he was active in suppressing Booth’s supporters. Arrest warrants against him (as Richard Price of Aberbechan, Montgomeryshire) were issued in 1660 and 1665. He was reported preaching in his own house in 1669 and licensed as a Congregationalist in 1672. Although he bought estates in Wales and Shropshire, his estate at his death was modest.
References: BDBR, 3.60-1; A.Woolrych, Commonwealth to Protectorate (1982), esp. 209-10, 213-4, 424-5; W.R.Williams, Parliamentary History of the Principality of Wales (1895), 3-4; TNA, SP28/346.
Armies: North Wales
Price, Richard Richard Price
Lieutenant in the company of firelocks of Philibert Emmanuel de Boyes [de Bois], lieutenant-general of the ordnance in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 25.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Price, [?Samuel] [?Samuel] Price
Major in Devon.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 4.422, 455.
Armies: Devon
Price, Samuel Samuel Price
Captain of the colonel’s company in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot raised for service in Ireland in Lord Wharton’s Army in 1642. Instead, by 12 Aug. served as major in William Bampfield’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 70, 40; TNA, SP28/1a/69.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pride, Thomas Thomas Pride (died 1658)
Son of a Somerset yeoman, apprenticed to a London haberdasher, Pride became a successful and prosperous brewer in London and Surrey
Ensign in the Orange regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel John Towse) in summer 1642; by 1644 major in the Orange regiment, London Auxiliaries. Also by Apr. 1644 major in Colonel Harry/Henry Barclay’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army, and thus probably serving under Essex in the disastrous campaign in the South West in summer 1644.
Although apparently not originally earmarked for transfer to the New Model Army, in fact by May 1645 he had become lieutenant-colonel of the New Model Army regiment of foot, command of which was given to Edward Harley. Pride went on to have a very prominent military career in the New Model Army infantry, fighting at Naseby, Bristol and elsewhere in 1645-6, and under Cromwell in the campaign in South Wales and at Preston in 1648; as the New Model’s chief agent in the purging of parliament in December 1648, then playing an active role in the trial of Charles I; and under Cromwell again in Scotland, fighting at Dunbar and Worcester.
He acquired land and property in London and elsewhere after the civil war and also played a prominent role in London politics during the 1650s. He was an MP in the second Protectorate Parliament. He died in autumn 1658.
References: Oxford DNB; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660; Oxford DNB; Thrale 1642; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 82; TNA, SP28/14/288, 293; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 58, 69, 150..
Armies: London; Earl of Essex
Prideaux, Bevil Bevil Prideaux
Captain in the earl of Peterborough’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642, he claimed for his company on 29 Nov. 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 28; TNA, SP28/3b/498.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Prideaux, Prue. Prue. Prideaux
Ensign in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Priest, Thomas Thomas Priest
Ensign in Robert Phippes’s company in John Barker’s/Thomas Willoughby’s regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 22.
Armies: Warwickshire
Primrose, Edward Edward Primrose (died 1643).
First captain in Colonel Thomas Ballard’s regiment of foot in the army of Lord Wharton raised for Ireland in 1642.
Captain in Ballard’s regiment of foot when it instead became part of the earl of Essex’s Army.
In July 1643 Primrose was a prisoner at Oxford, and was released shortly before 22 Aug.
However, he died on 7 Sept. 1643; in Dec. his widow Elizabeth claimed for his arrears from 16 Jan. to 7 Sept. 1643 for his pay as captain in Thomas Ballard’s late regiment.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 69, 43; TNA, SP28/4/258, SP28/5/117, 178, SP28/9/91, 168, SP28/11/291.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Primrose, William William Primrose (died 1643)
Ensign. In Feb. 1643 he was ensign in the earl of Stamford’s company in the latter’s regiment of foot. He had not been in the regiment at the time of the officers’ list published in 1642.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 642, 646.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Prince, James James Prince
Colonel of the Westminster auxiliary regiment in Oct. 1646.
