BHO

Henry VI: July 1455

Parliament Rolls of Medieval England. Originally published by Boydell, Woodbridge, 2005.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

In this section

1455 July

Introduction 1455

Westminster

9 July 1455 -12 March 1456

(PRO C 65/103. RP , v.278-327. SR , ii.369-78)

C 65/103 is a roll of twenty-five membranes, each approximately 310mm in width, sewn together in chancery style and numbered at the head and foot in a later hand in reverse order. The text, written in the small, clear, chancery scripts of several scribes, occupies the rectos of the membranes only. The dorse of the roll is blank apart from the later identification of the parliament - variously 'Parl. 33 H.6', 'anno H.VI XXXIII', '33 H.6 parliament' or 'anno 33 H.6' - on the back of each membrane. In addition, the later heading 'Parliamentum de anno Henrici sexti tricesimo tertio' is to be found on the dorse of membrane 25 and the words 'Resumpcio XXXIII' on the dorse of membrane 8. The roll is in good condition and legible throughout. All headings are contemporary except that for item 40 and those to be found on membranes 13-1. The marginal arabic item numbers in the roll are of later date. No separate membranes of parchment are stitched to the roll, which appears to be complete.

The parliament was summoned by writs of 26 May 1455, four days after the battle of St Albans had brought the duke of York back to power. Henry VI had recovered from his mental collapse around Christmas 1454 and York's protectorate had come to an effective end in the course of the following January, although he was not formally relieved of the office until 9 February (appendix item 28). The circle around the king had proceeded to make it clear that they regarded York's actions over the previous months as partisan. The duke of Somerset had been released from the Tower and restored as captain of Calais. The duke of Exeter, involved in the northern unrest of 1453-4 against the Nevilles, was also released. His actions, which York had construed as treasonable, were tacitly redefined, with his imprisonment blamed on the malice of ill-wishers. Henry's insistence on seeing Exeter as the wronged party had the effect of pushing the junior Nevilles - York's brother in law the earl of Salisbury and Salisbury's son Richard, earl of Warwick - into stronger support for York.

The unpicking of York's actions as protector led York and his allies to believe that more direct steps would be taken against them. Amidst growing political tension they withdrew from court and began raising troops, and their fears can only have been confirmed when they were summoned to attend a great council to be held at Leicester on 21 May 1455. The choice of location was ominous. Leicester was a duchy of Lancaster lordship, and they may well have feared that the summons was a prelude to their arrest. They can hardly have forgotten the precedent of the duke of Gloucester's arrest in 1447. This time York struck first, and intercepted the royal party at St Albans on 22 May. Henry had left London the previous day (the day the council had been due to meet) and a recent flurry of military summonses suggests that his advisers had belatedly realised that the situation was sliding towards outright conflict. Inconclusive negotiations ensued before the Yorkists attacked. The fighting was brief, and has been seen more as a series of political assassinations than an actual battle. It ended with Somerset, Northumberland and Clifford dead and Henry, who had been slightly wounded, in York's control.

The victors showed the king ostentatious deference, insisting, as they had done before the battle, that they were loyal subjects coming to the king's defence against the enemies within. This was also to be the line taken in parliament when it assembled on 9 July. Henry himself opened it and there was a respectable turn-out of lords: thirty-three lords spiritual and twenty-seven lords temporal. Although there were some notable absentees, including the duke of Exeter and Thomas Percy, lord Egremont, who had played leading roles in the Neville / Percy violence and were both in custody, there were some equally striking attenders. Egremont's brother, the new earl of Northumberland, whose father had died at St Albans, was present, and so was John, Viscount Beaumont, who had refused to serve under York in his first protectorate, reminding his colleagues 'that he was with the quene'. (fn. int1455-1) Among the commons, in spite of some well-attested competition for seats in Kent and East Anglia, the general attitude to the parliament appears to have been cautious. On 24 June John Jenney, although labouring on behalf of would-be candidates in the Norfolk and Norwich elections, commented to John Paston I, 'Sum men hold it right straunge to be in this parlement, and me thenkith they be wyse men that soo doo'. (fn. int1455-2)

One hundred and ninety-eight members of the commons have been traced. (fn. int1455-3) The candidate for whom Jenney was 'labouring' in Norfolk, an associate of the duke of Norfolk, Roger Chamberlain, was returned successfully in spite of being based in Suffolk, which did not stop Jenney waxing indignant about the choice of another Suffolk man, John Howard, as the other knight of the shire for Norfolk. He wrote angrily to John Paston that it was 'a evill precedent for the shire that a straunge man shulde be chosyn, and no wurshipp to my lord of Yorke nor to my lord of Norfolk to write for hym; for yf the jentilmen of the shire will suffre such inconvenyens, in good feithe the shire shall noght be called of seche wurshipp as it hathe be'. (fn. int1455-4) In spite of York's successful involvement here, the 1455 parliament should not be characterised as 'Yorkist', although, as was to become apparent, the commons were in no mood to pull their punches in criticising aspects of Henry VI's regime.

The chancellor, Thomas Bourgchier, archbishop of Canterbury, gave an opening address. Space was left for it on the roll, but text and subject matter remain unrecorded. On the second day (before the election of the speaker on the third day) the archbishop offered the lords an agenda of eight items for their attention: the rule and funding of the royal household; payment of the Calais garrison; the defence of Calais and Berwick; the deployment of 13,000 archers granted in the previous parliament; the establishment of 'parfite love and rest' among the lords; the prevention of the export of bullion; the keeping of the sea; and the unrest in Wales (items 7-15).

The question of household finance had been an ongoing issue throughout the reign, but the reference to the need to establish 'an ordinate and a substantiall rule' for the household signalled the reopening of what York must have considered unfinished business from his protectorate. On 13 November 1454 a dramatic reduction in the size of the household had been announced by the council, in order to rescue the country from the financial burden of supporting so large an establishment. There is no way of telling whether this took effect. Henry's recovery soon afterwards probably meant that it did not. Certainly the size and cost of the household remained an issue. Within the extant parliamentary material the emphasis is on funding the household. There was an attempt to assign revenue to meet its cost for the financial year 1455-6 (item 48). The difficulty of the king's maintaining an honourable household was also the justification given for a number of bills not directly concerned with household finances. But in letters patent of March 1457, granting Robert Savage the office of yeoman of the crown in place of William Grimsby, it is noted that parliament had agreed that there should only be twenty-four yeomen of the crown and had listed the individuals who made up the total. The extant council ordinance of November 1454 had listed twenty-three yeomen of the crown, with Grimsby in a separate category as yeoman of the stool. The implication is that a version of the ordinance had received parliamentary confirmation in 1455-6 and that men like Savage, who held the office of yeomen but were not included in the final list, saw their offices resumed in consequence. (fn. int1455-5)

Defence of the realm was also a perennial concern, but had been given an edge by recent problems in Calais. In May 1455 the council had been concerned by French plans to besiege Calais, a threat already under discussion a year earlier and in part, surely, a response to the internal disarray of the fortress. (fn. int1455-6) The financing of Calais had been one of the failures of York's first protectorate. He had inherited the crisis caused by parliament's refusal, in February 1454, to grant £40,000 for the wages of the garrison. York had been forced back onto loans from the Staplers. But before any money could be delivered to the garrison the men mutinied and, early in May that year, seized and sold the stocks of wool in the town. The financial issue was the more intractable because of York's failure to establish his own authority in the town. An early move in his protectorate had been an order that all the Calais fortresses be surrendered into his hands, an obvious prelude to his replacing Somerset as captain of Calais, although this was not formally achieved until 17 July 1454. Even then Somerset's lieutenants remained in effective control. In August York legalised the garrison's seizure of the wool, but the underlying problem of how to meet the garrison's costs remained. It is noticeable that in 1455-6 the most extreme penalties suggested in parliamentary bills were earmarked for the defence of Calais. Although none took effect, the assumption is clearly that anxieties about meeting the cost of the garrison would make palatable otherwise outrageous suggestions such as the proposed penalty of 10,000 marks if John Wood pleaded a royal pardon in response to the charge of evading custom on wool (appendix item 13).

The lords responded to the chancellor's agenda by establishing five committees to look into the matters they considered most pressing. The composition of the committees is, uniquely, listed. Most of the lords present were drafted into service and the result was deliberately non-partisan. There was clearly some attempt to match individual expertise to the appropriate committee, and all but one of the committees also had the advice of external members. The committee looking into the household included three former treasurers of the exchequer (the earl of Worcester and Lords Cromwell and Sudeley), one of whom (Sudeley) was the current steward of the household. In addition it could call on the chamberlain of the household, Sir Thomas Stanley, and unspecified household officers. Together with the two named officials of Henry VI's household, it also included Viscount Beaumont, the great chamberlain. The Calais committee was, unsurprisingly, much the strongest. It was also the most politically sensitive, given York's earlier failure to challenge Somerset's control there, and both Salisbury and Warwick (who had been named captain of Calais after St Albans) served on this committee. But even this committee was not exclusively 'Yorkist' and William Neville, Lord Fauconberg, although a kinsman of the Nevilles, had been with Henry VI rather than with York at St Albans. The lords appointed were to be joined in their deliberations by the treasurer and victualler of Calais. The committee was also given responsibility for Berwick, but on the first day of parliament word reached London that the Scottish siege of the town had been lifted and this seems to have taken the northern threat temporarily off the agenda. (fn. int1455-7) There is no indication that anything came of any deliberations on that subject

The safe-keeping of the sea was given its own committee, with the earl of Oxford the senior lay peer. The only trace of its deliberations in the parliamentary record was that on 30 July, the penultimate day of the first session, the earls of Salisbury, Shrewsbury and Worcester, and lord Stourton (none of whom was a member of the committee) were discharged of the keeping of the seas at their own request. They, along with the earl of Wiltshire, had been appointed to guard the seas in the previous parliament, but if their resignation was designed to clear the way for new arrangements these were not formally enrolled. Nor is there any trace within the parliamentary record of any attempt to engage with the habitual anxieties about the shortage of bullion. This committee only included one lay peer, ex-treasurer Worcester. Apart from two unnamed merchants, the professional expertise was primarily administrative, including the prior of St Johns (then keeper of the privy seal), Master Thomas Kent (the clerk of the council) and one of the king's secretaries for the French tongue, Master Gervase le Vulre.

The fifth committee was to look into Wales. The concern here seems to have been less with Wales as a cockpit for political tensions, and rather with the perennial lawlessness of the region, although this is admittedly a blurred distinction in the context of the 1450s. The committee was to consist of unspecified marcher lords, the serjeants at law and the king's attorney general - the most perfunctory definition of any of the committees. As with the committee on bullion, any discussion has left no trace in the parliamentary record, although this is not to say that none took place. One of the most persistent offenders was Somerset's deputy at Carmarthen, Griffith ap Nicholas. At some stage during the parliament, probably in the second session, the king granted the petition of Griffith ap David ap Thomas, who had been imprisoned by Griffith ap Nicholas. As well as releasing his prisoner, Griffith ap Nicholas was also ordered to surrender Carmarthen and Aberystwyth to York (appendix item 30). (fn. int1455-8)

Of the items on the chancellor's agenda, this apparently left three unaccounted for. The urgent matter of paying the Calais garrison was surely the responsibility of the committee 'for Calais' since finance was inseparable from defence. The use to be made of the 13,000 archers may also have fallen within their remit, although there is no sign of any decision being made. Only the establishment of peace between the lords did not fall to the share of any committee. This issue, at least as defined by the Yorkists, was to dominate the first session of parliament. On the roll, the recognition of the loyalty of York, Warwick and Salisbury and an indemnity for acts committed at St Albans follow immediately after the presentation of John Wenlock as speaker on 11 July. All the blame for the events of May was placed on Somerset (now dead) and two lesser figures: the baron of the exchequer Thomas Thorp, who had been speaker in the 1453 parliament until his arrest at the suit of the duke of York, and the household man William Joseph. They were accused of denying the Yorkists all access to the king, whether in writing or in person, culminating in an attempt to block the Yorkists' resort to the king by force. In this account - which is presented in the parliamentary record as the king's narrative of events - the battle of St Albans becomes not an attack on the king but an attempt by Somerset and his cronies to kill York and his supporters. The motivation of the three men is stressed throughout to have been personal malice, a presentation that avoids any explicit characterisation of them as traitors.

The interpretation is, of course, tendentious, although the letters embedded in the narrative are presumably genuine. (fn. int1455-9) It had always, after all, been a central plank of York's platform that he was the loyal subject of the king whose quarrel was with the evil counsellors around Henry. Now events were publicly reformulated to match this reading. The events at St Albans had left York and his followers open to the accusation of treason in making war against the king, and this possibility was very carefully closed down. The parliamentary narrative ends with the king's acknowledgement that their behaviour had demonstrated that their faith and truth to him were beyond question. None of them was to be 'empeched, sued, vexed, hurt or molested in thaire bodies, goodes or landes' as a result of the events of 22 May. Or, as a letter-writer on 19 July summarised it, the bill (which passed on 18 July) affirmed 'all thing doon there [St Albans] well doon, and nothing doon there never after this tyme to be spoken of'. (fn. int1455-10) Nor did the Yorkist rehabilitation stop there. In a bill which received the royal assent but was not enrolled (appendix item 2) the resumption of the royal grants of those present with York when he confronted the king at Dartford in 1452 was rescinded. The act of 1453 had presented Dartford as a battle, and cast York and his allies as 'traitours assembled in the field ayenst youre saide moost roial persoune and estate'. Now the act was revoked on the grounds that it had raised dangerous doubts about 'the feith, trouth and ligeance of many youre true liegemen'. The indictment of Walter Devereux for treason in February 1452 was also over-ridden and Devereux acknowledged to be the king's true liegeman (appendix item 23). York's allies Thomas Young and William Oldhall also received redress for their earlier arrest and attainder respectively (appendix items 14, 26). Oldhall secured an exemplification of his petition in November, but it is likely to have passed in the first session. (fn. int1455-11)

By contrast, a bill was introduced calling for the punishment of Thorp and Joseph by forfeiture of all their royal grants and imprisonment for twelve years, and a fine of £1,000 to be put towards the defence of Calais (appendix item 9). No pardon granted to them previously or (a later insertion in the bill) to be granted in future was to have any force in respect of the penalty. Predictably, given this attempt to over-ride his prerogative of mercy, the king reserved judgement, but he did consent (probably in the second session) (fn. int1455-12) to a bill resuming their royal grants, to take effect from 13 December, the last day of the second session. The bill accused the two men of 'inordinate and presumptuouse malepertenesse [and] unfitting demeanyng in the presence of our said soverain lord' (appendix item 22).

The parliamentary record gives no hint of dissent from this radical rewriting of recent history. But the very care with which York and his followers are redefined as loyal subjects, and all responsibility heaped on Somerset, Thorp and Joseph, is testimony to the extreme sensitivity of the issue, as is the angry clash between Lord Cromwell and Warwick on 17 July over who should bear responsibility for the battle. The letter writer who recorded that episode also noted that followers of York, Warwick and Salisbury 'have stuffed their Lordes barges full of wepon dayly unto Westminster' and that the passing of the bill (on 18 July) exonerating York and his followers from any blame was 'groged full sore' by many. (fn. int1455-13)

The actions of parliament, it is clear, were perceived as partisan - probably within parliament as well as without. It is within that context that one should see the story spread by John Heydon in July that John Paston and others planned to put a bill before parliament laying accusations of treason against him, the bishop of Norwich and Sir Thomas Tuddenham. According to Heydon's version, which Paston indignantly repudiated, if he (Heydon) had been absent from parliament six hours longer than he was, a commission of oyer et terminer would have been appointed to look into the accusations. (fn. int1455-14) But none of these tensions was allowed to surface in the roll. Officially, parliament achieved (as the chancellor had hoped) 'parfite love and rest' among the lords, embodied in the re-assertion of shared loyalty to the crown. On 24 July all the lords present took a formal oath of loyalty to Henry VI (item 25). Each spiritual lord laid his hand upon his breast in taking the oath and every temporal lord, led by York, took the king by the hand. Lords not present were to take the oath on their next arrival. On 31 July parliament was prorogued by the chancellor until 12 November, but before it rose a general pardon was offered for all offences committed before the opening of parliament against the statute of livery, and all treasons, murders and other offences. As far as legal recriminations were concerned, bygones were to be bygones, and York's opponents were among the first to avail themselves of the pardon. (fn. int1455-15)

Contrary to the impression given by the roll, the exoneration of the Yorkists was not the only business accomplished in the first session. The duke of Gloucester, whom York had come to see as his forerunner as a victim of the circle around the king, was rehabilitated, although the act was not enrolled. John Stow, usually well-informed about parliamentary matters, went so far as to put the duke's rehabilitation first in his list of business. The chronicler of St Albans (where Gloucester was buried), John Whethamstede, describes it as something done ' inter alia ' but his discussion gives it pride of place, ahead of the act of indemnity - something he regarded with far less enthusiasm, since it blocked the possibility of those harmed by the battle of St Albans claiming redress. (fn. int1455-16) According to Whethamstede efforts had been made in all the parliaments since Gloucester's death to clear his name, and an extant fragmentary petition to the commons, itemising the dead duke's service to the crown, may be a legacy of one such earlier attempt. (fn. int1455-17) Only now, however, with York's help, was it achieved and the dead duke declared a faithful, indeed the most faithful, liege of the king until the day of his death (appendix item 12). On 31 July, the last day of the session, writs were duly sent to sheriffs and bailiffs ordering them to make public proclamation of the duke's loyalty, and this was apparently done on 16 August. (fn. int1455-18) Attention was also being given to the fate of Gloucester's soul. A further unenrolled bill, about which the king reserved judgement, sought to secure the administration of the duke's will and payment of his debts by authorising the seizure of land purchased by the duke, with reversion to the king once the debts had been met (appendix item 18).

It was probably also in the first session, as B. P. Wolffe suggested, rather than in the third (as Wedgwood assumed), that the commons first petitioned for the resumption of royal grants, in order to finance the royal household without putting an undue burden on the king's subjects (item 47). As was usual practice, the bill and the exemptions from it were recorded on their own membranes, which were sewn into the roll when it was made up at the end of the parliament. Their placing within the roll thus gives no clue to the timing of the various events, and the dating of the initial petition to the first session relies largely on the statement that the resumption was to take effect from Michaelmas. (fn. int1455-19) The version of the petition given by Whethamstede, although undated, does give some clues to the sequence of events. This consists only of the long preamble itemising what was to be included in the resumption and the first five exemptions as enrolled (for the queen, prince Edward, benefactors of fraternities and the like, grants made by the king as feoffee and office holders on the queen's lands). The exemption for John Wenlock (the speaker) which follows on the roll is apparently a later insertion, for the St Albans version of the petition continues with the clause 'saving to each of your lieges his title and interest in any of the things stated, such as they had or ought to have had before the said grants, or afterwards, other than by your grants'. (fn. int1455-20)

It is possible that the petition as originally presented ended at this point. As enrolled, it continues with the request that the commons should see any proposed exemptions 'other than be conteigned in this oure peticion to the ende that we may gife our assentz therto, if it be thought to us expedient'. The request is introduced 'in the most lowely wyse', but the commons were presumably well aware of the radical nature of their demand. They went on to make an even more audacious suggestion: that anyone receiving a grant after the deadline not allowed in the listed exemptions or 'contrarie to this oure desire' be fined a thousand marks: half to go to the king to be applied to the cost of the Calais garrison and half to whoever chose to sue for it. The penalty was not, it was added, to be applied to offices requiring actual exercise and paid at the same rate as on the first day of the reign.

If the commons' demands do represent a later development, designed to give them a greater say in the enforcement of the resumption, it is hard to date this stiffening of their resolve. The following proviso on the roll, exempting any grant of the protectorship to the prince of Wales or to York, and any subsequent grant to the prince of the principality or Wales and the earldom of Chester, must date from parliament's second session. Certainly the bill was under discussion then, for Bale's chronicle dates the commons' agreement to December. (fn. int1455-21) Whatever the exact chronology, it seems clear that the act of resumption, as it appears on the roll, had developed across the life of the parliament. The commons, whether or not encouraged by York, were evidently prepared to take a hard line. They were not unreasonable. They recognised that offices had to be filled and that the queen was entitled to her dower rights. She was allowed an exemption of grants worth 10,000 marks - with the possibility of receiving new grants if the endowment of the prince of Wales had reduced her income below that level. But the commons wanted to close the loophole of unilateral royal exemptions. They seem also to have been unsympathetic to the separation of the duchy of Lancaster lands from the crown estate, and the duchy lands were explicitly brought within the scope of the resumption.

But perhaps the clearest indication that the commons meant business was their willingness to see resumption as the solution to other problems. An unenrolled petition, upon which the king reserved judgement but which the lords rejected (appendix item 1) attempted to use resumption to make the office of sheriff more attractive to 'men of goode and worthy reputacion' such as in the past had 'entreted your people undre the directe order of the lawe without extorcion, and put them in devoir to kepe your peas and to resiste and subdewe the offendours of your lawes'. The problem (as the commons were to reiterate in successive parliaments) was that the county revenues for which the sheriffs were meant to account had been eroded until the sheriffs were liable for more money than they could levy. In 1455-6 the solution was seen as the resumption of all liberties, franchises and the like granted since the beginning of the reign and before 14 February 1456 and not enrolled within three months of that date. This time scale probably implies that the bill was presented in the final session, as does the fact that the verdict was left to the lords.

The bill belongs to an ongoing series of attempts to set the office of sheriff on a more realistic financial footing. Outside parliament, two sheriffs had successfully petitioned the king and council late in 1455 for allowance for those parts of their farm that could no longer be levied, and the allowance granted to the sheriff of Huntingdon and Cambridge in April 1456 was said to be by the authority of parliament. (fn. int1455-22) What is unusual is that resumption was adopted as the alternative to such ad hoc expedients. Later parliamentary bills were to seek other solutions, albeit with no more success. In 1455-6 resumption was the commons' first resort. This can be seen also in their petition to resume grants of wardship and marriage made since Michaelmas 1448 (appendix item 3), which drew the unusually blunt response that the king and all the lords thought it unreasonable.

Behind this faith in resumption was real anxiety about the state of the king's finances. This surfaced elsewhere in parliamentary business, notably in the bills attacking the licensing of shipments of wool to ports other than Calais (appendix items 4 and 13). (fn. int1455-23) It is likely that the Staplers' concern to maintain their monopoly was somewhere at the back of the agitation - and hence, indirectly, the question of the financing of Calais - but there was a clear appeal to the commons' financial concerns in the assertion that such licences facilitated the evasion of customs duty.

The commons were also much concerned with law and order. Again, this can be seen not only in petitions directly concerned with enforcing the law but in the way in which the issue was used to make out a case for other demands. Thus the justification for sorting out the financial position of the sheriffs was that it would facilitate the maintenance of law. Most of these petitions cannot be dated to a particular session, and, indeed, lawlessness was an ongoing concern of the commons in this period. But a sense of an inexorable slide into violence, especially at the margins of the realm, coloured much of the business of the second session.

Parliament had been prorogued by the chancellor on 31 July because of the need to get the harvest in and the unhealthy air in London (item 28). It met again, as planned, on 12 November. No list of those attending is extant, but two days after this session was prorogued on 13 December writs of privy seal were sent out ordering absentees among the lords spiritual and temporal to turn up for the next session which was to start on 14 January. The writ not only threatened the king's displeasure but 'like paynes or gretter as have ben in oure afore this tyme and leide upon suche as have absented theim and forborn to come to oure Parlement for the tyme beyng'. (fn. int1455-24) On this showing, of the temporal lords who had taken the oath to Henry in July, two earls (Pembroke and Shrewsbury) and seven lords had not returned for the second session. One of the lords, Cromwell, was probably already ill; he died in January 1456. Among the lords spiritual the tailing off is more marked. Six bishops and fourteen abbots who had attended the first session did not return, and a further ten spiritual lords did not attend either session.

On the day before the second session opened York had been authorised to resume and prorogue parliament because the king 'for certain just and reasonable causes' could not be present (item 30). The most likely explanation is that the king's health had broken down again. A Paston correspondent had reported in late October that 'summe men ar a-ferd that he is seek ageyn'. (fn. int1455-25) Whatever the reason, Henry's ceding of authority to York provided the justification for the main item of business of this session: the appointment of a protector. On the second day of the session (13 November), William Burley, in the name of the commons and accompanied by many of them, came before York and the lords and requested that given that the king had found it necessary to designate a lieutenant to proceed with the parliament, a suitable person should also be appointed for the defence of the land, and that the commons should be notified as speedily as possible of whom that was to be. The absence of the speaker, John Wenlock, from the delegation is striking, as is the fact that Burley was one of York's councillors. But although the whole affair was presumably (and predictably) stage-managed, it does not seem to have been particularly divisive. There is no evidence that Wenlock forfeited York's trust and, more to the point, no suggestion that the lords had qualms about accepting Burley as the commons' spokesman. Burley was an experienced member of the commons (he had first sat in 1417), and had stepped in as speaker in 1437 on the illness of Thomas Tyrell. He may well have been regarded as what in later centuries would be called the father of the house.

In his appeal for effective leadership, Burley drew particular attention to the disorder in the south west, where the dispute between the earl of Devon and Lord Bonville had flared up again. (fn. int1455-26) The murder of Nicholas Radford on 23 October 1455 has been regarded as the most notorious crime of the decade, if not the century, but proved to be only the first stage in the escalation of the hostility between the two lords to the point of outright war. On 15 December, two days after the second session ended, the two sides would confront each other at the 'battle' of Clyst. Parliament resumed under the shadow of that mounting violence. At some point, the violence became a matter of parliamentary business, with the presentation of a petition from Radford's executor and the commons' demand for the imprisonment of Bonville and Courtenay until commissions of oyer et terminer could be appointed (appendix items 8, 32). There may even have been some form of judicial process, for the commission issued in July 1456 to arrest named Courtenay associates described them as attainted of felony in this parliament (appendix item 33). But Burley's deployment of the violence in support of his demand for a protector are the only references to it in the roll.

The chancellor agreed that the lords would discuss the matter of a protector and give the commons an answer. Two days later Burley, again 'accompanied in grete nombre of the communes, in name of all theire felawes' reappeared before York and the lords and reiterated their demand, adding, in an apparent reference to the king's health, that it seemed to them that the resolution of current problems would be 'overe grevous and tedious' to the king (item 32). This second appearance spurred the lords into action, the chancellor claiming, although it is nowhere stated in the enrolled version of Burley's speeches, that the commons were refusing to proceed with parliamentary business until the matter was settled. It was agreed that a protector should be appointed and that it should be the duke of York. After a token disclaimer York agreed to consider the matter further. The resulting delay prompted another appearance by Burley on the following Monday (17 November) and a further restatement of the problem, to which the chancellor replied that York had been requested to take on the role and that it was hoped he would agree. The duke then set out his conditions, most of which were agreed in principle by the lords, although they obviously had doubts about how money could be found to pay the annuity of 2,000 marks and expenses unpaid from York's last term of office as well as the costs of his latest appointment.

The whole episode, unusually in parliaments of this period, is presented on the roll as a single, sustained narrative. But this is not to say that it is a neutral description of events. There is an obvious attempt to maintain that York's assumption of office was not only for the king's benefit but at the king's desire. The duke's statement began with a reminder that the commons had requested the lords to be a mean to the king in appointing a protector, and he insisted throughout that it was only his obedience to the king that had led him to agree to taking on the office. The chancellor, in reporting developments to the commons, presented it as a royal appointment. But (in contrast to the negotiations of 1460) there is no record of consultation with the king. The deal is presented as a matter for negotiation between York and the lords. Indeed, in the fine-tuning of the agreement which took place on Tuesday 18 November the limit of York's appointment was specifically amended from 'during our pleasure' (which had been the phrase used in his first protectorate) to 'until [he] shall be discharged ... by us in parliament, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in parliament' (item 37).

The issue of letters of appointment under the great seal was duly authorised on 19 November, the justification being explicitly the lawlessness in the realm and the king's inability to deal with it due to 'the impediment of the present infirmity which it has pleased Our Most High Saviour to visit on his person' (item 39). As in York's first protectorate, the right of the prince of Wales to take up the office on attaining years of discretion was asserted - a remote contingency given that the prince was only two years old, but symptomatic of the lords' desire to underline their continuing loyalty to Henry and his issue. That loyalty was also asserted in parliament's willingness to recognise the young Edward of Lancaster as his father's heir; a willingness embodied in a series of entries on the roll which contrast dramatically with the apparently artless narrative of York's assumption of the protectorate.

The entries relating to the prince's grants as heir begin a new membrane [19], which immediately raises questions of how they relate chronologically to York's appointment. The enrolled material relating to the protectorship flows without a break from the prorogation of parliament and York's appointment as lieutenant to open the second session. There is a long gap after item 38 (the negotiations leading to York's assumption of the office) and item 39, which is the formal grant of the protectorship, begins a new membrane [20]. The last item (41) on this membrane is dated 22 November and is the appointment of a council to lift the labour of government ('full tedious and grete to suffre and bere') from the king's shoulders. The appointment is couched in general terms, but it is possible that it also had a specifically parliamentary application and that from this point decisions on bills were delegated from the king to the lords as some of the endorsements on unenrolled items (discussed below) would suggest.

According to the roll, on the very first day of the session (12 November), before the issue of protector had been raised, the king, with parliament's approval, had confirmed Prince Edward's creation as prince of Wales and earl of Chester on 15 March 1454. This was followed by a whole raft of actions in the prince's favour, all formally dated 12 November and all couched as actions by the king with the advice and assent of parliament. Letters patent were authorised granting the prince the lands of the principality and earldom, and of the duchy of Cornwall. A stated amount of the revenue from them was to fund the prince's household, at this stage still a department of the king's household.

Although it is credible that protection of the prince's interests was under discussion alongside the establishment of a protectorate, there are obvious problems with its presentation on the roll. The dating of all the grants to 12 November is clearly fictitious, given that Henry was not present for the opening of the second session. The likelihood that York's appointment as protector was formalised first is supported by the exemption for York and the prince added to the bill of resumption. This must be later than the grant of the protectorship, but it implies that the grants to the prince of the principality and earldom, although planned, were yet to be made. The choice of 12 November as the nominal date for the grants probably does locate them somewhere within the second session, although additions to the series of provisos which follow the grants may have been made as late as the third session. The provisos are followed immediately by material relating to Calais (item 45). This had evidently been under discussion by the lords in the second session, to judge by a royal letter of 13 December rebuking the garrison for not replying to an earlier communication and assuring them that an act made for them in the current parliament was to be engrossed in as full a form as seemed appropriate to 'the lords to whom auctorite is committed'. (fn. int1455-27) But the final settlement must indeed, as the letter implies, date from the third session because its enrolment is prefaced by a petition of the Staplers concerning an indenture made on 19 December 1455. The ensuing deal with the merchants to secure their repayment was to be effective from 1 March 1456.

As this analysis suggests, the organisation of the roll after York's appointment as protector says little about the chronology of events. The Calais material is followed by the ten membranes comprising the act of resumption and its exemptions, which span all three sessions. After this block, the assignments for the royal household (item 48) begin a new membrane [4]. They are followed immediately by the prorogation of the second session from 13 December until 14 January, which allows them to be located with some confidence within the second session. But then the roll ceases to be of much help in establishing the course of events. The only other item on this membrane is the discharge of York as protector on 25 February 1456. There is no reference to the resumption of parliament, which presumably took place, as planned, on 14 January or to its dissolution, which Bale's chronicle dates to 12 March. (fn. int1455-28) The final three membranes record the common petitions.

The place of the household assignments within the roll, coupled with the insistence that a share of the revenues from the prince's endowment should go to the household, suggests that household finances were a major item of business in what remained of the second session after York's appointment. It seems to have been an issue to which he felt committed and upon which (as discussed above) more action was perhaps taken than appears from the roll. If so, York had reason to feel as parliament adjourned for Christmas that things were progressing as he wished. The submission of Bonville and Devon over the Christmas recess was another advance. Perhaps it was over-confidence that led York to take up the commons' demands for resumption when parliament reassembled. It is abundantly clear that the lords were not happy with the bill as it had left the commons, or with their other attempts to resume royal grants. By early February observers regarded the fate of the bill and of the protectorate as linked. (fn. int1455-29) The exact sequence of subsequent events is unclear but Benet's version of events, in which the lords wheeled out Henry to block the act and York resigned, seems plausible. (fn. int1455-30) The duke was formally discharged as protector on 25 February and withdrew from parliament before the end of the session. Some efforts were made to retain his good will. King and parliament agreed that he should be paid the wages still owing from his first protectorate (nothing was said about the second) and letters patent to that effect were issued on 9 March. (fn. int1455-31)

The bill of resumption was not abandoned, but its sting was drawn by the king's reply that he understood the thinking behind the petition but that he would accept exemptions submitted in writing during the lifetime of the parliament and endorsed by the lords. This opened the floodgates. Prudent observers, like the abbot of St Albans, had no doubt been organising their petitions for exemption ever since the bill was first mooted - coping with such acts must already have become second nature for beneficiaries of royal favour. But it was probably only now that individual exemptions began to be made to the act. Very few of the extant petitions are endorsed with the date of their acceptance, so it is impossible to be sure that none had been agreed in principle earlier, but the handful that are dated all come from the period after York's dismissal. (fn. int1455-32)

The commons' efforts to ensure that the act had teeth were swept aside. Henry's readiness to accept petitions endorsed by the lords (only) was a tacit rejection of the commons' plea for some say in the process. He explicitly rejected the penalty they had sought to impose on anyone receiving a subsequent grant within the scope of the act, which meant that there was no assurance that resumed grants would remain in the king's hands to swell the royal coffers. But this is not to imply that individual petitions were nodded through without scrutiny. Selby abbey had sought exemption for the abbot and his successors. This was amended to exemption for the lifetime of the present abbot, and an endorsement spelled out that upon the present incumbent's death all royal grants to the abbey would be resumed. William Lawshull, groom of the chamber, was struck out of a joint petition with William Neel. In some cases an endorsement gave reasons for the acceptance of the petition. Sir Thomas Tyrell's petition for the advowson of East Thorndon was endorsed with a note that it had been agreed because the church was of little value and Tyrell planned to augment its endowment - information which then found its way into the enrolled proviso. (fn. int1455-33)

That scrutiny continued at a later stage. It was not until 19 July that writs went out to the sheriffs and escheators ordering them to seize grants for which no exemption had been obtained, which could be taken as showing a certain lack of urgency. (fn. int1455-34) But it is clear that the exchequer (which was presumably sympathetic to the aims of the resumption) did then take a rigorous line in assessing exemptions. St Albans abbey discovered that their exemption was inadequate and it was not until November 1457 that they managed to get their exemption confirmed in letters patent. (fn. int1455-35)

As this survey has made clear, it is the high profile 'political' issues which dominate the roll. No private petitions are enrolled (other than individual petitions for exemption from various acts), and just seven common petitions. But it is clear that a great deal more was going on than the roll reveals. An unusually large amount of unenrolled material is extant for this parliament. There are the apparent remains of a whole file of it in PRO C49/30 as well as more scattered survivals among the Ancient Petitions (SC 8).

It is now well-accepted that not all parliamentary business was ever enrolled. The roll was the king's record of business and was consequently selective. It was usual to omit petitions which had been rejected outright. Indeed a major difficulty in studying medieval parliamentary business is the almost complete silence on issues which were raised but then thrown out. Business reserved for further consideration was also unlikely to appear. Of the matters which received the royal assent, private petitions (what contemporaries called 'particular petitions') were always likely candidates for omission. But petitions from the commons which did not result in statutes might also be left off the roll. There are examples of both categories among the unenrolled 1455 material, with endorsements suggesting that the petitions had been bundled up and stored by category. A petition from the duke of York (appendix item 25) is endorsed 'particulares petitiones lecte et expedite anno xxxiij o ', while the commons' request for the repeal of the 1453 act of resumption (appendix item 2) is endorsed 'communes peticiones lecte et response anno xxxiij o '.

Much the greater part of the unenrolled material from 1455, however, relates to unresolved or rejected business. Material, in other words, which one would not expect to be enrolled. The question raised by the additional 1455 material is thus not so much why it is not on the roll, as why so much unresolved business survives at all. The value of keeping copies of material that had been agreed, but not enrolled, is obvious. It is less obvious why rejected material might be kept, and there is relatively little evidence that it was. The 1455 material is unusual in yielding an example of what looks like the deliberate archiving of petitions without the royal assent, with the endorsement 'communes peticiones non concesse de anno xxxiij o ' made to appendix item 4a. This could imply that the high survival rate is explained by the good practice of the clerk of the parliament, John Fawkes, and his clerks. But the other parliaments for which Fawkes was responsible do not show a similar survival rate for unresolved or rejected material, which suggests that some other explanation is needed.

It is likely that parliament's attention to business was faltering in its final session. Aside from the possibility that the king was no longer an active force, the tensions over York's role and the related matter of the act of resumption must have dominated, if not monopolised, meetings. John Bocking's letter of 9 February 1456, which interupts its account of the debate about York's survival as protector with the comment that the lords had that day spoken much of the great star seen recently and 'merveilous in apperyng', confirms rather than challenges this one-track-mindedness. (fn. int1455-36) Once York's resignation resolved that issue, attention concentrated instead on the scramble to secure exemption from the act of resumption before parliament rose. Assuming that the king's assertion of his willingness to receive petitions for exemption was only made at around the time York lost the protectorship on 25 February, there was barely a fortnight before the session ended on 12 March for those concerned to submit their petitions and have them agreed. This is not to suggest that no other business was settled. At least two private petitions are known to have received the king's agreement (appendix items 19, 34). But two other bills known to have been under discussion in the final session went unanswered. One, put in by Philip Wentworth, was under active consideration in the second and third sessions, but had to be brought back to the next parliament. The other, put in by the recorder of London at the instigation of the Mercers' company, involved the seizure of Flemish ships by William, Lord Bonville. (fn. int1455-37)

Neither bill, perhaps significantly, survives. Those which do had got as far as receiving an answer. In the great majority of cases this was 'le roy s'advisera'. A few of these then received a further, formal, answer from the lords: 'Huic bille domini non concenserunt'. This seems to confirm the suggestion that the king was handing on a large share of the business to the lords for decision. It further suggests that they failed to reach an answer on much of it. Perhaps this was why more petitions than usual were preserved: they were still, at least in theory, under consideration when parliament ended. In practice, the probability is that they then fell. The petition endorsed 'communes peticiones non concesse de anno xxxiij o ', does not bear a note of any answer from the lords after the king reserved judgement. It was not just that parliament ran out of steam. York's fall from power rendered many, although not all, of the bills redundant. By the time of the next parliament this reversal of political fortune was to be even more marked.

