Surnames beginning 'T'

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Surnames beginning 'T'

Talbot, Francis Francis Talbot (died 1643)
Of Appleton Roebuck township, Bolton Percy parish, Yorkshire (West Riding), gentleman, eldest son of Thomas Talbot of the same and Anne, daughter of James Ward of Rokewith.
Major in the regiment of foot of either John Lambert or Thomas Mauleverer. He signed the report on the battle of Wakefield (May 1643) but was killed at Adwalton Moor (30 June).
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 404; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 105.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax)
Talbot, Thomas Thomas Talbot
A gentleman of Hull, and according to Jones a son of Thomas Talbot of Appleton, Yorkshire (West Riding) and younger brother of Francis Talbot. Lieutenant to Edward Briggs in Sir Henry Foulis’s/Sir William Fairfax’s regiment of horse. Promoted captain, he stayed in the same regiment under Matthew Alured. After June 1645 he became a captain of foot under General Poyntz and later under Richard Thornton. He fought at the battle of Worcester. By 1655 a lieutenant-colonel, and in June appointed colonel of the regiment of foot previously commanded by Matthew Alured stationed in Scotland. In late 1659 he acted as a go-between for Fleetwood and Lambert with Monck and he was persuaded by Lambert to side with him (although it was reported that thereby he was ‘prevailed upon to act contrary…(some think) to his own inclinations; for he was esteemed by all that knew him to be a person not averse to a better and more just government than he at that time lived under, and was obliging to all the gentry where he lived, that needed his assistance and help’ (Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 2.468-9). His regiment overwhelmingly stood by Monck and Talbot was displaced by the latter. He married Anne, sister of John Rushworth and widow of Henry Lilburne.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 404; Greaves and Zaller, III, 223; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 2.465-470; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 91.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Poyntz); New Model Army
Talbot, Thomas Thomas Talbot
Probably the Captain Talbot in Waller’s regiment of horse in his Western Army. Later captain in Colonel Jonas Vandruske’s regiment of horse in Waller’s Southern Association Army.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, xxx; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West,7.706.
Armies: Waller; Waller (Southern Association)
Tanton, Richard Richard Tanton
Lieutenant in Sir Thomas Myddelton’s North Wales army. Known through one warrant, of 13 Apr. 1644, for payment of £2 to Dorithy Tanton, wife to Richard Tanton, Lieutenant; she signed the acquittance.
References: TNA, SP28/346, no. 107.
Armies: North Wales
Tapp, Edmund Edmund Tapp
Quartermaster to Major Beindicke Clutterbuck’s troop in George Thompson’s regiment of horse. He succeeded Richard Nicholetts as lieutenant when the latter was promoted captain. Later lieutenant to Major Stephen Winthrop’s troop in Thomas Harrison’s regiment of horse, and captain when Winthrop succeeded as colonel of that regiment. In Apr. 1656 Tapp’s troop was stationed at Glasgow.
References: Spring, Waller’s army,136; Firth and Davies,Regimental history, 1.192-3.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); New Model Army
Tapper, Nathaniel Nathaniel Tapper
In Sept. 1642 he was a lieutenant in the earl of Stamford’s regiment of foot, and still described as such in Gloucester accounts on 24 Mar. (when he was in the company of Captain Dobson) and as late as 4 Apr. 1643. On 8 Apr. and thereafter he was described as captain. However, for whatever reason, he was no longer in the regiment by the late summer. He is not named in any of the accounts of the siege of Gloucester, nor in the list of officers after the siege.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6. 642-3, 645-6; TNA, SP28/129, Part 5, fols. 3v, 4r.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Gloucestershire
Tasker, Ralph Ralph Tasker (died 1675)
Son of John Tasker of Tysoe, Warwickshire.
Of St Giles Cripplegate by 1641 (White Cross Street in 1651). Apprenticed to the Blacksmiths’ Company 1616; liveryman by 1641; warden of the company, 1651, 1661 and 1667. Of White Cross Street (1641).
Despite signing the conservative Benyon petition opposing radical changes in the militia, 24 Feb. 1642, Tasker was an officer in the London Trained Bands and Essex’s Army in the civil war. Ensign in the Green regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel John Warner) in summer 1642. Captain in Colonel Philip Skippon’s newly-raised regiment of foot from 19 Nov. 1642 (when he was a captain of one of ‘severall foot companyes raised in the City of London and to be employed and to serve under Collonell Phillip Skyppen’, Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 2.425) until at least May 1643 (when the company was at Reading). He was no longer in the regiment at its inclusion in the New Model Army.
Captain in the Green regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Owen Rowe) in Oct. 1646. The evidence is ambiguous as to whether he was retained as such by the Presbyterian militia committee in 1647 under Colonel Matthew Sheppard; or continued after Rowe’s reinstatement later that year. But he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the Green regiment, London Trained Bands, in Dec. 1659 and still at that rank in Mar. 1660; major of the same in Oct. 1660 and 1672. Common councilman for Cripplegate Without Ward, 1660, 1663-71, and deputy there 1662-9.
References: Dale, City Companies, 1641, 166;Thrale 1642; Marshall, Essex funeral, 12; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317-8; K. Lindley, ‘London’s citizenry in the English Revolution’ in R.C. Richardson ed., Town and country in the English revolution (1992), 26; Woodhead, Rulers, 159; C. Webb, Blacksmiths’ Company Apprentices (2011), 221: Strype, London, 2.i.302: TNA, SP28/4/186; SP28/7/186; Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 2.425.
Armies: London
Tassell, - - Tassell
Captain in a Kent Trained Band regiment, possibly the St Augustine Lathe regiment of volunteers.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 76.
Armies: Kent
Tattersall, Roger Roger Tattersall
Commissioned captain of foot in the Lancashire militia under Colonel Thomas Birch, 24 May 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 507.
Armies: Lancashire
Tatton, John John Tatton
Lieutenant in Daniel Thomas’s company in James Holborne’s regiment of dragoons at the time of its disbandment on 25 Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 146.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Tatton, William William Tatton
Ensign in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642. Like several other officers in that regiment, he then probably transferred to Hesilrige’s regiment of foot in Waller’s Army, serving as captain in the regiment from summer 1643 until at least July 1644.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 34; Spring, Waller’s army, 58, 69, 146.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Lord Brooke; Waller (Southern Association)
Taylor, - - Taylor
Of Queanby, described as already a captain when commissioned captain in a regiment of foot in the Yorkshire militia, 10 Apr. 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 506.
Armies: Yorkshire
Taylor, - - Taylor
Lieutenant in Edward Meredith’s company in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.64.
Armies: Eastern Association
Taylor, - - Taylor
Lieutenant, possibly in troop of Captain Newdigate, or commanding Sir Walter Erle’s dragoons.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.531.
Armies: Dorset
Taylor, Dennis Dennis Taylor
By spring 1644, lieutenant in Goodyear’s company in Edward Montagu’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army; still there in Mar. 1645, though in the previous month he had allegedly been ringleader in a mutiny while the regiment was garrisoning Henley-on-Thames and this perhaps explains why he did not enter the New Model Army in spring 1645 with his former regiment.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.70; Holmes, Eastern Association, 199.
Armies: Eastern Association
Taylor, Edward Edward Taylor
Of Pickhill, near Wrexham, Flint. He captured the royalist commander, Sir John Owen, at the battle of Llandygai (5 June 1648). He carried the news of the victory to London and was presented with £200. He became (or more likely already was) a county committee member for Denbighshire. Commissioner for the propagation of the gospel in Wales (where described as an ‘esq.’), and assessment commissioner for Denbighshire in 1647 (when described as a ‘gent.’) and 1649, 1650, 1652, 1657. He was a militia commissioner in 1659.
References: Tucker, North Wales, 139, 146; Acts and Ordinances,1, 979, 1097, 2.343, 46, 313, 482, 679, 1086, 1335.
Armies: North Wales
Taylor, Henry Henry Taylor
Ensign in the regiment of foot of Oliver Lord St John/Thomas Essex, named in the published list of officers in the earl of Essex’s army, 1642.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.650; Peacock, Army Lists, 34.
Armies: Bristol
Taylor, Jacob Jacob Taylor
Lieutenant in Richard Newdigate’s company in Sir William Waller’s regiment of foot in late 1643. He became a captain in the same regiment, probably succeeding to the command of Newdigate’s company, from 15 Mar. to 24 June 1644. He then became captain-lieutenant in John Fitzjames’s regiment of horse. He probably served in that regiment in the Massey brigade (but does not appear as one of those who petitioned parliament upon its demise). By 14 Oct. 1646 the Dorset committee has appointed Captain Jacob Taylor to command the Dorset county troop. The following day they ordered that Taylor assist the sequestrators and collectors in collecting the state’s rents, and on 11 Nov. to help the excise commissioners.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 150; Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 19, 28, 55.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Massey Brigade; Dorset
Taylor, Jacob Jacob Taylor
Captain. By 14 Oct. 1646 the Dorset Committee appointed Captain Jacob Taylor to command the Dorset county troop. It was ordered the following day that Taylor was to assist the sequestrators and collectors in collecting the state’s rents, and on 11 Nov. to help the excise commissioners.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 19, 28, 55.