In 1642 identified by Lindley as a radical activist in Westminster, a collector of the ‘voluntary’ contribution and a parish zealot. Later a lay Presbyterian trier.
In Sept. 1647, he was appointed to the Westminster militia committee, perhaps a mark of his perceived reliability after the failed Presbyterian coup.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 11; Lindley, Popular politics, 220, 233; Acts and Ordinances, 1.1011.
Armies: Westminster
Prince, Walter Walter Prince
Son of Sir Richard Prince of Shrewsbury, who was a royalist commissioner of array. Walter, however, was a parliamentarian in Shropshire, by 1645 colonel and commander-in-chief of Shropshire horse. Thus in June 1645 he commanded a body of horse in an attack on royalist-held Moreville Hall in Shropshire. He was killed, probably commanding Shropshire horse, at the battle of Rowton, Cheshire, on 24 Sept. 1645.
References: Perfect Occurrences, 20-27 June 1645; CSPD, 1645-47, 483.
Armies: Shropshire
Pritchard, - - Pritchard
By spring 1644, captain in Edward Montagu’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army and still there in spring 1645, though he seems to have lost his place shortly after when his company and the regiment transferred to the New Model Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.70.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pritchard, - - Pritchard
Captain in Nathaniel Whetham’s Northampton-based regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 164.
Armies: Northamptonshire
Pritchard, - - Pritchard
Captain in the Southwark Trained Bands regiment in later 1643. lieutenant of the same regiment by 22 Oct. 1646.
References: TNA, SP28/131, Part 13, f. 5v.; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317; Marshall, Essex funeral, 12.
Armies: Southwark
Prowse, Thomas Thomas Prowse
There are several gentry families of this name in Devon (of Barnstaple and Tiverton, of Chagford and of Exeter); none fits with any certainty, though he was possibly of the Tiverton branch.
He is possibly the Captain Prowse at Dartmouth in Feb. 1643 whose troops were billeted at Kingsbridge. As a lieutenant-colonel, his regiment fought at Modbury, Stratton and the first siege of Exeter. His colonel is uncertain: Peachey and Turton suggest that he was most likely lieutenant-colonel in John Were’s regiment of foot, but that he may have been lieutenant-colonel to Sir Henry Rosewell’s Trained Band regiment.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 4.432; Vis. Devon, 626-8.
Armies: Devon
Puckle, William William Puckle
Sometime after spring 1644, but before the regiment was disbanded in spring 1645, succeeded James Burrill to become captain of a company in Sir Miles Hobart’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.42.
Armies: Eastern Association
Pudsey, - - Pudsey
Sergeant-Major in Colonel Arthur Forbes’s Gloucestershire regiment of dragoons, for which he received a payment of £10 on 9 Aug. 1643. When the king besieged Gloucester later that month Pudsey and a citizen carried the formal rejection of the royal offer of pardon. During the siege he led a force of musketeers out of the North Gate against the Welsh and Worcester forces.
Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, list him as Marmaduke Pudsey, but none of the sources they cite record his forename. One reference, 16 Sept., gives him the rank of lieutenant-colonel.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 634, 626-7; Bibliotheca, 44, 47-8, 211, 216.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Pudsey, Thomas Thomas Pudsey (1608/09-1676)
Of Seisdon, Staffordshire. Eldest son of Nicholas Pudsey (died 1637) of Horburne, Staffordshire and his wife Catherine, daughter of Raphaell Norman of Staffordshire, and elder brother of Captain Daniel Pudsey.
On 30 Apr. 1644 he and Major Medhope were ordered to bring in a number of named men who were subscribed to lend money upon the Propositions, and to receive the money so gathered for their disbursements and arrears. On 24 Aug. 1644 the treasurer was ordered to pay him £40 to supply his present needs.
A Staffordshire county committeeman, to which he was nominated on 7 Dec. 1643.