Text and translation

[p. v-278]
[col. a]
< PARLIAMENTUM DE ANNO HENRICI SEXTI TRICESIMO TERTIO. > THE PARLIAMENT OF THE THIRTY-THIRD YEAR OF HENRY VI.
[memb. 25]
Memorandum quod die mercurii, nono die Julii, anno regni regis Henrici sexti post conquestum tricesimo tertio, ipso domino rege in camera depicta regali solio residente; presentibus etiam quampluribus prelatis, proceribus et communibus regni Anglie ad parliamentum summonitum auctoritate regia convocatis; reverendus pater Thomas archiepiscopus Cantuar', cancellarius Anglie, causam summonicionis parliamenti predicti de mandato ipsius domini regis notabiliter declaravit, assumens pro suo themate: [editorial note: A third of the membrane has been left blank.] [The opening of parliament.]
[1.] Be it remembered that on Wednesday 9 July, in the thirty-third year of the reign of King Henry, the sixth since the conquest [1455], with the lord king sitting on the royal throne in the Painted Chamber; there being also present many prelates, nobles and commons of the kingdom of England assembled at the parliament summoned by royal authority; the reverend father Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, chancellor of England, by order of the lord king memorably announced the reason for summoning the aforesaid parliament, taking as his theme: [editorial note: A third of the membrane has been left blank.]
2. Quapropter ad providendum realiter in eodem parliamento, predictus dominus noster rex presens parliamentum fecerit convocari, prefatis communibus firmiter injungendo, quatinus pro celeriori expedicione negociorum in dicto parliamento tractandorum, in domo sua communi antiquitus usitata in crastino convenirent, et quendam suum prelocutorem eligerent, ac sic electum eidem domino regi die veneris tunc proximo futuro realiter presentarent. Declaravit insuper prefatus dominus cancellarius, de mandato ipsius domini regis, qualiter idem dominus rex voluit et concessit, quod omnes et singuli domini spirituales et temporales, ac communes predicti, et eorum quilibet, omnibus et singulis libertatibus et quietanciis, eis et eorum cuilibet per nobiles progenitores ipsius domini regis concessis et minime revocatis, nec per legem Anglie revocabilibus, set per eos et quemlibet ipsorum rationabiliter usitatis, uti et gaudere deberent; ac eciam ut justicia conqueri volentibus posset celerius adhiberi, idem dominus rex certas personas ad peticiones in parliamento predicto exhibendas recipiendum, ac quosdam dominos et justiciarios ad easdem peticiones triandum et terminandum assignari fecit in forma subsequenti. 2. For which reason, in order to make due provision in the same parliament, our aforesaid lord the present king caused a parliament to be assembled, firmly ordering the aforementioned commons that for the more rapid resolution of the business to be dealt with in the said parliament, they assemble on the following day in their common house as usual, and elect one of their number as speaker and present the man thus elected to the same lord king on the following Friday. The said lord chancellor also announced, by order of the lord king himself, that the same lord king willed and conceded that each and every lord spiritual and temporal, and the aforesaid commons, and each one of them, should use and enjoy each and every liberty and quittance conceded to them and each of them by the noble progenitors of the lord king, neither revoked nor revocable by the law of England, but reasonably exercised by them and each of them; and also, so that justice might be done more swiftly to those wishing to complain, the same lord king caused to be appointed certain persons to receive the petitions to be presented in the aforesaid parliament, and certain lords and justices to try and determine the same petitions in the following form.
[col. b]
3. Receivours des peticions d'Engleterre, Irland, Gales et Escoce:

  • Sire Thomas Kirkeby
  • Sire Johan Faukes
  • Sire Robert Kirkeham.
3. Receivers of petitions from England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland:

  • Sir Thomas Kirkby
  • Sir John Faukes
  • Sir Robert Kirkham.
4. Receivours des peticions de Gascoigne, et d'autres terres et paiis depar dela, et des Isles:

  • Sire Johan Derby
  • Sire Richard Wetton
  • Sire Richard Fryston.
4. Receivers of petitions from Gascony, and the other lands and countries overseas, and from the Channel Islands:

  • Sir John Derby
  • Sir Richard Wetton
  • Sir Richard Fryston.
Et ceux qi voillent deliverer lour peticions, les baillent parentre cy et                     jour proschenment ensuant. And those who wish to submit their petitions should deliver them either today or tomorrow.
5. Et sount assignez triours des peticions d'Engleterre, Irlond, Gales et Escoce:

  • L'ercevesqe de Caunterbris
  • Le duke d'Everwyk
  • L'evesqe de Loundres,
  • L'evesqe de Wyncestr'
  • L'evesqe de Ely
  • Le count de Pembroke
  • Le count de Warwyk
  • Le count de Sarisbirs
  • Le viscount Bourgchier
  • L'abbe de Seint < Johan de > Colcestr'
  • L'abbe de Seint Marie d'Everwyk
  • Le seignour de Faukenbrigge
  • Le seignour de Cromwell
  • Sire Johan Fortescu
  • Piers Ardern
  • William Yelverton
5. And the following are assigned triers of petitions for England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland:

  • The archbishop of Canterbury
  • The duke of York
  • The bishop of London
  • The bishop of Winchester
  • The bishop of Ely
  • The earl of Pembroke
  • The earl of Warwick
  • The earl of Salisbury
  • Viscount Bourchier
  • The abbot of St John of Colchester
  • The abbot of St Mary of York
  • Lord Fauconberg
  • Lord Cromwell
  • Sir John Fortescue
  • Piers Ardern
  • William Yelverton
- toutz ensemble, ou < sis > dez prelates et seignours avauntditz, appellez a eux les chaunceller, tresorer et auxi les serjauntez du roy, quaunt y bosoignera. Et tiendront lour place en le chambre du chamberleyn, pres le chambre de peinte. - to act all together, or at least six of the aforesaid prelates and lords, consulting with the chancellor, treasurer, and also the king's serjeants, when necessary. And they shall hold their session in the chamberlain's room, near the Painted Chamber.
[p. v-279]
[col. a]
6. Et sount assignez triours dez peticions de Gascoigne, et d'autres terres et paiis de par dela, et dez Isles:

  • L'ercevesqe d'Everwyk
  • Le duke de Buk'
  • L'evesqe de Wircestre
  • L'evesqe de Cicestre
  • L'evesqe de Norwyche
  • L'evesqe de Hereford
  • Le count de Salop
  • Le count de Wircestre
  • L'abbe de Bury
  • Le priour de Coventre
  • L'abbe de Waltham
  • Le priour de Seint Johans Jerusalem d'Engleterre
  • Le seignour de Bonvyle
  • Le seignour de Berners
  • Johan Prysot
  • Ricardus Byngham
  • et Nicholaus Aysshton
6. And the following are assigned triers of petitions for Gascony and the other lands and countries overseas, and for the Channel Islands:

  • The archbishop of York
  • The duke of Buckingham
  • The bishop of Worcester
  • The bishop of Chichester
  • The bishop of Norwich
  • The bishop of Hereford
  • The earl of Shrewsbury
  • The earl of Worcester
  • The abbot of Bury
  • The prior of Coventry
  • The abbot of Waltham
  • The prior of St John of Jerusalem in England
  • Lord Bonville
  • Lord Berners
  • John Prysot
  • Richard Bingham
  • and Nicholas Aysshton
- toutz ensemble, ou quatres dez prelates et seignours avauntditz, appellez a eux lez chaunceller, tresorer et auxi lez serjantz du roy, quaunt y bosoignera. Et tiendront lour place en le chambre marcolf. - to act all together, or at least four of the aforesaid prelates and lords, consulting with the chancellor, treasurer, and also the king's serjeants, when necessary. And they shall hold their session in the Marcolf Chamber.
7. Memorandum quod die Jovis, secundo die presentis parliamenti, venerabilis pater Thomas archiepiscopus Cantuar', cancellarius Anglie, de mandato domini regis, coram dominis spiritualibus et temporalibus in presenti parliamento congregatis, legi fecit quosdam articulos, < quos > inter alia recitavit fieri causam summonitionis hujus parliamenti, quorum tenores hic inferius annotantur. [The reason for summoning the parliament.]
7. Be it remembered that on Thursday, the second day of the present parliament, the venerable father Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, chancellor of England, by order of the lord king, in the presence of the lords spiritual and temporal assembled in the present parliament, caused certain articles to be read, which, among other things, he announced to be the reason for summoning this parliament, the tenors of which are noted below.
8. Furst, to establissh an ordinate and a substantiall rule for the kynges honeurable houshold, and to ordeigne where redy paiement shall growe for the expenses of the same. 8. First, to decree a proper and substantial rule for the king's honourable household, and to ordain where ready money shall come from to meet its expenses.
9. Item, to establissh an ordinarie paiement for the wages of the towne, castell and marches of Caleys, wherethurgh such restraintz as here tofore have been had mowe be forborne and ceessed, wherof thanne grete corage shall growe to the merchauntz of this land, to entende the plenteuous shippyng of theire wolles, and therof also grete good to the kyng of custume and subsidie; which withoute purveiaunce hadde for paiement of the seid wages, mowe not of reason be hadde. 9. Item, to decree regular payment for the wages of the town, castle and marches of Calais, whereby such restrictions as have previously existed may be stopped and ended, so that the merchants of this land shall be emboldened to ship more wool, to the king's profit from the custom and subsidy; which cannot reasonably be expected unless provision is made for payment of the said wages.
10. Item, for somuche as the kynges enemies been purveied of grete armies < and > navier, either to arryve in this his land, either elles to leye siege aboute the seid toune of Caleis, it must hastely be purveid, that they mowe hounerably, mightly and manfully be recountred and resisted, and specially to resiste the malice of the Scottes, the which ayenst the trewes have nowe late with all the power they coude make besieged the toune and castell of Berwik, and purpose to do all the hurt thei canne to this lande. 10. Item, because the king's enemies have equipped themselves with great armies and a navy either to invade this his land, or else to lay siege to the said town of Calais, swift provision must be made to confront and resist them honourably, mightily and manfully, and especially to resist the malice of the Scots, who, contrary to the truce, have recently besieged the town and castle of Berwick with all the power they could muster, and intend to do as much damage as they can to this land.
11. Item, to advertise and ordeyne howe and when the .xiij. mille archers graunted in the last parlement shall be emploied. (fn. v-278-37-1) 11. Item, to consider and ordain how and when the thirteen thousand archers granted in the last parliament shall be employed. (fn. v-278-37-1) .
[memb. 24]
12. Item, to sette a parfite love and rest amonge the lordes of this lande, to the entent that they mowe drawe directly togidres in oon union and accorde, in that that may be sowne to the honour, prosperite and welfare of the kyng oure soveraine lord, and the politique [col. b] and restfull reule and gouvernaunce of this his lande and people. 12. Item, to establish perfect love and peace among the lords of this land, so that they may come together in one union and accord, which would be to the honour, prosperity and welfare of the king our sovereign lord, and the politic [col. b] and peaceful rule and governance of this his land and people.
13. Item, to provide and ordeine meanes to sette aside the beryng out of gold and silver of this reaume, to Burdeaux and other places, withoute the which greet inconvenience is like to ensue, aswell in enpoverysshyng this lande as otherwyse. 13. Item, to provide and ordain means to prevent the export of gold and silver from this realm to Bordeaux and other places, without which great trouble is likely to ensue, both by impoverishing this land and otherwise.
14. Item, to purveie and ordeine for the seure kepyng of the see, the which shalbe a grete suerte for the towne of Caleys, etc. 14. Item, to provide and ordain for the safekeeping of the sea, which will provide great security for the town of Calais, etc.
15. Item, to ordeine and purvey for restfull and sadde reule in Wales, and to sette aparte such riottes and disobeisaunces as have be there afore this tyme used. 15. Item, to ordain and provide for peaceful and sober rule in Wales, and to prevent such riots and disobedience as have arisen there in the past.
Quibus articulis ut predicitur lectis et recitatis, prefati domini inter se concordarunt super quinque articulis articulorum predictorum specialius communicare, laborare et tractare; videlicet, pro hospicio regis, pro villis Berewici et Cales', pro custodia maris, pro auro et argento infra regnum custodiendo, et pro Wallia. Et ad expedicionem eorumdem, certi domini tam spirituales quam temporales, super singulis articulis illis singulariter communicaturi et tractaturi assignati fuerunt, juxta ordinem hic inferius annotatam. When these articles had been read and recited as aforesaid, the said lords agreed among themselves to discuss, examine and consider more particularly the aforesaid five articles; that is to say, for the king's household, for the towns of Berwick and Calais, for the keeping of the sea, for the keeping of gold and silver in the kingdom, and for Wales. And to expedite matters, certain lords both spiritual and temporal were assigned to discuss and consider each of those articles, in the order noted below.
16. Pro hospicio regis.

  • Episcopus Wynton'
  • Episcopus Lincoln'
  • Comes Wygorn'
  • Vicecomes de Beaumont
  • Dominus de Cromwell
  • Dominus de Sudeley
  • Thomas Stanley, miles
  • et officiarii dicti hospicii.
16. For the king's household.

  • The bishop of Winchester
  • The bishop of Lincoln
  • The earl of Worcester
  • Viscount Beaumont
  • Lord Cromwell
  • Lord Sudeley
  • Thomas Stanley, knight
  • and officers of the said household.
Pro Cales' et Berewico.

  • Episcopus Cestr'
  • Episcopus Elien'
  • Episcopus Hereford'
  • Dux Buk'
  • Comes Warr'
  • Comes Sar'
  • Comes Salop,
  • Prior Sancti Johannis
  • Dominus de Faucomberge
  • Dominus de Stourton
  • Thesaurarius Cales'
  • Vitellarius Cales'.
For Calais and Berwick.

  • The bishop of Chester
  • The bishop of Ely
  • The bishop of Hereford
  • The duke of Buckingham,
  • The earl of Warwick
  • The earl of Salisbury
  • The earl of Shrewsbury
  • The prior of St John
  • Lord Fauconberg
  • Lord Stourton
  • The treasurer of Calais
  • The victualler of Calais.
Pro custodia maris.

  • Episcopus Norwicen'
  • Episcopus Sar'
  • Comes Oxon'
  • Dominus de Scales
  • Dominus de Fitzwareyn
  • Dominus de Bonevyle.
For keeping the sea.

  • The bishop of Norwich
  • The bishop of Salisbury
  • The earl of Oxford
  • Lord Scales
  • Lord Fitzwarin
  • Lord Bonville.
[p. v-280]
[col. a]
Pro auro et argento, etc.

  • Archiepiscopus Ebor'
  • Episcopus Roffen'
  • Comes Wygorn'
  • Prior Sancti Johannis, custos privati sigilli
  • Decanus Sancti Severini
  • Magister Thomas Kent
  • Magister Gervasius le Vulre, duo mercatores.
[The export of bullion.] For gold and silver, etc.

  • The archbishop of York
  • The bishop of Rochester
  • The earl of Worcester
  • The prior of St John, keeper of the privy seal
  • The dean of St Seurin
  • Master Thomas Kent
  • Master Gervase le Vulre, two merchants.
Pro Wallia.

  • Domini marchearum
  • Servientes domini regis ad legem
  • Attornatus domini regis.
For Wales.