Armies: Dorset
Taylor, John, junior John Taylor, junior
Captain in the White regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Jos. Vaughan) in 1647, approved by the Presbyterian militia committee.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 318.
Armies: London
Taylor, John, senior John Taylor, senior
Captain in the White regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Thomas Player) in Oct. 1646, and continued as such by the Presbyterian militia committee in 1647 in the White regiment (then Colonel Jos. Vaughan).
A Presbyterian, elected common councilman of Bridge Within, Dec. 1645.
References: Nagel, ‘London militia’, 317-8; Marshall, Essex funeral, 12; Lindley, Popular politics, 361.
Armies: London
Taylor, [Ralph?] [Ralph?] Taylor
Captain Taylor commanded a company in Ralph Assheton’s regiment of foot in Apr. 1645, when he sat on the court martial which sentenced two of his men to death for mutiny and plunder. Dore suggests that he may have been Ralph Taylor of Sankey, near Warrington, Lancashire.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 188-9; Gratton, Lancs. war effort, 282.
Armies: Lancashire
Taylor, Richard Richard Taylor
Ensign in the colonel’s company in Sir Miles Hobart’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, but he did not then go and serve as an officer in the New Model Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.40.
Armies: Eastern Association
Taylor, Robert Robert Taylor
Captain of a company in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army by 1 Apr. 1644, succeeded by William Johnstone between 25 May and 15 July 1644. On the former date he was paid for conducting soldiers of the regiment from Cambridge to Lincoln.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.15; Davies, ‘Eastern Association’, 94; TNA, SP28/25/125.
Armies: Eastern Association
Taylor, Samuel Samuel Taylor
A lead merchant. Captain in Sir John Gell’s regiment of foot. In late 1643 Taylor and Captain Ralph Clarke defected from Gell’s force, going first to Nottinghamshire and then to join up with Sir Thomas Fairfax. Taylor later claimed he had deserted Gell after the latter had threatened to shoot and arrest any who tried to collect money without the Derbyshire county committee’s permission for Fairfax’s troops when they were at Derby. Gell got warrants for Taylor’s and Clarke’s arrest, complaining that ‘if some speedy course bee not taken herein other Captaines and officers will doe the like, so that we are sure to bee undone by raiseing forces to goe away at theyre owne pleasure’ (Slack, Man at War, 93-4). Both Clarke and Taylor went on to be commissioned in the regiment of foot raised by another deserter from Gell, Randle Ashenhurst, under the authority of Lord Fairfax.
In 1650 Taylor was a JP in Derbyshire.
References: Slack, Man at War, 93-4, 105; Turbutt, Derbyshire, 3.1063, 1100; Brighton, ‘Governor’, 7.
Armies: Derbyshire; Nottinghamshire
Taylor, Thomas Thomas Taylor
Of Hipperholme-with-Brighouse, Halifax parish, Yorkshire (West Riding), gentleman. He married Judith, sister of the future Quaker Hoshua Henson of Briggroyd.
Taylor was a captain of foot in Yorkshire for a long period (regiment unknown). In 1648 he claimed arrears of £593 14s. He later became a Quaker, for which he was imprisoned in York Castle. He named one of his children Love.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 404; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 110.
Armies: Yorkshire
Taylour, - – Taylour
Captain. This could be Lieutenant Taylor, above.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 377.
Armies: Dorset
Teake, Thomas Thomas Teake
In spring 1644 ensign in Captain Woodroffe’s company in the Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 138.
Armies: Tower Hamlets
Tempest, Henry Henry Tempest
Commissioned colonel of a regiment of foot in the Yorkshire militia, 10 Apr. 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 506.
Armies: Yorkshire
Temple, Edmund Edmund Temple
By summer 1644 and continuing to serve until the regiment was disbanded, captain in Colonel John Fiennes’s regiment of horse in Oxfordshire.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 54.
Armies: Oxfordshire
Temple, James James Temple
Captain in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Temple, Purbeck Purbeck Temple
Between spring 1643 and spring 1644 he served as captain in Sir John Norwich’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association. Subsequently became major in John Fiennes’s regiment of horse in which he served until spring 1645 and the creation of the New Model Army. Then served first as Governor as Bletchington House and then (from autumn 1645) of Henley-on-Thames.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.74.
Armies: Eastern Association
Temple, Purbeck Purbeck Temple
Major of Colonel John Fiennes’s regiment of horse in Oxfordshire from summer 1644 to spring 1645, when he became first governor of Bletchington House and then governor of Henley before the end of the year.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 54.
Armies: Oxfordshire
Temple, Thomas [James?] Thomas [James?] Temple
Apparently the same officer is generally referred to as Thomas Temple but occasionally as James Temple. Captain of a troop of horse in Essex’s Army in 1642, and still its commander in Jan. 1643, although by May command had evidently passed to his lieutenant, William Baker.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 56; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 7.716.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Temple, Thomas Thomas Temple
In 1642 he is listed as captain of a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 54.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Templeman, Peter Peter Templeman
Ensign in Weymouth garrison, 18 Mar. 1651.
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 337.
Armies: Dorset
Tennant, William William Tennant (c. 1608-1684).
Of Chapel House, near Conistone, Yorkshire (West Riding), gentleman, third son and heir of Richard Tennant. He probably served with Lambert, who came from the same area, but his service and rank are unknown.
In Feb. 1645, whilst visiting his wife at Killinghall, he was captured; according to parliamentarian accounts, his wife was physically abused by the royalists.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 405.
Armies: Yorkshire
Terry, - - Terry
Lieutenant in Captain Bowen’s company in Richard Norton’s Hampshire regiment of foot in Dec. 1643, when he led the forlorn hope in the raid on royalist quarters at Romney.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 104.
Armies: Hampshire; Waller (Southern Association)
Terry, John John Terry
He is plausibly the Lieutenant Terry who in Dec. 1642 led the forlorn hope when Colonel Richard Norton’s force attacked Romsey, Hampshire. Captain-Lieutenant in the Surrey troop of horse of Colonels Samuel Jones/John Fielder, commanding the troop at the last siege of Basing House and at the siege of Donnington Castle. In Oct. 1645 he escorted the marquess of Winchester and about sixty other prisoners up to London, when he was noted as ‘a person who is reported to have done many good services’ (Godwin, Hants., 366); the sheriff of Hampshire was ordered to give him £50 to buy two good horses.
Godwin puts his family as of Dummer, Hampshire. But given that the troop of Jones and Fielder was part of the Farnham garrison, he is plausibly of the family of Terry of Farnham whose rather brief pedigree (which does not mention him) appears in the Surrey herald’s visitation of 1662. In Apr. 1646 he was described as ‘Captain Terry, of Surrey’.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 63, 104; Vis. Surrey, 1662, 111; Godwin, Hants., 140, 366.
Armies: Hampshire; Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Terry, Josiah Josiah Terry (1597-1667)
Lieutenant in Captain Joseph Paty’s company of volunteer foot. Paty’s company according to Underdown was transferred to Whiteway, yet by June 1643 Tery was probably serving in Captain Richard Savage’s company. Haberdasher of Dorchester, nephew of John White. Freeman, 1623; constable, 1628-9, mayor of Dorchester, 1649-50, 1661-62.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.521-2; Whiteway, Diary, 182; Underdown, Fire from Heaven, 201, 214, 233, 237.
Armies: Dorset
Tetlow, Edward Edward Tetlow
Lieutenant in Thomas Grantham’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 41.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Theoball, - - Theoball
Captain in the Colonel’s company in Sir Miles Hobart’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, but he did not then go on and serve in the New Model Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.40.
Armies: Eastern Association
Thickell, John John Thickell
Of Colton township, Bolton Percy parish, Yorkshire (West Riding). Cornet and quartermaster to Sir William Fairfax of Steeton.
References: Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’,105 [citing TNA, E121/3/3/, no. 24].
Armies: Yorkshire
Thistlethwaite, Francis [?] Francis [?] Thistlethwaite
Captain in Richard Norton’s Hampshire regiment of horse in 1643 and probably until its disbandment in 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 103.
Armies: Hampshire; Waller (Southern Association)
Thomas, Daniel Daniel Thomas
Captain in the regiment of dragoons commanded successively by Sir William Waller, James Kerr and James Holborne from at least 24 Apr. 1644 to 25 Apr. 1645.
Spring places him then in Sir Hardress Waller’s regiment of foot in the New Model Army.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 146.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); New Model Army
Thomas, Edward Edward Thomas
Captain. Thomas’s unit is uncertain, but from the date of his muster roll, 16 Apr. 1644, probably either in the Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment or the Southwark auxiliary regiment.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 5, ff. 600r.-601v.