References: Vis. Staffs., 246; Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 108, 171, 353.
Armies: Staffordshire
Puett, - - Puett
Major. Mentioned in Cooper’s account of taking of Abbotsbury House.
References: Christie, Shaftesbury, 1.63.
Armies: Dorset
Puinde, John John Puinde
Cornet in William Carr’s troop in Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s regiment of horse by 13 July 1643.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 26.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Puller, - - Puller
In summer 1643 major of Sir John Wittrough’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.112.
Armies: Eastern Association
Puller, Isaac Isaac Puller
Son of Abraham Puller of Hertford and by the time of the civil war a wealthy property owner.
He supported the parliamentarian war effort in Hertfordshire both by sitting on many county committees and by serving as a captain in, later lieutenant-colonel of, one of the militia-based regiments of foot in Hertfordshire. He remained active in local and county government after the war and was an MP in all three Protectorate parliaments.
References: A. Thompson, The Impact of the First Civil War on Hertfordshire, 1642-47 (2007), passim but especially 228.
Armies: Hertfordshire
Purefoy, Gamaliel Gamaliel Purefoy
Of Wolvershill, Bulkington parish, Warwickshire. Son of George Purefoy of Wolvershill and his wife Jane, daughter of Sir John Zouch of Weston, Warwickshire and niece of George Lord Zouche. Gamaliel’s father’s eldest brother William was grandfather of Colonel William Purefoy. Gamaliel married Anne Aston of Cheshire and was the father of Major George Purefoy, Captain Michael Purefoy, Lieutenant William Purefoy and Ensign Peter Purefoy.
Commissioned major in the Coventry regiment of foot (Colonel Thomas Willoughby), 20 Aug. 1645, and still there in Sept. 1645.
References: TNA, SP28/136, Part 53B; Hughes, Warwickshire, 97-9, 109, 171, 175, 187, 195, 253n., 248, 251, 333, 360-3; Vis. Warwicks., 1682-3, 109-10.
Armies: Warwickshire
Purefoy, George George Purefoy (born 1617/18, alive in Aug. 1682)
Of Wolvershill, Bulkington parish, Warwickshire. Eldest son of Gamaliel Purefoy of Wolvershill (1579/80-1661) and his wife Anne Aston of Cheshire; eldest brother of Captain Michael Purefoy Lieutenant William Purefoy and Ensign Peter Purefoy. His father’s eldest brother was the grandfather of Colonel William Purefoy. He married (1) Dorothy, daughter of - Murcot of White Abbey, Shropshire and widow of - Manwaring, Citizen of London, and (2) Anne, daughter of Walter Savage of Broadway, Worcestershire, gentleman.
Purefoy later submitted accounts as governor of Compton House, on the Warwickshire/Oxfordshire border, from its capture on 8 June 1644 to 8 Feb. 1645, when he had a garrison of 70 foot and 56 troopers, which included amongst its officers his brothers Michael, William and Peter. He later claimed for the same period £130 pay as major of foot and captain of horse. The latter position, which he evidently acquired shortly before the taking of Compton, was in his kinsman Colonel William Purefoy’s regiment (strictly captain-lieutenant as it was Purefoy’s own troop and he was only promoted captain in spring 1645 when William gave up his command).
Purefoy was, Ann Hughes has concluded, ‘perhaps the most unsavoury commander’ in Warwickshire, ‘and the inhabitants of the south Warwickshire and Oxfordshire parishes around this garrison suffered particularly from forced labour and kidnapping’ (Hughes, Warwickshire, 202). His warrants to ‘the most base and malignant constable and town of Tysoe’ demanded labour on his fortifications upon pain of death or imprisonment, and a royalist newsbook described the tone of his warrants as ‘in such a prerogative style as if the youth were Wat Tyler himself’ (Hughes, Warwickshire, 202).