  • The lords of the marches
  • The lord king's serjeants-at-law
  • The lord king's attorney.
Presentacio prelocutoris. The presentation of the speaker.
17. Item, die veneris, tercio die parliamenti predicti, prefati communes presentaverunt domino regi, Johannem Wenlok, militem, prelocutorem suum, de quo idem dominus rex se bene contentavit. Qui quidem Johannes, post excusacionem suam coram domino rege factam, pro eo quod ipsa excusatio ex parte dicti domini regis admitti non potuit, humillime supplicavit, quatinus omnia et singula per ipsum in parliamento predicto nomine dicte communitatis proferenda et declaranda, sub tali posset protestacione proferre et declarare, quod si ipse aliqua sibi per prefatos socios injuncta, aliter quam ipsi concordati fuerint, aut in addendo vel omittendo declaraverit, ea sic declarata per predictos socios suos corrigere posset et emendare; et quod protestacio sua hujusmodi in rotulo parliamenti predicti inactitaretur. Cui per prefatum dominum cancellarium de mandato dicti regis extitit responsum, quod idem Johannes tali protestacione frueretur et gauderet, quali alii prelocutores hujusmodi, tempore dicti domini regis ac nobilium progenitorum suorum, in hujusmodi parliamentis uti et gaudere consueverunt. 17. Item, on the Friday, the third day of the aforesaid parliament, the aforesaid commons presented John Wenlock, knight, to the lord king as their speaker, with whom the same lord king was well satisfied. Which John, having made his excuse before the lord king, because that excuse could not be allowed by the said lord king, most humbly requested that each and every thing to be proposed or announced by him in the aforesaid parliament in the name of the said commons, he might propose and announce under the protestation that if he should say anything enjoined upon him by the aforementioned colleagues, other than they had agreed, either by adding or omitting matter, that what he had said might be corrected or amended by his aforesaid colleagues; and that his protestation might be enacted in this way on the roll of the aforesaid parliament. To which the aforementioned lord chancellor answered, on the order of the said king, that the same John might reap and enjoy the benefit of such a protestation, as other speakers had used and enjoyed it in such parliaments in the time of the said lord king and his noble progenitors.
Declaracio Ricardi ducis Ebor', Ricardi comitis Warr', et Ricardi comitis Sar', facta auctoritate parliamenti. The declaration of Richard, duke of York, Richard, earl of Warwick, and Richard, earl of Salisbury, made by authority of parliament.
18. Memorandum quod excellentissimus in Cristo princeps prefatus dominus noster rex, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium, ac communitatis regni sui Anglie in presenti parliamento existencium, necnon auctoritate ejusdem parliamenti, declarabat carissimos consanguineos suos Ricardum ducem Ebor', Ricardum comitem Warr', et Ricardum comitem Sar', suos fideles ligeos, sub modo et forma in quadam cedula in dicto parliamento exhibita, ac manu ipsius domini regis signata contentis. Cujus quidem cedule tenor sequitur et est talis: 18. Be it remembered that the most excellent prince in Christ our aforementioned lord the king, with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and the commons of his kingdom of England being in the present parliament, and also by authority of the same parliament, declared his beloved kinsmen Richard, duke of York, Richard, earl of Warwick, and Richard, earl of Salisbury, to be his faithful lieges, in the manner and form presented in a certain schedule in the said parliament, and containing the sign manual of the lord king himself. The tenor of which schedule follows and is thus:
Where that Edmunde late duc of Somerset, Thomas Thorp, and William Joseph, entendyng as it is supposed to the hurte and destruction of oure true right trusty and well beloved cousyns, Richard duc of York, Richard erle of Warrewik, and Richard erle of Salisbury, and of theire heires; moved and sollicited us by diverse meanes to mistruste oure seid cousyns, and to instraunge theym from oure favour and good grace affermyng theym not oure true liege men, and therefore provoked and stired us to have proceeded with grete might of people under colour of oure matiers, where noon we hadde, to the avaunsyng of theire owne matiers and quarelles. Oure said cousyns understandyng and consideryng, as they saye, the labours made ayenst theym, and that the said Edmunde, Thomas, and William, [col. b] for thexecution of theire entent, enforced < thaim with grete might > of men in diverse countreyes, moche harneys and grete habilmentes of werre, addressed thaim toward oure presence, to declare theim oure true liegmen, the better accompanyed for theire suertee, and to resiste such malice as they verrely demed was purposed to have been executed ayenst theim, at thaire commyng unto us, by the seid Edmunde, Thomas and William, and for noon other cause; and to thentent that we shuld not wondre nor mervaille of the commyng of oure said cousyns aforereherced toward us, nor of the manere therof, nor have any suspecion or mystrust therof toward oure persone, they wrote thaire lettres at Roiston the .xx. day of May last passed, and thaim sent afore thaire commyng < unto > us, for thaire declaracion and desire, to the most reverend fadre in God Thomas archiebishop of Caunterbury, oure chaunceller of Englond, to be by hym openned unto us, whereof thendorsment and teneur foloweth hereafter: Where Edmund, late duke of Somerset, Thomas Thorpe and William Joseph, intending, as it is supposed, the hurt and destruction of our true, most trusty and well-beloved cousins Richard, duke of York, Richard, earl of Warwick, and Richard, earl of Salisbury, and their heirs, prompted and solicited us by various means to mistrust our said cousins, and to estrange them from our favour and good grace, declaring them not to be our true liegemen, and therefore provoked and incited us to proceed with a great force of people on pretence of our own interest, but in fact to advance their own interests and quarrels. Our said cousins understanding and considering, as they say, the efforts made against them, and how the said Edmund, Thomas and William, [col. b] to accomplish their purpose, reinforced themselves with a large host of men in various counties and a great supply of armour and military equipment, set off towards us, to declare themselves our true liegemen, better companioned for their security, and to resist such malice as they sincerely thought was planned against them, at their coming to us, by the said Edmund, Thomas and William, and for no other reason; and so that we should not wonder or marvel at the appearance before us of our said cousins, or at the manner of it, or have any suspicion or mistrust of their intentions towards us, they wrote letters at Royston on 20 May last, stating their desire, and before coming to us they sent them to the most reverend father in God, Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, our chancellor of England, to be divulged by him to us, the endorsement and tenor of which follow hereafter:
19. To the right reverend fadre in God, right worshipfull and with all oure hertes right entierly welbelovyd cousyn, Thomas archiebishop of Caunterbury, and chaunceller of Englond. Right reverend fader in God, right worshipfull and with all oure hertes right entierly welbelovyd cousin, we recommaunde us unto you. And for somuche as we here that a greet rumour and wondre is hadde of oure commyng, and of the manere therof, toward the most noble presence of the kyng oure moost doubted soverain lord, and that by diverse persones such as of approved experience have not put thaim in such devoir to that that might have avaunced the honour and prosperite of him, of this his noble reaume, and his people of the same, as accorded with theire trouthe and duetee, many doubtes and ambiguitees be thrawen to his magestee roiall, < and amonge > the peeple, of oure trouth and duetee unto his highnesse: we < havyng > consideracion unto thoffice the heed of justice of this lande that ye occupie, notifie unto youre worthy faderhood and cousinage, that of oure said commyng, ner of the manere therof, we entende not with Goddes grace to procede to any matier or thyng, other than with Goddes mercy shalbe to his plesire, the honour, prosperite and wele of oure said soveraine lord, his said land and people. Alwey kepyng oure trouthe to his said highnesse unspotted and unbrused, entendyng to drawe directly to gidres with you, and all other lordes of this lande, that be of such tendre zele and affeccion to the honour, prosperite and wele of oure said soveraine lord, his said reaume and people, as we hold undoubted ye bee, and as blissed be God ye approve youre self to youre grete laude and worship, to the profite and uncolored groundes and conclusions of suche thinges as of reason mowe most spedely growe to the said honour and wele, and the good publique, restfull and politique rule and governaunce of his said lande and people, withoute any thyng takyng or presumyng upon oure self, withoute thavis and assent of < you, and of the > said lordes; leiyng therefore a part oure owne particuler quarels, which we shall never preferre afore the duetee, trouth, love and affeccion, that we owne unto oure said soveraine lord, his said reaume and people. Over this like it you to wite, that we understond the callyng and stablisshyng of the kynges counsail at his towne of Leycestre, toke the grounde by such as we conceyve caused thappointement therof there, for suertee of his moost noble persone, which of commun presumpcion implieth a mistrust to somme persones: we therfore his true and humble liegemen, have accompaigned us the better, to thentent to emploie us in such devoir as accordeth with oure duetee, to that that may be the suertee of his said most [p. v-281][col. a] noble persone, wherin we woll neither spare our bodies ner goodes; and also to knowe whoo be had in jelosy of such mistrust, to the entent that we mowe procede to the subduyng of thaim beyng culpables of the thyng causyng such mistrust; or elles by the avis of your said faderhood and the said lordes, to remove the ambiguitee and the occasion of the same mistrust. We also understond what colerable and subtile meanes be made by oure enemies, holdyng thaim colorably aboute the seid moost noble persone of oure said soveraine lord, of might of men and habilementes of werre have the more surely accompaigned us, to thentent that at oure commyng to his most high presence, we mowe be of power to kepe oureself oute of the daungier whereunto oure said enemies have not ceessed to studie, labour and compasse to bryng us, such as in allewise we will eschewe with Goddes grace. [The duke of York's letter to the archbishop of Canterbury.]
19. To the most reverend father in God, most worshipful and with all our hearts most entirely well-beloved cousin, Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury and chancellor of England. Most reverend father in God, most worshipful and with all our hearts most entirely well-beloved cousin, we commend ourselves to you. And because we hear that there is great rumour and wonder at our coming, and at the manner of it, into the most noble presence of the king our most redoubted sovereign lord, and that by various people who, as experience shows, have not done all they should to advance the honour and prosperity of him, of this his noble realm, and his people of the same, according to their truth and duty, many doubts and uncertainties have been put before his royal majesty, and spread among the people, as to our truth and duty to his highness: we, mindful that you are the head of justice in this land, inform your worthy fatherhood, our cousin, that by our said coming, or the manner of it, we do not intend, with God's grace, to proceed to any matter or thing other than that which, with God's mercy, shall be to his pleasure, and the honour, prosperity and weal of our said sovereign lord, his said land and people. Always keeping our truth to his said highness unspotted and unbruised, intending to join with you, and all other lords of this land who are of such tender zeal and affection to the honour, prosperity and weal of our sovereign lord, his said realm and people, as we consider you undoubtedly to be, and as blessed be God you show yourself to your great praise and worship, to the profit and the unbiased grounds and conclusions of such things as by reason must most speedily grow to the said honour and weal, and the public good, peaceful and politic rule and governance of his said land and people, without presuming to take anything upon ourselves without the advice and assent of you and the said lords; therefore laying aside our own particular quarrels, which we shall never prefer over the duty, truth, love and affection which we owe to our said sovereign lord, his said realm and people. Moreover, may it please you to know that we understand the summoning and establishing of the king's council at his town of Leicester was based by such as we conceive made the decision on the security of his most noble person, which clearly implies a mistrust of certain persons: therefore, we, his true and humble liegemen, have come better companioned, in order to do whatever accords with our duty for the security of his said most [p. v-281][col. a] noble person, wherein we will spare neither our bodies nor goods; and also to know who is suspected of such mistrust, so that we may proceed to the subjugation of those who are guilty of causing such mistrust; or else by the advice of your said fatherhood and the said lords, to remove the uncertainty and the occasion of the same mistrust. We also, understanding what plausible and devious means are used by our enemies, who remain persuasively in attendance upon the said most noble person of our said sovereign lord, have for security accompanied ourselves with a force of armed men, so that in coming into his most high presence we may be able to keep ourselves out of the danger into which our said enemies have never ceased to contrive, work and plot to bring us, such as we will, with God's grace, avoid by every means.
Item, for asmoche as we understonde that other lordes of this lande have be late sent fore, by the kynges commaundement under his lettres, to comen unto his counsail privately late called at Westmynstre, whereunto we have not been among the said lordes called, we conceyve a jelosy had ayenst us, wherof we purpose with Goddes grace to declare us, and to shewe us such as we bee in oure trouthe, duetee and ligeaunce to oure said soveraine lord, entendyng < in alle > wyse to remove the said jelosy, < which we woll > eschewe to have liyng dormant upon us. Furthermore, we heryng the grete defaime and blaspheme thrawen ayenst us by oure seid ennemies of oure said commyng, require you on Goddes behalf, and of the feith and trouth that ye owe unto oure said soveraine lord, on his behalf also require you, and on oure owene exhorte and pray you, that ye standyng the fadre and metropolitan of the chirche of Englond, wol at oure request make oute with all possible diligence the censures of the chirche, to be opened and leied at the crosse of Seint Paule within the citee of London, and thurgh all the parties of this land, in as rigorous and timorouse manere as the chirche wol suffre it, uppon and ayenst all thaim that entende any untrouth, prejudice, hurt or derogacion ayenst thestate, prosperite and welfare of oure said soveraine lord, or his said land. And that this oure lettre of oure entent God knoweth, wherin we trust ye wol be partiner, and therof require you of the feith, trouth and duetee that ye owe to God, to oure said soveraine lord, his said land and people, it wol like you to shewe and ministre unto his high excellence, and to the lordes of his counsail, makyng also oure said entent to be shewed to all other to whom it apperteigneth by youre wisdome, for the removyng and overthrawyng of the cedicious and fraudelent blaspheme and defaime, untruly savyng youre reverence leyed upon us, Oure Lord knoweth; the which request in the premisses we make unto you, first on Goddes behalf, as to the < fader of the > chirche of this land, and on the kynges behalf, as to the chaunceller and chief justice of the same; and also on oure owne behalf, and on the behalf of the lordes, knyghtes, squiers and all other people beyng with us, which have desired and required us to make to you the said request, wherein we desire and pray you to put you in such devoir, as it belongeth you of youre duetee to God, to oure said soveraine lord, and his said land; that of any inconvenient that for lacke therof mowe falle, that God defende, noo charge or burdon be leyed upon you, wherof we wold be right sory, as knoweth Oure Blessid Creatour, whoo your said faderhood and cousinage evermore preserve and guyde in all honour, felicite and welfare. Item, in that we understand that other lords of this land have lately been sent for by the king's commandment under his letters, to come to his council recently summoned secretly at Westminster, among which said lords we were not included, we perceive that there is suspicion of us, and we therefore intend, with God's grace, to declare and show ourselves as we are in our truth, duty and allegiance to our said sovereign lord, intending in every way to remove the said suspicion, which we wish to avoid clinging to us. Furthermore, we, hearing the great defamation and blasphemy hurled at us by our said enemies concerning our coming to the king, require you on God's behalf, and on the faith and loyalty which you owe to our said sovereign lord, on his behalf also require you, and on our own behalf exhort and pray you, that you, being the father and metropolitan of the church of England, will at our request draw up with all possible diligence the censures of the church, to be opened and laid at St Paul's cross in the city of London, and throughout all parts of this land, in as rigorous and fearful a manner as the church will allow, upon and against all those who plan any disloyalty, prejudice, harm or damage to the estate, prosperity and welfare of our said sovereign lord or his land. And this our letter stating our intent is known to God, wherein we trust you will be a sharer, and therefore we require you in the faith, truth and duty which you owe to God, to our said sovereign lord, his said land and people, that it will please you to explain and minister to his high excellence, and to the lords of his council, also causing our said intention to be explained to all others to whom it pertains by your wisdom, for the removal and overthrow of the seditious and fraudulent blasphemy and defamation, untruly, saving your reverence, laid upon us, Our Lord knows; which request we make to you, first on God's behalf, as to the father of the church of this land, and on the king's behalf, as to the chancellor and chief justice of the same; and also on our own behalf, and on behalf of the lords, knights, esquires and other people being with us, who have desired and required of us that we make this said request to you, wherein we desire and pray that you do your best for our said sovereign lord and his land, as your duty to God requires; and that for any harm which through default thereof may befall, which God forbid, no charge or burden shall be laid upon you, for which we would be very sorry, as our Blessed Creator knows, who may evermore preserve and guide your said fatherhood, our cousin, in all honour, felicity and welfare.
Writen at Roiston, the .xx. day of May. R. York, R. Warr', R. Sar'. Written at Royston on 20 May; Richard York, Richard Warwick, Richard Salisbury.
[col. b]
'Nota' appears in a contemporary hand in the margin.
20. And uppon the morowe next after, that is to say the .xxi. day of May last passed, oure said cousyns wrote unto us theire lettres, signed by thaire handes, and undre theire signetes sealed, wherin was closed the copie of thaire said lettre to the said moost reverend fader in God, the said .xx. day sent. The tenour of þe which lettre to us sent of the date of the said .xxi. day, foloweth hereafter: [The letters of York etc. to the king.]
20. And on the following day, namely 21 May last, our said cousins wrote us letters signed by their hands and sealed under their signets, in which was enclosed the copy of their said letter to the said most reverend father in God, sent on the said twentieth day. The tenor of which letter sent to us on the said twenty-first day, follows:
To the moost Cristen kyng, right high and mighty prynce, and our moost redoubted soverain lord the kyng of Englond and of Fraunce, and lord of Irlond. Moost Cristen kyng, right high and mighty prynce, and oure moost redoubted soverain lord, we recommaunde us as humbly as we suffice unto youre high excellence. Where unto please it to wite, that for somoch as we here and understond to oure grettest sorowe erthly that oure enemies of approved experience, such as abide and kepe theim self undre the wynge of your mageste roiall, have thrawen unto the same right cediciously and right fraudelently, many ambiguitees and doubtes of the feith, liegeaunce and duetee, that God knoweth we bere unto youre highnesse, and have put thaim in as greet devoir as they coude to estraunge us from youre moost noble presence, and from the faveur of youre good grace; the which good grace to us is, and awe to be, oure singuler and moost desired joye and consolacion: we at this tyme be commyng with Goddes grace, as youre true and humble liegemen, toward youre said high excellence, to declare and shewe ther unto at large oure said feith and liegeaunce, entendyng with the mercy of Jhesu of oure said commyng to put us in as diligent and herty devoir and duetee as any youre liegemen alyve, to that that may avaunce or preferre the honeur and welfare of your said mageste roiall, and the suertee of your said moost noble persone, the which we beseche Oure Blissed Creatour to prospere in as greet honour, joye and felicite, as ever hadde eny prynce erthly, and to youre seid highnesse soo to take, accepte and repute us, and not to plaise to yeve trust or confidence unto the sinistres, maliciouz and fraudelentes labours and rapportes of oure said enemies, unto oure commyng to youre said moost noble presence, where unto we beseche humbly that we mowe be admitted as youre liegemen, to thentent to shewe us the same, wherof [...] yisterday we wrote oure lettres of oure entent to the right reverend fadre in God Thomas archiebisshop of Caunterbury, youre chaunceller of Englond, to be shewed to youre said highnesse. And for somoche as we be not acertaigned whether oure said entent be by his faderhood shewed unto youre said good grace or not, we send ther < unto > in thees closed, a copie of oure said lettres of oure disposicion towarde youre said high excellence, and the honeur and weel of youre lande, [memb. 23] < wherein we woll persevere with the grace of Oure Lorde, > [...] whoom we beseche youre roial persone to prospre and guyde in all honour and felicite. To the most Christian king, most high and mighty prince, and our most redoubted sovereign lord the king of England and France, and lord of Ireland. Most Christian king, most high and mighty prince, and our most redoubted sovereign lord, we commend ourselves as humbly as we can to your high excellence. May it please you to know that because we hear and understand to our greatest earthly sorrow, that our proven enemies, who abide and keep themselves under the wing of your royal majesty, have planted in your mind, most seditiously and deceitfully, many uncertainties and doubts as to the faith, allegiance and duty, which God knows we bear towards your highness, and have done their best to estrange us from your most noble presence and from the favour of your good grace; which good grace is to us, and ought to be, our special and most desired joy and consolation: we at this time are coming, with God's grace, as your true and humble liegemen to your said high excellence, to declare and fully show to you our said faith and allegiance, intending, with the mercy of Jesus, by our said coming to make the most diligent and hearty effort of any of your liegemen alive to do that which may advance or promote the honour and welfare of your said royal majesty, and the security of your said most noble person, whom we pray Our Blessed Creator to prosper in as great honour, joy and felicity as was ever had by any earthly prince, and we pray that your said highness may so take, accept and hold us, and not trust or believe the underhand, malicious and deceitful efforts and reports of our said enemies until our coming into your said most noble presence, to which we humbly beseech that we may be admitted as your liegemen, so that we may show ourselves to be the same; concerning which, we wrote letters yesterday stating our purpose to the most reverend father in God, Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, your chancellor of England, to be shown to your said highness. And because we have not ascertained whether our intentions were shown by his fatherhood to your said good grace or not, we send enclosed in this a copy of our said letters stating our disposition towards your said high excellence, and the honour and welfare of your land, [memb. 23] wherein we will persevere, with the grace of Our Lord, whom we pray to prosper and guide your royal person in all honour and felicity.
Writen at Ware, the .xxi. day of May; youre moost humble and lowly subgittes and liegemen, R. York, R. Warr', R. Salisbury. Written at Ware on 21 May; your most humble and lowly subjects and liegemen, Richard York, Richard Warwick, Richard Salisbury.
21. The which lettres either to us, or to the said moost reverend fadre in God sent, or the contenu therof, or any copie or copies of thaim, were never openned or declared unto us, afore the commyng of oure said cousyns to the side of the toune of Seint Albone, the .xxij. day of May last passed, we than beyng within the same toune, but from us to that tyme kept by the seid Edmunde, Thomas and William. Howe it be that we nowe understond and knowe certainly that the seid moost reverend fadre in God, in continent [p. v-282][col. a] after the recepcion and sight of the said lettres to him brought, sent us the same, which were < to us presented at > Kilbourne by John Say, the .xxi. day of May aforeseid, aboute .x. of the clocke of the same day afore noon, and by Thomas Mannyng clerc there than receyved, and by him and the said Edmunde, Thomas and William there thanne redde as we for certaine be enfourmed: and that the said lettres to us from oure said cousins sent, were to us presented at Watford by maistre William Willeflete, the .xxij. day of May aforesaid, aboute .ij. of the clocke in the mornyng, and by the erle of Devonshire by oure commaundement there than receyved, and by the said Edmunde, Thomas Thorp and William Joseph from oure heryng kept to us undeclared, unto the said commyng of oure said cousins to the side of the towne of Seint Albone aforeseid. And the said .xxij. day, oure said cousins heryng of oure beyng in the said towne of Seint Albone, come thider desiryng in full lowly wyse to have hadde knowlache of oure entent and pleasire of thaire demeanyng, touchyng the matier in thaire said lettres, to us by thaim the said .xxij. day afore sent, and to come to oure presence to declare thaim as above it is specified. Whereunto aboute .xij. of the clocke of that same day, by thavis of the said Edmunde, Thomas Thorp and William Joseph, it was as we conceyve withoute oure knoweleche answered unto thaim that than we had not seen the same lettres; wheruppon oure said cousins, demyng as we < nowe > conceyve and understond for trouth, that the same lettres shold be by the seid Edmunde, Thomas Thorp and William Joseph that were thanne there aboute us kept from us, to the entent that we shuld not knowe the true and feithfull disposition of the same oure cousins toward us and oure estate, profered theim self to entree into the same towne, to come to oure presence for thaire said declaracion. [The letters are concealed from the king.]
21. Which letters sent either to us, or to the said most reverend father in God, or their contents, or any copy or copies of them, were never opened or declared to us before the arrival of our said cousins outside the town of St Albans on 22 May last, we then being within the same town, but were kept from us up to that time by the said Edmund, Thomas and William. However, we now understand and know for certain that the said most reverend father in God, immediately [p. v-282][col. a] upon receipt and sight of the said letters brought to him, sent us them, which were presented to us at Kilburn by John Say, on 21 May aforesaid, at about 10 o'clock in the morning, and were then received there by Thomas Manning, clerk, and read by him and the said Edmund, Thomas and William as we are certainly informed: and that the said letters sent us by our said cousins were presented to us at Watford by Master William Willeflete, on 22 May aforesaid, at about 2 o'clock in the morning, and were then received there by the earl of Devon by our command, and were kept from our ears by the said Edmund, Thomas Thorpe and William Joseph until the arrival of our said cousins outside the town of St Albans aforesaid. And on the said twenty-second day, our said cousins hearing that we were in the said town of St Albans came thither, desiring most humbly to know our intention and pleasure concerning their conduct, touching the contents of their said letters sent by them to us beforehand on the twenty-second day, and to come into our presence to explain themselves as detailed above. To which, at about 12 o'clock on the same day, on the advice of the said Edmund, Thomas Thorpe and William Joseph, an answer was given them, without our knowledge as we believe, that we had not then seen the same letters; whereupon our said cousins, believing that, as we now perceive and understand to be the truth, the same letters had been kept from us by the said Edmund, Thomas Thorpe and William Joseph, then being about us, so that we should not know of the true and faithful disposition of our same cousins towards us and our estate, proposed to enter the same town, to come into our presence to make their said declaration.
22. And the said Edmunde, Thomas Thorp and William Joseph, with grete multitude of people to thaim assembled, defensably arraied, to the entent to let oure said cousins to come to oure < presence, and > thaim to destroie and slee, opennely saiyng and callyng thaime fals traitours to us, and that they shuld dye as traitours, thenne and there sore assaulted oure said cousins in the said entre into the said towne, in which assaulte it happened the said Edmunde, the said .xxij. day, at the said towne of Seint Albone to be sleyne; and at the commyng of oure said cousins to oure presence, they and all that comme with theim put theim in as notable, humble and true devoir and acquietaille in theire liegeaunce < to our said > persone, and the suertee and saufgarde therof, and also to oure said estate in the duetee and obeissaunce that they owe therunto, as ever did any liegemen to thaire soveraine lord, approvyng and shewyng theim of worshipfull and honorable devoir therin oure true and feithfull liegemen, whoos feith and trouthe therefore at that tyme was and is to us undoubted, and to alle men it awe so to bee. [The duke of Somerset slain at St Albans.]
22. And the said Edmund, Thomas Thorpe and William Joseph, with a great multitude of people gathered around them, defensibly arrayed, planning to prevent our said cousins coming into our presence, and destroy and slay them, openly calling them false traitors to us, and saying that they should die as traitors, then and there grievously assaulted our said cousins in the said entry into the said town, in which assault, on the said twenty-second day, it befell that the said Edmund was slain in the said town of St Albans; and on the coming of our said cousins into our presence, they and all who came with them placed themselves in as good, humble and true duty and obligation in their allegiance to our said person, and its security and safeguard, and also to our said estate in the duty and obedience they owe thereto, as any liegemen ever did to their sovereign lord, proving and showing themselves our true and faithful liegemen by their worshipful and honourable behaviour therein, whose faith and truth, therefore, was at that time and is undoubted by us, as it ought to be by all men.
23. We therfore consideryng the premisses, declare, repute, accepte, hold and approve oure said cousins, and all thoo persones that comme with thaim in thaire felaship to the said towne of Seint Albone, the said .xxij. day, and all < other persones that > thaim or any of thaim have assisted, stired, helped, conforted or counseilled, oure true and feithfull liegmen; and woll that thurgh all oure said reaume by all oure people of the same, they and ichoon of theim be soo taken, reputed, accepted, holden and approved. [The duke of York etc. reputed loyal.]
23. We, therefore, considering the foregoing, declare, repute, accept, hold and approve our said cousins, and all those who accompanied them to the said town of St Albans on the said twenty-second day, and all those who have assisted, encouraged, helped, comforted or advised them or any of them, to be our true and faithful liegemen; and we will that throughout our said realm, they and each of them be so taken, reputed, accepted, held and approved, by all our people of the same.
24. And over that, we woll and graunte by thavis of [...] the lordes spirituell and temporell, and of the communes in this present parlement assembled, and by auctorite of the same, that oure said cousins, and all the said persones comyng or beyng in thaire felauship, and ichoon of thaim, thaire assistours, helpours, sturrers, confortours and counseillours aforesaid, be so taken, had and reputed ayenst [col. b] us and oure heires, and all other men, for ever. And that noon of oure said cousins, the duc of York, and erles of Warwic and Salisbury, nor noon of the said persones commyng or beyng with thaim, nor noon of thaire said assistours, helpours, stirrers, confortours or counseillours, ner noon of any of thaire heires, of ner for any thyng supposed or pretended to be doon to or ayenst oure persone, corone or dignitte, be empeched, sued, vexed, greved, hurt or molested in thaire bodies, landes or goodes, in anywyse. And over that, we woll by the said advis and auctoritee, that noon of oure said cousins, ner noon of the said persones commyng with thaim to the said toune of Seint Albone, ner noon of thaire said assistours, helpours, sturrers, counseillours or confortours, ner noon of any of thaire heires, of ner for any thyng that happened the said .xxij. day to falle or be doon at the said towne of Seint Albone, be empeched, sued, greved, vexed, hurt or molested in thaire bodies, goodes or landes, in anywyse. [Their pardon.]
24. Moreover, we will and grant by the advice of the lords spiritual and temporal, and the commons in this present parliament assembled, and by authority of the same, that our said cousins, and all those accompanying them or being of their fellowship, and each of them, their assistants, helpers, inciters, comforters and counsellors aforesaid, be so taken, had and reputed towards [col. b] us and our heirs and all other men forever. And that none of our said cousins, the duke of York and the earls of Warwick and Salisbury, nor any of the said persons accompanying them, nor any of their said assistants, helpers, inciters, comforters or counsellors, nor any of their heirs, for anything supposed or alleged to have been done to or against our person, crown or dignity, be impeached, sued, vexed, grieved, harmed or molested in their bodies, lands or goods in any way. Furthermore, we will by the said advice and authority, that none of our said cousins, nor any of the said persons coming with them to the said town of St Albans, nor any of their said assistants, helpers, inciters, counsellors or comforters, nor any of their heirs, for anything which happened to occur or be done on the said twenty-second day at the said town of St Albans, be impeached, sued, grieved, vexed, harmed or molested in their bodies, goods or lands, in any way.
[editorial note: De sacramento regi prestito.] [editorial note: Of the oath taken to the king.]
25. The .xxiiij. day of Juyll, the .xxxiij. ti yere of oure soveraine lord kyng Henry the VI te , at Westm' in the grete counsaill chambre, tyme < of > parlement, in the presence of oure said soveraine lord, the lordes spirituell and temporell, in shewyng theire trouth, feith and love that they have and bere to his highnesse, every lord spirituell leiyng his hond uppon his brest, and every temporell lord takyng oure said soveraine lord by the hande, frely sware and promitted in manere and fourme that folowith: 25. On 24 July, in the thirty-third year of our sovereign lord King Henry VI [1455], at Westminster in the great council chamber, at the time of the parliament, in the presence of our said sovereign lord, the lords spiritual and temporal, to show the truth, faith and love which they have and bear to his highness, every lord spiritual laying his hand upon his breast, and every lord temporal taking our said sovereign lord by the hand, freely swore and promised in the manner and form which follows:
I promitte unto youre highnesse by the feith and trouth that I owe to God, and to you, that I shall truely and feithfully kepe the liegeaunce that I owe unto you my most soveraine lord, and to put me in my devoir to do all that that may be to the welfare, honour and saufgard of youre most noble persone, and roiall estate, preeminence and prerogative: and I shall at no tyme will or consent to that that myght in enywyse be or sowne to the hurte or prejudice of youre said most noble persone, dignitte, corone or estate. And over that, I shall with all my power resiste and withstonde all theim that wold in eny wyse presume to attempte the contrarie. So God me help and his seyntes. I promise to your highness by the faith and truth I owe to God and to you, that truly and faithfully shall I keep the allegiance that I owe to you my most sovereign lord, and do my best to do everything that may be to the welfare, honour and safeguard of your most noble person and royal estate, pre-eminence and prerogative: and I shall at no time will or consent to anything which might in any way be or lead to the harm or prejudice of your said most noble person, dignity, crown or estate. Moreover, I shall resist and withstand with all my power all those who shall in any way presume to attempt the contrary. So help me God and his saints.
26. It was also ordeined and avised, that all other lordes beyng not present, shuld at theire commyng make the seid othe and promisse; the which promisse and othe made as above, the kyng wold and commaunded shuld be enacted in the parlement rolle, and also to < be written and incorporat > in the boke of the counseill, there to remayne < of record among other actes and > ordenaunces. 26. It was also ordained and advised that all lords who were not present should make the said oath and promise on their arrival; which promise and oath made as above, the king willed and commanded should be enacted in the parliament roll, and also be written and included in the book of the council, there to remain on record among other acts and ordinances.
Exoneracio certorum dominorum habentium custodiam maris. [The earl of Salisbury and others discharged of keeping the sea.]
27. For asmoche as the erles of Salisbury, Sherosbery, and Worcestre, and the lord Stourton, besought the kynges highnesse in this present parlement, that it myght like his high excellence of his noble grace to have theym clerely discharged of the kepyng of the see. The kyng therfore, and for other causes moevyng his highnesse, by the advis of his < lords > spirituelx and temporelx in this seid present parlement assembled, the .xxx. day of Juyll, the .xxij. day of the same parlement, admitted theire desire, and wold that the seid erles, and Lord Stourton, or eny other that had the kepyng of the see, by an acte made in the last parlement begunne and holden at Redyng, and ended at Westm', (fn. v-278-109-1) be fro the seid .xxx. day of Juyll fully discharged of the kepyng of the same; and that it shuld be enacted of record. 27. The discharge of certain lords having the keeping of the sea. The earls of Salisbury, Shrewsbury and Worcester, and Lord Stourton begged the king's highness in the present parliament that it might please his high excellence of his noble grace to discharge them fully from the keeping of the sea. The king, therefore, and for other reasons prompting his highness, by the advice of his lords spiritual and temporal assembled in the said present parliament, on 30 July, the twenty-second day of the same parliament, granted their wish, and willed that the said earls and Lord Stourton, or anyone else who had had the keeping of the sea by an act made in the last parliament begun and held at Reading and ending at Westminster, (fn. v-278-109-1) should be fully discharged from its keeping from the said 30 July; and that it should be enacted of record.
Prorogacio parliamenti. The prorogation of parliament.
28. Memorandum quod tricesimo primo die Julii, anno presenti, tribus statibus regni coram domino rege in presenti parliamento comparentibus, venerabilis pater Thomas Cantuar' archiepiscopus, cancellarius Anglie, ex parte dicti domini regis et ejus mandato declarabat, qualiter idem dominus rex, pro eo [col. b] quod tempus autumpnale, in quo communes regni sui Anglie circa fructuum terre congregacionem assidue laborare et intendere oportebat, < ac pro indispositione aeris > in civitate London' et suburbiis ejusdem jam regnante; presens parliamentum suum usque duodecimum diem Novembris tunc proximum futurum apud Westm' adtunc reincepturum prorogare voluit, ac sic illud realiter prorogavit; omnibus et singulis quorum interfuit firmiter injungendo, quod dicto duodecimo die Novembris apud Westm', excusacione quacumque cessante, personaliter convenirent, ad tractandum, communicandum et consentiendum super hiis que tunc ibidem pro pacis bono, ac regis et regni commodo, favente Domino, contigerint ordinari. Et ulterius dictus dominus cancellarius declaravit quod prefatus dominus rex, de gracia sua speciali et ex mero motu suo, concessit graciam et pardonacionem suas, universis et singulis ligeis suis, qui proinde prosequi voluerint, juxta formam in quadam cedula inde facta et in cancellaria dicti domini regis residenta specificatam et contentam. Cujus quidem cedule tenor sequitur, hanc seriem verborum continens: 28. Be it remembered that on 31 July, in the present year, the three estates of the realm appearing before the lord king in the present parliament, the venerable father Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, chancellor of England, announced on behalf of the said lord king and by his command that the same lord king, because [col. b] it was autumn, at which time it was fitting that the commons of his realm of England should assiduously set about and attend to the harvesting of the fruits of the land, and because of the unhealthy air now prevailing in the city of London and its suburbs, wished to prorogue his present parliament until the following 12 November, when it would be resumed at Westminster, and so he did indeed prorogue it; firmly ordering everyone concerned that they should assemble in person on the said 12 November at Westminster, without any excuse, to consider, discuss and reach agreement on those things which would then need to be ordained, God willing, for the good of peace and the profit of the king and kingdom. And further, the said lord chancellor announced that the aforementioned lord king, of his special grace and own free will, granted his grace and pardon to each and all of his lieges who might wish to sue for it, according to the form specified and contained in a certain schedule kept in the chancery of the said lord king. The tenor of which schedule follows in these words:
De pardonacione generali. Concerning the general pardon.
29. Rex, omnibus ballivis et fidelibus suis ad quos, etc., salutem. Sciatis quod de gracia nostra speciali, et ex certa sciencia et mero motu nostris, pardonavimus, remisimus et relaxavimus A, seu quocumque alio nomine censeatur, omnimodos transgressiones, offensas, mesprisiones, contemptus et impeticiones, per ipsum A. ante nonum diem Julii ultimo preteritum, contra formam statutorum de liberatis pannorum et capiciorum factos sive perpetratos, unde punitio caderet in demandam debitam seu in finem et redempcionem, aut in alias penas pecuniarias seu imprisonamenta, statutis predictis non obstantibus. Et insuper, ex motu et sciencia nostris predictis, pardonavimus, remisimus et relaxavimus eidem A. sectam pacis nostre, que ad nos versus ipsum pertinet, pro omnimodis prodicionibus, murdris, raptibus mulierum, rebellionibus, insurrectionibus, feloniis, conspirationibus, cambipartiis, manutenenciis et imbraciariis, ac aliis transgressionibus, offensis, negligenciis, extorsionibus, mesprisionibus, ignoranciis, contemptibus, concelamentis, forisfacturis et decepcionibus, per ipsum A. ante dictum nonum diem Julii qualitercumque factis sive perpetratis; ac etiam utlagariis sique in ipsum A. hiis occasionibus seu earum aliqua fuerint promulgatis, et firmam pacem nostram ei inde concedimus: ita tamen quod stet recto in curia nostra, si quis versus eum loqui voluerit de premissis vel aliquo premissorum. 29. The king, to all his bailiffs and faithful men to whom, etc., greeting. Know that of our special grace, and of our certain knowledge and free will, we have pardoned, remitted, and released to A., or by whatever other name he is known, all transgressions, offences, misprisions, contempts and other accusations committed or perpetrated by A. before 9 July last, against the form of the statutes concerning livery of cloth and hoods, for which the punishment should have been the execution of a bond or a fine and redemption, or other monetary penalties or imprisonment, notwithstanding the aforesaid statutes. Moreover, of our aforesaid free will and knowledge, we have pardoned, remitted and released to the same A. breach of our peace, which pertains to us against him, on account of all manner of treasons, murders, rapes of women, rebellions, insurrections, felonies, conspiracies, champerty, maintenance and embracery, and other transgressions, offences, negligences, extortions, misprisions, ignorances, contempts, concealments, wrongs and deceptions, howsoever committed or perpetrated by A. before the said 9 July; and also outlawry, if it has been promulgated against the same A. on these grounds or any others, and we have granted our firm peace to him: provided nevertheless that he stand to right in our court, should there be anyone who wishes to speak against him concerning the things stated or any of them.
Et ulterius pardonavimus, remisimus et relaxavimus eidem A. omnimoda escapia felonum, catalla felonum et fugitivorum, catalla utlagatorum, et felonum de se, deodanda, vasta, impeticiones, ac omnimodos [memb. 22] articulos itineris, destructiones et transgressiones de viridi vel venacione, venditiones boscorum infra forestas et extra, et aliarum rerum quarumcumque, ante dictum nonum diem Julii, infra regnum nostrum Anglie et marchia Wallie emersa et eventa, unde punicio caderet in demandam debitam seu in finem et redempcionem, aut in alias penas pecuniarias, seu in forisfacturam bonorum et catallorum, aut imprisonamenta, seu amerciamenta communitatum villarum, vel singularium personarum, vel in oneracionem liberi tenementi eorum qui nunquam transgressi fuerunt, ut heredum, executorum vel terre tenencium, escaetorum, vicecomitum, coronatorum et aliorum hujusmodi, et omne id quod ad nos versus ipsum A. pertinet seu pertinere posset ex causis supradictis. Ac etiam pardonavimus, remisimus et relaxavimus eidem A. omnimodas donaciones, alienaciones et perquisiciones, per ipsum de terris et tenementis de nobis vel progenitoribus nostris quondam regibus Anglie in capite tentis. Ac etiam omnimodas donaciones et perquisiciones ad manum mortuam [p. v-284][col. a] factas et habitas absque licencia regia; necnon omnimodos intrusiones et ingressus in hereditatem suam in parte vel in toto, post mortem antecessorum suorum, absque debita prosecucione ejusdem extra manum regiam, ante eundem nonum diem Julii fact; una cum exitibus et proficuis inde medio tempore perceptis. Moreover, we have pardoned, remitted and released to the same A. all manner of escapes of felons, chattels of felons and fugitives, chattels of outlaws and suicides, deodands, wastes, impeachments and all manner of [memb. 22] articles of the eyre, destructions and trespasses of vert and venison, sale of wood within forests and without, and any other things, happening or occurring before the said 9 July in our kingdom of England and the marches of Wales, for which punishment should have been the execution of a bond, or a fine and redemption, or other monetary penalties, or forfeiture of goods and chattels, or imprisonment, or amercements of communities, towns or individuals, or the charging of the free-holding of those who had never transgressed, such as heirs, executors or tenants of land, escheators, sheriffs, coroners and such others, and everything which pertains or may pertain to us against the same A. for the aforesaid reasons. And we have also pardoned, remitted and released to the same A. all manner of gifts, alienations and purchases of lands and tenements held in chief by him from us and our progenitors, once kings of England. And also all manner of gifts and purchases made and had in mortmain [p. v-284][col. a] without royal licence; and also all kinds of intrusion and entry into his inheritance in part or in full, after the death of his ancestors, without duly suing the same from the king's hand, done before the same 9 July; together with issues and profits received in the meantime.