Armies: Tower Hamlets/Southwark
Thomas, William William Thomas
Originally clerk, later ensign and lieutenant in the company of foot sent from Hull to Sir John Gell in Derbyshire in 1642 under the command of Captain Humphrey Mathews. When Mathews was recalled under arrest, the men of the company transferred to Gell’s own company in his regiment of foot. Thomas became lieutenant of the same.
References: Brighton, ‘Governor’, 1-3.
Armies: Derbyshire
Thomason, Francis Francis Thompson
In the list of the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642, he is shown as captain of a troop of horse. Captain in John Dalbier’s regiment of horse, probably from the formation of the regiment early in 1643 until it was broken up and reduced in spring 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 49; Peacock, Army lists, 54.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Thomlinson, - - Thomlinson
By autumn 1643, major in Vermuyden’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.101.
Armies: Eastern Association
Thomlinson [Tomlinson], Matthew Matthew Thomlinson [Tomlinson]
By Mar. 1644 and still there a year later, near the end of the regiment’s Eastern Association existence, captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army. Perhaps the Captain Tomlinson appointed by Cromwell to command the guard which conveyed money from the Newport Pagnell garrison to the New Model Army in spring 1645. Later captain, then major, in Pye’s New Model Army horse regiment, becoming its colonel in July 1647 after Pye left the army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.52; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 53, 63, 74, 83, 95, 108.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army.
Thompson, Alexander Alexander Tompson
Signatory to the Presbyterian, anti-New Model Army ‘Engagement or Declaration of the Officers and Souldiers of the County Palatine of Lancaster’, May 1648.
References: Lancashire military proceedings, 248-50.
Armies: Lancashire
Thompson, Francis Francis Thompson
Colonel of a fairly short-lived regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army, raised in spring 1643, which took part in the relief of Gloucester and first battle of Newbury in late summer 1643, but which was broken up in spring 1644. It seems to have been significantly under-strength for much of that period.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Thompson, George George Thompson
He began the civil war as a cavalry officer, probably as a captain of horse under the earl of Bedford and commander of a troop of horse in the earl of Essex’s Army, and by the beginning of 1643 was major-general of horse under the earl of Stamford. In Jan. 1644 he succeeded Richard Turner as colonel of his London-raised regiment of horse but just a few weeks later, at the battle of Cheriton, he was badly wounded and lost a leg and so had to relinquish his command.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 140.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Thompson, Robert Robert Thompson
Captain in Colonel Richard Turner’s regiment of London horse, and under its succeeding Colonel, George Thompson, from Aug./Sept. 1643 until 1 Jan. 1645. Very possibly colonel in the London militia by 1647.
References: TNA, SP28/132, Part 2, f. 1v.; Spring, Waller's Army., 136
Armies: London; Waller (Southern Association)
Thompson, Robert Robert Thompson
In 1642 ensign in the colonel’s company in the White regiment of the London Trained Bands (Colonel Isaac Penington). Captain in regiment of Colonel George Langham, 1643, raised from London Trained Bands.
Colonel in the London militia, subject of a pay warrant authorised by the Presbyterian London militia committee, dated 25 June 1647. From the phrasing of the warrant, he may be less their appointee than just dismissed by them and paid off. Possibly the same Robert Thompson who was captain in the regiment of horse of Richard Turner/George Thompson.
References: TNA, SP28/5/187; SP28/46, f. 33r.; Spring, Waller’s army, 167.
Armies: London
Thompson, William William Thompson
Ensign in Colonel William Willoughby’s Ratcliff Precinct company in Tower Hamlets, probably in 1644.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 4, f. 541r.
Armies: London; Waller (Southern Association)
Thomson, - - Thomson
At its muster in Nov. 1643, though no longer in the regiment in summer 1644, captain in Sir Thomas Barrington’s regiment of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.32.
Armies: Eastern Association
Thomson, - - Thomson
Probably not the same man who served in Barrington’s regiment of foot, captain in Sir John Norwich’s short-lived regiment of dragoons in the Eastern Association Army, which late in 1643 was transferred to Lord Grey of Groby and his army.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.76.
Armies: Eastern Association
Thoresby, John John Thoresby (1626-1679).
Of Sykehouse township, Fishlake parish, Yorkshire (West Riding), younger son of John Thoresby of Leeds, merchant and alderman (died 1661), younger brother of Captain Joseph Thoresby and father of the antiquary Ralph Thoresby. He served as cornet in his brother Joseph’s troop of horse.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 405.
Armies: Yorkshire
Thoresby, Joseph Joseph Thoresby
Of Sykehouse township, Fishlake parish, Yorkshire (West Riding), eldest son of John Thoresby of Leeds, merchant and alderman (died 1661), and his first wife Grace Chuddey. His younger brother John Thoresby was his cornet. Joseph married Catherine, daughter of John Routh of Pollington.
Lieutenant to Captain John Dent for 40 weeks (during which time he received no pay); for 16 of these weeks he was a prisoner (implying that he was captured with his captain at Bradford in July 1643). Fairfax granted him £20 on 2 Dec. 1643.
Later captain in Christopher Copley’s regiment of horse, where he still was in May 1645 when he again complained that he had received no pay for some time. He died 1665.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 405; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 108.
Armies: Yorkshire
Thoresby, Ralph Ralph Thoresby (died 1643)
Cousin of Joseph Thoresby and John Thoresby.
An ensign in the Fairfaxes’ Yorkshire Army, he was killed at the battle of Wakefield, 21 May 1643.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 405; Hopper, ‘Yorkshire parliamentarians’, 114.
Armies: Yorkshire
Thornehill, John John Thornehill
Captain in Lord Brooke’s regiment of foot, 27 Jan. to 6 Apr. 1643; captain in Colonel James Kerr’s [Carr’s] regiment of foot in Waller’s Southern Association Army. He was a member of Waller’s lifeguard (the colonel’s troop of Edward Cooke’s regiment of horse), 6 May to Oct. 1644.
He was listed as an officer present at the relief of Taunton, 16 Dec. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 25.
Armies: Lord Brooke; Waller (Southern Association)
Thornehill, Richard Richard Thornehill
Ensign in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642. Probably the Richard Thorn[e]hill who in spring 1645 was lieutenant in the regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army commanded successively by Colonels James Holborne and William Davies; unlike Davies himself and a few of his other officers, he did not transfer to the New Model Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 45; Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 149.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Thorneton, Richard Richard Thorenton (1624-1647)
Gentleman, of Tyersal, Yorkshire (West Riding), eldest son of Tempest Thorneton, gentleman, and his wife Margaret, daughter and heir of John Lockwood of Linthwaite, gentleman
Richard was a strong puritan. He married Rosamund, daughter of William Arthington of Arthington, esquire, whose brother Henry had married Mary, a daughter of Ferdinando, Lord Fairfax. This connection may explain why he was made colonel of foot in the Northern Army in spring 1644 when only twenty.
Thorneton was wounded at Marston Moor and was captured on 1 Mar. 1645 when the royalists relieved Pontefract. In autumn 1645 he commanded the siege of Skipton. His regiment was retained after June 1645 and almost certainly was still in existence in Jan. 1646.
Thorneton was appointed to the Northern Association committee for the West Riding in June 1645.
References: Jones, ‘War in the North’, 405.
Armies: Yorkshire; Northern Army (Fairfax); Northern Army (Poyntz)
Thorney [Thornee], John John Thorney [Thornee]
Captain in Mazieres’s short-lived regiment of horse in the Eastern Association Army, 1643-4 – there by Oct. 1643 and still there in Mar. 1644, after which there is little or no record of that regiment. May have later served in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.67.
Armies: Eastern Association
Thornhaugh [Thornhagh], Francis Francis Thornhaugh [Thornhagh] (1617/18-1648)
Second son of Sir John Thornhaugh (died 1637) of Fenton, Nottinghamshire, and his wife Mary, daughter of Francis Rodes, serjeant-at-law, of Barlborugh, Derbyshire. He married Elizabeth, second daughter and coheir of John St Andrew of Gotham, Nottinghamshire. Matriculated Magdalen College, Oxford, 8 May 1635, aged 17; admitted Inner Temple 1637.
High sheriff of Nottinghamshire, 1643 and an ally of John Hutchinson’s on the Nottinghamshire county committee.
Recruiter MP for East Retford, 1646-8.
‘By all accounts (even Lucy Hutchinson’s!) a dashing and attractive character’ (Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 67).
In late 1642/early 1643 Thornhaugh raised a regiment of horse, probably under commission from Lord Grey of Groby. The regiment for part of 1643 incorporated Henry Ireton’s troop of horse, which had served under the earl of Essex in summer 1642; Ireton became Thornhaugh’s Major. On 27 June 1643 Thornhaugh fought under Cromwell at Gainsborough; captured in the retreat, he escaped (by Lucy Hutchinson’s account, he was stripped of his arms and coat, and then basely wounded and left for dead by a royalist major whom he had wounded in the fight). Thornhaugh was again wounded when Rupert relieved Newark in Mar. 1644.