Purefoy had accepted a commission from the earl of Denbigh in the spring of 1644, almost certainly as a precaution rather than out of any allegiance to the earl’s authority, as he was evidently closer to the Warwickshire county committee. Certainly, by Aug. 1644 those moderate gentry who looked to Denbigh were petitioning that the earl take care of the government of Compton House (as Hughes notes, a witness to just how rapidly Purefoy had alienated local society). In 1645 he was accused of having bullied men into voting for the county committee’s candidates in the 1645 recruiter election for the county with threats of plunder. In May 1646 the Presbyterian Scottish Dove reported Purefoy having ridden into a tree in Hyde Park, losing a hat with diamonds worth £150: ‘In a couple of sentences the editor thus suggested both Purefoy’s corruption, and his inadequacy as a cavalry officer’ (Hughes, Warwickshire, 251).
In 1659 Purefoy was quartermaster to the politically moderate and respectable Coventry militia horse.
References: Hughes, Warwickshire, 202-3, 229, 235, 248, 251, 333; Vis. Warwicks., 1682-3, 109-10; Vis. Warwicks., 1619, 255;TNA, SP28/136, Part 37.
Armies: Warwickshire; Earl of Denbigh
Purefoy, Michael Michael Purefoy
Second son of Gamaliel Purefoy of Wolvershill (1579/80-1661) and his wife Anne Aston of Cheshire; younger brother of Major George Purefoy and elder brother of Lieutenant William Purefoy and Ensign Peter Purefoy. He married the daughter of one Smith of Mitcham, Surrey
Captain in the Compton House garrison, June 1644-Mar. 1645, serving under his brother George; he was succeeded as captain of the company by his brother and Lieutenant William. In 1682 Michael was alive and living in Ludlow.
References: Vis. Warwicks., 1682-3, 109-10; TNA, SP28/136, Part 37, f. 5r.; SP28/136, Part 38, ff. 3r.-4r.
Armies: Warwickshire
Purefoy, Peter Peter Purefoy
Eighth son of Gamaliel Purefoy (1578/79-1661) of Wolvershall, Bulkington parish, Warwickshire and his wife Anne Aston of Cheshire. Younger brother of Major George Purefoy, Captain Michael Purefoy and Lieutenant William Purefoy.
In 1644-6 Peter Purefoy served as an ensign in the garrison at Compton House, commanded by his brother George Purefoy.
In 1682 Peter was alive, living in Ireland.
References: Vis. Warwicks., 1682-3, 109-10; TNA, SP28/136, part 37, f. 5r.
Armies: Earl of Denbigh
Purefoy, William William Purefoy (c. 1580-1659)
Of Caldecote, Warwickshire. Eldest son of Francis Purefoy (died 1613), and his wife, Eleanor, daughter of John Baskerville of Curdworth, Warwickshire. He married in 1609, Joan daughter of Aleyn Penkeston and widow of George Abbott. The Purefoys of Wolvershill, Bulkington parish, Warwickshire, who provided several officers in the Warwickshire forces, were his kinsmen.
MP for Coventry (1628); Warwick (both the Short and Long Parliaments); Coventry (in all three Protectorate Parliaments). A regicide.
Although the Purefoys were armigerous, the family was very much on the fringes of the county elite: William’s estate, one ally of the earl of Denbigh commented, was ‘inconsiderable’ (Oxford DNB), and although sheriff of Warwickshire, 1630-1, and a JP from 1632, he was not of the quorum on the county Bench until 1649.
Purefoy was a Forced Loan refuser in 1627, and initially resisted distraint of knighthood. He was a patron of godly ministers in the 1630s and a close ally of Lord Brooke. In the Long Parliament, he was a fervent advocate of the Grand Remonstrance.