Et insuper pardonavimus, remisimus et relaxavimus eidem A. omnimodas penas ante dictum nonum diem Julii forisfactas, coram nobis seu consilio nostro, cancellario, thesaurario, seu aliquo judicum nostrorum, pro aliqua causa, et omnes alias penas tam nobis quam carissimo patri nostro defuncto, per ipsum A. pro aliqua causa ante eundem nonum diem Julii forisfactas, et ad opus nostrum levandas, ac omnimodas securitates pacis ante eundem nonum diem Julii similiter forisfactas. Ac etiam tertias et tertiarum tertias omnimodorum prisonariorum in guerra captorum, nobis dicto nono die Julii qualitercumque debitas, pertinentes seu spectantes per eundem A.; necnon omnimodos transgressiones, offensas, mesprisiones, contemptus et impeticiones, per ipsum A. ante eundem nonum diem Julii, contra formam tam quorumcumque statutorum, ordinacionum et provisionum, ante dictum nonum diem Julii factorum sive editorum de perquisicionibus, acceptationibus, lectionibus, publicationibus, notificacionibus et execucionibus quibuscumque, quarumcumque litterarum et bullarum apostolicarum, ante dictum nonum diem Julii, et omnium aliorum statutorum, ordinationum et provisionum, pretextu quorum aliqua secta versus eundem A. per billam vel per breve de premunire facias, seu alio modo quocumque, pro aliqua materia ante eundem nonum diem Julii fieri valeat; quam quorumcumque aliorum statutorum factorum sive perpetratorum, statutis, ordinacionibus et provisionibus illis non obstantibus, litteris et bullis de exempcionibus dumtaxat exceptis. Ac etiam pardonavimus, remisimus et relaxavimus eidem A. omnimodos fines adjudicatos, amerciamenta, exitus, forisfacturas, relevia, scutagia, ac omnimoda debita, compota, prestita, arreragia firmarum et compotorum, nobis ante octavum diem Julii anno regni nostri vicesimo sexto qualitercumque debita et pertinencia; necnon omnimodas acciones et demandas, quas nos solus, vel nos conjunctim cum aliis personis vel alia persona habemus seu habere poterimus versus ipsum A. pro aliquibus hujusmodi finibus, amerciamentis, exitibus, releviis, scutagiis, debitis, compotis, prestitis et arreragiis, ante eundem octavum diem Julii nobis debitis. Ac etiam utlagariis in ipsum A. promulgatis, pro aliqua causarum supradictarum; omnimodis debitis et compotis nobis debitis et pertinentibus, que vigore litterarum nostrarum patencium, seu brevium nostrorum de magno vel privato sigillo, aut per estallamenta sive assignationes respectuata existunt, omnino exceptis. Et quod presens pardonacio nostra, quo ad premissa seu aliquod premissorum, non cedat in dampnum, prejudicium vel derogacionem alicujus alterius persone quam persone nostre dumtaxat: nec quod presens pardonacio nostra, nec aliqua hujusmodi pardonacio nostra, ad aliquos magnos computantes nostros, qui nunc sunt vel qui nuper fuerunt, videlicet, ad thesaurarios et hospicii nostri, vitellarios Cales', camerarios Cestr', Northwall' et Suthwall', custodes garderobe nostre hospicii nostri, aut custodes magne garderobe nostre, aut custodes sive clericos garderobe nostre, clericos operacionum nostrarum, constabularios Burdegall', thesaurarios terre nostre Hibernie, et receptores ducatus nostri Lancastr', et ducatus nostri Cornub', tam generales quam particulares, quoad aliqua hujusmodi officia sua, seu hujusmodi occupaciones suas, aut alicujus eorumdem tangencia ullo modo se extendat. In cujus, etc. Per ipsum regem. We have also pardoned, remitted and released to the same A. all kinds of penalties forfeited before the said 9 July, before us or our council, chancellor, treasurer, or any of our justices, for any reason, and all other penalties forfeited both to us and our most beloved father, deceased, by the same A. for any reason before the same 9 July, and levied for our use, and all kinds of sureties of the peace similarly forfeited before 9 July. And also the third parts and third parts of third parts of all manner of prisoners captured in war, howsoever due to us on the said 9 July, pertaining or relating to the same A.; and also all kinds of trespasses, offences, misprisions, contempts and impeachments committed or perpetrated by the same A. before the same 9 July, against the form both of certain statutes, ordinances and provisos, made or declared before the said 9 July, concerning any purchases, acceptances, readings, publications, notifications and executions of any apostolic letters and bulls, before the said 9 July, and of all other statutes, ordinances and provisos, on the strength of which any suit could be brought against the same A. by bill or by writ of premunire facias, or in any other way whatever before 9 July; as of any other statutes, made or done notwithstanding those statutes, ordinances and provisos, letters and bulls of exemptions only excepted. And we have also pardoned, remitted and released to A. all manner of fines adjudged, amercements, issues, forfeitures, reliefs, scutages and all manner of debts, accounts, loans, arrears of farms and accounts, howsoever due and pertaining to us before 8 July in the twenty-sixth year of our reign [1448]; and also all manner of actions and demands, which we alone, or jointly with other persons or another person have or ought to have against A. for any such fines, amercements, issues, reliefs, scutages, debts, accounts, loans and arrears, due to us before the same 8 July. And also outlawry promulgated against A. for any of the aforesaid reasons; all manner of debts and accounts due and pertaining to us, which have been respited by force of our letters patent, or our writs of great or privy seal, or by instalments or assignments, wholly excepted. And that our present pardon, with regard to the things stated or any of them, should not result in the injury, prejudice or damage of any other person but only ourselves: and neither our present pardon, nor any other similar pardon of ours, shall extend to any of our leading accounting officials, present or past, namely our treasurers including those of our household, victuallers of Calais, the chamberlains of Chester, North Wales and South Wales, the keepers of the wardrobe of our household, or keepers of our great wardrobe, or keepers or clerks of our wardrobe, the clerks of our works, constables of Bordeaux, treasurers of our land of Ireland, and the receivers of our duchy of Lancaster and our duchy of Cornwall, both general and particular, with regard to any of their offices or responsibilities, or anything else touching the same. In [witness] of which, etc. By the king.
[col. b]
Commissio procedendo in parliamento. Commission to proceed with parliament.
30. Memorandum quod duodecimo die Novembris, anno regni < dicti metuendissimi domini > regis tricesimo quarto, in quem diem prefatus dominus rex presens parliamentum suum adjornavit et prorogavit; pro eo quod idem dominus rex, in dicto parliamento propter certas justas et racionabiles causas in persona sua interesse non potuit, quasdam litteras patentes sub magno sigillo suo signatas, primo coram dominis spiritualibus et temporalibus, deinde coram communibus in dicto parliamento existentibus legi mandavit, in hec verba: 30. Be it remembered that on 12 November, in the thirty-fourth year of the reign of the said most dread lord king [1455], until which day the aforementioned lord king had adjourned and prorogued his present parliament; because the same lord king could not, for certain just and reasonable causes, be present in person in the same parliament, he ordered certain letters patent sealed under his great seal to be read first before the lords spiritual and temporal, and then before the commons being in the said parliament, in these words:
Henricus, Dei gratia, rex Anglie et Francie, et dominus Hibernie, omnibus ad quos presentes littere pervenerint, salutem. Sciatis quod cum pro quibusdam arduis et urgentibus negociis, nos, statum et defensionem regni nostri Anglie, et ecclesie Anglicane contingentibus, quoddam parliamentum nostrum nuper apud palacium nostrum Westm' teneri, et usque ad duodecimum diem hujus instantis mensis Novembris ad idem palatium nostrum adjornari et prorogari ordinaverimus. Quia vero dicto parliamento nostro propter certas justas et racionabiles causas in persona nostra non poterimus interesse, nos, de circumspectione et industria carissimi consanguinei nostri Ricardi ducis Ebor' plenam fiduciam reportantes, eidem consanguineo nostro ad parliamentum < predictum > nomine nostro tenendum, et in eodem procedendum, et ad faciendum omnia et singula que pro nobis et per nos, pro bono regimine et gubernacione regni nostri predicti, et aliorum dominiorum nostrorum eidem regno nostro pertinentium, ibidem fuerint faciendum, necnon ad parliamentum illud finiendum et dissolvendum, de assensu consilii nostri, plenam tenore presencium commisimus potestatem: dantes ulterius, de assensu ejusdem consilii nostri, tam universis et singulis archiepiscopis, episcopis, abbatibus, prioribus, ducibus, comitibus, vicecomitibus, baronibus et militibus, cum omnibus aliis quorum interest, ad parliamentum nostrum predictum < conventuris, > similiter tenore presencium firmiter in mandatis, quod eidem consanguineo nostro intendant in premissis in forma predicta. In cujus rei testimonium, has litteras nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud Westm', undecimo die Novembris, anno regni nostri tricesimo quarto. (fn. v-278-121-1) Henry, by the grace of God, king of England and France, and lord of Ireland, to all to whom the present letters shall come, greeting. Know that where for certain important and urgent matters of business concerning us, the state and defence of our kingdom of England, and the English church, we ordered our parliament lately held at our palace of Westminster to be adjourned and prorogued until the twelfth day of the present month of November at our same palace. Since, however, we are not able to be present in person at our said parliament for certain just and reasonable causes, we, wholly trusting in the circumspection and industry of our most beloved kinsman Richard, duke of York, have committed to our same kinsman, by the tenor of the present document, full authority to hold the aforesaid parliament in our name, and proceed with it, and do each and every thing which was to be done for us and by us, for the good rule and governance of our aforesaid kingdom, and of all our dominions pertaining to our same kingdom, and also to end and dissolve that parliament, with the assent of our council: giving, moreover, strict orders, again by the tenor of the present document and with the assent of our same council, to each and every archbishop, bishop, abbot, prior, duke, earl, viscount, baron and knight, with all others present, assembled at our aforesaid parliament, that they assist our same kinsman in the aforesaid. In witness of which we have caused these our letters patent to be made. Witness myself at Westminster, 11 November, in the thirty-fourth year of our reign [1455]. (fn. v-278-121-1)
Per breve de privato sigillo et de data predicta, auctoritate parliamenti. By writ of privy seal of the aforesaid date, by authority of parliament.
Requesta facta per communes pro protectore habendo. Request made by the commons for a protector.
31. Memorandum that the .xiij. day of the said moneth of Novembre, it was shewed to the duke of York, the kynges lieutenaunt in this present parlement, and to þe lordes spirituell and temporell, by the mouthe of Burley, accompanyed with notable nombre of the communes, in name of all the communes, that howe it had liked the kynges highnesse for certayn causes hym moevyng to assigne the said duk of York to be his lieutenaunt in this present parlement, and to procede in matiers of parliament, as in the kynges lettres theruppon < made > and late radde before the said communes it is playnly conteyned, and that the said duke of York had taken uppon hym so to procede. Wherfore it was thought by theym that were commen for the communes of this lande, that if for suche causes the kyng heraftre myght not entende to the proteccion and defence of this lande, that it shuld like the kyng by the advis of his said lieutenaunt and the lordes, to ordeigne and purvey suche an hable persone as shuld mowe entende to the defence and proteccion of the said lande, and this to be doon as sone as it myght be, and they to have knowelege therof, to that entent that they myght sende to theym for whom they were commen to this present parlement knowelege who shuld be protectour and defensour of this lande, and to whom they [p. v-285][col. a] shuld mowe have recours to sue for remedie of injuries and wronges done to theym. And also where there ben grete and grevous riotes doon in the weste countrey, betwene therle of Devonshire, and the lord Bonevile, by the whiche som men have be murdred, some robbed, and children and wymen taken: it is thought that if suche protectour and defensour were had, that suche riotes and injuries shuld be souner punysshed, justice largely ministred, and the lawe more duely to procede. Wherfore it myght lyke the said lieutenaunte and all the lordes to be goode meanes unto the kynges highnesse, that suche a persone myght be purveide fore and had. And theruppon it was answered by the archebisshop of Caunterbury, chaunceler of Englond, that the said lieutenaunt and all the lordes wolde comon and delibre uppon theire desire, and they shuld have suche aunswere as shuld be pleasyng to God, and profitte to the land. 31. Be it remembered that on the thirteenth day of the said month of November, it was shown to the duke of York, the king's lieutenant in the present parliament, and to the lords spiritual and temporal by Burley, accompanied by a considerable number of the commons, in the name of all the commons, that it had pleased the king's highness for certain reasons prompting him, to appoint the said duke of York as his lieutenant in the present parliament, to proceed with the business of parliament, as is fully stated in the king's letters on the subject lately read before the said commons, and that the said duke of York had taken it upon himself so to proceed. Wherefore it was thought by those who had come on behalf of the commons of this land, that if for these reasons the king could not subsequently attend to the protection and defence of this land, it should please the king, with the advice of his said lieutenant and the lords, to ordain and provide such an able person as would best attend to the defence and protection of the said land, and that this should be done as soon as possible, and that they should be informed of it, so that they could notify those for whom they had come to the present parliament who would be the protector and defender of this land, and to whom they [p. v-285][col. a] should have recourse to sue for remedy of injuries and wrongs done to them. Moreover, where there have been great and grievous riots done in the West Country, between the earl of Devon and Lord Bonville, in which some men have been murdered and some robbed, and children and women taken, it is thought that if such a protector and defender were appointed, such riots and injuries would the sooner be punished, justice fully administered, and the law proceed more properly. Wherefore, might it please the said lieutenant and all the lords to intercede with the king's highness, that such a person might be provided and appointed. And thereupon the archbishop of Canterbury, chancellor of England, answered that the said lieutenant and all the lords would consult and deliberate upon their wish, and they would receive such an answer as would be pleasing to God, and of profit to the land.
De eodem. [The commons' request renewed.]
32. Item, the Saturday, the .xv. day of the said moneth of Novembre, the said Burley, accompanied in grete nombre of the communes, in name of all theire felawes, come before the said lyeutenaunt and all the lordes in this present parlement, openyng before theym that howe uppon Thursday last past, it was desired by theym that were comen for the communes of this lande, that for asmoche as it liked the kynges highnesse for certeyn causes meovyng hym, and that he myght not personelly entende to procede in matiers of parliament, to assigne the duc of York to be his lieutenaunt in this his high court of parliament, to procede in suche matiers as in the kynges lettres patentes theruppon made, radde and declared before the said communes of this lande is plainly conteyned; that it myght like their good lordshippes to be good meanes to the kynges highnesse, that if he for suche causes myght not personelly heraftre entende to the defense of this lande, to ordeyn and provide an hable persone to be protectour and defensour of this lande. It is yit thought to theym that be come to this high court of parlement for the communes of this lande, that where there be mony grete and grevous riottes done in the west contrey, where som men ben robbed and som slayn, and mony grevously hurte and injuried, if the kyng shuld be vexed and troubled with suche matiers, and that his people shuld have recours to his highnesse to complayne and sue to hym for their grevaunces, matiers and suetes, it shuld be overe grevous and tedious to his highnesse, and that there must be a persone to whom the people of this lande may have recours to sue to for remedy of their injuries; for these causes, they that be comen for the communes of this lande to this high court of parliament required the said lieutenaunt and all the lordes that it myght like theire good lordshippes to be good meanes to the kynges highnesse, that suche persone myght be ordeyned and purveide, that shuld mowe entende to the proteccion and defence of this lande, and that they myght have knowelege of hym, his power and auctorite, the whiche shuld be to theym right grete comfort and consolacion. Wheruppon it was aunswered < by thassent > of the < seid lieutenaunt and lordes, by the mouthe of the seid > chaunceler, that the said lieutenaunt and all the lordes woold comon uppon their desire, trustyng to God they shuld have therof good and comfortable aunswere. 32. Concerning the same. Item, on Saturday, the fifteenth day of the said month of November, the said Burley, accompanied by a great number of the commons, in the name of all their fellows, came before the said lieutenant and all the lords in the present parliament, explaining to them that last Thursday it was requested by those who had come on behalf of the commons of the land, that inasmuch as it pleased the king's highness for certain reasons prompting him, and because he could not attend personally to the business of parliament, to assign the duke of York to be his lieutenant in this his high court of parliament to proceed with such business, as is fully contained in the king's letters patent made thereon, and read and declared before the said commons of the land; that it might please their good lordships to intercede with the king's highness, so that if he for such reasons could not subsequently attend personally to the defence of the land, he might ordain and provide an able person to be protector and defender of the land. It is still thought by those who have come to this high court of parliament on behalf of the commons of the land, that where there have been many great and grievous riots in the West Country, where some men have been robbed and some slain, and many grievously hurt and injured, if the king should be vexed and troubled with such matters and his people have recourse to his highness to complain and sue to him for their grievances, matters and suits, it would be too burdensome and wearisome to his highness, and that there must be a person to whom the people of the land may have recourse to sue for remedy of their injuries; for these reasons, those who had come on behalf of the commons of the land to this high court of parliament, requested the said lieutenant and all the lords that it might please their good lordships to intercede with the king's highness, that such a person might be ordained and provided who would attend to the protection and defence of this land, and that they might be informed of him, his power and authority, which would be a very great comfort and consolation to them. The answer, delivered by the said chancellor, by the assent of the said lieutenant and lords, was that the said lieutenant and all the lords would consult upon their wish, trusting to God that they would receive a good and encouraging answer.
33. Item, this same day, aftre the voidyng of the said Burley and of theym accompanied with hym out of the parliament chambre, this question was axed by the said chaunceler of the lordes, seyng, My lordes, for asmoche as the communes have made twies theire [col. b] desire and request, and that it is understoud that they woll not ferther procede in matiers of parliament, to the tyme that they have answere of theire desire and request, what is thought to your wysdomes that shuld be done in this behalfe? To the whiche question it was aunswered by all the lordes that for the causes above meoved by the said communes, it were right expedient and behovefull that suche a protector and defensor shuld be had as the communes desired. And than the said chaunceler seide to all the lordes: sith it is expedient and behovefull that suche protector and defensor shuld be had, asked who that persone shuld be, and that it shuld lyke theym to name hym. And there it was aggreed by all the lordes spirituelx and temporelx, every lord severally yevyng his voice and assent, considered the grete noblenesse, sadnesse and wysdome of the duc of York, the sad governaunce and polletique rule had in this lande, the tyme that he was last protectour and defensour of the land, that he shuld nowe take the charge uppon hym ayen, aftre semblable presidences as he had it before: to the whiche the said duc of York aunswered, praiyng and desiryng all the lordes, that for asmoche as he knewe well that he was no persone hable neithir in wisdome ne in governaunce to take so grete and chargefull occupacion uppon hym, to name and take anothir persone more able to so grete charge than he was, and be fully therof to be discharged: the whiche desire the lordes in no wyse wold admitte. And than the said duc of York seyde, that if so were that he shuld nedes take that occupacion uppon hym, but onely for the grete trust that he had in the lordes, that he wuld have of theym in that behalfe supportacion, good assistence, counseill and aide, and also certeyn protestacions, and that he myght theruppon be advised. [The choice of York as protector.]
33. Item, on the same day, after the said Burley and those who had accompanied him had left the parliament chamber, this question was put by the said chancellor of the lords, saying, 'My lords, inasmuch as the commons have twice expressed their [col. b] wish and request, and it is understood that they will proceed no further with the business of parliament until they receive an answer to their wish and request, what do your wisdoms think should be done in this matter?' To which question all the lords answered that for the reasons urged by the said commons, it was most expedient and necessary that such a protector and defender should be appointed as the commons desired. And then the said chancellor said to all the lords, 'Since it is expedient and necessary that such a protector and defender be appointed, who should that person be?' and he asked that it might please them to name him. And it was agreed there by all the lords spiritual and temporal, every lord giving his individual voice and assent, that considering the great nobility, gravity and wisdom of the duke of York, and the well-ordered governance and politic rule had in this land when he was last protector and defender of the land, he should now take the charge upon himself again, on the precedents established before: to which the said duke of York answered, praying and requesting all the lords that because he well knew that he was not someone able either in wisdom or governance to undertake so great and burdensome a responsibility, they might name and take another person better able to undertake so great a charge than he was, and that he might be fully discharged of it: to which request the lords would in no way agree. And then the said duke of York said that if he must undertake that responsibility, which he would only do out of the great trust he had in the lords, he wanted their support, good assistance, counsel and aid, and also made certain conditions, and [asked] that he might have their views on them.
34. Item, the Monday, the .xvij. day of the said moneth of Novembre, it was shewed to the said lieutenaunt and all the lordes, by the mouth of Burley, accompanied in notable nombre of the communes, in the name of all their felawes, that howe the seid communes had dyvers tymes made requestes to theire good lordships, that they shuld be good meanes to the kynges highnesse, that ther myght be chosyn and made a protectour and defensour of this land, of the whiche requestes as yit they have none aunswere. And where as < it is yit thought > by theym that be come to this high courte of parliament for the communes of this lande; for asmoche as this day they have knowelege and understondyng by suche persones whiche the said lordes send to theym, that ther be grete and grevous riotes done in the west contrey at the cite of Excestre, by therle of Devonshire, accompanied with mony riotouse persones, as it is seide with .viij. c horsmen, and .iiij. mille fotemen, and there have robbed the churche of Excestre, and take the chanons of the same churche and put theym to fynaunce, and also take the gentilmen in that contrey, and don and commytted mony othir grete and heynous inconveniences; that in abriggyng of suche riottes and inconveniences, suche a protectour and defensour must be had, and that they myght have knowelege of hym, his power and auctorite; and that he in abriggyng of suche riottes and offenses shuld ryde and labour into that cuntrey, for but if the said riottes and inconveniences were resisted, it shuld be the cause of the losse of that londe, and if that lond were lost, it myght be cause of the subversion of all this lande; wherefore they that be come for the communes of this lande desired the said lieutenaunt and lordes, for asmoche as the holy fest of Cristemas approchith so nygh, that rathir than the lond shuld be loste, it myght like the said lieutenaunt and all the lordes, this present parliament [p. v-286][col. a] to proroge, adjorne or dissolve, to that entente that these said riottes and inconveniences myght be resisted. [The commons renew their demand for a protector.]
34. Item, on Monday, the seventeenth day of the said month of November, it was shown to the said lieutenant and all the lords by Burley, accompanied by a considerable number of the commons, in the name of all their fellows, that although the said commons had at various times requested their good lordships to intercede with the king's highness, so that there might be chosen and appointed a protector and defender of this land, to these requests they had as yet received no answer; and it is still the opinion of those who had come to this high court of parliament on behalf of the commons of this land; for on this day they have received knowledge and information from such persons as the said lords sent to them, that there are great and grievous riots in the West Country in the city of Exeter, committed by the earl of Devon, accompanied by many riotous persons, as is said with eight hundred horsemen and four thousand footmen, and they have robbed the church of Exeter, and seized the canons of the same church and held them to ransom, and have also captured the gentlemen of that country, and have done and committed many other great and heinous offences; that to cut short such riots and troubles, a protector and defender must be appointed, and that they might be informed of him, his power and authority; and that to cut short such riots and offences he should ride and labour in that country, for if the riots and troubles were not resisted it would result in the loss of that land, and if that land were lost, it might result in the overthrow of all this land; wherefore those who had come on behalf of the commons of the land requested the said lieutenant and lords, since the holy feast of Christmas was approaching, that rather than the land be lost, it might please the said lieutenant and all the lords [p. v-286][col. a] to prorogue, adjourn and dissolve the present parliament, so that these said riots and troubles might be resisted.
35. Item, this same day, the said chaunceler, by the assent of the said lieutenaunt and all the lordes, shewed and declared unto the communes beyng in theire house accustumed, that where as the said communes had made dyverse desires and requestes to the said lordes, to be good meanes to the kyng our soverayn lord, that for causes meoved by theym, ther myght be had a protectour and defensour of this land, the kyng our said soveraigne lord, by thadvis and assent of his lordes spirituell and temporell beyng in this present parliament, had named and desired the duc of York to be protectour and defensour of this land; the said lordes trustyng verily that he wuld take it uppon hym. And that as for the subduyng and resistence of the grete riottes and inconveniences that were done and committed as it is seide in the west cuntrey, the said lieutenaunt and all the lordes have be and wull be as diligent, as desirous, and as coragious to the subduyng and resistence therof, as they can or may be, and thonked the communes of theire grete diligences and desires made by theym in that behalfe. And as for the adjornyng, prorogyng or dissolvyng of this parliament, the said lieutenaunt, by thadvis of all the lordes, wull procede theryn as the case shall require, and be most behovefull and expedient. [The king's assent to York's appointment.]
35. Item, on the same day, the said chancellor, by the assent of the said lieutenant and all the lords, showed and announced to the commons in their usual house, that because the said commons had expressed various desires and requests to the said lords to intercede with the king our sovereign lord, that for reasons urged by them, a protector and defender of this land might be appointed, the king our sovereign lord, by the advice and assent of his lords spiritual and temporal in the present parliament, had named and asked the duke of York to be protector and defender of this land; the said lords wholly trusting that he would undertake it. And that as for the subjugation and resisting of the great riots and troubles that were done and committed, as it is said, in the West Country, the said lieutenant and all the lords have been and will be as diligent, keen and courageous in subduing and resisting them, as they can or may be, and thanked the commons for their great diligence and keenness in that matter. And as to the adjourning, proroguing or dissolving of this parliament, the said lieutenant, by the advice of all the lords, will proceed therein as the case requires, and as will be most necessary and expedient.
Item, pro eo quod dicto quintodecimo die dicti mensis Novembris, prefati domini spirituales et temporales in dicto parliamento existentes prout superius recitatur, elegerunt et nominarunt Ricardum ducem Ebor', fore protectorem et defensorem regni Anglie, juxta precedencia ultimo inde habita, prefatus dux, decimo septimo die ejusdem mensis Novembris tunc proximo sequenti, in dicto parliamento deliberavit certos articulos quos audiri et intelligi ac postmodum inactari affectabat. Quorum tenores, cum suis responsionibus, hic inferius annotantur. Item, because on the said 15 November the aforesaid lords spiritual and temporal in the said parliament, as declared above, chose and nominated Richard, duke of York, to be protector and defender of the realm of England, according to the most recent precedents, the aforementioned duke, on the seventeenth day of the same month of November then following, submitted certain articles in the said parliament which he caused to be heard and understood and afterwards enacted. The tenors of which, with his answers, are noted below.
Protestacio ducis Ebor'. [York's conditions for assuming the protectorship.]
36. Thogh al I am not suffisaunt of myself of wisdome, connyng, power ner habilite, to take uppon me the name of protectour and defensour of this land, ner the charge and burdon therto apperteinyng, wherunto it hath lyked you my lordes to calle, name and desire me. [memb. 21] Under protestacion, if I shall applie me to the perfourmyng of your said desire, and at your instaunce take uppon me with your supportacion and aide the saide name, charge and burdon: I desire and pray you to graunte unto me, and to ennacte in this present parliament by auctorite therof, the thynges folowyng: 36. The statement of the duke of York. Although I do not myself possess adequate wisdom, skill, power or ability to assume the name of protector and defender of this land, or the charge and burden pertaining thereto, to which it has pleased you my lords to call, name and choose me, [memb. 21] if I apply myself, under protest, to the performance of your wish, and at your urging take upon me, with your support and aid, the said name, charge and burden, I desire and pray you to grant me and enact in the present parliament by its authority, the following things:
I. First, where that aftre request made unto you by the commons beyng in this present parliament, to be moyen unto the kynges highnesse to ordeyne and name a persone to be protectour and defensour of this lande, it lyked you of your self, and of your free and mere disposicion, to desire, name and calle me to the said name and charge; and that of eny presumpcion of my self I ne take theym upon me, but onely of the obeisaunce that y awe to do to the kyng our most dradde soverain lord, and to you as the parage of this lande, the lordes spirituelx and temporelx beyng in this present parliament, takyng uppon you the excercise of his auctorite, for suche urgent, necessary and resonable causes, as move you so to take uppon you, for the good and honour of his highnesse, the politique and restfull rule and governance of this his lande, and the observacion and entreteygnyng of his lawes and peas, wheryn [col. b] restith the joy, consolacion and suretie of you, and all his liege people, and of my self specially, whiche with Goddes grace entende not to take, ner not wull presume to take uppon myself to procede to thexecution or determinacion of eny thyng touchyng or concernyng the estate, honoure or dignite of our said soverain lord, either els the seid politique rule and governance, without your advis and assent in the parlement, eithir els the advis and assent of thaym that it shall please the kynges highnesse to name of his prive counseill; < to whoos advis, conseill and assent, I wull obey and applie myself, as y knowe it > accordeth to my duete to do. I. First, in that after the request made to you by the commons in the present parliament to intercede with the king's highness to ordain and name a person to be protector and defender of this land, it pleased you of your own free will to choose, name and call me to the said name and charge; and that I would not presume to take them upon myself were it not for the obedience I owe to the king our most dread sovereign lord, and to you as the peerage of this land, the lords spiritual and temporal in the present parliament, taking upon yourselves the exercise of his authority, for such urgent, necessary and reasonable causes as prompt you so to do for the good and honour of his highness, the politic and peaceful rule and governance of this his land, and the observance and maintenance of his laws and peace, wherein [col. b] lie the joy, consolation and security of you and all his liege people, and of myself especially, who, with God's grace, do not intend to take, nor will presume to take it upon myself to proceed to the execution or conclusion of anything touching or concerning the estate, honour or dignity of our said sovereign lord, or the said politic rule and governance, without your advice and assent in parliament, or the advice and assent of those whom it shall please the king's highness to choose for his privy council; whose advice, counsel and assent I will obey and to which I will apply myself, as I know it accords with my duty to do.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
It is agreed. It is agreed.
II. Also, that suche auctorite and power, and also suche fredame and libertee, as shall belong and be annexed unto the said name and charge, and also howe ferre and howe amplie they shall stretche and extende, be ordenned, stablisshed and enacted in this said present parlement, and by auctorite therof. II. Also, that such authority and power and also such freedom and liberty as shall belong and be attached to the said title and charge, and also how far and how fully they shall reach and extend, shall be ordained, decreed and enacted in this said present parliament, and by its authority.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
It is agreed, that the said duc shall have like fredame and libertee as he had before what tyme he was protectour and defensour of this lande, if he will so agree and contente hym self. It is agreed that the said duke shall have the same freedom and liberty as he had when he was previously protector and defender of this land, if he will so agree and content himself.
III. Also, that it lyke you lovyngly, diligently, duely and effectuelly, to assiste me of your herty favours, tendre zele and sadde advises, and of your persones and power, as the case shall require, to the execucion and expedicion of that that may be to the honeure, prosperite and welfare of the estate and mageste of our said soverain lord, to the rest, tranquilite, pollitique reule and governance of this lande, and thobservation of his lawes and peas, wheryn I shall emploie my persone with you to the uttermust perell and jopardie therof, whan so ever it shall nede that so y shall do. III. Also, that it may please you lovingly, diligently, duly and effectively to assist me by your hearty support, sympathetic zeal and grave advice, and with your persons and power, as the case shall require, in the execution and performance of whatever may be to the honour, prosperity and welfare of the estate and majesty of our said sovereign lord, to the peace, tranquillity, politic rule and governance of this land, and the observance of his laws and peace, wherein I shall employ myself with you to my utmost peril and jeopardy whenever it is necessary for me to do so.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
It is agreed. It is agreed.
IV. Also, for somoche as here tofore certein lordes spirituelx and temporelx, and othir persones, have be named of the said conseil, wherof somme have not yeven so diligent attendance therunto as it had neded that they shuld have done, wherby diverses matiers belongyng to the honour, wele and prosperite of our said soverain lord, and the said pollitique and restfull rule, have be slowthed and throwen into grete and to jopardouse omission, not executed; it like you to ordeigne, appointe, name and establisshe in the said parlement, and by auctorite therof, a suffisaunt and convenient nombre of lordes spirituelx and temporelx to be of the said consaill, not of favour ner affection, but suche as be approved of vertuouse and rightwesse disposicion, of raison, wisdame and indifferencie, and as wull applie theym to the tendirnesse and good zele of the honour and proufit of our said soverain lord, and the good publique of his said lande and people; thrawyng therfore out of theire myndes and remembraunces the favour and affection of all othir thynges, and the drede and nyghnesse of eny othir persone erthely. IV. Also, inasmuch as certain lords spiritual and temporal, and other persons have formerly been appointed to the said council, some of whom have not attended to its business as diligently as was necessary, whereby various business concerning the honour, weal and prosperity of our sovereign lord, and the said politic and peaceful rule, have been disregarded and fallen into great and dangerous neglect, remaining undone; may it please you to ordain, appoint, name and decree in the said parliament, and by its authority, an adequate and appropriate number of lords spiritual and temporal to be of the said council, not by favour or affection, but choosing those who are known to be of a virtuous and righteous disposition, men of reason, wisdom and impartiality, and who will apply themselves sympathetically and with enthusiasm to the honour and profit of our said sovereign lord, and the public good of his said land and people; banishing from their thoughts and memories favour and affection towards all other things, and fear and fondness for any other earthly person.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
It is agreed. It is agreed.
V. And for somoche as it accordith not with reason, that eny lord yif suche attendance ner bere the charge therto required, without that that his pension or annuite therfore assigned hym be to hym duely paide accordyng to his attendance, and the contynuance therof, it like you to ordeigne and establisshe in the said parlement, and by auctorite therof, suffisant aggreable and undelaied paiement to be made unto the said [p. v-287][col. a] lordes to be named of the said conseill, wherthorugh they mowe be couraged to attende therunto accordyng to theire duete without absence, onlesse than they be licenced by the said conseill, or that by eny resonable or lefull cause eny of theym be dreven < to absente hym, þe > whiche cause he so absentyng hym shall certifie in writyng truely, without colour, feyntice or dissimulacion, by the feithe he awe to God and to his ligeaunce. V. And, in that it does not accord with reason that any lord should give such attendance or bear the charge required in this, unless the pension or annuity assigned him for it is duly paid according to his attendance and its continuance, may it please you to ordain and decree in the said parliament by its authority, that adequate, acceptable and prompt payment be made to the said [p. v-287][col. a] lords appointed to the said council, whereby they might be encouraged to attend to it according to their duty without absence, unless they have the permission of the said council, or anyone is forced to absent himself for any reasonable or lawful cause, which cause he so absenting himself shall certify in writing truly, without pretence, deceit or dissimulation, by the faith he owes to God and to his allegiance.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
It is agreed. It is agreed.
VI. Also, that in the said parliament, and by auctorite therof, a suffisant and a competent somme of money, by wey of annuite, be appointed, ordened and graunted unto me, to susteigne, maynteigne and supporte the said name and charge, for thonour of our said soverain lord and this his lande, and for the execucion of that that must of necessite belonge to the same name and charge, the lyklyhode of the costes and expenses that be therunto required, in your grete wisdames and discrecions weyed and considered, over my costes and expenses that y shall bere and susteigne in eny parties of this lande for the conservacion of the pease, and subducion of theym that entende to the breche therof. VI. Also, that in the said parliament and by its authority a sufficient and adequate sum of money, by way of an annuity, shall be assigned, ordained and granted to me, to sustain, maintain and support the said name and charge, for the honour of our said sovereign lord and this his land, and for the execution of that which necessarily pertains to the same name and charge, the costs and expenses likely to be required having been weighed and considered in your great wisdom and discretion, in addition to the costs and expenses I shall bear and sustain in any parts of this land to preserve the peace and subjugate those who plan to break it.
VII. Also, for somoche as of myn annuitee of .mm. marcs to me graunted in the last parlement, (fn. v-278-171-1) with the name and charge of protectour and defensour of this lande etc. I am as yit unpaide, and also unrewarded for the grete and outrageouse costes and expenses not unknowen unto your wurthynesses, which in divers parties of this lande I bare, in execucion of the said charge, by your advis and assent; it like you to ordeigne and commaunde suffisant and agreable paiement of my saide annuite, and also to assesse by your discrecions suche competent and convenient reward, as can be thought to your wisdames covenable for my said charges in ridyng by your said advises. VII. Also, in that I have not yet been paid my annuity of 2,000 marks granted to me at the last parliament, (fn. v-278-171-1) with the name and charge of protector and defender of this land, etc., nor have I been rewarded for the great and outrageous costs and expenses not unknown to your worthinesses, which I bore in various parts of the land in executing the said charge, by your advice and assent; may it please you to ordain and order adequate and acceptable payment of my said annuity, and also to assess at your discretion such adequate and fitting compensation as, in your wisdom, you think appropriate for my expenses in riding by your advice.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
As to the said last .ij. articles they ben agreed, so that weyes and meanes may be founde and hadde howe he may be paied. And for asmoche as certeyn of the seid articles conteynen in theym self a generalte, the specialte not understoud, it is agreed by all the lordes that the archebisshop of York, the bisshops of Rochestre, Norwiche, and Ely, the duc of Buk, the erle of Warrewyk, the viscount Bourghchier and the lord Stourton, shuld have a communicacion with the said duc of York, to have knowelege of his entente, and of the specialte of theym. As to the last two articles, they have been agreed, if ways and means of paying him may be found and had. And because certain of the said articles are too general, and the particular point of them is not understood, it is agreed by all the lords that the archbishop of York, the bishops of Rochester, Norwich and Ely, the duke of Buckingham, the earl of Warwick, Viscount Bourchier and Lord Stourton, should consult with the said duke of York, to have knowledge of his intention, and the particular point of those articles.
37. Item, the .xviij. day of the said moneth of Novembre, the said chaunceler rehersed to all the lordes, that where as tharchebishop of York, the duc of Buk', the bisshops of Rochestre, Norwiche, and Ely, therle of Warrewyk, the viscounte Bourghchier, and the lord Stourton, were uppon Monday last past assigned by the said lordes to have communicacion with the said duc of York, uppon a generalte conteyned in certeyn articles made by hym, in his protestacions concernyng the takyng uppon hym of the name and charge of protectour and defensour of this realme. The said archebisshop of York, duc of Buk, bisshops of Rochestre, Norwiche, and Ely, therle of Warrewyk, the viscount Bourghchier, and Lord Stourton, have had communicacion with the seid duc of York; and as touchyng the declaracion of his entent in his seid protestacions, they declaron that he is agreed and content to have suche power, fredame and libertees, as he had last, his said power to endure at the kynges pleasir; his said pleasir to be declared by thadvis of the lordes spirituelx and temporelx. And as for his annuite, he is [col. b] content to have .ij. mille marcs, beside rewardes for suche labour and charges as he shall bere in rydyng and othirwise. And as for his rewardes of suche charges as he bare whan he was last protectour, he is content to have .m. marcs. And as for his annuite of .mm. marcs for the tyme that he was protectour last, he is content to have aftre the rate for the tyme that he occupied, and to have therof a sufficiaunt assignement by auctorite of parliament. And also he desireth to have a .m. marcs in hand. Wheruppon the said protestacions were radde agayn before the said lordes. And as to the first article, it is agreed as above. And as to the second, it is agreed, that the said duc of York have suche power, liberte and fredame as he had before. And where as in his last power were these wordes, Quam diu nobis placuerit; (fn. v-278-177-1) shuld nowe be in his power these wordes, Quousque idem consanguineus noster, de occupacione sive onere et nomine hujusmodi, per nos in parliamento, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in parliamento existencium, exoneretur. And as to the .iij. e , .iiij. e , and .v. e articles, it is answered as above. And as to the .vi. e and .vij. e articles, they ben agreed as the said duc is content, and in suche fourme as is above rehersed by the said chaunceler, so the weyes and groundes may be founde and hadde for paiement and contentacion in that behalf. [The terms of York's appointment.]
37. Item, on the eighteenth day of the said month of November, the said chancellor described to all the lords how on Monday last the archbishop of York, the duke of Buckingham, the bishops of Rochester, Norwich and Ely, the earl of Warwick, Viscount Bourchier and Lord Stourton, were assigned by the said lords to consult with the said duke of York on the generalities contained in certain articles drawn up by him in his statement concerning his assumption of the name and charge of protector and defender of this realm. The said archbishop of York, the duke of Buckingham, the bishops of Rochester, Norwich and Ely, the earl of Warwick, Viscount Bourchier and Lord Stourton have consulted with the said duke of York; and concerning the declaration of his intention in his said statement, they declare that he agrees and is content to have such power, freedom and liberties as he had last time, his said power to continue at the king's pleasure; his said pleasure to be announced by the advice of the lords spiritual and temporal. And as for his annuity, he is [col. b] content to have 2,000 marks, besides rewards for the labour and expenses he shall sustain in riding and otherwise. And for the reward of those expenses he sustained when he was last protector, he is content to have 1,000 marks. And as for his annuity of 2,000 marks at the time when he was last protector, he is content to have payment pro rata for the time he occupied the office, and to have an adequate assignment for it by authority of parliament. And also he wishes to have 1,000 marks in hand. Whereupon the said statements were read again before the said lords. And as to the first article, it is agreed as above. And as to the second, it is agreed that the said duke of York shall have such power, liberty and freedom as he had before. And where the terms of his last appointment contained the following words, 'During our pleasure'; (fn. v-278-177-1) there should now be the words, 'Until our same kinsman shall be discharged from the same task or charge and name of the same, by us in parliament, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in parliament'. And as to the third, fourth and fifth articles, it is answered as above. And as to the sixth and seventh articles, they have been agreed to the said duke's satisfaction, and in the way described above by the said chancellor, if ways and means may be found and had for payment and satisfaction in that matter.
38. Aftre agreement of whiche articles of protestacions, all the lordes then beyng present in parlement both spirituelx and temporelx: for asmoche as it was uppon Monday last passed declared by the seid chaunceler to the communes that be come to this present parlement, that howe at theire request and desire the kyng, by thadvis of the seid lordes, had named the seid duc of York to be protectour and defensour of this lande, trustyng veraly that he wull take it uppon hym; and that this day, certeyn of the commens in the name of all theire felawes were with the seid chaunceler aparte, desiryng among othir thynges to have knowelege whethir the seid duc of York wuld take uppon hym the name and charge of protectour and defensour of this lande or noo; and if he wuld, that then they myght have knowelege of his auctorite and power: desired and praied the seid duc of York that it shuld like his good lordship to take uppon hym the name and charge of protectour and defensour of this lande. And theruppon the said duc of York saide to all the lordes that howe be it that it liked theire good lordshippes, to desire and name hym to that name and charge, he shuld not take that name and charge uppon hym of presumpcion of hymself, but onely of the obeissaunce that he oweth to the kyng our soverain lord, and to the lordes as the apparage of this lande. And he to perfourme theire desires, under theire supportacion and aide, wuld take, and toke uppon hym, the name and charge of protectour of this lande, under suche protestacions as he had made and were aggreed by the seid lordes. [The duke of York accepts the protectorship.]