According to Lucy Hutchinson (whose husband commanded the regiment whilst Thornhaugh recovered from his wounds), Thornhaugh was a lax commander. John Hutchinson, she noted: ‘made the men live orderly, and march out upon designs more frequently than they used to do when their colonel was well, upon whose easiness they prevailed to do what they list; and some of them, who were great plunderers, were connived at’ (Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 1.279).
In 1645 and 1646 Thornhaugh’s regiment was part of Poyntz’s Northern Army. Thornhaugh led a charge at Rowton Moor (24 Sept. 1645) and was a signatory to the surrender of Newark on 6 May 1646.
The regiment continued in arms in 1647, and allied itself with the engagements and demands of the New Model Army and was added to the New Model payroll. In spring and early summer 1648 the regiment was stationed in the Welsh Marches (though references mention his officers rather than Thornhaugh himself). The regiment moved north to face the Scottish invasion, Thornhaugh joining Cromwell at Nottingham.
At Preston (17 Aug.) Thornhaugh’s was one of the two regiments of horse on Cromwell’s right wing. The following day Thornhaugh was ordered to take two or three regiments of horse to pursue the retreating Scots, and try and hold them whilst the main army came up. In the ensuing fight, according to Lucy Hutchinson: ‘he made such furious speed to set upon a company of Scotch lancers, that he was singly engaged and mortally wounded before it was possible for his regiment, though as brave men as ever drew sword, and too affectionate to their colonel to be slack in following him, to come time enough to break the fury of that body, which shamed not to unite all their force against one man: who yet fell not among them, but being faint and all covered with blood, of his enemies as well as his own, was carried off by his own men’.
She reported that he lived to the end of the day, saying on his deathbed, ‘I now rejoice to die, since God hath let me see the overthrow of this perfidious enemy’ (Firth and Davies, Regimental History, 1.281-2).
References: Vis. Notts.1662-64, 29; Firth and Davies, 1.271-82; Dore, Brereton letter books, 1.66-7; Hutchinson, Life, passim.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Nottinghamshire; Northern Army (Poyntz)
Thornhill, William William Thornhill
Lieutenant in Captain John Joyner’s company by 27 June 1644, and the following year promoted to captain of a newly-raised company in the Surrey regiment of foot of Samuel Jones/John Feilder.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 65.
Armies: Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Thornhull, Edward Edward Thornhull
Captain of foot. Presumably of family of Thornhull of Thornhull; perhaps Edward, second son of George Thornhull, aged under 9 in 1623.
References: Vis. Dorset, 1623, 91-2.
Armies: Dorset
Thornhull, William William Thornhull
Captain-Lieutenant in William Sydenham’s troop of horse, serving in the garrisons of Weymouth and Wareham, 26 Dec. 1643-7 Aug. 1644. Described as a gentleman. Possibly 4th son of George Thornhull of Thornhull, Dorset, and younger brother of Edward.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 233-4; Vis. Dorset, 1623, 92.
Armies: Dorset
Thornton, John John Thornton
‘A Fel-monger or Shepe Skin gatherer’ (BL, Harl. 986, p. 67).
Captain in the Southwark auxiliaries regiment in Sept. 1643.
Noted by Symonds of him and all the other captains of this regiment: ‘all these violent ○ [i.e. Roundhead]’ (BL, Harl. 986, p. 66).
Captain in the Southwark Auxiliaries (Colonel James Houblon) by autumn 1643, and first captain in that regiment on 16 Apr. 1644; lieutenant-colonel (by then under Colonel Daniel Sowton), Oct. 1646.
References: BL, Harl. 986, p. 66-7; TNA, SP28/131, Part 13, f. 5 r. & v., SP28/121A, Part 5, f. 646r.; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 94-6, 317.
Armies: Southwark
Thornton, William William Thornton
Of Mancetter, Warwickshire. He served in the Coventry regiment of foot (Colonels John Barker/Thomas Willoughby) from 30 Sept. 1642, and served in the company of Major Gamaliel Purefoy; probably by Mar. 1643, he was its lieutenant. In Sept. 1645 he became captain of the company previously commanded by William Colemore. His company was at the siege of Lichfield Close in 1646; his lieutenant, Miller, was killed in a royalist sally on the siege works.
Commissioned major of foot in the Warwickshire militia under Colonel William Purefoy, 27 June 1650. Also a sequestration commissioner from the early 1650s, and a radical figure in the local politics of 1659.
References: TNA, SP28/136, Part 53B, f. 107r.; TNA, SP28/136, Part 3, ff. 369v., 373r.; Hughes, Warwickshire, 186, 298, 300, 330, 334n., 337; CSPD, 1650, 507; Brereton Staffs., 274-5.
Armies: Warwickshire
Thorogood, Thomas Thomas Thorogood
Captain. An officer in the regiment of foot of Oliver Lord St John/Thomas Essex.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 6.649; Peacock, Army Lists, 33.
Armies: Bristol
Thorpe, Robert Robert Thorpe
Lieutenant-Colonel of Edward Cooke’s regiment of foot, from its formation in Aug. 1643 until Jan. 1644, at which point he left, raised a troop of horse in Sussex and, as major, joined the regiment of horse commanded by Sir Richard Grenville and, after his defection, by Colonel Edward Cooke.
It is difficult to unscramble Thorpe’s quite complicated service history in various southern horse regiments, but he is probably also the Robert Thorpe who in 1644 was lieutenant-colonel in the London-raised regiment originally of Colonel Richard Turner but by then commanded by Colonel George Thompson, until the latter was severely wounded at the battle of Cheriton (Mar. 1644), whereupon Thorpe effectively took temporary command of Thompson’s troop and of the regiment.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 29, 58, 140.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Thorpe, William William Thorpe
Lieutenant in the earl of Peterborough’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 28.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Throckmorton, Job Job Throckmorton
Ensign in Thomas Grantham’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 41.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Throckmorton, William William Throckmorton
By summer 1644 major, and by the end of the year lieutenant-colonel, of Edward Harley’s regiment of foot. By summer 1649 he was serving as lieutenant-colonel of George Cooke’s newly-formed New Model Army regiment.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 62; Wanklyn, New Model Army, 160.
Armies: Waller; Gloucestershire; New Model Army
Tichborne, Robert Robert Tichborne (c.1611-1682)
Born in London c. 1611, he followed his father into the Skinners’ Company in the 1630s and was later described as ‘a linnen draper by the little Conduct [Conduit] in Chepe Side’ (BL, Harl. 986, p. 20).
Captain in the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Sir John Wollaston) in Apr. 1642 (noted as fourth captain shortly after); by Sept. 1643 first captain of the same regiment, by when he was also lieutenant-colonel of a London auxiliary regiment, possibly White. He and his men were probably part of Essex’s force which relieved Gloucester and fought at the first battle of Newbury in late summer 1643.
His principal role, however, was as an active and radical City politician and administrator, sitting on many London committees, including the militia committee. He was part of the high court which tried and condemned Charles I and he signed the death warrant. He was one of the most active members of the Nominated Assembly in 1653 and was lord mayor of London in 1656-7. He was tried and condemned to death as a regicide after the Restoration and although he was reprieved, he spent the rest of his life in prison. He died in the Tower in 1682.
References: Oxford DNB; Overton 1642; Thrale 1642; BL, Harl. 986, p. 20.
Armies: London
Tidler, - - Tidler
Captain in Colonel Richard Hardy’s Kentish regiment, possibly the Scraye Lathe regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 75.
Armies: Kent; Waller (Southern Association)
Till, James James Till
Till evidently did not join Sir Thomas Myddelton’s army when it was raised in London in spring 1644. However, he had become Myddelton’s lieutenant-colonel of horse by early Sept. 1644. He then forced the pace of the surrender of Montgomery Castle by Lord Herbert of Cherbury, who had already provisionally agreed to yield, entering the castle with a strong force and a petard about midnight, and refusing to withdraw whilst negotiating terms. Later that month Myddelton sent Till down to London to represent the situation in North Wales to the Committee of Both Kingdoms, requesting that they send him back with a troop of horse. Sir Thomas asked his cousin and treasurer Andrew Myddelton to let Till have £10 or £20 should he need it, and on 23 Oct. 1644 Till signed a receipt for £10.
This is the last certain placing of Till in the parliamentarian army and there is no evidence of Till as one of Myddelton’s officers in Sir William Brereton’s letterbook the following year. It is possible therefore that he left the army when he came down to London or was killed/died shortly afterwards, though it is just possible that he is the by then royalist Colonel Till who was noted as being captured at the fall of Colchester in late summer 1648.
References: CSPD, 1644, 533, 534-5; Herbert correspondence, ed. W.J. Smith, Board of Celtic Studies, University of Wales History and Law Series, no. 21 (1963), 115-7.
Armies: North Wales
Tilley, Nathaniel Nathaniel Tilley
On 27 Jan. 1643 parliament ordered the earl of Holland to commission Tilley as captain of the newly-formed Tower Hamlets Trained Bands regiment for St Leonard, Shoreditch. Still captain in that regiment when his company was mustered 16 Apr. 1644, but no longer there by 22 Oct. 1646.