With the approach of war, Purefoy was active in raising the county under the Militia Ordinance. Purefoy held a command in Lord Brooke’s Association Army. He was colonel of a regiment of horse, raised in Warwickshire from Apr. 1643. He was commissioned commander-in-chief in Warwickshire and Staffordshire by the earl of Essex on 24 Mar. 1643, an emergency measure by Essex in the wake of Lord Brooke’s death, but which provided an alternative claim which would sabotage the earl of Denbigh’s efforts to establish his military authority as commander-in-chief of the West Midland Association. Although in his sixties, Purefoy saw some active military service, taking part in the relief of Gloucester in 1643. He gave up his command under the Self-Denying Ordinance in 1645, the regiment passing to William Colemore.
Purefoy’s significance in the war effort was, however, rather ‘as the archetypal “county boss”, with a tight political and administrative hold on Warwickshire parliamentarianism’ (Oxford DNB). In politics he was a war party figure, in religion a strict Presbyterian. Although uneasy about Pride’s Purge, he was willing to sign the king’s death warrant and was an active member of the Rump parliament and a member of the Commonwealth’s Council of State.
Commissioned colonel of horse and foot and commander of some troops in the Warwickshire militia, 27 June 1650.
References: Oxford DNB; Hughes, Warwickshire; HoP: The Commons, 1604-1629, 5.783-4; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming); Vis. Warwicks., 1619, 255; CSPD 1650, 507.
Armies: Warwickshire
Purefoy, William William Purefoy
Third son of Gamaliel Purefoy (1579/80-1661) of Wolvershill, Bulkington parish, Warwickshire and his wife Anne Aston of Cheshire; younger brother of Major George Purefoy and Captain Michael Purefoy; elder brother of Ensign Peter Purefoy. He married Flora Henshaw, daughter of a London silkman.
The Warwickshire county committee appointed him lieutenant of foot in his brother Michael Purefoy’s company on 8 June 1644, and was himself promoted captain of foot on 21 Mar., in succession to his brother. Throughout, until 8 June 1646, he served in the garrison of Compton House, where his eldest brother, George Purefoy, was governor.
On 8 Oct. 1646 William was commissioned major in James Castle’s newly-authorized regiment of foot, officered from the disbanded Warwickshire and Worcestershire forces. The regiment landed at Dublin on 30 Mar. 1647 and fought at Dungan’s Hill (8 Aug. 1647). Purefoy was noted for his defence of Ballisonan in June 1649 against Ormonde’s troops. Following Castle’s death at Drogheda, Purefoy succeeded Henry Slade as lieutenant-colonel in the regiment (which became Slade’s and then Leigh’s, and was disbanded c. 1653).
At the fall of the Protectorate, Purefoy became lieutenant-colonel to the Baptist Robert Barrow, given command of the regiment of foot previously commanded by the Cromwellian loyalist Henry Ingoldsby. Purefoy, like Barrow, evidently sided with the army rather than parliament in the closing months of the republic, and was hostile to the shifting currents in Ireland leading towards the Restoration. In 1660 the Irish parliament proposed to except Purefoy from the Act of Indemnity, but Purefoy was included in a general pardon. In Nov. 1666 he received a grant by the Commissioners of Settlement in Ireland of lands in the King’s County and barony of Coolestown. In 1682 William was alive, and living in Ireland.
References: Vis. Warwicks., 1682-3, 109-10; TNA, SP/28136, part 38; SP28/136, Part 37, f. 5r.; Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 2.632-3, 638, 645-6; Clarke, Prelude to Restoration, 63; CSP Ireland, 1666-1669, 233-4.
Armies: Warwickshire
Purpett, Robert Robert Purpett
Ensign in Colonel Thomas Ballard’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642 (the regiment later commanded by Francis Martyn).
Captain-Lieutenant of the colonel’s company in Francis Martyn’s regiment of foot while based at Aylesbury, May 1644-Oct. 1645. As such he signed the account that Peter Alston, who had served in the company as Gentleman of the Pikes, submitted for payment in Mar. 1647. His own claim for arrears for his time as captain-lieutenant at Aylesbury was for the period 31 Aug. 1644-26 Oct. 1645. Note also the arrears paid to Francis Browne as a soldier under Captain Purpett in Colonel Martyn’s regiment on 17 Mar. 1647 and for Robert Neale.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 43; TNA, SP28/126, Part 3, ff. 258r., 248v., SP28/219 (arrears claim of Robert Neale).