38. After the agreement of these articles, inasmuch as it had been announced on the previous Monday by the said chancellor to the commons who had come to the present parliament, that at their request and desire, the king, by the advice of the said lords, had named the said duke of York protector and defender of this land, wholly trusting that he would take it upon himself; and that on this day, certain of the commons in the name of all their fellows asked the said chancellor privately, among other things, whether the said duke of York would assume the name and charge of protector and defender of this land or not; and if he would, that they might have knowledge of his authority and power: all the lords both spiritual and temporal then present in parliament asked and prayed the said duke of York, that it might please his good lordship to take upon him the name and charge of protector and defender of this land. And thereupon the said duke of York said to all the lords that although it had pleased their good lordships to request and appoint him to that name and charge, he would not presume to take that name and charge upon himself were it not for the obedience he owed to the king our sovereign lord, and to the lords as the peerage of this land. And to perform their requests, and with their support and aid, he would take and did take upon himself the name and charge of protector of this land, under such conditions as he had made and had been agreed by the said lords.
[memb. 20]
Pro protectore. [The appointment of the duke of York as protector.]
39. Memorandum quod cum communitas metuendissimi domini nostri regis Anglie, in presenti parliamento existens, eidem domino nostro regi sepius humillime supplicaverit et instanter persuaserit, ob reprimendum insolencias, rebelliones, murdra et riotas, que indies diversis ejusdem regni partibus attemptantur et committuntur, et ob bonum publicum tuicionemque ejusdem regni, ac pacis sue, necnon tranquillitatis subditorum suorum conservacionem, sua serenitas inclinari et consentire vellet personam aliquam potentem et idoneam, protectorem et defensorem regni sui predicti constituere et ordinare, cujus sapiencia et industria, potencia [p. v-288][col. a] et juvamine, regni negocia melius, tucius et felicius dirigi et expediri valeant: idem dominus noster rex, contemplans peticionem communitatis predicte, infirmitateque qua Altissimo Salvatori Nostro personam suam visitare placuit impedimentum prestante, quo minus ad actualem execucionem protectionis et defensionis regni sui Anglie et ecclesie Anglicane intendere posset, et si plurimis celsitudo sua vexaretur negociis celeri sanitati sue recuperande obstaculum foret consideratum, ad instanciamque dominorum spiritualium et temporalium [...] in eodem parliamento existencium, decimo nono die Novembris, anno regni sui tricesimo quarto, de industria et circumspectione carissimi consanguinei sui Ricardi ducis Ebor' plenarie confidens, de avisamento et assensu dominorum tam spiritualium quam temporalium in parliamento predicto existencium, necnon de assensu communitatis predicte in eodem parliamento existentis, ordinavit et constituit dictum consanguineum suum, regni sui et ecclesie Anglicane predictorum protectorem et defensorem, ac consiliarium ipsius domini regis principalem; et quod ipse dux, ejusdem regni protector et defensor, ac ipsius domini regis principalis consiliarius sit et nominetur; quousque idem consanguineus ipsius domini regis, de occupacione sive onere et nomine hujusmodi, per prefatum dominum regem in parliamento, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in parliamento existencium, exoneretur. Auctoritate tamen dicti ducis, quo ad excercitium et occupacionem oneris protectoris et defensoris predicti omnino cessante, cum sive quando Edwardum dicti domini regis filium primogenitum contigerit ad annos discrecionis pervenire, si idem Edwardus onus protectoris et defensoris predictum super < se adtunc > assumere voluerit. Et quod super hoc littere domini regis patentes fierent, sub forma subsequenti. 39. For the protector. Be it remembered that where the commons of our most dread lord king of England being in the present parliament have often most humbly requested and urgently prevailed upon our same lord king that to check the outrages, rebellions, murders and riots which are attempted and committed every day in various parts of the kingdom, and for the defence of the public good of the same realm and of his peace, and also for the preservation of the tranquillity of his subjects, his serenity should incline and agree to the appointment and ordaining of a powerful and suitable person as protector and defender of his aforesaid realm, whose wisdom and industry, power [p. v-288][col. a] and aid, would direct and conduct the business of the realm better, more safely and more fruitfully: our same lord the king, considering the petition of the aforesaid commons, and the impediment of the present infirmity which it has pleased Our Most High Saviour to visit on his person, because of which he could contribute little towards the protection and defence of his kingdom of England and the English church, and taking into account that if his highness should be troubled by much business, it will be an obstacle to the swift recovery of his health, at the instance of the lords spiritual and temporal being in the same parliament, on 19 November, in the thirty-fourth year of his reign [1455], wholly trusting in the industry and circumspection of his most beloved kinsman Richard, duke of York, with the advice and assent of the lords both spiritual and temporal being in the aforesaid parliament, and also with the assent of the aforesaid commons in the same parliament, he ordained and appointed his said kinsman protector and defender of his aforesaid kingdom and the English church, and principal councillor of the lord king; and that the duke should be and be named protector and defender of the same kingdom, and principal councillor of the lord king, until the same kinsman of the lord king should be discharged from that responsibility or charge and name, by the aforementioned lord king in parliament, with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in parliament. Nevertheless, the authority of the said duke as to the exercise and responsibility of the said charge of protector and defender shall entirely cease when or whenever Edward the first-born son of the said lord king comes of age, if the same Edward should then wish to assume the said charge of protector and defender. And that on this matter letters patent of the lord king were made, in the following form.
Henricus, Dei gratia, rex Anglie et Francie, et dominus Hibernie, omnibus ad quos presentes littere pervenerint, salutem. Sciatis quod cum communitas regni nostri Anglie, in presenti parliamento nostro existens, nobis sepius humilime supplicaverit et instanter persuaserit, ob reprimendas insolencias, rebelliones, murdra et riotas, que indies diversis ejusdem regni partibus attemptantur et committuntur, et ob bonum publicum tuicionemque ejusdem regni, ac pacis nostre, necnon tranquillitatis subditorum nostrorum conservacionem, inclinari et consentire velimus personam aliquam potentem et idoneam, protectorem et defensorem regni nostri predicti constituere et ordinare; cujus sapiencia et industria, potencia et juvamine, regni negocia melius, tutius et felicius dirigi et expediri valeant. Nos, peticionem communitatis predicte contemplantes, infirmitateque qua Altissimo Salvatori Nostro personam nostram visitare placuit impedimentum prestante, quo minus ad actualem execucionem proteccionis et defensionis regni nostri predicti et ecclesie Anglicane intendere possimus, et si plurimis vexaremur negociis celeri sanitati recuperande obstaculum foret consideratum, de circumspeccione et industria carissimi consanguinei nostri Ricardi ducis Ebor' plenam fiduciam reportantes, de avisamento et assensu tam dominorum spiritualium et temporalium, quam de assensu communitatis regni nostri Anglie, in instanti parliamento nostro existencium, ordinavimus et constituimus ipsum consanguineum nostrum, dicti regni nostri Anglie et ecclesie Anglicane protectorem et defensorem, ac consiliarium nostrum principalem; et quod ipse, ejusdem regni nostri Anglie et ecclesie Anglicane predictorum protector et defensor, ac principalis consiliarius noster sit et nominetur; quousque idem consanguineus noster, de occupacione sive onere et nomine hujusmodi, per nos in parliamento, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in parliamento existencium, exoneretur, in et juxta [col. b] vim, formam et effectum cujusdam acti in < dicto instanti > parliamento die datorum presentium habiti et concordati. Auctoritate tamen dicti ducis, quoad excercicium et occupacionem oneris protectoris et defensoris predicti omnino cessante, cum sive quando Edwardus filius noster primogenitus ad annos discrecionis pervenerit; presentibus litteris nostris patentibus, necnon vigore et effectu earumdem extunc minime valituris, si dictus Edwardus, cum ad hujusmodi annos pervenerit, onus protectoris et defensoris predictum super se assumere voluerit. Damus autem universis et singulis archiepiscopis, episcopis, abbatibus, prioribus, ducibus, comitibus, vicecomitibus, baronibus, militibus, et omnibus aliis fidelibus et subditis nostris dicti regni nostri Anglie quorum interest, tenore presencium firmiter in mandatis, quod prefato consanguineo nostro duci Ebor', quociens et quamdiu protectionem et defensionem hujusmodi sic habuerit et occupaverit, in premissis faciendo pareant, obediant et intendant prout decet. In cujus rei testimonium, has litteras nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud Westm', decimo nono die Novembris, anno regni nostri tricesimo quarto. (fn. v-278-185-1) Henry, by the grace of God, king of England and France, and lord of Ireland, to all to whom the present letters shall come, greeting. Know that where the commons of our kingdom of England being in our present parliament have frequently asked us most humbly and urgently prevailed upon us, in order to punish the outrages, rebellions, murders and riots which are attempted or committed every day in various parts of the same kingdom, and for the defence of the public good of the same realm, and of our peace, and also the preservation of the tranquillity of our subjects, to agree and assent to the appointment and ordaining of a powerful and suitable person as protector and defender of our aforesaid kingdom; whose wisdom and industry, power and aid will enable the business of the kingdom to be better, more safely and more fruitfully conducted and executed. We, considering the petition of the aforesaid commons, and the impediment of the present infirmity which it has pleased Our Most High Saviour to visit on our person, in consequence of which we can contribute little towards the protection and defence of our kingdom of England and the English church, and taking into account that if we should be troubled by much business it will be an obstacle to the swift recovery of our health, placing full trust in the circumspection and industry of our most beloved kinsman Richard, duke of York, with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and with the assent of the commons of our kingdom of England, being in the present parliament, have ordained and named our same kinsman protector and defender of our kingdom of England and the English church, and our principal councillor; and that he should be and be named protector and defender of our aforesaid kingdom of England and English church, and our principal councillor; until our same kinsman is released from the responsibility or charge and name of the same, by us in parliament, with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in parliament, in and according to [col. b] the force, form and effect of an act given and agreed on the day the present document was given in the said present parliament. Nevertheless, the authority of the said duke as to the exercise and responsibility of the said charge of the protector and defender shall entirely cease when or whenever Edward our first-born son shall come of age; these our letters patent, and also the force and effect of the same, becoming invalid should the said Edward when he comes of age wish to assume the aforesaid charge of protector and defender. Moreover, by the tenor of the foregoing we strictly order each and every archbishop, bishop, abbot, prior, duke, earl, viscount, baron, knight and all other faithful men and our subjects of our said realm of England being present, to support, obey and assist our aforementioned kinsman the duke of York, as they ought, in carrying this out, as often and as long as he shall thus have and possess the protection and defence. In witness of which we have caused these our letters patent to be made. Witness myself at Westminster, 19 November, in the thirty-fourth year of our reign [1455]. (fn. v-278-185-1)
Quibus omnibus actis, lectis et recitatis, acceptis et approbatis, auctoritate supradicta, idem dux Ebor', habita prius matura deliberacione, onus et excercitium nominacionis et occupacionis hujusmodi, ad Dei Omnipotentis honorem, laudem et gloriam, regis et regni predictorum commodum et utilitatem, necnon dominorum predictorum complacenciam, et predicte communitatis rei publiceque dicti regni augmentum, in se quantum ad ipsum pertinuit assumere se velle dixit, et assumpsit tunc ibidem, juxta formam acti, potestatis et concessionum predictorum. When all these articles had been read and recited, accepted and approved, by the aforesaid authority, the same duke of York, after mature consideration, said that he was willing to assume as far as it pertained to him, the charge and exercise of the name and responsibility of the same, according to the form of the aforesaid act, power and grant to the honour, praise and glory of Almighty God, and the profit and utility of the aforesaid king and kingdom, and the pleasure of the aforesaid lords, and the increase of the aforesaid community and common weal of the said kingdom.
Et ulterius, idem dominus rex, de avisamento et assensu predictis, ordinavit et constituit, quod Edwardus filius suus primogenitus, cum sive quando ad annos discrecionis pervenerit, regni Anglie et ecclesie Anglicane protector et defensor, ac principalis consiliarius ipsius domini regis sit et nominetur, quam < diu > eidem domino regi placuerit, si idem Edwardus, cum ad hujusmodi annos pervenerit, onus protectoris et defensoris predictum super se assumere voluerit. Et super hoc littere domini regis patentes fierent sub forma subsequenti: [The prince of Wales to be protector when of age.]
And in addition, the same lord king, with the aforesaid advice and assent, ordained and decreed that Edward his first-born son, when or whenever he shall come of age, shall be and be named protector and defender of the kingdom of England and the English church, and principal councillor of the lord king, during the pleasure of the same lord king, should the same Edward, when he comes of age, wish to assume the aforesaid charge of protector and defender. And on this matter letters patent of the lord king were made in the following form:
Henricus, Dei gratia, rex Anglie et Francie, et dominus Hibernie, omnibus ad quos presentes littere pervenerint, salutem. Sciatis quod cum communitas regni nostri Anglie, in presenti parliamento nostro existens, nobis sepius humilime supplicaverit et instanter persuaserit, ob reprimendas insolencias, rebelliones, murdra et riotas, que indies diversis ejusdem regni partibus attemptantur et committuntur, et ob bonum publicum tuicionemque ejusdem regni, ac pacis nostre, necnon tranquillitatis subditorum nostrorum conservacionem, inclinari et consentire velimus personam aliquam potentem et idoneam, protectorem et defensorem regni nostri predicti constituere et ordinare; cujus sapiencia et industria, potencia et juvamine, regni negocia melius, tutius et felicius dirigi et expediri valeant. Nos, peticionem communitatis predicte contemplantes, infirmitateque qua Altissimo Salvatori nostro personam nostram visitare placuit impedimentum prestante, quo minus ad actualem execucionem proteccionis et defensionis regni nostri Anglie et ecclesie Anglicane intendere possimus, et si plurimis vexaremur negociis celeri sanitati recuperande obstaculum foret consideratum, de circumspeccione et industria Edwardi carissimi filii nostri primogeniti plenam fiduciam naturalem reportantes, de avisamento et assensu tam dominorum spiritualium et temporalium, quam de assensu communitatis regni nostri Anglie, in instanti parliamento nostro existencium, ordinavimus et constituimus quod prefatus Edwardus, cum sive quando ad annos discrecionis pervenerit, regni nostri [p. v-289][col. a] Anglie et ecclesie Anglicane protector et defensor, ac principalis consiliarius noster sit et nominetur; quousque idem filius noster, de occupacione sive onere et nomine hujusmodi per nos in parliamento, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in parliamento existencium, exoneretur; si idem filius noster, cum ad hujusmodi annos pervenerit, onus protectoris et defensoris predictum super se assumere voluerit, in et juxta vim, formam et effectum cujusdam acti in dicto parliamento die datorum presencium habiti et concordati. Damus autem universis et singulis archiepiscopis, episcopis, abbatibus, prioribus, ducibus, comitibus, vicecomitibus, baronibus, militibus et omnibus aliis fidelibus et subditis nostris dicti regni nostri Anglie, quorum interest, tenore presencium firmiter in mandatis, quod prefato Edwardo filio nostro primogenito, cum ad predictos annos pervenerit, quociens et quamdiu protectionem et defensionem hujusmodi sic habuerit et occupaverit, in premissis faciendo pareant, obediant et intendant prout decet. In cujus rei testimonium, has litteras nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud Westm', decimo nono die Novembris, anno regni nostri tricesimo quarto. Henry, by the grace of God, king of England and France, and lord of Ireland, to all to whom the present letters shall come, greeting. Know that where the commons of our kingdom of England being in our present parliament frequently asked us most humbly and urgently prevailed upon us, in order to punish the outrages, rebellions, murders and riots which are attempted and committed every day in various parts of the kingdom, for the defence of the public good of the same kingdom, and of our peace, and also the preservation of the tranquillity of our subjects, to agree and assent to the appointment and ordaining of a powerful and suitable person as protector and defender of our aforesaid kingdom; whose wisdom and industry, power and aid will enable the business of the kingdom to be better, more safely and more fruitfully conducted and executed. We, considering the petition of the aforesaid commons, and the impediment of the present infirmity which it has pleased Our Most High Saviour to visit on our person, in consequence of which we can contribute little towards the protection and defence of our kingdom of England and the English church, and taking into account that if we should be troubled by much business it will an obstacle to the swift recovery of our health, naturally placing full trust in the circumspection and industry of Edward, our most beloved first-born son, with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and with the assent of the commons of our kingdom of England, being in our present parliament, ordained and decreed that the aforesaid Edward, when or whenever he shall come of age, should be and be named [p. v-289][col. a] protector and defender of our kingdom of England, and our principal councillor; until our same son is released from the responsibility or charge and name of the same by us in parliament, with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in parliament; should our same son when he comes of age wish to assume the aforesaid charge of protector and defender, in and according to the force, form and effect of an act given and agreed on the present day in the said parliament. Moreover, by the tenor of the foregoing we strictly order each and every archbishop, bishop, prior, duke, earl, viscount, baron, knight, and all other faithful men and our subjects of our said kingdom of England being present, to support, obey and assist the aforementioned Edward our first-born son, as they ought, in carrying this out, when he comes of age, as often and as long as he shall thus have and possess the protection and defence. In witness of which, we have caused these our letters patent to be made. Witness myself at Westminster, 19 November, in the thirty-fourth year of our reign [1455].
< Edwardus, primogenitus regis, protector cum ad annum, etc. > Edward, first-born of the king, protector when he should come of age, etc.
40. Memorandum quod cum dominus rex, tam de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium, quam de assensu communitatis regni sui Anglie, in presenti parliamento existencium, per litteras suas patentes ordinaverit et constituerit carissimum consanguineum suum, Ricardum ducem Ebor', protectorem et defensorem regni sui predicti, ac ecclesie Anglicane, necnon principalem consiliarium suum; et quod idem dux Ebor', dicti regni protector et defensor, ac principalis consiliarius dicti domini regis sit et nominetur, in et juxta vim, formam et effectum cujusdam acti in dicto parliamento die datarum predictarum litterarum in eodem parliamento habiti et concordati. Ac insuper idem dominus rex, de assensu et avisamento predictis, per alias litteras suas patentes, ordinaverit et constituerit Edwardum carissimum filium suum primogenitum, cum sive quando ad annos discrecionis pervenerit, protectorem et defensorem regni et ecclesie predictorum, ac principalem consiliarium suum: volens quod idem filius suus, cum ad hujusmodi annos pervenerit, protector et defensor dictorum regni et ecclesie, ac principalis consiliarius suus sit et nominetur, si adtunc onus protectoris et defensoris predictum super se assumere voluerit, in et juxta vim, formam et effectum cujusdam acti in dicto parliamento die datarum dictarum litterarum in eodem parliamento habiti et concordati. Prefatus dominus rex, considerans varios labores quos tam prefatum Edwardum, quam prefatum ducem, occasionibus premissis subire oportebit, et volens proinde personas suas honoribus et favoribus prosequi graciosis, de avisamento et assensu predictis, voluit, concessit et ordinavit quod tam prefatus Edwardus, quociens et quando, cum ad annos predictos onus predictum super se assumpserit et realiter excercuerit et occupaverit; quam prefatus dux, quociens et quando onus illud habuerit et excercuerit, vacantibus officiis forestariorum, parcariorum, ac custodum warennarum infra regnum Anglie et partes Wallie, ad donacionem predicti domini regis ut ad coronam suam pertinentibus, de eisdem officiis disponere possit sub forma subsequenti; videlicet, quod quandocumque aliquod officiorum predictorum vacare contigerit in futuro et donacioni dicti domini regis spectans, tam dictus Edwardus cum ad annos predictos pervenerit, onus predictum super se adtunc assumens, quam dictus dux occupacionis, protectionis et defensionis hujusmodi onus habens et excercens, personam idoneam ad idem officium nominare, et inde sub signeto suo custodi privati sigilli dicti domini regis qui pro tempore fuerit significare [col. b] possit; qui super hoc tenebitur cancellario Anglie, vel custodi magni sigilli nostri pro tempore existenti, litteras sub privato sigillo, pro hujusmodi officio quamdiu regi placuerit obtinendo, in forma debita conficere. Proviso semper, quod quelibet persona aliquod hujusmodi officium ad nominacionem alicujus Edwardi et ducis predictorum, virtute acti presentis, per litteras domini regis patentes optinens in futuro, stet in officio illo pacifice, juxta effectum litterarum illarum, absque ammocione ejusdem, nisi per dominum regem, per avisamentum dominorum consilii sui ex causa racionabili coram eis monstrata et < probata, > ammoveatur de eodem. 40. Be it remembered that where the lord king, both with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and the assent of the commons of his kingdom of England, being in the present parliament, by his letters patent, ordained and appointed his most beloved kinsman, Richard, duke of York, as protector and defender of his aforesaid kingdom and the English church, and also his principal councillor; and that the same duke of York should be and be named protector and defender of the same kingdom, and principal councillor of the said lord king, in and according to the force, form and effect of an act had and agreed in the said parliament on the same day as the aforesaid letters. Moreover, the same lord king, with the aforesaid advice and assent, by other letters patent ordained and appointed Edward his most beloved first-born son, when or whenever he shall come of age, protector and defender of the aforesaid kingdom and church, and his principal councillor: willing that his same son, when he shall come of age, shall be and be named protector and defender of the said kingdom and church, and his principal councillor if he should then wish to assume the aforesaid charge of protector and defender, in and according to the force, form and effect of an act had and agreed in the said parliament on the same day as the said letters. The aforementioned lord king, considering the various labours which both the aforementioned Edward, and the aforementioned duke, will have to endure because of this, and wishing to act towards them with honour and favour in that matter, with the advice and assent aforesaid, willed, conceded and ordained that both the aforementioned Edward, as often and whenever, after he had come of age, he shall assume the aforesaid charge and actually exercise and possess it; and the aforementioned duke, as often and whenever he shall have and exercise that charge, shall have the right to appoint to vacant offices of foresters, parkers and keepers of warrens within the kingdom of England and regions of Wales, which are in the gift of the said lord king as pertaining to his crown in form following: namely, that whenever any of the aforesaid offices shall happen to fall vacant in future and be in the gift of the said lord king, both the said Edward when he shall come of age and assume the aforesaid charge, and the said duke having and exercising the charge of the occupation, protection and defence of the same, may appoint a suitable person to the same office, and then under his signet inform the lord king's keeper of the privy seal at the time; [col. b] who shall then make out letters under the privy seal to the chancellor of England or the keeper of the great seal at the time for a grant of the office during the king's pleasure in due form. Provided always that whoever obtains such an office at the nomination of either the said Edward or the said duke, by virtue of the present act, by letters patent of the lord king in future, shall hold that office peacefully, according to the tenor of those letters, without being removed from it, except by the lord king on the advice of the lords of his council for a reasonable cause demonstrated and proved before them.
Item, < idem > dominus rex, ex avisamento, consensu et causa predictis, voluit, concessit et ordinavit, quod uterque Edwardi et ducis predictorum, pro tempore quo onus proteccionis et defensionis predictum habuerit et excercuerit, ad quascumque ecclesias parochiales, ultra taxam viginti marcarum, usque ad taxam triginta marcarum inclusive: ac eciam omnes prebendas in capellis regiis ad donacionem domini regis jure corone sue spectantes cum vacaverint, exceptis decanatibus in eisdem capellis regiis, durante vigore litterarum eis separaliter de protectione et defensione regni predicti ut premittitur confectarum, idoneas personas nominare, et inde sub signeto suo prefato custodi privati sigilli dicti domini regis significare possit; qui super hoc tenebitur cancellario Anglie, vel custodi magni sigilli pro tempore existenti, litteras sub privato sigillo, pro hujusmodi ecclesiis et prebendis obtinendo, in forma predicta conficere, una cum nominacionibus in et de permutacionibus et ratificacionibus ecclesiarum et prebendarum predictarum: cetera autem officia, prebende et beneficia, superius non specificata, ac decanatus predicti, ad donacionem sive presentacionem domini regis spectantes sive spectancia, ad disposicionem predicti domini regis, de avisamento predicti protectoris et defensoris pro tempore existentis, et ceterorum dominorum de consilio dicti domini regis, de tempore in tempus cum vacaverint, sint, cedant et pertineant; exceptis beneficiis ad dispositionem, tam cancellario Anglie racione officii sui, quam thesaurario Anglie racione officii sui spectantibus. Insuper cum ita sit quod idem dux, in tenendo honorifice statum suum, quem ampliare necesse erit, consideracione et causa dicti nominis protectoris et defensoris, cum ampliores honores illo respectu sibi debeantur, qui secum onera trahunt, eritque concursus frequencior ad eundem tam subditorum regis, quam extraneorum, sua negocia prosequencium: rex, de avisamento et assensu predictis, voluit, concessit et ordinavit, quod idem dux, durantibus proteccione et defensione predictis, habeat et percipiat annuatim pro vadiis suis, non quantum alii ante hec tempora habuerunt, set solum duo milia marcarum, attenta exili condicione moderna, et hoc per viam regardi; habeatque de hoc securam solucionem aut competentem assignacionem: et si durante onere supradicto, casus exigat ut idem dominus dux, laborem personalem subire oporteat, pro illo labore speciali itinerando aut equitando aliter ve proficiscendo pro regardo remuneracionem seorsum habebit racionabilem et competentem, per avisamentum dominorum de consilio dicti domini regis. Proviso semper, quod presens actus non extendat nec aliqualiter prejudicialis existat Margarete regine Anglie, de aliqua concessione sibi per dictum dominum regem facta, neque alicui actui parliamenti pro ipsa facto. [...] Item, the same lord king, with the advice, assent and for the reason aforesaid, willed, granted and ordained to both the aforesaid Edward and the duke, during the time they shall have and exercise the charge of the aforesaid protection and defence, certain parish churches valued at between 20 and 30 marks: and also all the prebends in the chapels royal in the gift of the lord king by right of his crown when they fall vacant, excepting deaneries in the same chapels royal, during the term of the letters granted to each of them for the protection and defence of the aforesaid realm, to nominate suitable persons, and notify under his signet the said lord king's aforementioned keeper of the privy seal; who shall then make out letters under the privy seal to the chancellor of England or the keeper of the great seal at the time for a grant of the churches and prebends, together with the nominations to and exchanges and ratifications of the aforesaid churches and prebends: however, other offices, prebends and benefices, not specified above, and the aforesaid deaneries, relating or pertaining to the gift or presentation of the lord king, shall be at, fall to and pertain to the disposal of the said lord king, with the advice of the aforesaid protector and defender at the time, and the other lords of the council of the said lord king, from time to time when they fall vacant; except benefices at the disposal of the chancellor of England by reason of his office, or the treasurer of England by reason of his office. Moreover, since the same duke, in maintaining his estate honourably, will need to enhance it, in consideration of and because of the said name of protector and defender, with greater honours owed to him in that respect, which will bring expenses with them, and there will be more frequent recourse to him both by the king's subjects and by foreigners pursuing their affairs: the king, with the aforesaid advice and assent, willed, conceded and ordained that the same duke, during the aforesaid protection and defence, should have and receive annually for his wages, not as much as others have had before that time, but only 2,000 marks, as a result of the present scanty resources, and this by way of reward; and he should have for this secure payment or adequate assignment: and if during the aforesaid charge the same lord duke should be compelled to undergo personal labour, for that special labour in journeying or riding or otherwise proceeding he shall have as a reward reasonable and satisfactory remuneration, by the advice of the lords of the said lord king's council. Provided always that the present act shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to Margaret, queen of England, concerning any concession made to her by the said lord king, or any other act of parliament made on her behalf.
41. The .xxij. ti day of Novembre, the yere of oure seid soverayne lord .xxxiiij. ti , the moost Cristen prince the kyng oure moost drad soverayne lord, at his paleys of Westm', remembryng that to the politique governaunce [p. v-290][col. a] and restfull reule of this his realme, apperteneth grete diligence and actuell laboure, the which is to his moost noble persone full tedious and grete to suffre and bere. Also, that every prince must of verray necessitee have counsaillers to helpe hym in his charges, to whome he muste trust and leene; for thees causes and other such as moeve his high wisedome, consideryng that God hath endued such as been of his counsaill with grete wisedome, cunnyng and experience, and knowe the direccion to be had moost expedient for the sadde and politique reule of this his land, whoos trouthes, love and good zele that they bere to his welfare, suertee of his high astate and roiall persone been to hym approved and knowen, openyng his gracious disposicion, ordeyned and graunted, that his counsaill shuld provyde, commyne, ordeyne, spede and conclude all such matiers as touche and concerne the good and politique rule and governaunce of this his land, and lawes therof, and directe thayme as it shalbe thought to theire wisdomes and discrecions behovefull and expendient; soo alwaye that in all such matiers as touchen the honour, wurship and suertee of his moost noble persone, they shall late his highnes have knowelech what direccion they take in theym: desiryng his said counsaill hertely, for the wele and ease of his said persone, and kepyng and beryng up his roiall astate, to take this his wille and ordenaunce upon thaym. The which lordes protestyng, that the high prerogative, preemynence and auctorite of his mageste roiall, and also the soverauntee of thaym and all this lande, is and alwey mot reste and shall reste in his moost excellent persone, offre thayme of humble obeissaunce, to put thaym in as grete diligence and devoir to doo all that that mowe preferre or avaunce the said high prerogatyve, preemynence and auctorite of his moost excellence, and also his high regalie, and honorable astate and welfare, and the felicitee and suertee of his moost noble persone, and also to the politique reule and governaunce of his lande, and the good publique, reste and tranquillite of his subgettes, as ever did eny counsaillers or subgettes to theire moost drad soverayne lord, and therunto at all tymes to be redy, not sparyng therfore at eny tyme that it shall nede, to putte theire bodyes in jeopardie. [The role of the council.]
41. On 22 November, in the thirty-fourth year of our said sovereign lord [1455], the most Christian prince the king our most dread sovereign lord, at his palace of Westminster, mindful that the politic governance [p. v-290][col. a] and restful rule of this his realm requires great diligence and labour, the endurance of which is to his most noble person very wearisome and a great burden. Also that every prince must necessarily have counsellors to help him in his duty, whom he can trust and rely on; for these reasons and others prompting his high wisdom, considering that God has endowed those of his council with great wisdom, skill and experience, and knowledge of what needs to be done for the well-ordered and politic rule of this his land, the loyalty, love and good zeal which they bear for his welfare, the security of his high estate and royal person, being proved and known to him, of his gracious disposition ordained and granted that his council should provide for, discuss, ordain, promote and conclude all matters touching and concerning the good and politic rule and governance of this his land, and its laws, and direct them as shall seem suitable and expedient to them in their wisdom and discretion; provided always that in all matters touching the honour, worship and security of his most noble person, they inform his highness of what they plan to do: wholeheartedly desiring that his said council, for the weal and ease of his said person, and the keeping and supporting of his royal estate, should take this his will and ordinance upon themselves. Which lords, protesting that the high prerogative, pre-eminence and authority of his royal majesty, and also the sovereignty of them and all this land, is and always must and shall rest in his most excellent person, offered in humble obedience to do as much and as diligently in promoting or advancing the said high prerogative, pre-eminence and authority of his great excellence, and also his high regality, and honourable estate and welfare, and the felicity and security of his most noble person, and also the politic rule and governance of his land, and the good ordering, peace and tranquillity of his subjects, as ever did any councillors or subjects for their most dread sovereign lord, and to be ready at all times, not refraining from placing themselves in jeopardy whenever necessary.
[memb. 19]
Pro principe. [Creation of the prince of Wales.]
42. The kyng our soveraine lord, in this his present parlement commensed at Westm' the .ix. e day of Juill, the .xxxiij. yere of his blessid reigne, proroged unto the .xij. day of Novembre thanne next folowyng, consideryng that he by his lettres patentes under his grete seall, hath creat Edward his moost entierly belovyd firstbegotyn sonne and heir apparaunt, prince of Wales, and erle of the counte palatyne of Chestre, the tenoir wherof hereafter folowith - 42. For the prince. The king our sovereign lord, in this his present parliament begun at Westminster on 9 July, in the thirty-third year of his blessed reign [1455], prorogued until the following 12 November, considering that he by his letters patent under his great seal has created Edward his most entirely beloved first-born son and heir apparent, prince of Wales and earl of the county palatine of Chester, the tenor of which follows:
Henricus, Dei gratia, rex Anglie et Francie, et dominus Hibernie, archiepiscopis, episcopis, abbatibus, prioribus, ducibus, comitibus, baronibus, justiciariis, vicecomitibus, prepositis, ministris et omnibus ballivis et fidelibus suis, salutem. De serenitate regalis preeminentie, velut ex sole radii, sic inferiores prodiunt principatus, nec regie claritatis integritas de luce lucem proferens ex lucis distribucione memorate [editorial note: The first three letters of 'memorate' have been erased.] lucis senciat detrimenta; immo tanto magis regale septrum extollitur, et solium regium sublimatur, quanto tribunali suo plures subsunt proceres eminencie et claritatis: hec autem consideratio condigna, nos, qui nominis et honoris Edwardi primogeniti nostri carissimi incrementum appetimus, in quo pocius nos ipsos conspicimus honorari, et domum nostram regiam, ac subditum nobis populum nostrum speramus per Dei graciam, sumpta de graciosis suis futuris auspiciis conjectura, [col. b] honorifice roborari, allicit et inducit, ut ipsum qui reputacione juris censetur eadem persona nobiscum digno preveniamus honore et fecunda gracia prosequamur; de consilio itaque et consensu prelatorum, ducum, comitum, vicecomitum et baronum regni nostri Anglie, in presenti parliamento nostro existencium, ipsum Edwardum, principem Wallie, et comitem Cestr' fecimus et creavimus, facimus et creamus; ac eidem Edwardo nomen, stilum, titulum, statum, dignitatem et honorem principatus et comitatus eorumdem damus et concedimus, et per cartam nostram confirmavimus, ac ipsum de eisdem principatu et comitatu ut ibidem preficiendum presideat et presidendo dictas partes dirigat et defendat, per cercum in capite, et annulum in digito aureum, ac virgam auream investivimus juxta morem: habendos sibi et heredibus suis regibus Anglie imperpetuum. Henry, by the grace of God, king of England and France, and lord of Ireland, to the archbishops, bishops, abbots, priors, dukes, earls, barons, justices, sheriffs, reeves, officials and all his bailiffs and faithful men, greeting. From the serenity of kingly pre-eminence, like rays from the sun, proceed lesser princes, nor is the integrity of kingly brightness diminished by light bringing forth light by sharing light; indeed the royal sceptre is advanced all the more, and the royal throne raised up when there are many nobles of eminence and fame under its judgment seat: this apt reflection has induced and persuaded us, who are eager to enhance the name and honour of our most dearly beloved first-born Edward, in which it seems rather that we do honour to ourselves and, we trust, by God's grace, strengthen our royal household and our people, reading the omens of a happy future in the abundance of his graces, [col. b] that we should anticipate and confer honour and fruitful grace upon him who is judged of right to be of equal worth with us; by the advice therefore and consent of the prelates, dukes, earls, viscounts and barons of our kingdom of England, being in our present parliament, we made and created, make and create this Edward, prince of Wales and earl of Chester; and we give and concede and have confirmed by our charter to the same Edward the name, style, title, state, dignity and honour of prince and earl of the same, and we invested him according to custom with the same principality and earldom so that he might preside over the same and so presiding govern and defend the said regions, by a circlet on the head, a gold ring on the finger, and a gold staff: to have to him and his heirs the kings of England forever.
Quare volumus et firmiter precipimus, pro nobis et heredibus nostris, quod predictus Edwardus filius noster, habeat nomen, stilum, titulum, < statum, dignitatem et > honorem principatus Wallie et comitatus Cestr' predictorum, sibi et heredibus suis regibus Anglie ut predictum est imperpetuum. Hiis testibus, venerabilibus patribus J. cardinali et archiepiscopo Cantuar', tocius Anglie primate, cancellario nostro, et W. Ebor' archiepiscopo, Anglie primate; Th. London', J. Lincoln', et W. Norwicen', episcopis; carissimis consanguineis nostris Ricardo Ebor', et Humfrido Buk', ducibus; carissimo fratre nostro uterino Jaspere comite Pembr', carissimis consanguineis nostris Ricardo Warr', Ricardo Sar', et Jacobo Wiltes', comitibus; ac dilectis et fidelibus nostris Radulpho Cromwell camerario hospitii nostri, Willelmo Fauconbrigge, et Johanne Stourton, militibus; et aliis. Datum per manum nostram, apud palacium nostrum Westm', quintodecimo die Martii, anno regni nostri tricesimo secundo. By which we will and strictly order, for us and our heirs, that the aforesaid Edward our son have the name, style, title, state, dignity and honour of the principality of Wales and earldom of Chester aforesaid, to him and his heirs, kings of England as aforesaid forever. Witnessed by the venerable fathers John, cardinal and archbishop of Canterbury, primate of all England, our chancellor, and William, archbishop of York, primate of England; Thomas of London, John of Lincoln and Walter of Norwich, bishops; our beloved kinsmen Richard of York, and Humphrey of Buckingham, dukes; our beloved uterine brother Jasper, earl of Pembroke, our beloved kinsmen Richard of Warwick, Richard of Salisbury and James of Wiltshire, earls; and our beloved and faithful men Ralph Cromwell, chamberlain of our household, William Fauconberg and John Stourton, knights; and others. Given by our hand, at our palace of Westminster, on 15 March, in the thirty-second year of our reign [1454].
- ratifieth, approveth and confermeth, the said creacion, lettres patentes, and all thinges in thaim conteined, by thavis and assent of the lordes spirituelx and temporelx, and commyns in this his present parlement assembled, and by auctorite of the same parlement. And by cause that it is thought unto the kynges highnesse, that it is behovefull and convenient the said prince to have divers honours, castels, manoirs, lordshippes, seignouries, londes, tenementes, rentes, advousons of chirches, abbeys, chapels, priories, and of all other benefices, reversions, services, knyghtes fees, voidances and patronages, with other libertees, fraunchises, enheritances, thinges and possessions in Wales, and in the seid counte palatyne of Chestre; graunteth to him, by the seid advis, assent and auctorite, his severalx lettres patentes therof, under his grete seale, in manere and fourme folowyng: - ratifies, approves and confirms the said creation, letters patent, and everything contained in them, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and the commons assembled in this his present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament. And because it is thought by the king's highness that it is fitting and appropriate for the said prince to have various honours, castles, manors, lordships, seigniories, lands, tenements, rents, advowsons of churches, abbeys, chapels, priories, and all other benefices, reversions, services, knights' fees, vacancies and patronal rights, with other liberties, franchises, hereditaments, things and possessions in Wales and in the said county palatine of Chester; grants to him, by the said advice, assent and authority, his several letters patent thereof, under his great seal, in the following manner and form:
Henricus, Dei gratia, rex Anglie et Francie, et dominus Hibernie, archiepiscopis, episcopis, etc., salutem. Sciatis quod cum nos quintodecimo die Marcii, anno regni nostri tricesimo secundo, per cartam nostram, de consilio et consensu prelatorum, ducum, comitum, vicecomitum, baronum, ceterorumque procerum et magnatum regni nostri Anglie, in parliamento nostro, anno regni nostri tricesimo primo tento, Edwardum primogenitum carissimum nostrum, in principem Wallie et comitem Cestr' fecerimus et creaverimus, ac eidem Edwardo nomen, stilum, titulum, statum, dignitatem et honorem principatus et comitatus eorumdem dederimus [...] et concesserimus, et per eandem cartam nostram confirmaverimus; ac ipsum de eisdem principatu et comitatu ut ibidem preficiendum presideat et presidendo dictas partes dirigat et defendat, per cercum in capite, et annulum in digito aureum, ac virgam auream investiverimus juxta morem: habendos sibi et heredibus suis regibus Anglie imperpetuum, prout in carta predicta [p. v-291][col. a] plenius continetur. (fn. v-278-205-1) Quam quidem cartam ac nomen, stilum, titulum, statum, dignitatem et honorem predicta, necnon omnia alia et singula in eadem contenta, eidem primogenito nostro sic factam, de gracia nostra speciali, ac de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium, et communitatum regni nostri Anglie, in presenti parliamento nostro apud Westm' nono die Julii, anno regni nostri tricesimo tertio inchoato, et usque duodecimum diem Novembris tunc proximo sequenti prorogato existencium; eodem duodecimo die Novembris, auctoritate ejusdem parliamenti, ratificamus, approbamus et confirmamus, juxta formam et effectum carte nostre predicte. Henry, by the grace of God, king of England and France, and lord of Ireland, to his archbishops, bishops, etc., greeting. Know that where we, on 15 March, in the thirty-second year of our reign [1454], by our charter, with the advice and consent of the prelates, dukes, earls, viscounts, barons and the rest of the nobles and magnates of our realm of England, in our parliament, held in the thirty-first year of our reign [1453], made and created Edward our most beloved first-born, prince of Wales and earl of Chester, and we gave and granted to the same Edward the name, style, title, state, dignity and honour of the same principality and earldom, and confirmed them by our same charter; and invested him according to custom with the same principality and earldom so that he might preside over the same and so presiding govern and defend the said regions, by a circlet on the head, a gold ring on the finger, and a gold staff: to have to him and his heirs, the kings of England, forever, as is more fully contained in the aforesaid charter. (fn. v-278-205-1) [p. v-291][col. a] Which charter and name, style, title, state, dignity and honour aforesaid, and also each and every other thing contained in the same, thus granted to our same first-born, of our special grace, and with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and the commons of our realm of England, in our present parliament begun at Westminster on 9 July, in the thirty-third year of our reign [1455], and prorogued until the following 12 November; on the same 12 November, by authority of the same parliament, we ratify, approve and confirm, according to the form and effect of our aforesaid charter.
