Edward I: Easter 1294

Parliament Rolls of Medieval England. Originally published by Boydell, Woodbridge, 2005.

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'Edward I: Easter 1294', Parliament Rolls of Medieval England, (Woodbridge, 2005), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/parliament-rolls-medieval/easter-1294 [accessed 19 June 2024].

. "Edward I: Easter 1294", in Parliament Rolls of Medieval England, (Woodbridge, 2005) . British History Online, accessed June 19, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/parliament-rolls-medieval/easter-1294.

. "Edward I: Easter 1294", Parliament Rolls of Medieval England, (Woodbridge, 2005). . British History Online. Web. 19 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/parliament-rolls-medieval/easter-1294.

In this section

1294 Easter

Introduction Easter 1294

Westminster

Easter parliament (June)

In the early winter of 1293, while the Michaelmas parliament was still in session, it was planned that the next parliament be held shortly after Easter 1294, and a series of writs for inquisitions ad quod damnum were issued at various dates between 28 November and 22 December 1293 which ordered the inquisitions to be returned to the parliament at the quindene of Easter following, indicating that the plan was for parliament to begin around 4 May 1294. (fn. foot-1294e-1) This suggests that the parliament was originally planned in accordance with the pattern of twice-yearly parliaments resumed at Easter 1293. There is, however, good evidence to suggest that parliament did not begin sessions till almost a month after that. (fn. foot-1294e-2) By then the news had reached England of the confiscation of the duchy of Gascony (announced in Paris on 19 May) and it seems likely that the meeting of parliament was largely devoted to discussing what measures should be taken in response to this. (fn. foot-1294e-3)

Although there is at least one reference to the parliament which was held as the 'parliament after Easter', (fn. foot-1294e-4) it seems reasonably certain that the session did not begin as early as that. The king did not return to Westminster till 1 June and parliament probably only opened about then. (fn. foot-1294e-5) The first evidence to suggest that parliament may have been in session comes from 2 June. (fn. foot-1294e-6) Thereafter, there is evidence to show that business was done there on 4 June, (fn. foot-1294e-7) 8 June, (fn. foot-1294e-8) 10 June, (fn. foot-1294e-9) 12 June, (fn. foot-1294e-10) 14 June, (fn. foot-1294e-11) 16 June, (fn. foot-1294e-12) 18 June, (fn. foot-1294e-13) and 20 June. (fn. foot-1294e-14) While parliament was in session the decision was taken (on 8 June) to issue summonses to a further sixty-two individuals to come as soon as they could to wherever the king then was for urgent business touching the king and his crown. (fn. foot-1294e-15) The parliamentary session probably ended around 21 June when the king left Westminster.

There is no surviving official record of business done at this parliament.

Appendix Easter 1294

Other evidence of business done at this parliament

1

For a petition which seems to have been submitted to this parliament, since it appears to refer to the Surrey eyre which was in session in May and June 1294, in which the abbot and convent of Westminster asked for a royal order to the justices to respect their privilege of taking prisoners from the abbey's lands to Westminster see SC 8/151, no. 7514. Below the endorsement endorsing their request is a note relating apparently to other matters for consideration at this parliament: 37 petitions for alienations in mortmain (and whether the king was willing to issue inquisitions ad quod damnum to enquire into them) and seven petitions relating to fairs, markets and warrens.

2

For a membrane of fines for the royal confirmations of charters authorised 'by petitions returned from council' ('per petiticiones de consilio retornatas ') in the communia section of the King's Remembrancer's Memoranda Roll for Trinity 1294 see E 159/67, m. 60 .