References: JHC, 2.926; JHL, 5.574; TNA, SP28/121A, Part 5, ff. 587r.-589v.
Armies: Tower Hamlets
Tindale, Richard Richard Tindale
Lieutenant in Captain John Carmichael’s troop in Hans Behre’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 25.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Tindall, Ambrose Ambrose Tindall
Lieutenant in Sir John Meyrick’s regiment of foot in the earl of Northumberland’s Army against the Scots. In summer 1642 Tindall was lieutenant in Captain William Roberts’s company in Charles Essex’s regiment of foot in Lord Wharton’s Army designed for Ireland.
Listed as captain of the earl of Essex’s firelocks in the published list of the latter’s army in 1642, and he was paid as a captain in Essex’s own regiment for late Sept. and the first half of Oct. 1642.
By mid-Oct. 1642 captain in John Middleton’s regiment of dragoons, and still captain of dragoons on 22 Dec.
By July 1644 Tindall was a reformado captain of foot.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 81, 70, 26; TNA, SP28/2b/243, 425, SP28/4/314, SP28/17/66.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Tindall, Deane Deane Tindall
At its muster in Nov. 1643, lieutenant-colonel in Colonel Thomas Honeywood’s regiment of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.32.
Armies: Eastern Association
Tinne, Morgan Morgan Tinne
Captain in Viscount Saye and Sele’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 30.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Tirlington, John John Tirlington
Probably captain in the Green (Cripplegate) regiment, London auxiliaries (Colonel Christopher Whichcott) in 1643; by Oct. 1646 lieutenant-colonel in the same regiment (by then under Colonel William Webb). A rather obscure piece of abuse in the Presbyterian satire, A case for the City-spectacles (1647), 4, implies that he was an Independent.
References: Spring, Waller's Army; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 318.
Armies: London
Tirwhit, George George Tirwhit
Reformado lieutenant of foot on 2 Aug. 1642. Shortly afterwards lieutenant in Sir William Fairfax’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: TNA, SP28/1d/481; Peacock, Army lists, 44.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Tissard, - - Tissard
A captain serving with Sir William Waller’s Army in June 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, app. 2, p. 3.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Tisser, Jo. Jo. Tisser
Captain-Lieutenant in the colonel’s company in the Westminster auxiliary regiment (Colonel James Prince) when it was mustered on 13 May 1644, part of Sir James Harrington’s London brigade serving with Waller.
References: TNA, SP28/121A, Part 4, f. 550r.
Armies: Westminster
Titus, Silias Silias Titus (1622/23-1704).
Grandson of an Italian immigrant, and son of Sylas Tyto of Field Lane, Holborn, and Bushey, Hertfordshire, a member of the Salters’ Company and leading London soapboiler, and his wife Constance Colley.
An officer employed in the Hertfordshire militia, infantry and then the Green regiment of horse.
Captain in Thomas Ayloffe’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army by Jan. 1645. He was at the siege of Donnington Castle in Oct. 1644.
Unlike several other officers of that regiment, Titus did not join the New Model Army. In Feb. 1647 he was one of the guard which picked up the king from the Scots commissioners at Durham and escorted him to Holmby House, where on 3 June he was one of the officers present (under the command of Colonel Richard Graves) when Cornet Joyce seized the king. He carried the news to parliament: the Commons the following day granted him £50 to buy a horse. He became a royalist – and a conspirator – when serving in the king’s household at Carisbrooke Castle.
MP for Ludgershall (31 July 1660), Lostwithiel (3 Feb. 1670), Hertfordshire (Mar, 1679), Huntingdonshire (Oct. 1679, 1681) and Ludlow (14 Jan. 1691). As MP, where he became a Whig, he was often called colonel, after his rank in the Cinque Ports militia in the 1660s; he was also governor of Deal Castle, 1661-9, and a captain of foot in the Admiralty regiment, 1666-7.
Remembered by Jonathan Swift as ‘the greatest rogue in England’ (HoP: The Commons, 1690-1715, 5.647).
References: Oxford DNB; Spring, Eastern Association, 1.9; JHC, 5.198; Davies, Eastern Association, 91; Thomson, Hertfordshire, xxxiii-iv, xvlii, 23-4, 43-5, 229-30; HoP: The Commons, 1660-1690, 2.570-4; HoP: The Commons, 1690-1715, 5.645-7; A. Thompson, The Impact of the First Civil War on Hertfordshire, 1642-47 (2007), passim but especially 229-30.
Armies: Hertfordshire; Eastern Association
Todd, Robert Robert Todd
By late summer 1644, shortly before the death of Major Pont and the reducation of his troop, lieutenant in Pont’s troop in William Purefoy’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 121.
Armies: Warwickshire
Tolhurst, Jeremiah Jeremiah Tolhurst
Captain in Ralph Weldon’s regiment of foot by Apr. 1645, and remained with it when became part of the New Model Army. He continued as one of its three remaining original captains after the regiment’s officers had split over the question of going to Ireland in 1647. When the regiment mutinied at the end of Oct. or early Nov. 1647, and marched to Corkbush Field, Tolhurst killed one or two men whilst defending the regimental paychest; wounded, he was confined to quarters by the mutineers. By Jan. 1649, when the regiment, now Sir Arthur Hesilrige’s, was stationed at Newcastle and Tynemouth, Tolhurst had been promoted its major. After Worcester Tolhurst commanded eight companies of the regiment garrisoning Carlisle. By Apr. 1658, by when the remaining companies of Hesilrige’s regiment had been formed into a new regiment under Charles Howard, Tolhurst was still major and deputy-governor of Carlisle. With the fall of the Protectorate, Hesilrige was re-instated, and Tolhurst demoted to Captain.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 153; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 2.452, 456-7, 459. 461, 522-3.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association); Kent; New Model Army
Tompkins, Peter? Peter? Tompkins
By the beginning of 1645 lieutenant in Axtell’s company in John Pickering’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, remaining in that role with the company and regiment when it transferred to the New Model Army in spring 1645 but he was killed in the battle of Naseby in June 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.85; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 60.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Tompson, Samuel Samuel Tompson
A captain in Sir Thomas Myddelton’s brigade, serving from, or before, May 1644, until, or beyond, mid-May 1645. Tompson’s troop was deployed in the capture of Oswestry, June 1644, and in Jan. 1645, based in Montgomeryshire, it numbered just 15 men, all ranks.
References: Phillips, Wales, 2.173-5; TNA, SP28/346, nos. 73, 287, unnumbered; National Library of Wales, Chirk Castle Ms. 1/Biii, 93.
Armies: North Wales
Tomson, - - Tomson
Ensign in Captain Charles O’Hara’s company in Lawrence Crawford’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army by 15 July until at least 26 Nov. 1644. Possibly the officer who served on the Isle of Wight in the later 1640s, before serving as a lieutenant, then a captain, in Ewer’s New Model Army regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.16; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 99.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army?
Tooley, - - Tooley
Captain in the earl of Manchester’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army (succeeding Captain Paris in command of his company), by 15 July 1644 until the regiment was disbanded.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.63.
Armies: Eastern Association
Toulnson, Clement Clement Toulnson
Commissioned captain of a troop of horse in Gilbert Ireland’s regiment of Lancashire militia, 22 Mar. 1650.
References: CSPD, 1650, 505; Lancs. war effort, 290.
Armies: Lancashire
Tovett, - - Tovett
Corporal, and by 13 Mar. 1644 cornet, in the colonel’s troop in John Middleton’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 96.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association)
Tovey, William William Tovey
Captain of horse under the earl of Denbigh, and appears in the surviving accounts of that army from 11 Aug. 1643 to 8 May 1644. By Jan. 1644 he was in Staffordshire and in the summer marched in Denbigh’s Army. He took part in the storming of Cholmondeley House, near Whitchurch, in July. On 10 Aug. 1644 the weekly pay of various parishes was allocated to Tovey’s troops ‘when they shall be in this County service’ (Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 162). On 7 May 1645 the Committee ordered, ‘that Captain Tovey (in respect his Troope is wholly squandred and lost, and that there is not horse in the Country to recruite nor neede of more officers, the contribution of the Country not being able to beare these we have already) be dismist his attendance here for Command and if he stay to have no more allowance from the Committee’ (Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 303-4).
References: TNA, SP28/131, part 12, ff. 4, 26; Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, 28, 41, 130, 162, 303-4; Great Victories obtained by the Earle of Denbigh (1644).
Armies: Earl of Denbigh; Staffordshire
Towell, - - Towell
Lieutenant in Major Sir Thomas Piers’s troop in the Kentish horse (1644) by 23 Aug. 1642.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 69.
Armies: Kent, Waller (Southern Association)
Traharne, James James Traharne
Captain of horse. He was paid money for himself and his troop in the Gloucester accounts on 12 Apr. 1643 by Sir William Waller’s order.
References: TNA, SP28/129, part 5, fol. 4r.