Nos, ut idem Edwardus princeps, statum suum hujusmodi juxta generis sui nobilitatem, ac tanti nominis excellenciam valeat decentius continere, ac dignitati sue onera necessaria incumbencia facilius supportare, dedimus et concessimus, et hac carta nostra, ex certa sciencia nostra, de assensu et auctoritate predictis, < confirmavimus > prefato Edwardo principi dictum principatum Wallie: habendum et tenendum ut premittitur de nobis sibi et heredibus suis regibus Anglie imperpetuum; una cum omnibus dominiis et terris nostris Northwall', Westwall' et Southwall'; ac dominio, castro, villa et comitatu de Caernarvan; dominio, castro et villa de Conwey, cum quatuor commotis de Haph et Ughaph, Naneconwey et Cruthyn, in predicto comitatu de Caernarvan. Ac dominio, castro et villa de Curkyth; dominio, castro et villa de Hardelagh, cum toto comitatu de Meryonnyth; dominio, castra, villa et comitatu de Kermerdyn; dominio, castro et villa de Lampadarvaur; dominio et senescalcia de Contremaure; dominio, castro, villa et comitatu de Cardigan; dominio et castro de Haverford, cum prisis vinorum ibidem; castro et dominio de Newcastell in Emelyn in Suthwall'; ac dominio de Newen et Plugheley in Northwall'; comitatu et dominio de Anglesey in Northwall'; castro de Beaumaries in eodem comitatu de Anglesey; ac omnibus dominiis, terris et tenementis que fuerunt Resi ap Mereduk, et que ad manus inclite memorie domini Edwardi filii regis Henrici quondam regis Anglie progenitoris nostri devenerunt; una cum omnibus aliis dominiis, civitatibus, castris, burgis, villis, maneriis, membris, hamelettis, terris, tenementis, feodis militum, vacacionibus episcopatuum, advocacionibus ecclesiarum cathedralium, collegiatarum, parochialium, prebendarum, et aliarum quarumcumque; necnon abbaciarum, prioratuum, capellarum, hospitalium, cantariarum, vicariarum et aliarum domorum religiosarum, et beneficiorum et officiorum quorumcumque; pensionibus, porcionibus, annuitatibus, corrodiis, officiis, mineris, regalitatibus, libertatibus, liberis consuetudinibus, custumis, prisis, et excercicio omnis justiciatus et cancellariatus, homagiis, redditibus, serviciis, proficuis, pratis, pascuis, pasturis, wrecco maris, piscariis, moris, marescis, turbariis, forestis, chaceis, parcis, boscis, warennis, hundredis, commotis, ragloriis, ringeldiis, senescalciis, amobragiis, curiis, wodwardiis, constabulariis, ballivis, forestariis, coronatoriis, reversionibus, feriis, mercatis, wardis, maritagiis, releviis, escaetis, et serviciis tenencium, tam liberorum quam nativorum, ac omnibus aliis tam ad dictum principatum, quam ad nos in partibus predictis spectantibus quoquo modo; adeo plenarie et integre, sicut carissimus progenitor noster Edwardus nuper princeps Wallie, et carissimus < dominus et pater noster rex > defunctus habuerunt et tenuerunt, seu eorum alter habuit et tenuit, seu habere et tenere debuisset, seu aliquis alius princeps Wallie ea tenuit seu de jure tenere debuisset seu potuisset; una cum titulis, accionibus, placitis, sectis, demandis, calumpniis, punicionibus quibuscumque, forisfacturis terrarum, tenementorum, reddituum et serviciorum, ac escaetis, wardis, maritagiis, presentacionibus ad quecumque officia et beneficia ecclesiastica, et aliis rebus quibuscumque, ac juribus universis nos ante [col. b] hec tempora in dicto principatu ubicumque, quandocumque et qualitercumque concernentibus, seu nobis de jure vel consuetudine parcium illarum quomodolibet pertinentibus; adeo plene et integre sicut nos ea seu eorum aliquod habere possemus vel deberemus, si dictus principatus in manibus nostris, < remansisset > non concessus; ac etiam cum reversionibus omnium et singulorum aliorum maneriorum, terrarum, tenementorum, feodorum, advocacionum, annuitatum, officiorum et aliarum possessionum quarumcumque, ad nos infra principatum predictum post mortem quorumcumque tenencium eorumdem in feodo talliato, in dotem per legem Anglie, < ad terminum vite > vel annorum, seu alias qualitercumque spectantibus imperpetuum; faciendo nobis, < pro predicto > principatu et premissis omnibus, tale servicium quale invenietur celebris memorie dominum Edwardum filium regis Edwardi progenitorem nostrum, eidem patri suo, pro predictis omnibus, dum ea tenuit ex concessione dicti patris sui, fecisse. We, so that the same Prince Edward can maintain his estate more appropriately according to the nature of his nobility, and the excellence of such a name, and support more readily the necessary charges incumbent upon his dignity, gave and conceded, and confirmed to the aforesaid Prince Edward by this our charter, of our certain knowledge, by the aforesaid assent and authority, the said principality of Wales: to have and to hold as aforesaid of us to him and his heirs, the kings of England, forever; together with all our lordships and lands in North Wales, West Wales and South Wales; and the lordship, castle, town and county of Caernarvon; the lordship, castle and town of Conway, with the four commotes of [Arllechwedd] Isaf and [Arllechwedd] Uchaf, Nantconwy and Creuddyn, in the aforesaid county of Caernarvon; and the lordship, castle and town of Criccieth; the lordship, castle and town of Harlech, with all the county of Merioneth; the lordship, castle, town and county of Carmarthen; the lordship, castle and county of Aberystwyth; the lordship and seneschalry of Cantref Mawr; the lordship, castle, town and county of Cardigan; the lordship and castle of Haverford, with prises of wine there; the castle and lordship of Newcastle Emlyn in South Wales; and the lordship of Nefyn and Pwllheli in North Wales; the county and lordship of Anglesey in North Wales; the castle of Beaumaris in the same county of Anglesey; and all the lordships, lands and tenements which belonged to Rhys ap Maredudd, and which fell into the hands of Lord Edward, of famous memory, son of King Henry once king of England, our progenitor; together with all lordships, cities, castles, boroughs, towns, manors, members, hamlets, lands, tenements, knights' fees, vacancies of bishoprics, advowsons of cathedral, collegiate and parish churches, prebends and all other things; and also of abbeys, priories, chapels, hospitals, chantries, vicarages, and other religious houses, and of all benefices and offices; pensions, portions, annuities, corrodies, offices, mining rights, regalities, liberties, free duties, customs, prises, and the exercise of all the duties of the justiciarship and chancellorship, homages, rents, services, profits, meadows, grazing, pastures, wreck of sea, fisheries, moors, marshes, turbaries, forests, chases, parks, woods, warrens, hundreds, commotes, offices of rhaglaws and rhingylls, and seneschalries, amobrs, courts, offices of woodwards, constabularies, bailiwicks, offices of forester and coroner, reversions, fairs, markets, wards, marriages, reliefs, escheats, and services of tenants, both free and villein, and all other things pertaining both to the said principality and to us in the aforesaid regions in any way; as fully and wholly as our most beloved progenitor Edward lately prince of Wales, and our most beloved lord and father the late king had and held, or either of them had and held, or should have had or held, or any other prince of Wales held or by right should or could have held; together with any titles, actions, pleas, suits, demands, accusations, penalties, forfeitures of lands, tenements, rents and services, and escheats, wards, marriages, presentations to all ecclesiastical offices and benefices, and any other things, and all rights before [col. b] this time anywhere in the said principality, whenever and however they concern us, or however they pertain to us by right or custom in those regions; as fully and wholly as we could or should have them or any of them if the said principality had remained in our hands without being granted; and also with reversions of each and every other manor, land, tenement, fief, advowson, annuity, office and any other possession whatever, pertaining to us forever within the aforesaid principality after the death of any tenant in fee-tail, in dower by the law of England, for term of life or years, or in any other way; doing to us, for the aforesaid principality and all the things stated, such service as Lord Edward, of famous memory, son of King Edward, our progenitor, can be found to have done to his father for the aforesaid things, when he held them by the grant of his said father.
Et ulterius, dedimus eciam et concessimus eidem Edwardo principi primogenito nostro, centum et tresdecim libras, sex solidos et octo denarios per annum, de exitibus, proficuis et revencionibus dominii, castri et ville de Buelt cum pertinentiis, sive de quadem feodifirma eorumdem dominii, castri et ville cum pertinentiis, quam Ricardus dux Ebor' nobis inde annuatim solvere tenetur; necnon quinquaginta et sex libras, tresdecim solidos et quatuor denarios per annum, de exitibus, proficuis et revencionibus dominii, castri et ville de Monte Gomery cum pertinentiis, sive de quadam feodifirma eorumdem dominii, castri et ville cum pertinentiis, quam idem dux nobis inde annuatim similiter solvere tenetur; habendas, tenendas et percipiendas, eidem Edwardo principi et heredibus suis predictis, tam predictas centum et tresdecim libras, sex solidos et octo denarios, de exitibus, proficuis et revencionibus predictorum dominii, castri et ville de Buelt cum pertinentiis, sive de feodifirma eorumdem dominii, castri et ville, quam predictas quinquaginta et sex libras, tresdecim solidos et quatuor denarios per annum, de exitibus, proficuis et revencionibus predictorum dominii, castri et ville de Monte Gomery cum pertinentiis, sive de feodifirma eorumdem dominii, castri et ville, per manus predicti ducis, seu per manus receptorum, firmariorum, tenencium, aut aliorum occupatorum tam predictorum dominii, castri et ville de Buelt, quam predictorum dominii, castri et ville de Monte Gomery, pro tempore existencium, ad terminos Pasche et Sancti Michelis per equales porciones. Furthermore, we also gave and granted to the same Prince Edward our first-born £113 6s. 8d. annually from the issues, profits and revenues of the lordship, castle and town of Builth with the appurtenances, or from a certain fee-farm of the same lordship, castle and town with the appurtenances, which Richard, duke of York, is bound to pay us each year; and also £56 13s. 4d. annually, from the issues, profits and revenues of the lordship, castle and town of Montgomery with the appurtenances, or from a certain fee-farm of the same lordship, castle and town with the appurtenances, which the same duke is also bound to pay us annually; to hold and to receive to the same Prince Edward and his aforesaid heirs, the aforesaid £113 6s. 8d., from the issues, profits and revenues of the aforesaid lordship, castle and town of Builth with the appurtenances, or from the fee-farm of the same lordship, castle and town, and also the aforesaid £56 13s. 4d. a year, from the issues, profits and revenues of the aforesaid lordship, castle and town of Montgomery with the appurtenances, or from the fee-farm of the same lordship, castle and town, by the hands of the aforesaid duke, or by the hands of the receivers, farmers, tenants, or other occupiers of the aforesaid lordship, castle and town of Builth, and also of the aforesaid lordship, castle and town of Montgomery, at the time, at the terms of Easter and Michaelmas in equal portions.
Quare volumus et firmiter precipimus, pro nobis et heredibus nostris, quod predictus Edwardus princeps primogenitus noster, habeat et teneat principatum predictum de nobis, sibi et heredibus suis regibus Anglie imperpetuum, cum omnibus dominiis et terris, ac ceteris premissis in Northwall', Westwall' et Southwall', ac dominiis, commotis, comitatibus, castris, villis, civitatibus, terris et tenementis predictis; una cum omnibus aliis dominiis, civitatibus, castris, burgis, villis, maneriis, membris, hamelettis, terris, tenementis, possessionibus, feodis militum, vacacionibus episcopatuum, advocacionibus ecclesiarum cathedralium, collegiatarum, parochialium, prebendarum, et aliarum quarumcumque; necnon abbaciarum, prioratuum, capellarum, cantariarum, hospitalium, vicariarum, et aliarum domorum religiosarum, et beneficiorum et officiorum quorumcumque; pensionibus, porcionibus, annuitatibus, corrodiis, officiis, mineris, regalitatibus, libertatibus, liberis consuetudinibus, custumis, prisis, et excercitio omnis justiciatus et cancellariatus, homagiis, serviciis, redditibus, proficuis, pratis, pascuis, pasturis, wrecco maris, piscariis, moris, mariscis, turbariis, forestis, chaceis, parcis, boscis, warennis, hundredis, commotis, ragloriis, ringeldiis, scenescalciis, amobragiis, curiis, wodewardiis, constabulariis, ballivis, forestariis, coronatoriis, reversionibus, feriis, [p. v-292][col. a] mercatis, wardis, maritagiis, releviis, escaetis, et serviciis tenencium, tam liberorum quam nativorum, et omnibus aliis tam ad predictum principatum, quam ad nos in dictis partibus spectantibus quoquo modo; adeo plene et integre sicut prefatus progenitor noster Edwardus nuper princeps Wallie, et carissimus dominus et pater noster rex defunctus habuerunt et tenuerunt, seu eorum alter habuit et tenuit, seu habere et tenere debuisset, seu aliquis alius princeps Wallie ea tenuit, seu de jure tenere debuisset vel potuisset; una cum titulis, accionibus, placitis, sectis, demandis, calumpniis, punicionibus, forisfacturis terrarum, tenementorum, reddituum et serviciorum, ac escaetis, wardis, maritagiis, presentacionibus ad quecumque officia et beneficia ecclesiastica, et aliis rebus quibuscumque, ac juribus universis, nos ante hec tempora in dicto principatu ubicumque, quandocumque et qualitercumque concernentibus, seu nobis de jure vel consuetudine parcium illarum quomodolibet pertinentibus; adeo plene et integre, sicut nos ea seu eorum aliquod habere possemus vel deberemus, si dictus principatus in manibus nostris remansisset non concessus: ac etiam cum reversionibus omnium et singulorum aliorum maneriorum, terrarum, tenementorum, feodorum, advocacionum, annuitatum, officiorum et aliarum possessionum quarumcumque, ad nos infra principatum predictum, post mortem quorumcumque tenencium eorumdem in feodo talliato, in dotem per legem Anglie, ad terminum vite vel annorum, seu alias qualitercumque spectantibus imperpetuum; faciendo nobis pro dicto principatu, et pro omnibus aliis premissis, tale servicium quale invenietur predictum dominum Edwardum filium regis Edwardi eidem patri suo, pro omnibus premissis, dum ea tenuit ex concessione dicti patris sui, fecisse, sicut predictum est; salvis semper quibuscumque ligeis nostris, jure, titulo et interesse suis, de et in castris, dominiis, maneriis, villis, terris, tenementis, et ceteris premissis quibuscumque, et qualibet parcella eorumdem, que ipsi seu eorum aliquis, antecessores seu predecessores sui, habuerunt seu habuit in premissis, seu aliquo premissorum, primo die regni nostri, aliter quam per litteras nostras patentes sibi seu eorum alicui inde confectas. Hiis testibus, etc. Datum per manum nostram, etc. Wherefore we will and firmly order, for us and our heirs, that the aforesaid Prince Edward our first-born, shall have and hold the aforesaid principality from us, to him and his heirs, the kings of England, forever, with all lordships and lands, and the other things stated in North Wales, West Wales and South Wales, and the aforesaid lordships, commotes, counties, castles, towns, cities, lands and tenements; together with all other lordships, cities, castles, boroughs, towns, manors, members, hamlets, lands, tenements, possessions, knights' fees, vacancies of bishoprics, advowsons of cathedral, collegiate and parish churches, prebends, and any other things; and also of any abbeys, priories, chapels, chantries, hospitals, vicarages, and all other religious houses, and benefices and offices; pensions, portions, annuities, corrodies, offices, mining rights, regalities, liberties, free duties, customs, prises and exercise of all the duties of the justiciarship and chancellorship, homages, services, rents, profits, meadows, grazing, pastures, wreck of sea, fisheries, moors, marshes, turbaries, forests, chases, parks, woods, warrens, hundreds, commotes, offices of rhaglaws and rhingylls, and seneschalries, amobrs, courts, offices of woodwards, constabularies, bailiwicks, offices of forester and coroner, reversions, fairs, markets, wards, marriages, reliefs, escheats, and services of tenants, both free and villein, and all other things pertaining both to the said principality and to us in the aforesaid regions in any way; [p. v-292][col. a] as fully and wholly as our aforementioned progenitor Edward once prince of Wales, and our most beloved lord and father the late king had and held, or either of them had and held, or should have had or held, or any other prince of Wales held or by right should or could have held; together with titles, actions, pleas, suits, demands, accusations, penalties, forfeitures of lands, tenements, rents and services, and escheats, wards, marriages, presentations to all ecclesiastical offices and benefices, and any other things, and all rights before this time anywhere in the said principality, whenever and however they concern us, or however they pertain to us by right or by custom in those regions; as fully and completely as we could and should hold them or any of them if the said principality had remained in our hands, without having been granted: and also with reversions of each and every other manor, land, tenement, fief, advowson, annuity, office and any other possession whatever, pertaining to us within the aforesaid principality after the death of any tenant in fee-tail, in dower by the law of England, for term of life or years, or in any other way; doing to us, for the aforesaid principality and all the other things stated, such service as the aforesaid Lord Edward son of King Edward, our progenitor, can be found to have done to his father for the aforesaid things, when he held them by the grant of his said father, as was said above; saving always to each of our lieges, their right, title and interest, concerning and in the castles, lordships, manors, towns, lands, tenements, and any other things stated, and in each part of the same, which they or any of them, their ancestors or predecessors, had in the things stated, or any of them, on the first day of our reign, other than by our letters patent made to them or any of them. Witnessed by, etc. Given by our hand, etc.
Henricus, Dei gratia, rex Anglie et Francie, et dominus Hibernie; archiepiscopis, episcopis, etc., salutem. Sciatis quod cum nos, quintodecimo die Marcii, anno regni nostri tricesimo secundo, per cartam nostram, et consensu prelatorum, ducum, comitum, vicecomitum, baronum, ceterorumque procerum et magnatum regni nostri Anglie, in parliamento nostro, anno regni nostri tricesimo primo tento, Edwardum primogenitum nostrum carissimum, in principem Wallie et comitem Cestr' fecerimus et creaverimus, ac eidem Edwardo primogenito nostro, nomen, stilum, titulum, statum, dignitatem et honorem principatus et comitatus eorumdem dederimus et concesserimus, et per eandem cartam nostram confirmaverimus; ac ipsum de eisdem principatu et comitatu ut ibidem preficiendum presideat et presidendo dictas partes dirigat et defendat, per cercum in capite, et anulum in digito aureum, ac virgam auream investiverimus juxta morem: habendos sibi et heredibus suis regibus Anglie imperpetuum, prout in carta predicta plenius continetur. Quam quidem cartam, ac nomen, stilum, titulum, statum, dignitatem et honorem predicta, necnon omnia alia et singula in eadem contenta, eidem primogenito sic factam, de gracia nostra speciali, ac de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium, et communitatum regni nostri Anglie, in presenti parliamento nostro apud Westm' nono die Julii, anno regni nostri tricesimo tercio inchoato, et usque duodecimum diem Novembris tunc proximo sequenti prorogato existencium, eodem duodecimo die Novembris, [col. b] auctoritate ejusdem parliamenti ratificamus, approbamus et confirmamus, juxta formam et effectum carte nostre predicte. Henry, by the grace of God, king of England and France, and lord of Ireland, to his archbishops, bishops, etc., greeting. Know that we, on 15 March, in the thirty-second year of our reign [1454], by our charter, with the advice and consent of the prelates, dukes, earls, viscounts, barons and the rest of the nobles and magnates of our realm of England, in our parliament, held in the thirty-first year of our reign [1453] made and created Edward our beloved first-born, prince of Wales and earl of Chester, and we gave and granted to the same Edward, our first-born, the name, style, title, state, dignity and honour of the same principality and earldom, and by our same charter confirmed them; and we invested him according to custom with the same principality and earldom so that he might preside over the same and so presiding, govern and defend the said regions, by a circlet on the head, a gold ring on the finger, and a gold staff: to have to him and his heirs, the kings of England, forever, as is more fully contained in the aforesaid charter. Which charter and name, style, title, state, dignity and honour aforesaid, and also each and every other thing contained in the same, thus granted to the same first-born, of our special grace, and with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and the commons of our realm of England, in our present parliament begun at Westminster on 9 July, in the thirty-third year of our reign [1455], and prorogued until the following 12 November, on the same 12 November, [col. b] by authority of the same parliament, we ratify, approve and confirm, according to the form and effect of our aforesaid charter.
Nos, ut idem Edwardus primogenitus noster comes Cestr', statum suum hujusmodi juxta generis sui nobilitatem ac nominis dignitatem valeat eo quo decet honore manutenere, dedimus et concessimus, et hac carta nostra, de auctoritate et assensu predictis, confirmavimus eidem comiti, comitatus nostros palatinos Cestr' et Flynt, et castra < nostra > de Cestr', Bestone, Rotheland, Hope et Flynt, et terras nostras ibidem, ac maneria et terras de Hopedale et Frodesham, necnon cantredum et terram de Inglefeld, et omnia alia maneria nostra in comitatibus predictis cum pertinentiis: habenda et tenenda eidem comiti et heredibus suis regibus Anglie, una cum feodis militum, tam forinsecis in Anglie quam aliis, et advocationibus ecclesiarum, abbaciarum, prioratuum, hospitalium, capellarum, cantariarum, vicariarum, et aliarum domorum religiosarum, et beneficiorum et officiorum quorumcumque, pensionibus, porcionibus, annuitatibus, corrodiis, officiis, prisis, custumis, libertatibus, regalitatibus, liberis consuetudinibus, franchesiis, dominiis, commotis, hundredis, escaetis, forisfacturis, feriis, mercatis, forestis, chaceis, parcis, boscis, warennis, maritagiis, releviis, servitiis, piscariis, molendinis, dominiis, possessionibus, proficuis et emolumentis quibuscumque, quibuscumque nominibus censeantur, et omnibus aliis rebus ad eadem comitatus, castra, maneria, terras, cantredum, < commotos et hundreda, tam in Anglie quam in Wallie et marchiis Wallie qualitercumque spectantibus, seu de jure pertinere debent; adeo plene et integre, et eisdem modis > et condicionibus, sicut carissimus progenitor noster Edwardus nuper comes Cestr', aut carissimus dominus et pater noster rex defunctus, seu aliquis alius comes predictorum comitatuum Cestr' et Flynt, dicta comitatus, castra, maneria, terras, cantredum, feoda, dominia et possessiones cum pertinentiis predictis tenuit et habuit, seu tenere et habere de jure debuisset, sine ullo retinemento; ac etiam cum advocacione ecclesie cathedralis Assaven', et cum vacacionibus, exitibus et proficuis temporalium, tam episcopatus Cestr' infra dictum comitatum Cestr' existentibus, quam dicti episcopatus Assaven', in singulis vacacionibus episcopatus eorumdem episcopatuum qualitercumque accidentibus et provenientibus; necnon feodis militum, et advocacionibus ecclesiarum, prebendarum, capellarum, cantariarum, vicariarum, porcionum, pensionum, ac aliorum beneficiorum et officiorum quorumcumque, tam ad dictum episcopatum Cestr' infra eundem comitatum Cestr', quam ad dictum episcopatum Assaven' ubicumque pertinentibus, durantibus vacacionibus supradictis; una cum titulis, accionibus, placitis, sectis, demandis, calumpniis, punicionibus quibuscumque, et forisfacturis terrarum, tenementorum, reddituum et serviciorum, ac escaetis, wardis, maritagiis, presentacionibus ad quecumque officia et beneficia ecclesiastica, et aliis rebus quibuscumque, ac juribus universis nos ante hec tempora in dictis comitatibus ubicumque quecumque et qualitercumque concernentibus, seu nobis de jure vel de consuetudine parcium illarum quomodolibet pertinentibus; adeo plene et integre sicut [memb. 18] nos ea seu eorum aliquod habere possemus vel deberemus, si dicti comitatus in manibus nostris remansissent non concessi; ac etiam cum reversionibus omnium et singulorum aliorum maneriorum, terrarum, tenementorum, feodorum, advocacionum, annuitatum, officiorum, et aliarum possessionum quarumcumque, ad nos infra comitatus predictos, post mortem aliquorum tenentium eorumdem maneriorum, terrarum, tenementorum, feodorum, advocacionum, annuitatum, officiorum, et aliarum possessionum quarumcumque in feodo talliato, in dotem per legem Anglie, ad terminum vite vel annorum, seu alias qualitercumque spectantibus imperpetuum. [The grant of the earldom of Chester.]
We, so that the same Edward, our first-born, earl of Chester, should be able to maintain his estate in appropriate honour, according to the nature of his nobility and the dignity of his name, gave and granted, and by this our charter, with the authority and assent aforesaid, confirmed to the same earl, our county palatines of Chester and Flint, and our castles of Chester, Beeston, Rhuddlan, Hope and Flint, and our lands there, and the manors and lands of Hopedale and Frodsham, and also the cantref and land of Englefield, and all our other manors in the aforesaid counties with the appurtenances: to have and hold to the same earl and his heirs, the kings of England, together with knights' fees, both outside the counties palatine in England and others, and advowsons of churches, abbeys, priories, hospitals, chapels, chantries, vicarages, and other religious houses, and all benefices and offices, pensions, portions, annuities, corrodies, offices, prises, customs, liberties, regalities, free customs, franchises, lordships, commotes, hundreds, escheats, forfeitures, fairs, markets, forests, chases, parks, woods, warrens, marriages, reliefs, services, fisheries, mills, demesnes, possessions, profits and emoluments whatever, by whatever name they are known, and all other things pertaining in any way, or which should by right pertain, to the same counties, castles, manors, lands, cantref, commotes and hundreds, both in England and in Wales and the marches of Wales; as fully and completely, and on the same terms and conditions, as our most beloved progenitor Edward once earl of Chester, or our most beloved lord and father the king, deceased, or any other earl of the aforesaid counties of Chester and Flint, had and held the said counties, castles, manors, lands, cantref, fees, demesnes and possessions with the appurtenances aforesaid, or ought to have and hold them by right, without any reservation; and also with the advowson of the cathedral church of St Asaph, and with the vacancies, issues and profits of the temporalities, both of the bishopric of Chester within the said county of Chester, and of the said bishopric of St Asaph, during all vacancies of either of the same bishoprics howsoever occurring or arising; and also knights' fees, and advowsons of churches, prebends, chapels, chantries, vicarages, portions, pensions, and other benefices and offices whatever, pertaining to the said bishopric of Chester within the same county of Chester, and anywhere in the said bishopric of St Asaph, during the aforesaid vacancies; together with any titles, actions, pleas, suits, demands, accusations, penalties, and forfeitures of lands, tenements, rents and services, and escheats, wardships, marriages, presentations to any ecclesiastical offices and benefices, and any other things, and all rights pertaining to us before this time in the said counties, wherever, whenever and however they concern us, or in whatever way they pertain to us by right or by the custom of those regions; as fully and completely as [memb. 18] we could and should have them or any one of them if the said counties had remained in our hands, without having been granted; and also with the reversions of all other manors, lands, tenements, fees, advowsons, annuities, offices and any other possessions within the aforesaid counties, after the death of any of the tenants of the same manors, lands, tenements, fees, advowsons, annuities, offices, and any other possessions in fee-tail, in dower by the law of England, for term of life or years, or in any other way pertaining to us, forever.
Quare volumus et firmiter precipimus, pro nobis et heredibus nostris, [p. v-293][col. a] quod predictus comes primogenitus noster, habeat et teneat de nobis, sibi et heredibus suis regibus Anglie, comitatus, castra, maneria, terras et cantredum predicta, cum pertinentiis; una cum feodis militum, advocacionibus ecclesiarum, abbaciarum, prioratuum, hospitalium, capellarum, cantariarum, vicariarum, et aliarum domorum religiosarum, et beneficiorum et officiorum quorumcumque; pensionibus, porcionibus, annuitatibus, corrodiis, officiis, prisis, custumis, libertatibus, regalitatibus, liberis consuetudinibus, franchesiis, dominiis, commotis, hundredis, escaetis, forisfacturis, feriis, mercatis, forestis, chaceis, parcis, boscis, warennis, maritagiis, releviis, serviciis, piscariis, molendinis, dominiis, possessionibus, proficuiis et emolumentis quibuscumque, quibuscumque nominibus censeantur, et omnibus aliis rebus ad eadem comitatus, castra, maneria, terras et cantredum, tam in Anglie quam in Wallie et marchiis Wallie qualitercumque spectantibus, seu de jure pertinere debent; adeo plene et integre, et eisdem modis et condicionibus, sicut idem progenitor noster nuper comes Cestr', aut carissimus dominus et pater noster rex defunctus, seu aliquis alius comes predictorum comitatuum Cestr' et Flynt illa tenuit et habuit, seu de jure habere et tenere debuisset, sine ullo retinemento; ac etiam advocationibus ecclesie cathedralis Assaven', et cum vacacionibus, exitibus et proficuis temporalium tam episcopatus Cestr' infra dictum comitatum Cestr' existentibus, quam dicti episcopatus Assaven', in singulis vacacionibus eorumdem episcopatuum, qualitercumque accidentibus et provenientibus; ac etiam cum feodis militum, advocacionibus ecclesiarum, prebendarum, capellarum, cantariarum, vicariarum, porcionum, pensionum, ac aliorum beneficiorum et officiorum quorumcumque, tam ad dictum episcopatum infra eundem comitatum Cestr', quam ad < predictum episcopatum > Assaven' ubicumque pertinentibus, durantibus vacationibus supradictis; una cum titulis, actionibus, placitis, sectis, demandis, calumpniis, punicionibus, forisfacturis terrarum, tenementorum, reddituum, serviciorum, escaetis, wardis, maritagiis, presentacionibus ad quecumque officia et beneficia ecclesiastica, et aliis rebus quibuscumque, ac juribus universis, nos ante hec tempora in dictis comitatibus ubicumque, quandocumque et qualitercumque concernentibus, seu nobis de jure seu consuetudine parcium illarum quomodolibet pertinentibus; adeo plene et integre sicut nos ea seu eorum aliquod habere possemus vel deberemus si dicti comitatus in manibus nostris remansissent non concessi; ac etiam cum reversionibus omnium et singulorum maneriorum, terrarum, tenementorum, feodorum, advocacionum, annuitatum, officiorum, et aliarum possessionum quarumcumque, ad nos infra comitatus predictos post mortem tenentium eorumdem maneriorum, terrarum et tenementorum, feodorum, advocacionum, annuitatum, officiorum, et aliarum possessionum quarumcumque, in feodo talliato, in dotem per legem Anglie, ad terminum vite vel annorum, seu alias qualitercumque spectantibus imperpetuum, sicut predictum est; salvis semper quibuscumque ligeis nostris, jure, titulo et interesse suis, de < et in castris, > dominiis, maneriis, villis, terris et tenementis, et ceteris premissis quibuscumque, et in qualibet parcella eorumdem, que ipsi seu eorum aliquis, antecessores seu predecessores sui, habuerunt seu habuit in premissis, seu aliquo premissorum, primo die regni nostri, aliter quam per litteras nostras patentes sibi seu eorum alicui inde confectas. Hiis testibus etc. Datum per manum etc. (fn. v-278-213-1) [The grant of the earldom of Chester.]
Wherefore we will and firmly order, for us and our heirs, [p. v-293][col. a] that the aforesaid earl, our first-born, shall have and hold of us, to him and his heirs, the kings of England, the aforesaid counties, castles, manors, lands and cantref; together with knights' fees, advowsons of churches, abbeys, priories, hospitals, chapels, chantries, vicarages, and other religious houses, and all benefices and offices; pensions, portions, annuities, corrodies, offices, prises, customs, liberties, regalities, free customs, franchises, lordships, commotes, hundreds, escheats, forfeitures, fairs, markets, forests, chases, parks, woods, warrens, marriages, reliefs, services, fisheries, mills, demesnes, possessions, profits and emoluments whatever, by whatever name they are known, and all other things pertaining in any way, or which should by right pertain, to the same counties, castles, manors, lands and cantref, both in England and in Wales and the marches of Wales; as fully and completely, and on the same terms and conditions, as our same progenitor once earl of Chester, or our beloved father and lord the king, deceased, or any other earl of the aforesaid counties of Chester and Flint held and had them, or should by right have and hold them, without any reservation; and also the advowson of the cathedral church of St Asaph, and with vacancies, issues and profits of temporalities both of the bishopric of Chester in the said county of Chester, and of the said bishopric of St Asaph, in all vacancies of the same bishoprics, however they occur or arise; and also with knights' fees, advowsons of churches, prebends, chapels, chantries, vicarages, portions, pensions, and all benefices and offices whatever, pertaining both to the said bishopric in the same county of Chester, and anywhere in the aforesaid bishopric of St Asaph, during the aforesaid vacancies; together with titles, actions, pleas, suits, demands, accusations, penalties, forfeitures of lands, tenements, rents, services, escheats, wardships, marriages, presentations to any ecclesiastical offices and benefices, and all other things, and all rights pertaining to us before this time in the said counties, wherever, whenever and however they concern us, or in whatever way they pertain to us by right or by the custom of those regions; as fully and completely as we could and should have them or any one of them if the said counties had remained in our hands, without having been granted; and also with the reversions of all other manors, lands, tenements, fees, advowsons, annuities, offices and any other possessions within the aforesaid counties, after the death of any of the tenants of the same manors, lands, tenements, fees, advowsons, annuities, offices, and any other possessions in fee-tail, in dower by the law of England, for term of life or years, or in any other way pertaining to us, forever, as said above; saving always to each of our lieges, their right, title and interest, concerning and in the castles, lordships, manors, towns, lands, tenements, and any other things stated, and in each part of the same, which they or any of them, their ancestors or predecessors, has or had in the things stated, or in any of them, on the first day of our reign, other than by our letters patent made to them or any of them. Witnessed by, etc. Given by our hand, etc. (fn. v-278-213-1)
< Pro ducatu Cornub'. > [The grant of the duchy of Cornwall.]
43. And moreover the kyng consideryng that his said bestbelovyd first begoten sonne, tyme of his birth is duke of Cornewayle, and aught of right to have lyvere of the said duchie, and of all honours, lordships, [col. b] seignories, castels, manoris, londes, tenementes, rentes, possessions and enheritaunces, with their appurtenaunces, to the said duchie belongyng or parcell of the same in anywyse, by the said advis, assent and auctorite, the said .xij. day of Novembre, delyvereth and doth to be delyvered to the said prynce his first begoten sonne, the said duchie of Cornewayll, and all honours, lordships, seignories, castels, manoirs, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions, fermes, feefermes, knyghtesfees, advousons of churches, chapels, and all other benefices, hospitals, chaunteries, with all manere libertees, fraunchises, offices, courtes, vieues of frank plegge, wayfes, strayes, forfaitures, wrekkes of the see, prises < of wyne, custumes havenary, > tolles, cunage of tynne, stannaries, markettes, faires, with all other thinges, possessions and enheritaunces, profites and commoditees, with theire appurtenaunces, to the said duchie annexid, unyed, perteynyng or belongyng, or parcell of the same in anywyse; and that the said prynce have, enjoye and possede all the premisses, as largely, frely and entirely, and in as ample fourme, as Prynce Edward, sonne of Kyng Edward the third his progenitour, or the most noble Cristen victorious prince Kyng Henry the V his fadre, aiell to his said sonne, ever had, enjoyed or posseded afore this tyme, as dukes of Cornewaile, the premisses or any parcell therof; and that his said sonne prynce Edward nowe beyng, have, entre, occupie and enjoie the same, fro the said .xij. day, to hym in like fourme, estate and enheritaunce, as the said Edward firstbegoten sone of kyng Edward the thrid his progenitour had and enjoyed the same. 43. For the duchy of Cornwall. Moreover, the king, considering that his said most beloved first-born son from the time of his birth was duke of Cornwall, and ought by right to have livery of the said duchy, and of all honours, lordships, [col. b] seigniories, castles, manors, lands, tenements, rents, possessions and hereditaments with their appurtenances belonging to the said duchy or part of it in any way, by the said advice, assent and authority, on the said 12 November, delivered and caused to be delivered to the said prince his first-born son the said duchy of Cornwall, and all honours, lordships, seigniories, castles, manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions, farms, fee-farms, knights' fees, advowsons of churches, chapels and all other benefices, hospitals, chantries, with all manner of liberties, franchises, offices, courts, views of frankpledge, waifs, strays, forfeitures, wrecks of the sea, prises of wine, customs, port tolls, coinage of tin, stannaries, markets, fairs, with all other things, possessions and hereditaments, profits and commodities, with their appurtenances, annexed, united, pertaining or belonging to the said duchy, or part of the same in any way; and that the said prince shall have, enjoy and possess all the things stated as largely, freely and entirely, and in as full a form, as Prince Edward, son of King Edward III, his progenitor, or the most noble Christian victorious prince King Henry V his father, grandfather to his said son, ever had, enjoyed or possessed before this time, as dukes of Cornwall, the foregoing or any part of them; and that his said son Prince Edward shall have, enter, occupy and enjoy the same, from the said twelfth day, in the same form, estate and inheritance as the said Edward the first-born son of King Edward III his progenitor had and enjoyed them.
44. And for asmoche as the said prince is tendre of age, it is thought convenient that ther be ordeyned and assigned a certeyne nombre of persones to be abowte the prince, his servauntes, accordyng to his estate; < and þat > the said prince and his said servauntes to sojorne and be at diettez in the kynges houshold, unto the tyme he be of .xiiij. yeres of age; the kyng, by thavise and auctorite aforesaid, willeth and ordeyneth that the said prince shall sojorne and be at diettez with the kyng, to the tyme that he be of the said age of .xiiij. yeres; that the kyng shall have yerely for the seid diettez, from the .xij. day of Novembre the .xxxiiij. ti yere of his reigne, all such yerely summez of money as shall clerely remayne to the said prince due, of all manere issuez and revenuez growyng and commyng of the said principaltee, erldome and duchie, from the said .xij. day of Novembre, to the tyme that he come to the age of .xiiij. yeres, over fees, < wages of > officers of old tyme therof due and accustumed, and reparacions, and all maner necessarie costes and reprisez of the same principaltee, erldome and duchie, as it shall openly appere yerely, by accompte therof to be made before the barons of the kynges eschequer, or auditours, to here the said accompte by the kyng to be assigned; alwey therof yerely to the said prince reserved by auctorite aforesaid, the summez of a .m.li. into the tyme the said prince come to the age of .viij. yerez, and fro the said age of .viij. yerez, to the said prince be of the age of .xiiij. yere, yerely reserved to the said prince the summe of .mm. marcs, for his warderobe, wagez of his servauntez, and other necessarie expensez; the which summez of .m.li. and .mm. marcs, in fourme aforesaid, the said prince, duryng the said tyme of his sojourne, shall have and receyve of the first money growyng and commyng of the revenuez and issuez aforesaid, withoute any accompte therof yeldyng; and that the said yerely issuez and revenuez of the said principaltee, erldome and duchie, duryng the tyme aforesaid, savyng the said summez of a .m.li. and .mm. marcs to the said prince before reserved, to be emploied and applied oonly to the kynges houshold, and to noon other oese. And if eny assignement [p. v-294][col. a] be made to eny persone or personez of the premissez to the contrarie, that than all such assignement by the seid auctorite be voide and of noon effect. (fn. v-278-218-1) [The prince's household.]
44. And inasmuch as the said prince is of tender age, it is thought fitting that there be ordained and assigned a certain number of persons to attend the prince as his servants, as befits his estate; and that the said prince and his said servants shall have board and lodging in the king's household until he is fourteen years of age; the king, by the aforesaid advice and authority, wills and ordains that the said prince shall have board and lodging with the king until he is of the said age of fourteen; and that the king shall have yearly for the said board, from 12 November in the thirty-fourth year of his reign [1455], all the net income due yearly to the prince from all the issues and revenues growing and coming from the said principality, earldom and duchy, from the said 12 November, until he reaches the age of fourteen, after the payment of fees, the traditional and customary wages of officers, and repairs, and all the necessary costs and expenses of the same principality, earldom and duchy, as shall be publicly shown each year in the account made before the barons of the king's exchequer, or auditors assigned to hear the said account by the king; there being reserved always for the said prince, by the aforesaid authority, an annual sum of £1,000 until he reaches the age of eight, and from the age of eight, until the prince reaches the age of fourteen, there being yearly reserved for the said prince the sum of 2,000 marks for his wardrobe, the wages of his servants, and other necessary expenses; which sums of £1,000 and 2,000 marks, the said prince, during the time of his residence in the king's household, shall have and receive in the aforesaid form from the first money growing and coming from the aforesaid revenues and issues, without accounting for it; and that the said yearly issues and revenues from the said principality, earldom and duchy, during the aforesaid time, saving the said sums of £1,000 and 2,000 marks previously reserved to the said prince, are to be used and spent only on the king's household, and put to no other use. And if any assignment [p. v-294][col. a] of the aforesaid is made to any person or persons to the contrary, then the whole assignment shall be invalid and of no effect, by the said authority. (fn. v-278-218-1)
Provided alwey that this acte in enywise extende not nor be prejudiciall nor hurt, to eny persone or persones havyng eny title, right, interest or possession, which they or eny of theym nowe have, of, to, or in eny of the premisses, or in any parcell therof, by reason of any title or right to theym, or any of theym, theire auncestre, predecessours, or eny other whose astate they or any of theym, or any having astate be theym, have or hadde growen to theym or any of theym, or to eny havyng estate be theym, afore the first day of the reigne of the kyng that nowe is; savyng also to the kyng oure soverayne lord, < all > avoidaunce of bisshoprich, abbeys and priories, and all manere presentacions and yeftes of avousons of bisshopriches, abbes, priories, chirches, chapels, hospitalitees, chaunteries, and < of all > other benefices abovereherced, unto the tyme the said prince come to the age of .xiiij. yere; savyng also to oure said soveraine lord, all manere knyghtesfees, wardes, mariages, reliefes and eschetes, that been or shall happe to falle and growe in or of the said principaltee, counte or duchie, or any parcell therof, unto the tyme the said prince come to the said age of .xiiij. yere; savyng also to our said soveraine lord, the yeftes all offices that shall fall and growe in or of all the premisses, or any parcell therof, or by reason of the premisses or any parcell therof, unto the tyme the said prince come to the said age of .xiiij. yere as it is aforesaid. Provided always that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial or harmful in any way to any person or persons having any title, right, interest or possession, which they or any of them now have of, to, or in any of the foregoing, or any part of them, by reason of any title or right to them, or any of them, their ancestors, predecessors, or anyone else whose estate they or any of them, or any having estate by them, have or have had come to them or any of them, or to any having an estate by them, before the first day of the reign of the present king; saving also to the king our sovereign lord, all vacancies of bishoprics, abbeys and priories, and all the presentations and gifts of advowsons of bishoprics, abbeys, priories, churches, chapels, hospitals, chantries, and of all other benefices listed above until the said prince reaches the age of fourteen; saving also to our said sovereign lord, all the knights' fees, wardships, marriages, reliefs and escheats that have or shall happen to come and grow in or of the said principality, county and duchy, or any part of them, until the said prince reaches the said age of fourteen; saving also to our said sovereign lord, the gift of all offices that shall come or grow in or of all the foregoing, or any part of them, or by reason of the foregoing or any part of them, until the said prince reaches the said age of fourteen as abovesaid.
Provided alweyes and ordeyned by the said auctorite, that Margarete Quene of Englond have and hold duryng the said .xiiij. yere all londes and tenementes parcell of the said duchie, rentes, profittes and annuitees to hir afore this tyme in eny wyse graunted, to be hadde of the issuez and revenuez of the said duchie, or of < any parcel þerof, > in and of like fourme and estate as she had theym before the first day of this present parlement. (fn. v-278-222-1) Provided always and ordained by the said authority, that Margaret, queen of England, shall have and hold during the said fourteen years all the lands and tenements which are part of the said duchy, [and the] rents, profits and annuities granted to her in any way before this time from the issues and revenues of the said duchy, or from any part of it, in and of the same form and estate as she had them before the first day of the present parliament. (fn. v-278-222-1)
Provided alweyes that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall to any graunte or acte made by auctorite of this present parlement, before the first day of January the yere of oure < reigne þe > .xxxiiij. ti , of .mmcccvi.li. .xij. s. .viij. d. ob. q a ., to be takyn and levyed of the issuez, profites and revenuez of the said principaltee, erldome and duchie, or of any parcell of them, to be emploied and applied to the expenses of oure houshold, which were assigned or shall be assigned by Henry Bouchier lord Bouchier thesorer of Englond, by taill or bill by reason of the said acte, to any persone or persones for youre said houshold. (fn. v-278-224-1) Provided always that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or act made by authority of this present parliament, before 1 January in the thirty-fourth year of our reign [1456], of £2,306 12s. 8d. three farthings to be taken and levied from the issues, profits and revenues of the said principality, earldom and duchy, or any part of them, to be used and spent on the expenses of our household, which were assigned or shall be assigned by Henry Bourchier, Lord Bourchier, treasurer of England, by tally or bill, by reason of the said act, to any person or persons for your said household. (fn. v-278-224-1)
Provided also that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall to any persone or persones as of any office or offices that neden actuell excercise, graunted to theim or any of theim by us by oure lettres patentes, ne to the wages and fees to such office or offices due and accustumed. Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to any person or persons with regard to any office or offices which require actual performance, granted to them or any of them by us by our letters patent, or to the customary wages and fees due for such an office or offices.
Provided also, ordeyned and forsayn, that this acte of lyvere made to oure said sone be not prejudiciall to Richard Wydevyll lord Ryvers, ne to Jaquette duchesse of Bedford, wyf to the same Richard, ne to any of theym onely duryng the lyf of the said duchesse, of and for an annuitee of .cccclxiiij.li. .viij. s. .x. d. ob., assigned to the said Richard and Jaquette, to hold in dower of the said duchesse, after the deth of oure uncle John late duc of Bedford, to be perceyved yerely at the receit of the duchie of Cornewaill, in allowaunce of hir dower of an annuitee of .mm. marcs graunted upon certain consideracions by the most excellent prince and lord oure fadre, whom God assoile, to oure said uncle, and to be perceyved at the resceite of the said duchie, by the lettres patentes of oure [col. b] said fadre yevyn the .xxvij. day of July, the yere < the yere [sic] of his reign þe thridde; and þat the seid Richard and duches, duryng þe lif of the seid duches, have and enjoie þe seid annuite > of .cccclxiiij.li. .viij. s. .x. d. ob., by oure auctorite, and by thassent of the lordes spirituell and temporell, and of the communes in this present parlement, and by auctorite of the same, any title or interesse to oure said sone belongyng or apperteynyng in the said duchie, or any lyvere to hym therof made, notwithstondyng; the tenure of the said lettres patentes is specified in this bill underwritten; the summez of a .m.li. .ij. mille marcs aforesaid to the said prince in manere and fourme aforesaid reserved, be preferred afore all the grauntes, assignementz or paiementz to be had by reason of the same. Provided also, ordained and on condition that this act of livery made to our said son shall not be prejudicial to Richard Woodville, Lord Rivers, or to Jacquetta, duchess of Bedford, wife of the same Richard, or to either of them during the lifetime of the said duchess, with regard to an annuity of £464 8s. 10d. halfpenny assigned to the said Richard and Jacquetta, to hold as dower of the said duchess after the death of our uncle John, late duke of Bedford, to be received yearly at the receipt of the duchy of Cornwall, allowed as her dower in an annuity of 2,000 marks granted for certain reasons by the most excellent prince and lord our father, whom God absolve, to our said uncle, and to be received at the receipt of the said duchy, by the letters patent of our [col. b] said father given on 27 July, in the third year of his reign [1415]; and that the said Richard and duchess, during the life of the said duchess, shall have and enjoy the said annuity of £464 8s. 10d. halfpenny, by our authority, and by the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and of the commons in the present parliament, and by authority of the same, notwithstanding any title or interest belonging or pertaining to our said son in the said duchy, or any livery of it made to him; the tenor of the said letters patent is given in the following bill; the aforesaid sums of £1,000 and 2,000 marks reserved to the said prince in the aforesaid manner and form, are to take precedence over all the grants, assignments or payments to be had by reason of the same.