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pury, Thomas, junior Thomas Pury, junior (1619-1693)
Of Gloucester and Taynton, Gloucestershire. Captain. MP for Monmouth Boroughs, c. Nov. 1646, and Gloucester, 1656. Captain in the regiment of Gloucester volunteers raised in the spring of 1643. On 6 Aug. 1643 he was one of the officers in a sally against the besieging royalists. On 25 Aug. he came under enemy gunfire when he set up lights on the College Tower to display that the town had not fallen. Oxford DNB states that he later served in the New Model Army, but he does not appear in Firth and Davies, Regimental History. An important figure in the administration of Gloucestershire in the 1650s. Faced with the threat of a royalist rising in July 1659, he and his father raised 300 volunteers and by Aug. had raised a militia foot regiment of which Thomas junior was made Colonel. By Jan. 1660 he was a supporter of Monck, and in Mar. his regiment helped suppress opposition to the changes first amongst troops stationed in the West Midlands and then in the Herefordshire and Monmouthshire area. At the Restoration he remained lieutenant-colonel of this regiment, now under Lord Herbert of Raglan, until its disbandment in Nov. 1660.
References: Oxford DNB; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 625-7; Bibliotheca, 208, 221; Warmington, Glos., passim; HoP: The Commons 1640-1660, (forthcoming).
Armies: Gloucestershire
Pury, Thomas, senior Thomas Pury, senior (c.1590-1666)
Of Gloucester. Captain. He was the son of Walter Pury of Gloucester, clothier, and his wife Anne Clutterbuck, and was apprenticed to a clothier after his father’s death. He married c. 1618 Mary Alye (died 1668). By 1630 he had moved into the law, becoming a country solicitor. One hostile pamphlet in 1648 mockingly described him as ‘first a weaver in Gloucester, then an ignorant Countrey Solicitor’ (A List of the Names of the Members of the House of Commons, 1648).
He served in Gloucester as common councillor (1618-1638), steward (1619-1620), sheriff (1626) and alderman (1638 until his resignation at the Restoration).
MP for Gloucester in the Long Parliament, where he sat through to 1653; and the parliament of 1654. An opponent of episcopacy, and by 1648 an Independent.
Captain in the regiment of Gloucester townsmen raised in the spring of 1643, commanded first by Henry Stephens and later by Edward Massey and Thomas Morgan. A committed parliamentarian, although by Nov. 1644 he had fallen out with Massey, evidently largely in a clash of personalities.
References: Oxford DNB;Keeler, Long Parliament, 316-7; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 625-7; Warmington, Glos., passim; HoP: The Commons 1640-1660, (forthcoming).
Armies: Gloucestershire
Pye, Sir Robert Sir Robert Pye (c.1622-1701).
Son of Sir Robert Pye (died 1662) of Faringdon Manor, Berkshire, MP for Woodstock in the Long Parliament.
Sir Robert (junior), who had married one of John Hampden’s daughters, raised a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army at the outbreak of the civil war and was wounded in the defence and fall of Cirencester in 1643. He became colonel of a horse regiment in Essex’s Army in 1644 and that summer was active in Somerset and captured Taunton Castle. In spring 1645 he supported Cromwell’s brief march into Warwickshire. Although occasionally active on the fringes of the Eastern Association region, especially in and around Buckinghamshire, and he is sometimes linked to Manchester’s horse regiment, Pye seems never formally to have seen service with and as part of the Eastern Association Army. He bravely if unsuccessfully defended Leicester when it was attacked and stormed by the king at the end of May 1645 and was captured though soon exchanged. He became colonel of a New Model Army horse regiment, with which he campaigned at the siege of Sherborne and the capture of Bristol in summer 1645 and he commanded the siege of Faringdon in spring 1646. But his political moderation was such that he fell from favour in 1647 and left the army that summer, for a time going into self-imposed exile in the Netherlands. He returned to England in the 1650s and was elected to the first and second Protectorate parliaments. In 1659-60 he pushed for the readmission of MPs secluded at Pride’s Purge (such as his elderly father), supported the Restoration and held minor office once again. He lived to see and support the Glorious Revolution. He was one of very few New Model colonels of the 1645-6 era to live on into the eighteenth century.