Footnotes

  • foot-1294e-1. C 143/21, nos. 8, 25, 28, 29, 31; C 143/22, nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28.
  • foot-1294e-2. For an inquisition ad quod damnum which was made returnable to the parliament at the quindene of Easter 1293 but which was endorsed with a note that 'he is to await the parliament after Trinity and the inquisition to be handed over to Gilbert of Rothbury' ( expectet parliamentum post festum Trinitatis et tradatur ista inquisicio G. de Roubur' ) see C 143/22, no. 7.
  • foot-1294e-3. Cotton (Historia Anglicana , 233-4) says that it was agreed at this parliament that the king should cross to France with an army to recover his lands from the the king of France and power given to the men of ports and other mariners to keep the seas and capture the king's enemies. For the imposition of general controls on the crossing of men, boats and goods from England, Ireland, Wales (and a parallel request to Scotland) on 2 June (perhaps after discussion at parliament) see Roles Gascons , iii, no. 3307-8, 3312-4; for William Leyburne's appointment as captain of ships at Westminster on 8 June (during the meeting of parliament) see Cotton, Historia Anglicana , 236-7; for the commission issued on 10 June to the royal justices Bereford and Brabazon (during parliament and probably after discussion there since it was said to have been issued at the request of the prelates, earls, barons and others of the council) see Cotton, Historia Anglicana , 235-6; Roles Gascons , iii, no. 3033; for the decision to prorogue the eyres of Yorkshire and Surrey till the autumn taken on 12 June (and perhaps also decided in parliament) see CCR 1288-96 , 351. Some time in June orders seem also to have been given for the seizure of all the goods and chattels of alien merchants from the lands of the king of France and also for the seizure of the lands of alien religious. These may also have received some kind of parliamentary approval.
  • foot-1294e-4. Sayles, Functions of the Medieval Parliament , 21.
  • foot-1294e-5. Cotton, Historia Anglicana , 233-4 says the king held parliament at London after Ascensiontide (27 May) and by continuation for several days. This fits reasonably well with a parliament opening at the very beginning of June.
  • foot-1294e-6. For the imposition of general controls on the crossing of men, boats and goods from England, Ireland, Wales on that day (and a parallel request to the king of Scotland to impose similar controls), probably after conciliar discussion, see Roles Gascons , iii, no. 3307-8, 3312-4; and for a mandate for an inquisition ad quod damnum into the proposed grant by master Nicholas of Hovington to the Dominicans of Canterbury which was returnable before king and which was issued at Westminster on 2 June 1294 (probably in response to a petition) see C 143/22, no. 14.
  • foot-1294e-7. For a licence for an alienation in mortmain to Forde abbey authorised by an inquisition returned from Council issued on that date see CPR 1292-1301 , 71.
  • foot-1294e-8. For William Leyburne's appointment as captain of ships at Westminster on that day see Cotton, Historia Anglicana , 236-7; for the remission of a tunnage of four shillings per tun recently imposed on all wine from Bergerac, Limousin and St Emilion loaded at Pierrefitte or Libourne and brought to England communicated by mandate of that date see CCR 1288-96 , 350; and see below for the issuing of summonses on that day.
  • foot-1294e-9. For the commission issued on that day to the royal justices Bereford and Brabazon, probably after discussion in parliament (since it was said to have been issued at the request of prelates, earls, barons and others of the council), see Cotton, Historia Anglicana , 235-6; Roles Gascons , iii, no. 3033.
  • foot-1294e-10. For the record of a case heard before king and council at Westminster on that day and subsequently enrolled on the King's Bench plea roll see KB 27/141, m. 7. It was also on the same day that the decision was taken to prorogue the eyres of Yorkshire and Surrey till the autumn ( CCR 1288-96 , 351) and this was probably also after conciliar discussion.
  • foot-1294e-11. For charters said to have been read before the king and the whole council which bear this date see CChR 1257-1300 , 435.
  • foot-1294e-12. For a mandate for an inquisition ad quod damnum issued on that date and made returnable at the quindene of St John the Baptist see C 143/22, no. 19; for another mandate of the same date (whose endorsement shows it was authorised by a petition of council) for an inquisition ad quod damnum into the proposed enclosure of land within the forest of Inglewood held by John bishop of Carlisle in Dalston see C 143/23, no. 11.
  • foot-1294e-13. The replevin of the Joinville liberty of Trim authorised on this day is probably to be associated with this session: CCR 1288-96 , 352 and so also is the appointment of Henry of Cobham as warden of the Channel Isles on the same day and the commission issued to him and others to hold an eyre of the Channel Islands: CPR 1292-1301, 74, 75.
  • foot-1294e-14. For a mandate for an inquisition ad quod damnum into a proposed grant to Cambridge university issued on 17 May 1294 which required the return of the inquisition to parliament at the octaves of Trinity (20 June) see C 143/21, no. 24.
  • foot-1294e-15. PW , i, 25.