Rex, omnibus ad quos, etc., salutem. Sciatis quod de gratia nostra speciali, et in recompensacionem terrarum et tenementorum et possessionum hereditatum de Percy, que carissimus frater noster Johannes dux Bedford tenet in presenti, et que Henry de Percy restitui faciemus, concessimus prefato duci tria milia marcarum, percipienda annuatim sibi et heredibus suis masculis, videlicet, mille marcas ad scaccarium nostrum, et duo milia marcarum ad receptam ducatus nostri Cornub', per manus receptoris ejusdem pro tempore existentis; quousque idem dux et dicti heredes sui, de aliis terris et dominiis seu possessionibus usque ad verum valorem dictorum trium milium marcarum recompensentur. Et ulterius de uberiori gracia nostra, pro majore securitate predicti ducis, concessimus pro nobis et heredibus nostris eidem duci, quod ipse et dicti heredes sui, de quibuscumque castris, dominiis et possessionibus competentibus et racionabilibus pro se et heredibus suis predictis, pro recompensacione predicta petendis, quamquam ea de corona nostra existant, sive per escaetam, per perquisicionem, seu aliter per justum et rectum titulum nobis aut heredibus nostris qualitercumque pertinuerint sive spectaverint, de tempore in tempus, ad eorum verum valorem, per persecucionem et declaracionem prefati ducis et heredum suorum predictorum inde faciendas preferrentur, usque ad tempus quo debita, vera, clara et racionabilis recompensacio integre aut parcellatim hujusmodi castrorum, terrarum, tenementorum seu possessionum sibi facta fuerit, ad < valorem annuum > trium milium marcarum predictarum faciendum, etc. Teste rege apud Sutht', .xxvij. o die Julii, anno regni nostri tercio. The king, to all to whom, etc., greeting. Know that of our special grace, and in recompense for the lands and tenements and possessions of the Percy inheritance, which our most beloved brother John, duke of Bedford, holds at present, and which are to be restored to Henry Percy, we grant to the aforementioned duke 3,000 marks annually to him and his heirs male, namely, 1,000 marks at our exchequer, and 2,000 marks at the receipt of our duchy of Cornwall by the hands of the receiver at the time; until the same duke and his said heirs have been compensated with other lands and lordships or possessions up to the actual value of the said 3,000 marks. And moreover, of our most abundant grace, for the greater security of the aforesaid duke, we grant on behalf of us and our heirs to the same duke, that he and his said heirs shall have priority in the grant of any castles, lordships and possessions which are fitting and reasonable for him and his aforesaid heirs, and which they shall request by way of compensation as aforesaid, even if they are of our crown, whether by escheat, purchase or just and rightful title, or however else they pertain or belong to us or our heirs, from time to time, at their actual value, by the suit and declaration made thereon by the aforementioned duke and his aforesaid heirs male until such time as proper, actual, clear and reasonable compensation has been made to him, by one grant or several, for these castles, lands, tenements or possessions, to the annual value of the aforesaid 3,000 marks, etc. Witnessed by the king at Southampton on 27 July, in the third year of our reign [1415].
Provided also that this ordenaunce or acte of lyvere extende not nor in eny wyse be prejudiciall to any disseveraunce, disanexion or disunion made of the manoir of Istilworth with the appurtenaunce in the counte of Midd' from the said duchie of Cornewaile, nor to any yifte, graunte or grauntes, assignacion, ratificacion, confirmacion or warante, had or made by oure fadre of blessid memoire to the abbesse and covent of oure monasterie of Seint Saveour, and Seintz Marie the Virgine and Brigitte of Syon, of the ordre of Seint Austyn of Seint Saveour called, by oure seid fadre within the same manoir of Istilworth late founden, or to theire predecessours or successours, or eny other persone or persones to their use and behofe, or to any of theym, by auctorite of his parlement holden at Westm' the .ij. d day of May, the .ix. yere of his most noble reigne, or by his lettres patentes or in any other wyse, of or in the said manoir of Istilworth with thappurtenaunce, or any parcell of the same manoir, nor to any other thyng comprised within the acte of the same parlement theruppon had or made. Consideryng that oure seid fadre by auctorite of the same parlement annexid and unyed to the said duchie for evermore, to remayne to the dukes of the said duchie and to theire heirs perpetually, in recompense of the said manoir of Istilworth, [p. v-295][col. a] diverse other manoirs, londes, tenementes and possessions, comprisid within the said acte therupon had or made, excedyng the value of the seid manoir of Istilworth yerely .cc.li. as in the same acte therupon had or made more openly doth appere. (fn. v-278-232-1) Provided also that this ordinance or act of livery shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to any severance, separation or disjunction made of the manor of Isleworth with its appurtenances in the county of Middlesex from the said duchy of Cornwall, or to any gift, grant or grants, assignation, ratification, confirmation or warrant had or made by our father of blessed memory, to the abbess and convent of our monastery of St Saviour and St Mary the Virgin and St Bridget of Syon, of the order of St Augustine called St Saviour, lately founded by our said father within the same manor of Isleworth, or to their predecessors or successors, or any other person or persons to their use and benefit, or to any of them, by authority of his parliament held at Westminster on 2 May, in the ninth year of his most noble reign [1421], or by his letters patent or in any other way, of or in the said manor of Isleworth with the appurtenances, or any part of the same manor, or to anything else contained in the act of the same parliament had or made thereon. Considering that our said father by authority of the same parliament annexed and attached to the said duchy forever, to remain to the dukes of the said duchy and to their heirs in perpetuity, as compensation for the said manor of Isleworth, [p. v-295][col. a] various other manors, lands, tenements and possessions, contained in the said act had or made thereon, exceeding the value of the said manor of Isleworth each year by £200, as appears more fully in the same act had or made thereon. (fn. v-278-232-1)
Provided also that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall to any feoffement or relese made by us to any persone or persones, of any londes or tenementes of which we were enfeoffed by them of trust, in which we had never title in or out of the same londes and tenementes, but onely by the feoffement made by us in trust. Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to any enfeoffment or release made by us to any person or persons of any lands or tenements of which we were enfeoffed by them in trust, in which we never had a title in or out of the same lands and tenements other than by the enfeoffment made by us in trust.
Provided alweyes and forseyn [memb. 17] that this acte and lyvere made to oure said sone be not prejudiciall to any persone or persones, of any graunte made by us by oure lettres patentes to theim or any of theim, of the premissez; which persone or persones, of such graunte or grauntes be provided for in the acte of resumpcion made in this present parlement. Provided always and on condition, [memb. 17] that this act and livery made to our said son shall not be prejudicial to any person or persons, with regard to any grant made by us by our letters patent to them or any of them of the foregoing; which person or persons have a proviso with regard to such a grant or grants in the act of resumption made in the present parliament.
Provided alweyes that this acte and graunte made unto the prince extende not nor in enywyse be prejudiciall to Rauf lord Sudeley, of a graunte made by us unto hym of a .c.li. for the fee of office of banerer, to be takyn yerely duryng his lif of the issuez, profitez and revenuz commyng and growyng of the commote of Turkelby in oure counte of Angles' in Northwales; but that oure lettres patentes of the said .c.li. stond good and effectuell, after the tenure and effect of the same, this act or eny other acte to the contrarie made notwithstondyng: the summes of a .m.li. .mm. marcs aforesaid, to the said prince in manere and fourme aforesaid reserved, be preferred yerely alwey afore all the grauntez, assignementz or paiementz to be had by the reason of the same. Provided always that this act and grant made to the prince shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to Ralph, Lord Sudeley, with regard to a grant made by us to him of £100, for the fee of the office of standard bearer, to be taken yearly during his life from the issues, profits and revenues coming and growing from the commote of Twrcelyn in our county of Anglesey in North Wales; but that our letters patent of the said £100 shall remain good and effectual, according to their tenor and effect, notwithstanding this act or any other act made to the contrary: the sums of £1,000 and 2,000 marks aforesaid, reserved to the said prince in the aforesaid manner and form, being always preferred each year before all the grants, assignments or payments to be had by reason of the same.
Provided also that this acte be not prejudiciall to any graunte or acte made afore this tyme, of any summez of money by any other of oure thesorers before this tyme, by force and auctorite of any acte of parlement by taill or bill assigned for the expensez of oure houshold, to be takyn and levyed of the profitez and issuez of the said principalte or erldom, or of any parcell therof; so [...] it can or may be duely and sufficiently provid afore oure chaunceller and thesorer of this oure reaume for the tyme beyng, that the said summes so assigned were emploied and applied duely to oure seid houshold: the said summez of a .m.li. and .mm. marcs, to the said prince in manere and fourme aforesaid reserved, be preferred alwey afore all grauntez, assignementz or paiementz to be had by reason of the same, be also preferred afore all such grauntes and assignementes or paiementz, to be had by the reason of them, and the seid summez of .mmcccvi.li. .xij. s. .viij. d. ob. by oure seid thesorer lord Bouchier assigned. And if any assignement be made to any persone or persones of the premissez, or of any of theim, in any otherwyse than to the kynges houshold, that than all such assignementez be voide and of noon effecte. Provided also that this act shall not be prejudicial to any grant or act made before this time of any sums of money assigned by tally or bill for the expenses of our household by any of our other treasurers in the past, by force and authority of any act of parliament, to be taken and levied from the profits and issues of the said principality or earldom, or any part of them; on condition that it can or may be properly and adequately proved before the chancellor and treasurer of this our realm at the time, that the said sums so assigned were duly used and spent on our said household: the said sums of £1,000 and 2,000 marks, reserved to the said prince in the aforesaid manner and form, being always preferred before all grants, assignments or payments to be had by reason of the same, and also preferred before all such grants and assignments or payments to be had by reason of them, and the said sums of £2,306 12s. 8d. halfpenny, assigned by our said treasurer Lord Bourchier. And if any assignment is made to any person or persons of the foregoing, or of any of them, in any other way than to the king's household, then all such assignments shall be invalid and of no effect.
Pro mercatoribus stapule Cales'. For the merchants of the staple of Calais.
45. Item, quedam peticio exhibita fuit eidem domino regi, in presenti parliamento, per majorem et mercatores societatis stapule Cales', cum quadam cedula eidem peticioni annexa, in hec verba: 45. Item, a petition was presented to the lord king, in the present parliament, by the mayor and merchants of the fellowship of the staple of Calais, with a schedule attached to the same petition, in these words:
Besechen in the most louly wyse the maire and merchauntez of the feloweship of the staple of Caleys, that where late it was desirid by the lordes of youre full honorable counseill that youre said besechers shuld purvey towarde the paiement of the soudeours of Caleys at certeine tymes to be appointed, .xxiij. mille marcs for partie of paiement, wherof was promitted to theim by the said lordes obligacions of subsidie of wolles and wolfell amountyng to the somme of .xij. mille marcs, to be delivered to theim by the handes of your thesorer [col. b] of Caleys, and obligacions of the said subsidie amountyng to the somme of .ij. mille marcs, to be delyvered to theim by the handes of the vitailler of the said toun of Caleys; accordyng to which promys, divers obligacions for the subsidie of wolles amountyng to the summe of .ij. mille marcs be delyvered by John Cheyne, knyght, viteller of Cales', to Robert White maire of the staple of Caleys, Robert Horne, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, merchauntz of the same staple, to the use of youre said besechers, by certeyn writyng endented therof made, the tenure wherof hereto is annexid. The mayor and merchants of the fellowship of the staple of Calais pray most humbly that where it was lately requested by the lords of your most honourable council, that your said petitioners should provide towards the payment of the soldiers of Calais at certain times to be decided, 23,000 marks, in part payment of which they were promised by the said lords obligations on the subsidy on wool and woolfells amounting to the sum of 12,000 marks, to be delivered to them by the hands of your treasurer [col. b] of Calais, and obligations on the said subsidy amounting to the sum of 2,000 marks, to be delivered to them by the hands of the victualler of the said town of Calais; according to which promise, various obligations on the subsidy on wool amounting to the sum of 2,000 marks were delivered by John Cheyney, knight, victualler of Calais, to Robert White, mayor of the staple of Calais, Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, merchants of the same staple, to the use of your said petitioners, by certain indentures made thereon, the tenor of which is here attached.
Please it your highnesse to considre that the soudeours of Caleys have receyved and taken at Caleys, < of þe money > commyng of the sale < of wolles > and wolfell of divers of youre said besechers, the summe of .ij. mille marcs and moch more. And theruppon to graunte and ordeyne, by thadvis and assent of the lordes spirituell and temporell, and commons in this present parlement assembled, and by auctorite of the same parlement, that aswell the said John Cheyne, knyght, as his heirs, executours and terre tenauntez, and every of theim, be utterly quiete and discharged, aswell ayenst you, youre heirs and successours, as ayenst the said soudeours and eche of theim for evermore, of the said obligacions specified in the seid writyng endented, and of all sommes in the same obligacions conteyned, aswell in your escheker or elleswhere. May it please your highness to consider that the soldiers of Calais have received and taken at Calais the sum of 2,000 marks, and much more, from the money growing from the sale of the wool and woolfells of several of your said petitioners. And thereupon, to grant and ordain, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and the commons assembled in the present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament, that the said John Cheyney, knight, as well as his heirs, executors and tenants, and each of them, shall be completely quit and discharged towards you, your heirs and successors, as well as towards the said soldiers and each one of them forever, of the said obligations specified in the said indentures, and of all sums contained in the same obligations, in your exchequer as well as elsewhere.
Tenor vero cedule predicte sequitur in hec verba: The tenor of the aforesaid schedule follows in these words:
This endenture made betwene Sir John Cheyne, knyght, viteller of Caleys, of that one part, and Robert White, maire of the staple of Caleys, Robert Horne, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, merchaunts of the staple aforesaid, of that other parte, witnessith that the said Sire John Cheyne, by desire of the lordes of the kynges counseill, and at the request of the said maire and merchauntz, hath delyvered to the said mair and merchauntz, certeine obligacions of subsidie of wolle and wolfell, wherin divers merchauntz of the seid staple be bounde to the kyng our soveraine lord, and to the collectours of the said subsidie in divers portz of this reame of Inglond, in certayn sommes of money undrewreten, for subsidie of wollez and wolfell, in the said portz late shipped < to > Caleys, paiable at certeine dayes, like as here under [...] more specially woll appere. That is to say, first, an obligacion of Thomas Stevenson the elder, Thomas Stevenson the yonger < of Tetney, and Thomas Gose of Bulyngbroke, > in the counte of Lincoln, merchauntz, in the which they be bound to the kyng, and to William Eland and John Acclum, custumers of the port of Kyngeston upon Hull, in .xlv.li. .xxi. d., paiable the last day of Septembre next commyng. Also, another obligacion of Stephen Marshall of Northmuskam, William Marshall of Southmuskam, and John Berton of the same, merchauntz, bound to the kyng and collectours aforesaid, in .liij.li. .xiij. s. .viij. d., paiable the forsaid last day of Septembre. Also, another obligacion of John Mundesson of Southkelsay in the counte of Lincoln, Robert Mundesson of Kyngeston upon Hull aforesaid, and John Owresby of Owresby in the counte of Lincoln aforesaid, merchauntz, bounde to the kyng and collectours < aforeseid, in > .xvi.li. .xij. s. .iiij.d., paiable the first day of the moneth of Octobre next commyng. Also, another obligacion of John Medilton of Beverlay, John Dey of Kyngeston upon Hull, and John Hadilsey of the same, merchauntz, bound to the kyng and collectours aforesaid, in .xvij.li. .vij. s. .ix. d., paiable the last day of Septembre aforesaid. Also, another obligacion of John Penycoke of Oteland in the counte of Surr', Thomas Stevenson of Tetnay in the counte of Lincoln aforesaid, and Symond Newton of the same, merchauntz, bounde to the kyng and collectours [p. v-296][col. a] aforesaid, in .xx.li. .xv. s. .ix. d., paiable the first day of Octobre aforesaid. Also, another obligacion of the said John Penycoke, < Thomas > and Symond, bound to the kyng and collectours abovesaid, in .xx.li. .xv. s. .ix.d., paiable the first day of Aprill next commyng. Also, an obligacion of John Carberton of the cite of Lincoln merchaunt, Richard Dotes of the same, merchaunt, and Roland Derwentwater of Kyngeston upon Hull, merchaunt, bounde to the kyng and collectours abovenamed, in .vij.li. .v. s. .viij. d., to pay the .viij. day of Juyn next commyng. Also, an obligacion of the said John Penycoke, Symond Newton, and Thomas Stephenson, bound to the kyng and the said collectours, in .xxiij.li. .xv. s. paiable the first day of Aprill. Also, another obligacion of the same John Penycoke, Symond Newton, and Thomas Stephenson, bound to the kyng and the said collectours, in .xxiij.li. .xv. s. to be paied the first day of Octobre next commyng. Also, an obligacion of John Berton of Southemuskham, William Marshall of the same, and Stephen Marshall of Northmuskham, in the counte of Notyngham merchauntz, bound to the kyng and the seid collectours, in .xxvi.li. .xv. s. .x. d., paiable the last day of Septembre next commyng. Also, an obligacion of Richard Sutton of Arom in the counte of Notyngham, squyer, Edmond Bernard of the same, merchauntz, and William Marshall the yonger of Newerk, merchaunt, bound to the kyng and the seid collectours, in .x.li. .v. s. .iij. d., paiable the .viij. day of the moneth of Decembre next commyng. Also, an obligacion of William Stokton, John Selby, and William Northby, citezeins and merchauntz of the cite of York, bound to the kyng and the seid collectours, in .ix.li. .xv. s. .vij. d. ob., to be paied the last day of the said moneth of Septembre. Also, an obligacion of the said William Stokton, Richard Lematon of York, merchaunt, and the said William Northby, bound to the kyng and the seid collectours, in .vi.li. .v. s. .ix. d., paiable the .viij. day of Juyn next commyng. Also, an obligacion of William Brompton of Notyngham, merchaunt, Thomas Alestre of Notyngham, merchaunt, and Richard Cotes of Lincoln, merchaunt, bound to the kyng and the seid collectours, in .iiij.li. .xvij. s. .viij. d., paiable the said .viij. day of Juyn. Also, an obligacion of William Nevile lord Faucomberge, and Symond Reyham, citezeins of London, bounde to the kyng, and John Poutrell and Robert Tanfeld, collectours of the custume and subsidie of wolles, leder and wolfell in the port of London, in .lij.li. .xv. s. .iij. d. ob., payable < the .xviij. day of Juyl > next commyng. Also, another obligacion of the seid lord and Symond, bound to the kyng and the said collectours in the port of London, in .lij.li. .xv. s. .iij. d. ob., to pay the .xviij. day of Janyuere next commyng. Also, an obligacion of William Cawod, and John Rede, of Boston in the counte of Lincoln, merchauntz, bounde to the kyng, and to Richard Pierpoint and William Pichard, collectours of the custume and subsidie in the port of the toune of Seint Botolphes, in .xli.li. .v. s. .vi. d., to be paied the last day of March which shall be in the yere of God .mcccclvij. Also, an obligacion of John Hode and Richard Wygot, of Boston in the counte of Lincoln, merchauntz, bounde to the kyng and to the said collectours of the toune of Seint Botolphes, in .xlij.li. .vi. s. .iij. d., paiable the last day of Septembre next commyng. Also, another obligacion of Walter Brews, citezein and merchaunt of London, Henry Curteys of Grantham, and William Obyn of Southwithom in the counte of Lincoln, merchauntz, bound to the kyng and the said collectours of the toune of Seint Botolphes, in .lxx.li. .viij. s. .vij. d., paiable the last day of Marche next commyng. Also, another obligacion of the same Walter Brews, Henry Curteys, and William Obyn, bound to the kyng and the same collectours, [col. b] in .lxx.li. .viij. s. .vij. d., paiable the last day of Septembre next commyng. Also, an obligacion of William Shadworth of Boston, and Richard Draper of Hagworthyngham in the [editorial note: The words 'in the' are repeated and marked for deletion.] counte of Lincoln, merchauntz, bounde unto the kyng and the said collectours of the toune < of Seint Botolphes, > in .c.li., paiable the .xiij. day of Octobre next commyng. Also, an obligacion of John Carberton, and John Tysedale, of Lincoln, merchauntz, bounde to the kyng and the same collectours, in .vij.li. .xvi.s. .ix. d. ob., paiable the last day of Septembre next commyng. Also, an obligacion of John Goldsmyth of Melton Moubray in the counte of Leycestr', merchaunt, and James Goldsmyth of Grantham in the counte of Lincoln, merchaunt, bounde to the kyng and the same collectours of Seint Botolphes, in .xli.li. .v. d., paiable the said last day of Septembre. Also, an obligacion of Robert Baret, and William Chapman, of Boston in the counte of Lincoln, merchauntz, bounde to the kyng and the same collectours, in .xvij.li. .viij. s. .i. d., paiable the same last day of Septembre. Also, an obligacion of Richard Knyght of Notyngham, merchaunt, and William Toliot of Boston in the counte of Lincoln, merchaunt, bounde to the kyng and the same collectours, in .lxxiii. s. .viij. d. ob., paiable the last day of Septembre aforesaid. Also, an obligacion of John Kylyng of Louthe, and Thomas Gose of Bolyngbroke, in the counte of Lincoln, merchauntz, bounde to the kyng and the same collectours, in .xxviij.li. .vij. s. .xi. d. ob., paiable the said last day of Septembre. Also, an obligacion of Richard Barbour of Boston in the counte of Lincoln, merchaunt, and Edmond Robertesson of Leverton, yoman, bound to the kyng and the same collectours of Seint Botolphes, in .xxv.li. .xi. s. .x. d., paiable the said last day of Septembre. Also, another obligacion of the same Richard Barbour and Edmond, bound to the kyng and the same collectours, in .xxv.li. .xi. s. .x. d., paiable the last day of Marche next commyng. Also, an obligacion of William Haddon and John Seker, citezeins of London, bound < to the kyng, > and the said John Poutrell and Robert Tanfeld, collectours of the custume and subsidie of wolles, leder and wolfell in the port of London, in .viij.li. .viij. s. .iiij. d. ob., payable the .x. day of May next commyng. Also, another obligacion of the same Haddon and Seker, bounde to the kyng and the same collectours, in .viij.li. .viij. s. .iiij. d. ob., paiable the .x. day of Novembre next commyng. Also, an obligacion of John Byngham of the toune of Caleis, merchaunt, and Thomas Blakbourne citezein and draper of London, bounde to the kynge and the same collectours of London, in .xxiiij.li. .xv. s. .ij. d. ob., paiable the said .x. day of May. Also, another obligacion of the same John and Thomas, made to the kyng and the same collectours, of .xxiiij.li. .xv. s. .ij. d. ob., paiable the said .x. day of Novembre. Also, another obligacion of the same John and Thomas, of .xviij.li. .xi. s. .iij. d., [memb. 16] paiable the said .x. day of May. Also, another obligacion of the same John and Thomas, of .xviij.li. < .xi. > s. .iij. d. q a ., paiable the said .x. day of Novembre. Also, another obligacion of theim, of .xviij.li. .xi. s. .iij. d. q a ., paiable the said .x. day of May. Also, another obligacion of the same John and Thomas, of .xviij.li. .xi. s. .iij. d., paiable the .x. day of Novembre aforesaid. Also, .ij. obligacions of Thomas Wynnes of Shrouesbury, and John Grafton of the same, merchauntz, bound to the kyng and the said collectours in the port of London, everych of hem of .lxvi. s. .v. d., that one paiable the said .x. day of May, and that other the said .x. day of Novembre. Also, .ij. other obligacions of the same Thomas and John, everich of theim of .iiij.li. .xix. s. .vij. d., q a ., that one paiable the said .x. day of May, and that other the said .x. day of Novembre. Also, .ij. obligacions of William Cantelowe citezein and alderman of London, and William Button citezein of [p. v-297][col. a] London, bounde to the kyng and the said collectours in the port of London, everych obligacion of .xxxvij.li. .xv. s. .viij. d., q a ., that one paiable the said .x. day of May, and that other the said .x. day of Novembre. Also, other .ij. obligacions of the same William and William, everich [...] of .xliiij.li. .ix. s. .ix.d., q a ., paiable at the same .ij. daies. Item, .ij. other obligacions of hem, everich of .xiij.li. .v. s. .iiij. d. ob., paiable at the same .ij. dayes. Also, .ij. obligacions of John Warr' and John Stratton, citezeins of London, bounde to the kyng and the said collectours of the port of London, everich of .xx.li. .xiij. s. .iiij. d., that one paiable the .x. day of May, and [...] that other the .x. day of Novembre aforesaid. Also, other .ij. obligacions of the same John and John, everich of .xv.li. .ix. s. .xi. d., q a ., paiable the .x. day of May, and the .x. day of Novembre. Item, other .ij. obligacions of the same John and John, everich of hem of .xv.li. .ix. s. .ix. d., q a ., that one paiable the said .x. day of May, and that other the said .x. day of Novembre. Ferthermore wittenessith this endenture, howe that the said Robert White, Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, by theire obligacion beryng date the day of makyng of this endenture, been hold and bounde, and everich of hem is hold and bounde in the hole to Sire John Cheyne, in .mm. marcs, to be paied to the said Sir John, in the fest of the Purification of Oure Lady of Seint Marie next commyng after the < date > of this endenture, like as in the said obligacion therof made more openly is conteyned. Netheles the forsaid Sire John Cheyne woll and graunteth by this endenture, that if the said Robert White, Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holte, John Tate and Richard Cely, before the said fest of the Purification of Oure Lady next commyng, by auctorite of parlement, sufficiantly and clerly acquite, save harmeles and discharge, the said Sire John Cheyne, his heirs and executours, ayens the kyng oure soveraine lord, his heirs and successours, and ayens the soudeours of the toune, castell and marches of Caleys, and ayens everiche of hem, of all the summes of money conteyned in the seid obligacions of subsidie: and that the said Sire John Cheyne, his heirs and executours, at and upon his or theire accomptes, or eny of theym, next to be made in the kynges eschequer at Westm', afore the thesorer and barons of the same eschequer, be clerly quiete and discharged by auctorite of parlement in fourme aforesaid, ayens the kyng oure soveraine lord, and his heirs and successors, and ayens the said soudeours, of all and everich of the said sommes of money, in all and every of the said obligacions of subsidie conteyned; < or elles of þat þe > said Robert White, Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holte, John Tate and Richard Cely, before the said fest of the Purification of Oure Lady next commyng, delyver or do to be delyvered ageyn to the said Sire John Cheyne, or to his attorney or executours in the cite of London, all the said obligacions of subsidie, in such fourme as they receyved and had hem of the forsaid Sire John Cheyne, that than the forsaid obligacion of .mm. marcs be hold for nought and lese his strength, or elles stonde it in his full strength and vertue, this endenture notwithstondyng. This indenture made between Sir John Cheyney, knight, victualler of Calais, on the one part, and Robert White, mayor of the staple of Calais, Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, merchants of the aforesaid staple, on the other part, testifies that the said Sir John Cheyney, at the wish of the lords of the king's council, and at the request of the said mayor and merchants, has delivered to the said mayor and merchants certain obligations on the subsidy on wool and woolfells, in which various merchants of the said staple are bound to the king our sovereign lord, and to the collectors of the said subsidy in various ports of this realm of England, for certain sums of money noted below, for the subsidy on wool and woolfells, lately shipped from the said ports to Calais, payable on certain days, as itemised below. That is to say, first, an obligation of Thomas Stevenson the elder, Thomas Stevenson the younger of Tetney, and Thomas Gose of Bolingbroke, in the county of Lincoln, merchants, in which they are bound to the king, and to William Eland and John Acclum, customers of the port of Kingston upon Hull, for £45 21d., payable on 30 September next. Also another obligation of Stephen Marshal of North Muskham, William Marshal of South Muskham, and John Berton of the same, merchants, bound to the king and the aforesaid collectors, for £53 13s. 8d., payable on the aforesaid 30 September. Also another obligation of John Mundesson of South Kelsey in the county of Lincoln, Robert Mundesson of Kingston upon Hull aforesaid, and John Owersby of Owersby in the county of Lincoln aforesaid, merchants, bound to the king and the aforesaid collectors, for £16 12s. 4d., payable on 1 October next. Also another obligation of John Middleton of Beverley, John Day of Kingston upon Hull, and John Hadilsey of the same, merchants, bound to the king and the aforesaid collectors, for £17 7s. 9d., payable on 30 September aforesaid. Also another obligation of John Penycoke of Otland in the county of Surrey, Thomas Stevenson of Tetney in the county of Lincoln aforesaid, and Simon Newton of the same, merchants, bound to the king and the aforesaid collectors, [p. v-296][col. a] for £20 15s. 9d., payable on 1 October aforesaid. Also another obligation of the said John Penycoke, Thomas and Simon, bound to the king and the abovesaid collectors, for £20 15s. 9d., payable on 1 April next. Also an obligation of John Carberton of the city of Lincoln merchant, Richard Dotes of the same, merchant, and Roland Derwentwater of Kingston upon Hull, merchant, bound to the king and the abovenamed collectors, for £7 5s. 8d., to be paid on 8 June next. Also an obligation of the said John Penycoke, Simon Newton and Thomas Stevenson, bound to the king and the said collectors, for £23 15s., payable on 1 April. Also another obligation of the same John Penycoke, Simon Newton and Thomas Stevenson, bound to the king and the said collectors, for £23 15s., to be paid on 1 October next. Also an obligation of John Berton of South Muskham, William Marshal of the same, and Stephen Marshal of North Muskham, in the county of Nottingham, merchants, bound to the king and the said collectors, for £26 15s. 10d., payable on the last day of September next. Also an obligation of Richard Sutton of Averham in the county of Nottingham, esquire, Edmund Bernard of the same, merchants, and William Marshal the younger of Newark, merchant, bound to the king and the said collectors, for £10 5s. 3d. payable on 8 December next. Also, an obligation of William Stockton, John Selby, and William Northby, citizens and merchant of the city of York, bound to the king and the said collectors, for £9 15s. 7d. halfpenny, to be paid on 30 September. Also, an obligation of the said William Stockton, Richard Lematon of York, merchant, and the said William Northby, bound to the king and the said collectors, for £6 5s. 9d., payable on 8 June next. Also, an obligation of William Brompton of Nottingham, merchant, Thomas Alestre of Nottingham, merchant, and Richard Cotes of Lincoln, merchant, bound to the king and the said collectors, for £4 17s. 8d., payable on the said 8 June. Also, an obligation of William Neville Lord Fauconberg, and Simon Reyham, citizens of London, bound to the king and to John Poutrell and Robert Tanfield, collectors of the custom and subsidy on wool, leather and woolfells in the port of London, for £52 15s. 3d. halfpenny, payable on 18 July next. Also, another obligation of the said lord and Simon, bound to the king and the said collectors in the port of London, for £52 15s. 3d. halfpenny, to be paid on 18 January next. Also, an obligation of William Cawod and John Reed, of Boston in the county of Lincoln, merchants, bound to the king, and to Richard Pierpoint and William Pichard, collectors of the custom and subsidy in the port of the town of St Botolph, for £41 5s. 6d., to be paid on the last day of March 1457. Also, an obligation of John Hode and Richard Wygot, of Boston in the county of Lincoln, merchants, bound to the king and to the said collectors of the town of St Botolph, for £42 6s. 3d., payable on 30 September next. Also, another obligation of Walter Brews, citizen and merchant of London, Henry Curtis of Grantham, and William Obin of South Witham in the county of Lincoln, merchants, bound to the king and the said collectors of the town of St Botolph, for £70 8s. 7d., payable on 31 March next. Also, another obligation of the same Walter Brews, Henry Curtis and William Obin, bound to the king and the same collectors, [col. b] for £70 8s. 7d., payable on 30 September next. Also, an obligation of William Shadworth of Boston, and Richard Draper of Hagworthingham in the county of Lincoln, merchants, bound to the king and the said collectors of the town of St Botolph, for £100, payable on 13 October next. Also, an obligation of John Carberton and John Tysedale, of Lincoln, merchants, bound to the king and the same collectors, for £7 16s. 9d. halfpenny, payable on 30 September next. Also, an obligation of John Goldsmith of Melton Mowbray in the county of Leicester, merchant, and James Goldsmith of Grantham in the county of Lincoln, merchant, bound to the king and the same collectors of St Botolph, for £41 5d., payable on the said 30 September. Also, an obligation of Robert Barret and William Chapman, of Boston in the county of Lincoln, merchants, bound to the king and the same collectors, for £17 8s. 1d., payable on the same 30 September. Also, an obligation of Richard Knight of Nottingham, merchant, and William Toliot of Boston in the county of Lincoln, merchant, bound to the king and the same collectors, for 73s. 8d. halfpenny, payable on 30 September aforesaid. Also, an obligation of John Killing of Louth, and Thomas Gose of Bolingbroke, in the county of Lincoln, merchants, bound to the king and the same collectors, for £28 7s. 11d. halfpenny, payable on the said 30 September. Also, an obligation of Richard Barber of Boston in the county of Lincoln, merchant, and Edmund Robertson of Leverton, yeoman, bound to the king and the same collectors of St Botolph, for £25 11s. 10d., payable on the said 30 September. Also, another obligation of the same Richard Barber and Edmund, bound to the king and the same collectors, for £25 11s. 10d., payable on 31 March next. Also, an obligation of William Haddon and John Seker, citizens of London, bound to the king and to the said John Poutrell and Robert Tanfield, collectors of the custom and subsidy on wool, leather and woolfells in the port of London, for £8 8s. 4d. halfpenny, payable on 10 May next. Also, another obligation of the same Haddon and Seker, bound to the king and the same collectors, for £8 8s. 4d. halfpenny, payable on 10 November next. Also, an obligation of John Bingham of the town of Calais, merchant, and Thomas Blackburn, citizen and draper of London, bound to the king and the same collectors of London, for £24 15s. 2d. halfpenny, payable on the said 10 May. Also, another obligation of the same John and Thomas, made to the king and the same collectors, for £24 15s. 2d. halfpenny, payable on the said 10 November. Also, another obligation of the same John and Thomas, for £18 11s. 3d., [memb. 16] payable on the said 10 May. Also, another obligation of the same John and Thomas, for £18 11s. 3d. farthing, payable on the said 10 November. Also, another obligation of them, for £18 11s. 3d. farthing, payable on the said 10 May. Also, another obligation of the same John and Thomas, for £18 11s. 3d., payable on 10 November aforesaid. Also, two obligations of Thomas Wynnes of Shrewsbury, and John Grafton of the same, merchants, bound to the king and the said collectors in the port of London, each for 66s. 5d., the one payable on the said 10 May, and the other on the said 10 November. Also, another two obligations of the same Thomas and John, each of them for £4 19s. 7d. farthing, the one payable on the said 10 May, and the other on the said 10 November. Also, two obligations of William Cantelow, citizen and alderman of London, and William Button, citizen of [p. v-297][col. a] London, bound to the king and the said collectors in the port of London, each obligation of £37 15s. 8d. farthing, the one payable on the said 10 May, and the other on the said 10 November. Also, another two obligations of the same William and William, each for £44 9s. 9d. farthing, payable on the same two days. Also, another two obligations of them, each for £13 5s. 4d. halfpenny, payable on the same two days. Also, two obligations of John Warr' and John Stratton, citizens of London, bound to the king and the said collectors of the port of London, each for £20 13s. 4d., the one payable on 10 May, and the other on the aforesaid 10 November. Also, another two obligations of the same John and John, each for £15 9s. 11d. farthing, payable on 10 May and 10 November. Also, another two obligations of the same John and John, each of them for £15 9s. 9d. farthing, the one payable on the said 10 May, and the other on the said 10 November. Furthermore, this indenture testifies that the said Robert White, Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, by their obligation bearing the date on which this indenture was made, are held and bound, and each one of them is held and bound completely to Sir John Cheyney, for 2,000 marks, to be paid to the said Sir John on the Purification of Our Lady St Mary next after the date of this indenture, as is more fully contained in the said obligation. Nevertheless, the aforesaid Sir John Cheyney wills and grants by this indenture that if the said Robert White, Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, before the Purification of Our Lady next, by authority of parliament, adequately and without reservation acquit, save harmless and discharge the said Sir John Cheyney, his heirs and executors, towards the king our sovereign lord, his heirs and successors, and towards the soldiers of the town, castle and marches of Calais, and towards each of them, of all the sums of money contained in the said obligations on the subsidy: and that the said Sir John Cheyney, his heirs and executors, at and upon his or their next accounts, or any of them, made in the king's exchequer at Westminster before the treasurer and barons of the same exchequer, are without reservation quit and discharged by authority of parliament in the aforesaid form towards the king our sovereign lord, and his heirs and successors, and towards the said soldiers, of each and all the said sums of money contained in all the said obligations on the subsidy; or else that the said Robert White, Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, before the said Purification of Our Lady next, deliver or cause to be delivered to the said Sir John Cheyney, or to his attorney or executors in the city of London, all the said obligations on the subsidy, in such a form as they received and had them of the aforesaid Sir John Cheyney, that then the aforesaid obligation of 2,000 marks shall be considered invalid and of no force, or else remain in full force and virtue, notwithstanding this indenture.
In witnesse of which thyng, the parties aforesaid to thise endentures chaungeably have sette theire sealls. Wreten the .xix. day of the moneth of Decembre, the .xxxiiij. yere of the reigne of kyng Henry the sixt. In witness of which the aforesaid parties to these indentures have each set their seals to the other's copy. Written on 19 December, in the thirty-fourth year of the reign of King Henry VI [1455].
Quibus quidem peticione et cedula, in parliamento predicto lectis, auditis et plenius intellectis, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium, ac communitatis regni Anglie, in eodem parliamento existencium, eidem peticioni respondebatur in forma sequenti: When this petition and schedule had been read, heard and fully understood in the aforesaid parliament, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and the commons of the kingdom of England, being in the same parliament, it was answered in the following form:
Soit fait come il est desire. Let it be done as it is desired.
[col. b]
Pro eisdem mercatoribus. [Loan made by the merchants of the staple.]
46. The kyng oure soverain lord tenderly consideryng, that for grete sommes of money by hym due to the late capitaigne and souldeours of his towne and castell of Caleys, there hath be taken by the seid souldeours, of money growyng of the sale of wolles and wolfelles there, of the maire and merchauntz of the staple of Caleys, before the first day of Marche the .xxxiiij. ti yere of his reigne, the somme of .xxvi m l. marcs: and that nouther payment of the seid somme, nor of the residue of the duetee of the seid souldeours, nor redy money which of necessitee must be had for the wages of a quarter of a yere, for the entree of the capitaigne there, after thordinary charge, amountyng to the somme of .mvij c xlij.li. .ij. s. .iiij. d., nor for the wages of .ccc. men ordeigned to be with him for a crue over the ordinary charge abovesaid, by a quarter of a yere, amountyng to the somme of .vij. c ., .iiij. xx .viij.li. .xiij. s. .iiij. d., which two sommes amounte to .mmv c xxx.li. .xv. s. .viij. d., nor for the settyng forth of the kynges commissioners, thidre depute to here and determyn by wey of accompt the duetee of the seid souldeours there, the costes wherof will amounte to the somme of .lxvi.li. .xiij. s. .iiij. d., in no wise can be made ne purveied, but by wey of a prest, to be had of the said maire and merchauntz; hath desired the said mair and merchauntz in this his present parliament to purvey by wey of lone under sufficiaunt suertee for full paiement and contentacion of the premisses, and of asmuch as shall be founde due to the seid late capitaigne and souldeours, for theire wages and rewardes for the seid toune and castell, before his commissioners furst thider by him to be sent next after the said first day of March, or two of them, havyng sufficeaunt auctorite by his lettres patentez to here, fynysshe and determyn by wey of accompt, the duetee, wages and rewardes of the said late capitaigne and souldeours; unto which desire, the said maire and merchauntz, as the kyngs feithfull and humble true liege men, have aggreed to pay the seid somme of .mm. .v. c . .xxx.li. .xv. s. .viij. d., for the wages of a quarter of a yere of thentree of the capitaigne and crue abovesaid, and the seid .lxvi.li. .xiij. s. .iiij. d., for settyng forthe of the seid commissioners. And over that, to satisfie and content to the seid late capitaigne and souldeours the seid residue of the duetee of theire wages and rewardes, atte dayes and tymes resonable to be appoynted by the seid commissioners, though it be to theim over grevous and importable charge. 46. For the same merchants. The king our sovereign lord sympathetically considering that for great sums of money owed by him to the late captain and soldiers of his town and castle of Calais, there has been taken by the said soldiers, from money growing from the sale of wool and woolfells there, of the mayor and merchants of the staple of Calais, before 1 March in the thirty-fourth year of his reign [1456], the sum of 26,050 marks: and that neither payment of the said sum, nor of the rest of the money due to the said soldiers, nor ready money which of necessity must be had for the wages for a quarter of a year, for the entry of the captain there, after the ordinary charge, amounting to the sum of £1,742 2s. 4d., nor for the wages of 300 men ordained to be of his company over the ordinary charge abovesaid, for a quarter of a year, amounting to the sum of £788 13s. 4d., which two sums amount to £2,530 15s. 8d., nor for the sending forth of the king's commissioners, deputed to hear and determine by way of account the money due to the said soldiers there, the costs of which will amount to the sum of £66 13s. 4d., can in no way be made or provided except by a prest to be had from the said mayor and merchants; has requested the said mayor and merchants in this his present parliament to provide by way of a loan under sufficient security, for full payment and satisfaction of the things stated, and of as much as shall be found due to the said late captain and soldiers for their wages and rewards for the said town and castle, before the first commissioners to be sent there after the said 1 March, or two of them, having adequate authority by his letters patent to hear, settle and determine by way of account the dues, wages and rewards of the said late captain and soldiers; in response to which request, the said mayor and merchants, as the king's faithful and humble true liegemen, have agreed to pay the said sum of £2,530 15s. 8d., for the wages for a quarter of a year, for the entry of the captain and company aforesaid, and the said £66 13s. 4d., for the sending forth of the said commissioners. And in addition, to satisfy and content the said late captain and soldiers with the said remainder of the money due to them in wages and rewards, at reasonable days and times to be fixed by the said commissioners, although it is to them a most grievous and intolerable charge.
His highnesse therfore willyng the said maire and merchauntz to have sufficeaunt repayment of the seid sommes, and of asmuche as shall be had of theim, or of any of them, for the paiement or contentyng of the seid wages and rewardes, ordeigneth, establisshith and grauntith to the maire and felauship of merchauntz of the staple of Caleys, and to theire successours, by advys and assent of the lordes spirituell and temporell, and commons in this his present parliament assembled, and by auctorite of the same, that the same maire and felauship of merchauntz of the staple of Caleys, and theire successours, shall have aswell almaner custumes as almaner subsidies commyng or growyng of almaner goodes and merchaundises which shall comme into the port of Sandewyche, and into all other portz and places to the same port belongyng, and there to be put to land, or to passe out of the same by wey of merchaundise over the see. And aswele all maner custumes as all maner subsidies commyng or growyng of almaner wolles and wolfelles, hides, tyn, and other merchaundise of the staple, that within the same port and places shall be shippid, and all sommes of money for the tyme commyng of such custumes and subsidies, by the handes of the collectours and custumers of the seid custumes and subsidies of and in the seid port and places for the tyme beyng, as sone and immediatly after the pleyn [p. v-298][col. a] payment or contentyng shall be made or had to Humfrey duke of Bukyngham, late capitaigne of the towne and castell of Caleys and the toure of Rysebank, or to his executours, of the duetee of the wages and rewardes of him, his lieutenaunt and souldeours there, by the fourme of an acte made for him by auctorite of parliament, holden at Westm' the .xxviij. ti yere of the reigne of oure seid soveraigne lord. (fn. v-278-262-1) His highness therefore, wishing the said mayor and merchants to have adequate repayment of the said sums, and of as much as shall be had from them, or from any of them, for the payment and satisfaction of the said wages, ordains, decrees and grants to the mayor and fellowship of the merchants of the staple at Calais, and to their successors, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and commons assembled in this his present parliament, and by authority of the same, that the same mayor and fellowship of merchants of the staple of Calais, and their successors, shall have all manner of customs as well as all manner of subsidies coming or growing from all manner of goods and merchandise which shall come into the port of Sandwich, and into all other ports and places belonging to the same port, being landed there or exported overseas by way of trade. And all manner of customs as well as all manner of subsidies coming or growing from all manner of wool and woolfells, hides, tin and other merchandise of the staple, that shall be shipped within the same port and places, and all sums of money coming at the time from such customs and subsidies, by the hands of the collectors and customers of the said customs and subsidies, of and in the said port and places at the time, as soon as and immediately after full [p. v-298][col. a] payment or satisfaction shall have been made or had to Humphrey, duke of Buckingham, late captain of the town and castle of Calais and the tower of Rysbank, or to his executors, of the money due for the wages and rewards of him, his deputy and soldiers there, under the terms of an act made for him by authority of parliament, held at Westminster in the twenty-eighth year of the reign of our said sovereign lord [1449]. (fn. v-278-262-1)