References: Oxford DNB; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 53, 63, 74, 83.
Armies: Earl of Essex; New Model Army
Pyke [Pike], Robert Robert Pyke [Pike]
Pike evidently served throughout the first civil war in Cheshire. He was later paid arrears as ensign in the volunteer company raised by Captain John Brooke which became the Trained Band of Bucklow Hundred (and by 1645 probably was Brooke’s company in his brother Henry Brooke’s regiment of foot). He was still an ensign on 21 Jan. 1648, when the Bucklow sequestrators were ordered to pay him £2 5s 4d as reimbursement of money which Pyke had paid to Robert Massey of Warrington for a debt to him from Pyke and Lieutenant Johnson on 2 June 1647 (itself a debt going back even further, from an original order of 7 June 1645 for powder and match for guarding Frodsham Ditch Ford). On 22 Aug. 1650 Pyke was commissioned captain in Henry Brooke’s militia regiment of foot.
References: TNA, SP28/224, f. 218, SP28/225, f. 524; CSPD, 1650, 509.
Armies: Cheshire
Pym, Alexander Alexander Pym
Captain. Eldest son of John Pym, for whom see Oxford DNB, HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming). Part of the earl of Essex’s detached forces in the West Country.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.657-8.
Armies: Somerset
Pym, Alexander Alexander Pym
In the summer 1642 listing he is shown as captain of a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Pym, Charles Charles Pym
Probably from its formation early in 1643 until it was broken up and reduced, captain in the regiment of horse of Colonel John Dalbier. He was son of the parliamentary leader John Pym MP (died 1643).
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 51.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Pyne, - - Pyne
Captain. Presumably Thomas Pyne. Cornet in Erle’s regiment of horse, Sept. 1642. 29 Sept. 1643 Captain Thomas Pyne was a captain of dragoons in the garrison of Lyme Regis under the command of Colonel Thomas Ceely, at least Sept. 1643-1 Feb. 1644, when he becomes captain of horse. Just possibly Captain James Pine, ordered to be arrested by provost martial, 3 Dec. 1646 (who, however, is quite possibly a royalist).
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.537; Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 94.
Armies: Dorset
Pyne, - - Pyne
Captain. Probably same man as Cornet Thomas Pyne [See above]. Captain of dragoons in Lyme garrison, Sept. 1643-1 Feb. 1644, and then captain of horse. Died of wounds received on 22 May 1644 after four days during siege of Lyme.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.537; Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 165.
Armies: Dorset
Pyne, John John Pyne (1600-1678)
Of Curry Malet, Somerset Colonel. Only son of Thomas Pyne (died 1609), counsellor-at-law, of Lincoln’s Inn and Merriott, Somerset and Amy, daughter of Thomas Hannam, serjeant-at-law, of the Middle Temple and Winterbourne Zelston, Dorset. Colonel of Trained Band regiment. In Jan. 1643 possibly colonel of volunteer regiment which went with Stamford into Devon and Cornwall Pyne’s significance for most of civil war was as a local boss dominating Somerset county committees. He was MP for Poole in parliaments of the 1620s, and in the two parliaments to assemble in 1640; and for Somerset in 1653.
He was later colonel. of regiment of volunteers, Somerset 1649; and of militia foot in 1650.
References: Oxford DNB; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.550-1; Underdown, Somerset; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Somerset