Armies: Gloucestershire
Travers [Trevis], John John Travers [Trevis]
Of Horton Hall, near Tarvin, Cheshire. A major in Cheshire, he had been Colonel Leigh’s major, but may have been omitted from list of 30 Apr. 1645 because by then he no longer had any troops under his command and was serving as Brereton’s emissary. A pay warrant of 4 Nov. 1646 directed payment of £30 to Major John Travers, in part of his pay for service done as major to Colonel Leigh in the garrison of Northwich and elsewhere, £10 of which was to be paid in convenient time, the rest when the army is disbanded.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1.327; TNA, SP28/224, f. 173.
Armies: Cheshire
Treest, Thomas Thomas Treest
Lieutenant in the earl of Peterborough’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 28.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Trefusis, John John Trefusis
Trefusis was a colonel at Plymouth involved in a dispute with others colonels including James Wardlaw and Sir Shilston Calmady. To judge from the involvement of Wardlaw, the dispute must have been between Sept. 1643 and Jan. 1644, and it was heard by the Commons in May 1644. In the late 1640s he was a county committeeman in Cornwall, and whilst there are a number of references to him in JHC and JHL, there is only this early one to him as a colonel.
References: JHC, 3.510-1, Coate, Cornwall, 29, 32, 154, 224, 229, 266.
Armies: Devon; Cornwall
Trenchard, Sir Thomas Sir Thomas Trenchard
Knight, of Wolverton, Charminster, who became a prominent committeeman, or possibly his son Thomas. Colonel of [Trained Band] regiment References to his regiment are dated early Sept. 1642: presumably the grounds for Peachey and Turton taking it as a Trained Band regiment. Sir Thomas, MP for Dorset from Nov. 1645, was secluded at Pride’s Purge, and left the Dorset committee. No evidence found of an active military role on his part.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, passim; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.503; Underdown, Pride’s Purge, 307-8; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1660 (forthcoming).
Armies: Dorset
Trendall, T. T. Trendall
A colonel serving in the Plymouth garrison, 1645-6.
References: Worth, History of Plymouth, 134.
Armies: Devon
Trevor, Daniel Daniel Trevor
In 1642, probably at and from its formation, lieutenant in Lord Robartes’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Trew, Thomas Thomas Trew
Lieutenant in Lieutenant-Colonel Benjamin Norton’s company in Thomas Ayloffe’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army, Apr. 1645.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.8.
Armies: Eastern Association
Trobridge, George George Trobridge (died 1645)
Probably George Trobridge (born 1597/8) of Trobridge, Devon, eldest son of George Trobridge (1564-1631) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Walter Dowrish of Dowrish.
In Oct. 1642 Trobridge was captain of a Devon Trained Band Company. By Jan. 1643 he was a captain in Sir John Northcote’s Devon volunteer regiment of foot, in which he served at the siege of Exeter.
By 1645 Trobridge was a colonel in the Plymouth garrison. On 16 Oct. 1645 Commissary Slade was reimbursed £20 for paying for Colonel Trobridge’s tombstone.
References: Vis. Devon, 738; Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 4.424-5; Worth, ‘Plymouth siege accounts’, 234.
Armies: Devon
Trucston, William William Trucston
Cornet in Captain Simon Farmer’s troop of horse, mentioned in receipts of 13 June 1644, 6 July 1644 and undated from Comissary David Moris to Simond Farmer for his troopers and officers, including Quartermaster George Hinkes and Cornet William Trucston.
References: TNA, SP28/346, no. 281.
Armies: North Wales
Trunke, William William Trunke
Captain in Sir William Fairfax’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Amy lists, 44.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Tuchet, Thomas Thomas Tuchet
Described as lieutenant in Henry Brooke’s regiment of foot in the 30 Apr. 1645 muster list for Bereton’s Cheshire Army (though probably the rank is in error for captain, as he is so described in a letter of complaint by Colonel John Booth about Tuchet’s raising men or money in the townships in the division allotted to Booth.) Constables’ accounts for Dutton (Bucklow Hundred) for All Saints’ Day 1644 to 25 July 1645 note that they paid £3 5s 4d to ‘Capt. Tuchett’s soldiers’ for pay on seven occasions (BL, Harl. Ms. 2128, f. 151r. and v.). Dore thinks he was probably the second son of William Tutchet of Nether Whitley in Bucklow Hundred.
References: Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 223-4, 324-32; BL, Harl. Ms. 2128, f. 151r. and v.
Armies: Cheshire
Tucker, William William Tucker
Second captain of the Red regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Thomas Atkins) in summer 1642.
References: Thrale 1642.
Armies: London
Tudman, Humphrey Humphrey Tudman
Of Walsall, Staffordshire. Brother-in-law of Colonel John Fox and Major Reighnold Fox. Tudman was a trained bandsman for the borough of Walsall in 1640. He became captain of horse in John Fox’s regiment of horse and dragoons in summer 1644. After Fox’s death, Tudman maintained the former’s children despite, as he petitioned the committee for compounding with delinquents, being himself almost ruined by the loss of his stock and trade in the service of parliament.
References: Hopper, ‘Fox’, 100, 102-3, 109.
Armies: Earl of Denbigh; Warwickshire
Tuke, Edward Edward Tuke
On 13 Feb. 1643 Tuke was ensign in the company of Major John Lobb in the Portsmouth garrison regiment commanded by Sir William Lewis.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 61.
Armies: Hampshire
Tulbin [?Tutchen], - - Tulbin [?Tutchen]
Ensign, Weymouth garrison, 1651.
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 337.
Armies: Dorset
Tullidasse, Alexander Alexander Tullidasse
In 1642, probably at and from its formation, ensign in Lord Robartes’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Turgis, - - Turgis
Lieutenant in Captain Thomas Bettesworth’s troop in Richard Norton’s regiment of horse which served with the Massey brigade in the West Country in 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 103.
Armies: Hampshire; Massey Brigade
Turkington, - - Turkington
Lieutenant in Lord Mandeville’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 36.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Turner, Edward Edward Turner
Ensign, later lieutenant, in Mark Grimes’s company in Edward Montagu’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army. Thus he was probably the Edward Turner who later in the 1640s served as lieutenant in Grimes’s company in what by then was Lambert’s New Model Army regiment of foot.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.69; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 118.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Turner, Henry Henry Turner
By spring 1644 and still there in autumn 1646 captain in the Westminster Auxiliaries Trained Bands regiment of foot (Colonel James Prince).
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 161.
Armies: Westminster
Turner, John John Turner
Sergeant of John Bromhall’s company of dragoons from its first mustering in London, listed as such on the first list of Bromhall’s officers; Bromhall recorded how he sent £1 11s ‘by Sergeant Turner’ to his soldiers ‘to Keepe them in Quiet’ (BL, Harl. 2128; ff. 20-33). By 20 May 1643 he may have been promoted cornet (although in Malbon’s account of a fierce skirmish at Lappington, near Wem in Shropshire, when Turner was captured alongside Bromhall, Malbon describes him still as ‘Seriant Turner’), rising to lieutenant by summer 1644 (when on 19 Aug. and 28 Sept. Bromhall directed two payments of £5 made to ‘Lieut. Turner for service done under my command’). However, by 2 Nov. 1644 the lieutenant of Bromhall’s troop was Cumberbach.
References: BL, Harl. 2128; ff. 20-33; Cheshire tracts, 76-7.
Armies: Cheshire
Turner, Richard Richard Turner
Captain-Lieutenant of the colonel’s company in William Jephson’s regiment of foot between at least 7 Dec. 1644 and 15 May 1645.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 71.
Armies: Hampshire
Turner, Richard Richard Turner
Captain in Sir William Waller’s regiment of horse.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 143.
Armies: Waller (Southern Association)
Turner, Richard Richard Turner
Eldest son of Richard Turner of London, alderman’s deputy in 1634 and political activist in the 1640s, and his wife Alice, daughter of William Jeffrey; elder brother of Samuel Turner. By 1634 he had married Martha, daughter of Alexander Prescot, alderman of London. He was a draper.
Captain in the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Sir John Wollaston) in 1642 (senior captain in summer 1642), and Major by Apr. 1643. In Aug. 1643 he moved to the command of a second City regiment of horse, as Major (22 Sept.-23 Oct. 1643) and colonel (23 Oct. 1643-3 Mar. 1644). The regiment initially patrolled the London area, in Sept.-Oct. it went to Windsor Castle and thereafter formed part of Skippon’s brigade which captured and garrisoned Newport Pagnell. On 3 Mar. the regiment was formally reduced and Turner ceased to command as its expense meant it was transferred (upon an advance of £2,000 by the Committee of the West) to Waller’s Army.
A parliamentarian activist in 1641-2, and like his father he became a political Independent. In 1643 and 1644, a member of the Salters’ Hall Committee which sought to raise militant citizen volunteers outside the orbit of the City’s militia committee, and was added to the militia committee when terms were struck between the two in July 1643. He returned to the militia committee in Sept. 1647 after the army had overturned the Presbyterian domination of the City.
References: Overton 1642; Thrale 1642; Nagel, ‘London militia’, 314, 112-3, 153-6; Vis. London, 1633-5, 2.301; Brenner, Merchants, 398, 399, 407, 447, 455, 456, 480, 482, 484, 492, 511, 513.
Armies: London
Turner, Robert Robert Turner
Captain in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army by late Aug. 1642 and still there in Jan. 1643. He appears as Essex’s captain of firelocks in the printed list of 1642 and is probably the captain of dragoons who received pay for his officers and men in Oct.-Nov. 1642.
References: TNA, SP28/1a/279, SP28/2a/237, SP28/2b/424, SP28/3b/299, SP 28/5/36; Peacock, Army lists, 26.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Turner, Samuel Samuel Turner
Probably reformado officer of horse: lieutenant in John Were’s regiment of horse, raised in Devon in Summer 1644 when the earl of Essex marched into the county (pay warrant: 16 Sept. 1644).
References: TNA, SP28/18/77.
Armies: Devon; Earl of Essex; reformado
Turner, Samuel Samuel Turner
Second son of Richard Turner of London, alderman’s deputy in 1634 and political activist in the 1640s, and his wife Alice, daughter of William Jeffrey; younger brother of Richard Turner.
Lieutenant in the Yellow regiment, London Trained Bands (Colonel Thomas Adams) in summer 1642. Probably also the Samuel Turner who served as a captain in Skippon’s London-raised regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Thrale 1642; Vis. London, 1633-5, 2.301.
Armies: London
Turner, William William Turner
At its muster in Nov. 1643 and still in the regiment in summer 1644, captain in Sir Thomas Barrington’s regiment of foot formed from the Essex militia, part of the Eastern Association Army that contributed to the siege of Reading in spring 1643, the siege of Greenland House in summer 1644 and probably to some other actions in which the army was involved.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 1.32.
Armies: Eastern Association
Turney, - - Turney
Captain of the company in Thomas Carr’s regiment of foot garrisoning Cowes Castle in 1642.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 24.
Armies: Isle of Wight
Turney, Isaac Isaac Turney
Lieutenant in Lord Wharton’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army in 1642.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 31.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Turpin, Daniel Daniel Turpin
In Apr. 1645, on the eve of its disbandment, lieutenant of what by then was Robert Dales’s company in the regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army by then commanded by Sir Thomas Hoogan, previously by Sir John Palgrave.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.81.
Armies: Eastern Association
Turpin, William William Turpin
Initially in Richard Browne’s regiment of dragoons, and a gentleman of arms in Mar. 1643. He was a captain in Sir William Waller’s/James Holborne’s regiment of dragoons between at least Sept. 1643 and Dec. 1644. Probably the William Turpin who was later a captain in John Okey’s regiment of dragoons.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 145.
Armies: Earl of Essex; Waller (Southern Association); New Model Army
Turpine, Robert Robert Turpine
Captain. Executed at Exeter by the royalists. Order for provision for his three daughters made by Dorset committee, 25 Sept. 1646.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 10.
Armies: Dorset
Turpintine [Toppenden, Tupperdene], John? John? Turpintine [Toppenden, Tupperdene] (died 1647)
Lieutenant in John Hewson’s company in John Pickering’s regiment of foot in the Eastern Association Army. He transferred with the regiment to the New Model Army and became a captain. He remained a captain in the regiment until his death in late 1647.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.84; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 59, 71, 81, 91, 104.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Turton, - - Turton
Present with Colonel Fox and Captain Hunt at the engagement on Stourbridge Heath in Mar. 1644. By that summer captain in the earl of Denbigh’s regiment of foot operating in Shropshire. He probably formally transferred to the Salop county forces and was a captain of foot in the attack on and capture of Shrewsbury in Feb. 1645. His company then assisted Brereton’s forces operating in Staffordshire in spring 1645, finding £87 for his own and his company’s pay, later reimbursed to him: ‘Paid to Captain Turton by an assignment upon the excise for himself and company of Salop foot who had no pay for that service from Salop.’
References: Warws. RO, C2017/C9/73, C2017/C10/3b; Carr and Atherton, Brereton Staffs., 324, 329; A More Exact and Particular Relation of the taking of Shrewsbury, than hath hithero been published. With the manner and performance thereof by Lieutenant Colonell William Reinking (1645).
Armies: Earl of Denbigh, Shropshire
Turtur, Edward Edward Turtur
Ensign, Weymouth garrison, 1651.
References: Bayley, Civil War in Dorset, 337.
Armies: Dorset
Turvey, Isaac Isaac Turvey
Lieutenant and by 1645 captain in the earl of Essex’s own regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army and still there when the regiment and Army were disbanded.
References: Wanklyn, New Model Army, 1. 147.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Tutchen, John John Tutchen
Captain.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 387.
Armies: Dorset
Tutchin, - - Tutchin
Chaplain to Colonel Samuel Jones’s regiment of Surrey foot, 5 July 1643 to 30 Sept. 1644.
References: Spring, Waller’s army,66; TNA, SP28/135/1.
Armies: Surrey; Waller (Southern Association)
Tuthill [Tuttle], Robert Robert Tuthill [Tuttle]
Tuthill was a captain in the earl of Denbigh’s Army (pay warrants and receipts witnessing his service from 8 Sept. 1643 to 16 Mar. 1644 survive). He was in Denbigh’s Army when it took Rushall, Staffordshire in May 1644, and was made its governor. In Sept. 1644 the royalist governor of Dudley attempted to suborn Tuthill to surrender Rushall, but Tuthill turned their correspondence against him: after a temporizing which yielded the return of prisoners-of-war, he fired on royalists who came to the gate expecting it to be opened, whilst their letters were published in London. Following the fall of Dudley in May 1646, Sir William Brereton appointed him as its governor, with his company of foot and troop of horse as garrison. In Nov. 1645 Tuthill wrote to Stone at Stafford about royalist movements, and a couple of days later the two men’s forces, combined with Captain Peter Backhouse’s, attacked a royalist force at Stourbridge, taking about 100 horse and 80 prisoners.
Tuthill later submitted his accounts as governor of Rushall and Dudley, for the period June 1644-Sept. 1646. He claimed pay as captain of foot and captain of horse, both 1 June 1644-26 Sept. 1646, and his expenses included £448 for raising the troop of 56 horse.
References: TNA, SP28/131, Part 12, ff. 11, 16; CSPD 1644, 178; CSPD 1644-5, 1; CSPD 1645-7, 474; Pennington and Roots, Committee at Stafford, lxvii, 133, 148, 223-4, 228, 269, 316, 331-4; Dore, Brereton letter books, 2. 136-7, 260, 266; A True Relation of Sir William Wallers Advance (1644), 2-6; Carr and Atherton, Brereton Staffs., 29, 90, 239, 337.
Armies: Earl of Denbigh; Staffordshire
Tweedy, Alexander Alexander Tweedy
Lieutenant of horse in Waller’s Western Association Army, 1 Feb. to 17 Mar. 1643. He was then a reformado until 11 Mar. 1644 when he was made captain-lieutenant of the colonel’s (and only) troop in Colonel Edward Apsley’s short-lived and abortive regiment of horse in Waller’s Southern Association Army.
References: Spring, Waller’s army, 15.
Armies: Waller; Waller (Southern Association)
Twisleton, George George Twisleton
Younger son of John Twisleton of Barlow Hall, near Selby, Yorkshire and his wife Margreat Constable of Drax Abbey, and brother to Colonel Philip Twisleton. How he came to serve with Myddelton is unclear, but his absence from 1644 warrants confirms the view of Tucker and Dore that he did not come to the North West in 1643 or 1644. They suspect that he came to the northern Marches in spring 1645 with Yorkshire horse. First appears in Brereton’s letter books with a date consistent with a surviving pay warrant, in Apr. 1645, when he was commanding (with Elliott and Mason) a force of Myddelton’s near Wrexham, falling back on Oswestry in the face of the king’s advance. By autumn 1645 Twisleton (as lieutenant-colonel) was with Colonel John Carter regarded as commanding the Montgomeryshire horse and foot. He was still apparently stationed at Oswestry. He marched with 200 Montgomery horse to Whitchurch as part of an attacking force on 21 Dec. 1645 and just before fall of Chester was sent to blockade Hawarden Castle.
In Feb. 1646 he certified that he had borrowed £20 the previous Mar. or Apr. from Lieutenant-Colonel Goldegue (or Goldegne) towards paying his soldiers and gave a former acquittance to him; witnessed 1 Feb. 1645[/6].
He married a Welsh heiress, Mary, daughter of William Glynne of Lleiar, Caernarfonshire. MP for Anglesey in the parliaments of 1654, 1656 and 1658-9. In Jan. or Feb. 1660 he was appointed colonel of a regiment of foot by the Rump; initially confirmed in the position by Monck in Feb. but then demoted to lieutenant-colonel under Sir Edward Massey in July. The regiment was disbanded in Oct.
Commisioner for the propagation of the gospel (1650) and assessment commissioner for Anglesey, Caernarfonshire, Denbighshire and Flint.
References: A.C. Evans, ‘George Twisleton, 1617/8-1667’, Transactions of the Caernarvonshire Historical Society, vol. 62 (2001), 23-58; Dore, Brereton letter books, 1. 144-5;Tucker, Denbighshire Officers, 145-6; Firth and Davies, Regimental history, 1.345-6; TNA, SP28/346, no. 304.
Armies: North Wales
Twistleton, Philip Philip Twistleton
Served as a junior officer in the regiment of horse raised to defend Lincolnshire in autumn 1642. When that regiment, under Edward Rossiter, became attached to the Eastern Association Army, Twistleton served as captain, continuing in that role when the regiment transferred to the New Model Army in spring 1645. Later promoted to major and in autumn 1648 he became colonel and succeeded Rossiter as commander of the regiment.
References: Spring, Eastern Association, 2.91; Wanklyn, New Model Army, I, 52, 62, 73, 83, 94, 106.
Armies: Eastern Association; New Model Army
Tyer [Tyrer], [?]Edward [?]Edward Tyer [Tyrer]
Lieutenant in Colonel Francis Hamond’s regiment of foot in the earl of Northumberland’s Army sent against the Scots in 1640. Intended as lieutenant in Captain Kilmady’s company in Lord Wharton’s own regiment of foot in Wharton’s Army raised for service in Ireland in 1642. Instead, by Aug./Sept. 1642 he was captain in Sir John Merrick’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: TNA, SP28/2b/505, 542; Peacock, Army lists, 68, 28, 90.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Tynte, Charles Charles Tynte
Captain-Lieutenant. This is a Somerset family name, but Charles’s name does not appear in the Tynte pedigrees of 1623 or 1672. The main line, the Tyntes of Chelvey, near Nailsea, were committed royalists.
References: Somerset Visitation, 1623, 113; Somerset Visitation, 1672, 118-9; Underdown, Somerset, 90-1.
Armies: Somerset: Col. Alexander Popham’s Regt. of Foot
Tyre [Tire, Tirre], Nathaniel Nathaniel Tyre [Tire, Tirre]
Cornet in May 1643, identified by Peachey and Turton as in Sydenham’s troop of horse. Later promoted lieutenant. County committee order, 29 Oct. 1646, states that Nathaniel Tyre, gentleman, has served parliament in this county as lieutenant to a troop of horse under Colonel Butler in the Wareham garrison, and under Colonel Fitzjames, sheriff, from 28 May 1645-27 Oct. 1646, 18 months and 11 days, serving faithfully and judiciously. Pay of £26 18s. 0d. per month, most unpaid and £410 19s. 10d. owing to him, for which he has the public faith of the kingdom. However, by 21 Jan. 1647 his state is even worse, and he petitions the committee that he has a wife and 3 small children; that he is much indebted and has pawned away all his goods, and has no means to subsist and carry his family beyond the seas. Committee allows him £110 free quarter and the remaining £300 to be paid as soon as possible by the county treasurer.
References: Peachey and Turton, Fall of the West, 5.532; Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 44, 153.
Armies: Dorset
Tyrrill [Tyrrell], Thomas Thomas Tyrrill [Tyrrell] (1593/4-1672)
Of Castle Thorpe, Buckinghamshire younger son of Sir Edward Tyrrill (died 1606) of Thornton, Buckinghamshire, with his second wife, Margaret (died 1632), daughter of John Aston of Aston, Cheshire, and widow of Thomas Egerton. He married (1) Frances, daughter of Thomas Saunders of Long Marston, Hertfordshire, widow of Richard Grenville of Wotton Underwood, Buckinghamshire; (2) Jane, the widow of Francis Windebank, royalist governor of Bletchington House, Oxfordshire, in 1655; (3) Bridget (died 1685), daughter of Sir Edward Harrington, second baronet, of Ridlington, Rutland and widow of Sir John Gore of Gilston, Hertfordshire, in 1662.
Tyrrill entered the Inner Temple in 1612 and was called to the bar in 1621.
He helped John Hampden raise forces in Buckinghamshire in 1642, and himself raised a troop of 60 horse whose command he gave to his son Thomas Tyrrill [junior], which served in the earl of Essex’s Army.
Treasurer at Aylesbury in 1642 to early 1643. In 1643 he succeeded as colonel to Hampden’s regiment of foot in Essex’s Army (Hampden died on 24 June; Tyrrill had succeeded by 5 July). In 1644 Tyrrill marched with Essex into the South West; his baggage was plundered at Fowey, 31 Aug. 1644.
In the accounts that he submitted to the Buckinghamshire county committee in 1646, Tyrrill explicitly excluded his command in Essex’s Army and only claimed for his disbursements ‘for the Cuntry’ (TNA, SP28/127, Part 7, f. 66r.). He noted, for instance, payments to ‘the Cuntry Captaines, viz. to Captain Mosely, Captain Deverell, Captain Theed, Captain Smith and Captain Field’ (TNA, SP28/127, Part 7, f. 65v.). He also claimed for his pay as colonel from 7 Apr. 1643 to late May 1644 (i.e. in a regiment which precedes and then runs alongside his command under Essex). This was evidently a garrison regiment at Aylesbury, which was explicitly identified as his regiment when several of its officers were appointed sequestration commissioners on 23 Oct. 1643. The regiment was raised in Aylesbury: it was probably a new, or partially new, regiment raised from a number of local units. It would share at least one officer with Colonel Henry Bulstrode’s pre-existing regiment at Aylesbury (Christopher Egleton), but though some reduction of the two regiments might have occurred at some point, they were separate units in May 1643. The details of local payments in his own accounts for his Aylesbury command only run to May 1643, which might be consistent with his increasing pre-occupation with his field regiment in Essex’s Army upon succeeding Hampden. Ceasing command of his Buckinghamshire regiment in late May 1644 might well fit in with Tyrrill marching into the West with Essex’s Army and his other regiment.
By 21 Oct. 1644 Tyrrill had left the earl of Essex’s Army and been replaced as colonel by Richard Ingoldsby, and Sir Samuel Luke was urging that he be added to the three counties committee (Bucks., Berkshire, and Oxfordshire): ‘It will be a great satisfaction to the gentry hereabouts, he being allied to most of them, and a man of good estate and of able parts, so that on all occasions he will be a great help to us’. However, he feared that ‘Aylesbury men will much oppose him because of his ability [i.e. social status and wealth] and therefore [we] will need the more pains in procuring him to be added’ (Luke Letter Books, 47). Tyrrill and Luke shared a social position and a hostility to the lowlier and more militant Buckinghamshire county committee at Aylesbury. Tyrrill complained to Luke about how he was being penalized financially by the committee’s demands and being backward in paying his due to the cause. The Aylesbury men opposed his appointment to the committee of the three counties and Tyrrill was only added to it on 30 Sept. 1645. By 1646 he was certainly active on the Buckinghamshire county committee, as witnessed by his signature on warrants. However, Tyrrill seems to have been generally supportive of Luke and his allies up to Apr. 1645, despite being ‘incensed by his man that you injured him’ in Nov. 1644 and being at odds over his contribution due to the Newport garrison (Luke Letter Books, 404). But by May 1645 he was evidently allied with the Buckinghamshire county committee against Luke. A petitioning campaign was organized to place him as governor of Newport Pagnell in succession to Luke, outgoing under the Self-Denying Ordinance, rather than Luke’s own choice, his deputy lieutenant-colonel Richard Cokayne.
Tyrrill unsuccessfully stood for Aylesbury in the recruiter election of 1645. A JP in 1641-9 (amongst other local offices), he held only one office, as an assessment commissioner, between 1649 and 1654; from 1654 to 1658 he was custos rotulorum for Buckinghamshire.
Tyrrill was MP for Aylesbury in Richard Cromwell’s parliament (1659) and for Buckinghamshire in the Convention parliament the following year, but had to give up his seat upon being made Justice of Common Pleas in July 1660. He was knighted on 16 July 1660.
References: See Oxford DNB; TNA, SP28/8/154, 239, SP28/9/119, SP28/19/76, SP28/126, Part 2, f. 180r., SP28/127, Part 7; JHC, 3.265, 4.293-5; Luke Letter Books, 46-7, 57, 92, 146-7, 153, 168, 276-7, 279, 281-2, 283, 347-8, 383-4, 403-4, 434, 437, 476, 516, 401-2, 444, 470-1, 98, 177,200,288, 596; CSPD: addenda, 1625-1649, 666; Bucks. contributions, 125; Davies, ‘Essex’, 47-51; HoP: The Commons, 1660-1690, 3.620; HoP: The Commons, 1640-1659 [forthcoming].
Armies: Earl of Essex
Tyrrill [Tyrrell], Thomas Thomas Tyrrill [Tyrrell]
In 1642, probably at and from its formation, lieutenant in Lord Robartes’s regiment of foot in the earl of Essex’s Army.
References: Peacock, Army lists, 37.
Armies: Earl of Essex
Tyte, - - Tyte
Quartermaster.
References: Mayo, Dorset Standing Committee, 386.
Armies: Dorset