And that the same maire and felauship of merchauntz, and theire successours, immediatly after the feste of the Nativite of Oure Lord next commyng after the said first day of Marche, shall have, by the seid assent and auctorite, aswell almaner custumes as almaner subsidies commyng and growyng of all maner goodes and merchaundises which shall come after the same fest into the port of Suthampton, and into all portz and places to the same port belongyng, and there to be put to land, or to passe oute of the same by wey of merchaundise over the see, after the same fest. And also aswele almaner custumes as almaner subsidies, commyng or growyng after the seid fest of the Nativite of Oure Lord, of almaner wolles and wolfelles, hides, tyn, and other merchaundise of the seid staple, that within the same port of Suthampton and places therto belongyng shall be shipped; and all sommes of money commyng of the same custumes and subsidies, by the handes of the collectours and custumers of the seid custumes and subsidies, in the same port of Suthampton and places for the tyme beyng. And over thise premisses, .vi. s. .viij. d. in money or obligacions, commyng or growyng of the subsidies of every sak of wolle, and .vi. s. .viij. d. in money or obligacions, commyng or growyng of the subsidie of every .cc. and .xl. wolfelles, shippid or to be shippid after the seid first day of Marche in every other port of this royalme, or in any of theim, except wolles and wolfelles of the growynges of the contrees of Northumberland, Cumbreland, Westmerland, and the bisshopriche of Derham, to be shippid in the portz of the Newcastell upon Tyne and Berwik, by the handes of the collectours of such subsidies in every such other port or portz, except wolles and wolfelles before except, by endentures severally to be made betwene the seid maire and felauship, and theire successours, or theire deputee and attourney in that partie, and the same collectours of the same subsidies in the same other portz, and every of them for the tyme beyng, except wolls and wolfelles before except, unto the tyme that to the same maire and felauship, and to theire successours, full payment or contentacion be had or made of the sommes afore specified, < and of > as muche as shall be founde due to the seid late capitaigne and souldeours, before the said commissioners or two of theim havyng the seid auctorite, and as shall appere so to be due, by the certificacion of them or two of them under theire sealx, to be made and certified < into þe > kynges court of his chauncery, the certificacion therof to be sent in due fourme to the barons of the kynges eschequer, for the more certeyntee and effectuell expedicion of the premisses. And that the same mayor and fellowship of merchants, and their successors, immediately after the feast of Christmas following the said 1 March, shall have, by the said assent and authority, all manner of customs as well as all manner of subsidies coming or growing from all manner of goods and merchandise which shall come after the same feast into the port of Southampton, and into all ports and places belonging to the same port, to be landed there or exported overseas by way of trade, after the same feast. And also all manner of customs as well as all manner of subsidies coming or growing after the said feast of Christmas, from all manner of wool and woolfells, hides, tin and other merchandise of the staple, that shall be shipped within the same port of Southampton and places belonging thereto; and all sums of money coming from the same customs and subsidies, by the hands of the collectors and customers of the said customs and subsidies in the same port of Southampton and places at the time. And in addition to the aforesaid, 6s. 8d. in money or obligations, coming or growing from the subsidies on every sack of wool, and 6s. 8d. in money or obligations, coming or growing from the subsidy on every 240 woolfells, shipped or to be shipped after the said 1 March in every other port of this realm, or in any of them, except wool and woolfells produced in the counties of Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmorland and the bishopric of Durham, shipped in the ports of Newcastle upon Tyne and Berwick, by the hands of the collectors of such subsidies in every other port or ports, except the wool and woolfells previously excluded, by separate indentures to be made between the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, or their deputy and attorney in that matter, and the same collectors of the same subsidies in the other ports, and every one of them at the time, except the wool and woolfells previously excluded, until full payment or satisfaction of the sums specified above has been had or made to the same mayor and fellowship, and of as much as shall be found owing to the said late captain and soldiers before the said commissioners or two of them having the said authority, and as shall appear so to be due, by the certification of them or two of them under their seals, to be made and certified into the king's court of his chancery, the certification to be sent in due form to the barons of the king's exchequer, for the greater certainty and effective execution of the foregoing.
And also the said maire and felauship of merchauntz of the seid staple, and theire successours, fro tyme to tyme at their will, shall name and assigne to the tresourer of Englond for the tyme beyng, a persone to be oon of the custumers and oon of the collectours of the said custumes and subsidies in the said port of Sandewyche, aswell of the petit custume, as of the grete custume and subsidies to be levyed in the same port, and all places and portez to the same belongyng, of all maner wolles, wolfelles, hides, tyn, and all other merchaundise commyng into the same, or therof < goyng oute, > as sone and immediatly after the pleyn payment and contentyng shall be made to the seid duk, or to his executours, after the fourme of the seid act for him [col. b] made the seid .xxviij. ti yere, unto the tyme that the seid maire and felauship, and their successours, be fully paid and content of the sommes of money above specified, and of asmuche as shall be founde due to the said late capitaigne and souldeours, before the seid commissioners, or two of them havyng the seid auctorite, and by certificacion by them or two of them to be made in the fourme as is aboveseid. And also the said mayor and fellowship of merchants of the said staple, and their successors, from time to time at their will, shall name and assign to the treasurer of England at the time, a person to be one of the customers and one of the collectors of the said customs and subsidies in the said port of Sandwich, of the petty custom as well as of the great custom and subsidies levied in the same port, and all places and ports belonging to the same, on all manner of wool, woolfells, hides, tin, and all other merchandise coming into the same or going out of it, as soon as and immediately after full payment and satisfaction shall have been made to the said duke, or to his executors, according to the terms of the said act made for him [col. b] in the said twenty-eighth year, until the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, shall have been fully paid and satisfied of the sums of money specified above, and of as much as shall be found owing to the said late captain and soldiers before the said commissioners, or two of them having the said authority, and by certification by them or two of them made in the form given above.
And < also > that the same maire and felauship of merchauntz, and theire successours, fro tyme to tyme at their will, after the seid fest of the Nativite of Our Lord, shall name and assigne to the said tresourer of Englond, a persone to be oon of the custumers and oon of the collectours of the seid custumes and subsidies, in the seid port of Suthampton, aswell of the petit custume, as of the grete custumes and subsidies to be levyed in the same port, and all places and portz to the same belangyng, of all maner wolles, wolfelles, hydes, tyn, and almanner other merchaundise commyng into the same or therof goyng oute, unto the tyme that the seid maire and felauship, and theire successours, be fully paid and content of the sommes of money abovesaid, and of asmuche as shall be founde due to the said late capitaigne and souldeours, before the seid commissioners or two of them havyng the seid auctoritee, and by the certificacion by them or two of them to be made in the fourme as is abovesaid. And that the seid tresourer of Englond for the tyme beyng, upon such nominacion and assignacion, shall make sufficiant warantz to be direct to the chaunceller of Englond for the tyme beyng, for severall lettres patentes under the kyngs grete seall to be made in due fourme to such persones so named and assigned with other, to be collectours of almaner of the seid custumes and subsidies of all wolles and wolfelles, hides, tyn, and other merchaundise of the staple, and all maner other merchaundise, in the seid portz of Sandewich and Suthampton, and in all other portz and places to them or either of them belangyng, unto the tyme that the said maire and felauship, and their successours, be fully paid and content of the sommes of money aboverehercid, and of asmuch as shall be founde due to the seid late capitaigne and souldeours, before the seid commissioners or two of them havyng the seid auctoritee, and by the certificacion by them or two of them to be made in the fourme as is abovesaid. And that suche persone for the tyme named to be oon of the seid collectours in the seid port of Sandewiche, and in all other portz and places therto belongyng, after the seid contentacion made in the fourme aforesaid to the seid duke, after the fourme of the seid acte for him made, and after such lettres patentes to the same persone so named collectour direct, have and take fro tyme to tyme, to the use and proufite of the said maire and felauship, and of theire successours, all sommes of money commyng or growyng in the same port, and in all other portz and places to the same belangyng, of the same custumes and subsidies; and the same sommes of money, and every part of them, pay to the same maire and felauship, and to theire successours, or to theire deputee and attourney in that partie, by endentures therof to be made betwene the same maire and felauship, or theire successours, or theire seid deputee and attourney, and every such collectours in the same port and places [memb. 15] therto belangyng by them to be named, unto the tyme that the seid maire and felauship, and theire successours, be fully paid and content of the sommes of money aforeseid, and of asmuche as shall be founde due to the seid late capitaigne and souldeours, before the seid commissioners or two of them havyng the said auctorite, and by the certificacion by them or two of them to be made in the fourme as is abovesaid. And also that the same mayor and fellowship of merchants, and their successors, from time to time at their will, after the said feast of Christmas, shall name and assign to the treasurer of England, a person to be one of the customers and one of the collectors of the said customs and subsidies in the said port of Southampton, of the petty custom as well as of the great custom and subsidies levied in the same port, and all places and ports belonging to the same, of all manner of wool, woolfells, hides, tin and all manner of other merchandise coming into the same or going out of it, until the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, shall have been fully paid and satisfied of the sums of money abovesaid, and of as much as shall be found due to the said late captain and soldiers before the said commissioners or two of them having the said authority, and by the certification by them or two of them made in the form given above. And that the said treasurer of England at the time, upon the nomination and assignation, shall make adequate warrants directed to the chancellor of England at the time for individual letters patent under the king's great seal to be made in due form to the persons so named and assigned to be collectors of all manner of the said customs and subsidies of all wool and woolfells, hides, tin, and other merchandise of the staple, and all manner of other merchandise, in the said ports of Sandwich and Southampton, and in all other ports and places belonging to them or either of them, until the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, shall have been fully paid and satisfied for the sums of money described above, and of as much as shall be found owing to the said late captain and soldiers before the said commissioners or two of them having the said authority, and by the certification by them or two of them made in the form given above. And that the person named for the time as one of the said collectors in the said port of Sandwich, and in all other ports and places belonging to it, after the said satisfaction made in the aforesaid form to the said duke, according to the terms of the said act made for him and of such letters patent directed to the person thus named collector, shall have and take from time to time, to the use and profit of the said mayor and fellowship, and of their successors, all sums of money coming or growing in the same port, and in all other ports and places belonging to it, from the same customs and subsidies; and pay the same sums of money, and every part of them, to the same mayor and fellowship, and their successors, or to their deputy and attorney in that matter, by indentures to be made thereof between the same mayor and fellowship, or their successors, or their said deputy and attorney, and every such collector in the same port and places [memb. 15] belonging thereto to be named by them, until the said mayor and fellowship and their successors shall have been fully paid and satisfied for the sums of money aforesaid, and of as much as shall be found owing to the said late captain and soldiers before the said commissioners or two of them having the said authority, and by the certification by them or two of them made in the form given above.
And in lyke wyse, every such persone for the tyme named by the said maire and felauship, [p. v-299][col. a] or theire successours, to be oon of the seid collectours in the seid port of Suthampton, and in all other portz and places therto belongyng, aftir such lettres patentes to him direct, to be oon of the seid collectours in the same, after the seid fest of the Nativite of Oure Lord, have and take fro tyme to tyme, to the use and proufite of the seid maire and felauship, and of theire successours, all sommes of money commyng or growyng in the same port, and in all other portz and places to the same belangyng, of the same custumes and subsidies, and the same sommes of money and every part of them pay to the same maire and felauship, and theire successours, or to theire deputee and attourney in that partie, by endentures therof to be made betwene the same maire and felauship, or theire successours, or theire seid deputee < and > attourney, and every such collectour in the same port and places therto belongyng by them to be named, unto the tyme that the maire and felauship, and theire successours, be fully paied and content of the sommes of money abovesaid, and of asmuch as shall be founde due to the seid late capitaigne and souldeours, before the said commissioners or two of them havyng the seid auctorite, and by the certificacion by them or two of them to be made in the fourme as is abovesaid. And that noon of the seid collectours in outher of the seid portz of Sandewich and Suthampton so to be named, be removed fro such office, but by thassent and expresse aggrement in writyng of the seid maire and felauship, and of theire successours, withoute cause resonable, unto the tyme they be fully paid and content in the fourme aforesaid of the sommes and duetee aforesaid. And if any such collectour by cause resonable be remevyd, that than an other collectour of the seid custumes and subsidies in outher of the seid portz of Sandewyche and Suthampton in his place be made, by the nominacion and assignacion of the seid maire and felauship, and theire successours, in the seid fourme. And that every such custumer or collectour, by the seid maire and felauship, or theire successours, in every or either of the seid portz of Sandewiche and Suthampton, in his accompt at the kyngs eschequer, of all such paiementz by him or them to the said maire and felauship, or theire successours, or to theire deputee and attourney in that partie in the fourme aforeseid to be made, have therof due allouaunce; and that aswele the same collectours and every of them, as the seid maire and felauship, and theire successours, be therof in the same eschequer fully quyte and discharged for evermore. And similarly, every person named for the time by the said mayor and fellowship, [p. v-299][col. a] or their successors to be one of the said collectors in the said port of Southampton, and in all other ports and places belonging to it, according to such letters patent directed to him, to be one of the said collectors in the same, after the said feast of Christmas, shall have and take from time to time, to the use and profit of the said mayor and fellowship and of their successors, all sums of money coming and growing in the same ports, and in all other ports and places belonging to the same, from the same customs and subsidies, and pay the same sums of money and every part of them to the same mayor and fellowship and their successors, or to their deputy and attorney in that matter, by indentures to be made thereon between the same mayor and fellowship, or their successors, or their said deputy and attorney, and every such collector in the same port and places belonging thereto to be named by them, until the mayor and fellowship, and their successors, shall have been fully paid and satisfied for the sums of money aforesaid, and of as much as shall be found owing to the said late captain and soldiers before the said commissioners or two of them having the said authority, and by the certification by them or two of them to be made in the form given above. And that none of the said collectors in either of the said ports of Sandwich and Southampton thus to be named shall be removed from office without reasonable cause, except by the assent and explicit agreement in writing of the said mayor and fellowship, and of their successors, until they shall have been fully paid and satisfied in the aforesaid form for the sums and dues aforesaid. And if any such collector is removed for reasonable cause, that then another collector of the said customs and subsidies in either of the said ports of Sandwich and Southampton shall be appointed in his place, by the nomination and assignment of the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, in the said form. And that every such customer or collector shall have due allowance from the said mayor and fellowship, or their successors, in both or either of the said ports of Sandwich and Southampton, in his account at the king's exchequer, for all such payments made by him or them to the mayor and fellowship, or their successors, or to their deputy and attorney in that matter in the aforesaid form; and that the same collectors and every one of them, as well as the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, shall be fully quit and discharged thereof in the same exchequer forever.
And that the collectours of the seid subsidies, of every sak of wolle, and of every .cc. and .xl. wolfelles, to be shippid in any other port of this roialme, oute of the seid portz of Sandewiche and Suthampton, for the tyme beyng, except wolles and wolfelles before except, upon theire accomptz in the seid eschequer, of .vi. s. .viij. d. of the subsidie of every sak of wolle, and .vi. s. .viij. d. of the subsidie of every .cc. and .xl. wolfelles, and obligacions therof commyng of the same subsidies, so to be paid to the seid maire and felauship, or to theire successours, or to theire deputee and attourney in that partie, by endentures therof to be made betwene them in the fourme aforesaid, have due allouaunce and discharge fro tyme to tyme, in to the tyme that full payment and contentyng be had to the said maire and felauship, and to theire successours, of the seid sommes of money, and of asmuch as shall be founde due to the seid late capitaigne and souldeours, before the seid commissioners or two of them havyng the seid auctoritee, and by the certificacion by them or two of them to be made in the fourme as is aboveseid. And that the same collectours, of the same .vi. s. .viij. d., and obligacions commyng of such subsidies, have noon allowaunce therof in anywyse but by such endentures. And over that, if any [col. b] of the seid collectours or custumers, make any payment in contrary of any of the grauntz abovesaid, than hit shall be leefull to the said maire and felauship, and to theire successours, to take theire sute and accion ayenst the same custumer or collectour, and therby to recovere of him or of his executours, the double of the somme or sommes so paid by him in the contrary of the seid graunte or grauntz or ordenaunces. And that the collectors of the said subsidies on every sack of wool and on every 240 woolfells shipped in any other port of this realm, other than the said ports of Sandwich and Southampton, at the time, except the wool and woolfells previously excluded, upon their accounts in the said exchequer, of 6s. 8d. of the subsidy on every sack of wool, and 6s. 8d. of the subsidy on every 240 woolfells, and obligations thereof coming from the same subsidies, to be thus paid to the said mayor and fellowship, or to their successors, or to their deputy and attorney in that matter, by indentures to be made thereof between them in the aforesaid form, shall have due allowance and discharge from time to time, until full payment and satisfaction has been made to the said mayor and fellowship, and to their successors, of the said sums of money, and of as much as shall be found owing to the said late captain and soldiers before the said commissioners or two of them having the said authority, and by the certification by them or two of them made in the form given above. And that the same collectors, of the same 6s. 8d., and obligations coming from such subsidies, shall have no allowance thereof in any way except by such indentures. And moreover, if any [col. b] of the said collectors or customers make any payment contrary to any of the aforesaid grants, then it shall be lawful for the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, to bring their suit and action against the same customer or collector, and thereby to recover from him or his executors double the sum or sums so paid by him contrary to the said grant or grants or ordinances.
And the kyng will by the seid auctorite, that his lettres patentes under his grete seale shall be directid to certeine commissioners by him to be named and depute to here, finysshe and determyn at Caleys, by wey of accompt, the seid duetee of the seid late capitaigne and souldeours, for theire wages and rewardes aforesaid as right will; and to common, conclude and appointe with the seid souldeours, aswele for the contentacion of theire seid duetees, as for suertees therof to them to be founde by the seid maire and felauship, and aswele all such duetees as the suertees by the seid maire and felauship before them to be founde for the payment to the seid souldeours, to certifie before the kyng in his chauncery, and all other thinges to doo and certifie touchyng the premisses, as in this partie shall be necessary or behoofull; < whiche > commissioners or two of them, before the fest of Seint Michell next commyng after the seid first day of marche, shall certifie into the seid chauncery all such thinges by them to be doon in the premisses. And the king wills by the said authority, that his letters patent under his great seal shall be directed to certain commissioners to be named and deputed by him, to hear, settle and determine at Calais, by way of account, the said money due to the said late captain and soldiers for their wages and rewards aforesaid as right requires; and to discuss, conclude and settle with the said soldiers for the satisfaction of their said dues as well as for sureties thereof to be found for them by the said mayor and fellowship, and to certify before the king in his chancery all such dues as well as the sureties to be found for the payment to the said soldiers by the mayor and fellowship and to do and certify everything else touching the foregoing as shall be necessary or required in this matter; which commissioners or two of them, before Michaelmas next after the said 1 March, shall certify in the said chancery all the things done by them in the foregoing.
And for asmoche as by the kynges commaundement, by [...] advis of his counseill, ther ar delyvered to Robert White maire of the seid staple, by the handes of Gervays Clyfton, knyght, tresourer of Caleys, obligacions of subsidie of wolles and wolfelles amountyng to the somme of .vij m vij c iij. marcs .iij. s. .vij. d. ob.; and in lyke wyse ben delyvered to the seid Robert White and Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holte, John Tate and Richard Cely, merchauntz of the seid staple, by the handes of John Cheyne, knyght, vetailler of Caleys, obligacions of subsidie of wolles and wolfelles amountyng to the somme of .mm. marcs, which sommes conteyned in all the seid obligacions amountyn to the somme of .ix m vij c iij. marcs .iij s. .vij. d. ob. The kyng willeth and ordeigneth by the seid auctoritee, that the seid maire and felauship of his staple of Caleys have and reteigne all the seid obligacions to theire owne use, and levy and receyve to theire propre use all the sommes of money conteigned in the same, in deduction and partie of payment of the seid .xxvi m l. marcs. And that aswele the said maire and felauship, and theire successours, as the seid Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, and theire heires, executours and terre tenauntz, be utterly dischargid ayenst the kyng of the receipt of the seid obligacions, and be nat compelled to yeld any accompt therof, nor of any parcell therof, in anywyse to the kyng; but that the persones bounde in the same obligacions be chargeable to pay particulerly to the said maire and felauship, and theire successours, all the sommes of money conteygned in the same obligacions, at the dayes of payment therof specified in the same obligacions. And because by the king's command, by the advice of his council, there are delivered to Robert White, mayor of the said staple, by the hands of Gervase Clifton, knight, treasurer of Calais, obligations on the subsidy on wool and woolfells amounting to the sum of 7,703 marks 3s. 7d. halfpenny, and similarly there are delivered to the said Robert White and Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, merchants of the said staple, by the hands of John Cheyney, knight, victualler of Calais, obligations on the subsidy on wool and woolfells amounting to the sum of 2,000 marks, which sums contained in all the said obligations amount to the sum of 9,703 marks 3s. 7d. halfpenny, the king wills and ordains by the said authority, that the said mayor and fellowship of his staple of Calais have and retain all the said obligations to their own use, and levy and receive to their own use all the sums of money contained in them, in deduction and part payment of the said 26,050 marks. And that the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, as well as the said Robert Horn, John Walden, William Holt, John Tate and Richard Cely, and their heirs, executors and tenants, be completely discharged towards the king of the receipt of the said obligations, and be not compelled to yield any account for them, or any part of them, in any way to the king; but that the persons bound in the same obligations shall be liable to pay to the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, all the particular sums of money contained in the same obligations, on the days of payment specified for them in the same obligations.
Provided alwey, that noo prejudice be doon by this acte, to any thyng of old tyme accustumed in the dayes of the kynges noble progenitours, nor to any graunte made by any of them, of any commoditees or revenuz in the seid portz of Sandewiche and Suthampton, or either of them; and that the kyng our soveraigne lord, and his heires and successours, for ever be discharged ayenst the said maire and felauship, and theire successours, of all such sommes of money as shall be duely founde to growe in the seid portz of Sandewiche and Suthampton, by the bokes of the custumers and countrollers there, duryng the tyme that such persone [p. v-300][col. a] or persones so named by the seid maire and felauship, or theire successours, shall be oon of the custumers or collectours in the same portz, or either of hem, over the seid commoditees and revenuz, and over other thinges usid and grauntid to be taken there, in the tymes of the kynges noble progenitours. Provided always that no prejudice is done by this act to anything traditionally done in the days of the king's noble progenitors, or to any grant made by any of them of any commodities or revenues in the said ports of Sandwich and Southampton, or either of them; and that the king our sovereign lord, and his heirs and successors, shall forever be discharged towards the said mayor and fellowship, and their successors, of all such sums of money as shall duly be found to grow in the said ports of Sandwich and Southampton, by the books of the customers and controllers there, during the time when the person [p. v-300][col. a] or persons so named by the said mayor and fellowship, or their successors, shall be one of the customers or collectors in the same port, or either of them, except the said commodities and revenues, and other things used and granted to be taken there, in the times of the king's noble progenitors.
Provided also, that an act of parlement made afore this tyme, for .xx. s. of subsidie of every sak of wolle, and .xx. s. of subsidie of every .cc. and .xl. wolfelles, appoyntid for Caleys, be nat hurt nor prejudiced by this acte, as for wolles and wolfelles to be shippid in the seid port of Suthampton. Provided also that an act of parliament made before this time, for 20s. of subsidy on every sack of wool, and 20s. of subsidy on every 240 woolfells, appointed for Calais, shall not be harmed or prejudiced by this act, with regard to wool and woolfells to be shipped in the said port of Southampton.
Provided also, that all grauntz by the kyng our soveraigne lord, by auctorite of parlement, or by lettres under his grete seall or prive seall, made to or for the maire of the seid staple of Caleys, or to or for the maire and felauship of the same, or to or for any of them, for money by them or any of them to the kyng lent, be except and forprisid out of this acte, and not hurt nor prejudiced by the same. Provided also that all grants by the king our sovereign lord, by authority of parliament or by letters under his great seal or privy seal, made to or for the mayor of the said staple of Calais, or to or for the mayor and fellowship of the same, or to or for any of them, for money lent by them or any of them to the king, shall be excepted and excluded from this act, and not harmed or prejudiced by it.
Provided alwey, that if such commissioners or two of hem certifie not in to the kynges chauncery, under the sealx of them or of two of them, before the fest of Seint Michell next after the seid first day of Marche, that the seid maire and felauship have founde such suertee, and made such contentacion to the seid late capitaigne and souldeours in this partie, as by them or two of them in the fourme aforesaid hit shall be ordeigned and appointed; that than this acte be not availlable to the seid maire and felauship, nor to theire successours, sauf oonly to the somme of .xvi m iij c xlvi. marcs .ix. s. .viij. d. ob., parcell of the seid .xxvi m l. marcs, and to the seid somme of .mmv c xxx.li. .xv. s. .viij. d. to be paid for the wages of the seid newe capitaigne, and for a crue of .ccc. men for a quarter of a yere, and to the somme of .lxvi.li. .xiij. s. .iiij. d. to be paid for the settyng forth of the seid commissioners: and that this act of and for repayment of the same sommes of .xvi m iij. c xlvi. marcs .ix. s. .viij. d. ob., and of .mmv c xxx.li. .xv. s. .viij. d., and of .lxvi.li. .xiij. s. .iiij. d., be good and effectuell, though never such suertee nor contentacion nor certificacion be made ne had as is aboveseid. Provided always that if such commissioners or two of them do not certify in the king's chancery, under the seal of them or of two of them, before Michaelmas next after the said 1 March, that the said mayor and fellowship have found such surety, and made such satisfaction to the said late captain and soldiers in this matter, as shall be ordained or decreed by them or two of them in the aforesaid form; that then this act shall not apply to the said mayor and fellowship, or to their successors, save only to the sum of 16,346 marks 9s. 8d. halfpenny, part of the said 26,050 marks, and to the said sum of £2,530 15s. 8d. to be paid for the wages of the said new captain, and for a company of 300 men for a quarter of a year, and to the sum of £66 13s. 4d. to be paid for sending forth the said commissioners: and that this act with regard to repayment of the same sum of 16,346 marks 9s. 8d. halfpenny, and of £2,530 15s. 8d. and of £66 13s. 4d., be good and effectual, even though no such surety or satisfaction or certification was made or had as abovesaid.
Provided also, that the collectours of the seid subsidies in the seid port of Suthampton for the tyme beyng shall mowe pay of the revenuz by them levable in the same port, in the first yere after the seid fest of the Nativitee of Our Lord, by the assignementz to be made by the tresourer of Englond for the tyme beyng for the kynges houshold, the somme of .m. marcs, and in the next yere than next folowyng, of the same revenuz by like assignement for the seid houshold, the somme of .m. marcs, this acte notwithstondyng. Provided also that the collectors of the said subsidies in the said port of Southampton at the time, shall still pay from the revenues leviable by them in the same port, in the first year after the said feast of Christmas, by the assignments to be made by the treasurer of England at the time for the king's household, the sum of 1,000 marks, and in the following year, from the same revenues by the same assignment for the said household, the sum of 1,000 marks, notwithstanding this act.
< Provided also, that this acte > strecche not nor be prejudiciall to Jamys Damport, oon of our sergeauntz atte armes, as for the payment of his wages of .xij. d. by the day, to be taken for terme of his lif by cause of that office, aswele of the custume of wolles, hides and wolfelle, as of the litill custume and subsidies in the port of the toune of Sandewich, by the handes of the collectours or custumers of the same custumes and subsidies in the same port for the tyme beyng, nor to the arrerages of the seid .xij. d. by the day to the same Jamys beyng behynde unpaid, as for the tyme of .iij. yeres passed. Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to James Damport, one of our serjeants-at-arms, with regard to the payment of his wages of 12d. per day, to be taken for term of his life for that office from the custom on wool, hides and woolfells, as well as from the petty customs and subsidies in the port of the town of Sandwich, by the hands of the collectors or customers of the same customs and subsidies in the same port at the time, or to the arrears of the said 12d. per day still unpaid to the same James for the past three years.
Provided alwey, that < the queene oure > soveraigne lady be not hurt nor prejudiced by this acte of any thing to hir grauntid to have for terme of hir lyve, in part of hir dower, nor of any graunte < nor > assignementz to hir made aswell by the kyngs lettres patentes as by tailles, of the somme of .mmxx.li. .xv. s. .x. d., to be taken of the custumes and subsidies, or custumes or subsidies in the said port of Suthampton, by the handes [col. b] of the custumers and collectours of the custumes and subsidies there for the tyme beyng; nor to nor of any graunte or assignementz after this day to be made, of or for the said somme of .mmxx.li. .xv. s. .x. d. or any parcell therof, if it shall happen the same grauntes or assignementz or any parcell of them to be voide, by chaungyng of any custumer or collectour of or in the said port or in any otherwise. Provided always that the queen our sovereign lady shall not be harmed or prejudiced by this act with regard to anything granted to her for term of her life as part of her dower, or any grant or assignments made to her by the king's letters patent as well as by tally, of the sum of £2,020 15s. 10d., to be taken from the customs and subsidies, or customs or subsidies in the said port of Southampton, by the hands [col. b] of the customers and collectors of the customs and subsidies there at the time; or with regard to any grant or assignments made after this day, of or for the said sum of £2,020 15s. 10d. or any part of it, if it shall happen that the same grants or assignments or any part of them become invalid through the changing of any customer or collector of or in the said port or in any other way.
Provided alwey, that oure lettres patentes made to John Wenlok nowe knyght, by what name he be named or called in the same, for the contentacion and payment of .mxxxiij. ti li. .vi. s. .viij. d. by him to us lent, stonde in theire force, and be good and effectuell, and be in preferrement of payement of the seid somme; this act, or eny other act afore the .xiij. day of Marche the yere of oure reigne .xxxiiij. ti made, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-289-1) Provided always that our letters patent made to John Wenlock, now knight, by whatever name he is named or called in the same, for the satisfaction and payment of £1033 6s. 8d. lent by him to us, shall remain in force, and be good and effectual, and have priority over payment of the said sum; notwithstanding this act, or any other act made before 13 March in the thirty-fourth year of our reign [1456]. (fn. v-278-289-1)
Provided alwey, that this act extende not nor be prejudiciall to any graunte or grauntz of licence of wolle, by auctorite of parlement made unto the maire and citezeins of the citee of Lincoln, and theire successours, of, in or for any shippyng or cariyng of wolle oute of this < oure > royalme unto oure staple of Caleys, nor to any provision in the last parlement for the seid maire and citezeins, and theire successours, made and graunted. (fn. v-278-291-1) Provided always that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or grants of licence on wool, made by authority of parliament to the mayor and citizens of the city of Lincoln, and their successors, with regard to any shipping or carrying of wool out of this our realm to our staple of Calais, or to any proviso made or granted in the last parliament for the said mayor and citizens, and their successors. (fn. v-278-291-1)
[memb. 14]
Peticio resumpcionis. Petition for resumption.
47. Prayen the commons in this present parlement assembled, that where the victorious prince of most noble memoire your fadir, whom God rest, and othir youre noble progenitours, have kept as worshipfull, noble and honorable estate of theire houshold in this lande, of the revenuz therof, as hath done eny kyng or prince in eny lond cristenned, to the ease and rest of the people of the same, without agrugyng for lak of paiement therfore, such as caused all othir londes to have this your said lond in as worshipfull renomme, and as grete drede, as eny othir lond cristenned. And notwithstondyng the grete and large grauntes of godes, that by your true people of this lond hath ben often tymes yeven, of true love and feith, tendre zele and affeccion unto youre said highnesse, ye be indetted in such outragious sommez, as be not easy to be paied, which by Goddes lawe and eschewyng of his displeasure owe to be paied and contentid; and that furthermore the revenuez of the said lond to your highnes nowe belongyng, mowe not suffice to kepe and susteyne your honorable houshold, which not onely but also your othir ordinarie charge mot be kept and boron worshiply, as it accordith to the honour of your estate and your said lond, if your adversaries and enemyes shuld falle < into the drede > wheryn here tofore they have been, and shall with Goddes grace be, of youre myghty regale and of < your said lond; > wherof youre people lament < and sorowe > petously and hevyly, the amenusyng of the worship and prosperite wheryn it hath joied and ben reputed in the daies here tofore, nowe the refuse of all othir landes reputed, < agrugyng also right > hevyly the charge that hath been born, and daily is borne among theym, of vitaill and othir chargez for your said houshold, and ordinarie charges, wherof they be not paied, to theire grete losse and hurt, which they mowe not of eny reason eny lenger susteigne. 47. The commons assembled in this present parliament pray that the victorious prince of most noble memory your father, God rest his soul, and other of your noble progenitors, kept as worshipful, noble and honourable an estate of their household in this land from its revenues as has any king or prince in any Christian land, to the ease and rest of the people of the same, without complaining about lack of payment, which caused all other lands to hold this your said land in as worshipful renown, and as great dread, as any other Christian land. And notwithstanding the great and large grants of goods, which have often been given by your true people of this land, out of true love and faith, tender zeal and affection for your said highness, you are indebted in such outrageous sums as cannot easily be repaid, which by God's law and to avoid his displeasure ought to be paid and satisfied; and that furthermore the revenues now belonging to your highness from the said land do not suffice to keep and sustain your honourable household, which along with your other ordinary charges must be kept and borne worshipfully, according to the honour of your estate and your said land, if your adversaries and enemies are to fall into the dread wherein they have been in the past, and shall with God's grace be again, of your mighty regality and of your said land; your people lament and grieve piteously and heavily for the decline in the worship and prosperity which it previously enjoyed and was famed for in the past, now it is reputed the dregs of all other lands; also complaining bitterly about the charges that have been borne and daily are borne by them for victuals and other charges for your said household, and ordinary charges, for which they have not been paid, to their great loss and hurt, which they cannot reasonably endure any longer.
It please you, by thadvis and assent of the lordes spirituell and temporell in this present parlement assembled, and by auctorite of the same, for the conservacion and supportacion of your seid estate, which first to Goddes pleasure, secundarie for < your owne suerte, honour and > wele, and for the thrid to the < universall wele, ease, > rest, and suerte of this lond, the which ye owe to preferre afore the favour of eny persone, or eny place, or othir thyng erthely; and to thentent that your seid enemyes, from whos knowelege the penurie [p. v-301][col. a] of your said houshold, and the cause therof, and also the agrugyng therfore of youre seid people had is not hidde, wherof without doute they take a grete corage and boldenesse ayenst youre said lond, mowe falle from the seid corage into rebuke, and have youre said lond and people in such drede as here tofore in the daies of you and < of your > progenitours they have hadde, to take, seise, have, reteigne, and resume into your handes and possession, from the fest of Seint Michell the Archangell next commyng, all honours, castels, lordships, townes, towneships, maners, londes, tenementes, wastes, forestes, chaces, rentes, reversions, feefermes, services, issues, profites of countees, advowsons of priories, churches, hospitalx and of free chapell, and all othir revenuez, with theire appurtenaunces, passed from you sith the first day of youre reigne, and by you graunted by your lettres patentes, by auctorite of parlement, or in eny otherwyse by your grauntes, confirmacions or relesse, in fee simple, fee taille, terme of lyf or terme of yeres, to eny persone or persones in Englond, Wales, or in the marches therof, in your lond of Irlond, in Guysnes, Caleys, or in the marches therof, or in Scotlond, or in the Este or Weste marches of Englond toward Scotlond; and also to take, resume, and reteigne in to your handes, from the seid fest, all the honours, castels, lordships, townes, towneshippes, maners, londes, tenementes, wastes, rentes, reversions, feefermes and services, with all theire appurtenaunces, which were of the duchie of Lancastre, and passed from you by youre grauntes, confirmacion or relesse, or by auctorite of parlement, or whereof eny persone or persones were seisid to your use, to the use of your seid fader, or to the [performyng] of youre or his will; ye to have, hold and reteigne all tho premisses in and of like state, fourme and condicion, as ye, or eny othir to your use, or to the use of your said fader, or to the perfourmyng of his or your will, had < theym at > the said first day, or eny tyme sith, eny acte or ordenaunce by parlement, or eny manere of lettres patentes, grauntes or estates, by you or eny othir persone or persones, of eny of the premisses in enywyse made to or for eny persone or persones at your request or desire or othirwyse notwithstondyng: all offices of your said duchie, suche as the said first day were offices there, and < the > fees, wages and rewardes, than or afore to theym had, accustumed or apperteynyng, except. And over that, that all manere of grauntes of rentes, rente charges, annuitees, somme or sommes of money, by you or eny othir persone sith the said first day made, of estate of enheritaunce, or terme of lif or terme of yeres, to eny persone or othirwise to be taken or had in or of eny of the premisses, or of any of your custumez, subsidies, awnage, or of the profites and revenuez of your hanaper commyng, or at or in the receite of your eschequer, or in eny othir place within this youre said realme, or in the said lond of Irlond, or within Wales, Guysnes, Caleys, or the marches therof, be fro the seid fest voide and of none effecte, to have, hold or occupie from thensforth eny of the premisses. And that almanere of grauntes or relesses by you sith the said first day made to eny persone or persones, of eny state of enheritaunce, terme of lif or terme of yeres, or othirwise, of eny of the premisses, or of the kepyng of eny of theym, or of eny of your gaoles, or of eny herbage or pannage, fisshyng, pasture, or commyn of pasture, wareyn, wode, wax, wyne, clothyng, furres, annuitees, fee or eny wages for doyng or occupiyng eny office or charge, and to noon such office or charge the said first day due, [...] accustumed, belongyng or apperteinyng, be voide and of none effecte. And furthermore to ordeine, by thavis, assent and auctorite aforesaid, that all grauntes made by you to eny persone or persones, of eny office or offices which were non office nor offices [col. b] the first day of your said reigne nor afore, be voide and of noo force. And that all maner grauntes by you or eny othir persone or persones, sith the said first day to eny persone or persones made, whereby the same persone or persones to whom eny such graunte or grauntes be made, shuld graunte or have power to graunte eny prebende or prebendes, churche or churches, hospitall or hospitalx, fre chapell or fre chapelx, or eny manere collacion, office or offices, or eny officer to make, the yefte or presentacion of which prebende or prebendes, churche or churches, hospitall or hospitalx, fre chapell or fre chapelx, collacion, office or offices, or of the makyng of the said officers, the said first day or any tyme sith < belonged > to you, be voide and of noo force nor effecte, to thentent that of such offices and othir the premisses it mowe please you to rewarde your servauntes meniall. Furthermore that < almaner of > grauntes by you made to eny persone or persones of eny office or offices, which were offices the said first day or afore, and to theym belongeth and nedith actuell excercise, or of the fee or wages therunto belongyng, to have in fee simple or in fee taille in enywyse, be of noo force ner effecte, but onely terme of lif of him or theym that eny such grauntes be made unto. And that all the grauntes of suche offices as that noble and worthy prince Humfrey late duke of Gloucestre, your late uncle, whom God rest, had and occupied of your graunte, the which offices were by youre highnesse to eny persone or persones graunted in his lif, to have after his decesse or deth, be voide and of none effecte. < And > that almanere of grauntes by you or eny othir persone or persones, by your grete seale, prive seale, or seale of your duchie of Lancastre, sith the said first day made, of eny shirrefwyke, or eny office of shirrefwyke, or of eny eschetour, or of eny office of eschetour, clerk of the peas, or of eny baillifwyk or wapentak to you belongyng, for terme of lif or terme of yeres, to eny persone or persones, be voide and of none effecte. And also that all grauntes and relesses made by you to any abbot, priour or eny othir persone, of [...] discharge, relesse or quietclayme of eny corrodies or corrodie, pension or pensions, dismes spirituelx or quinszimes, or dismes temporelx, or of the collections of the same rentes or services, or of the paiement of eny knyghtes spence for commyng to your parlement, be voide and of none effect. May it please you, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal assembled in this present parliament, and by authority of the same, for the preservation and support of your said estate, which, first to God's pleasure, second for your own security, honour and weal, and third for the universal weal, ease, peace and security of this land, you should promote before the favour of any person, or any place, or other earthly thing; and with the intention that your said enemies, from whose knowledge the penury [p. v-301][col. a] of your said household, and its cause, and also the grumbling of your said people about it is not hidden, from which they undoubtedly take great courage and boldness against your said land, may fall from the said courage into shame, and hold your said land and people in such dread as they used to in the days of you and of your progenitors, to take, seize, have, retain and resume into your hands and possession, from Michaelmas next, all honours, castles, lordships, towns, townships, manors, lands, tenements, wastes, forests, chases, rents, reversions, fee-farms, services, issues, profits of counties, advowsons of priories, churches, hospitals and free chapels, and all other revenues, with their appurtenances, which have passed out of your hands since the first day of your reign, and have been granted by you by your letters patent, by authority of parliament, or in any other way by your grants, confirmations or release, in fee-simple, fee-tail, term of life or term of years, to any person or persons in England, Wales, or in their marches, in your land of Ireland, in Guisnes, Calais, or in their marches, or in Scotland, or in the east or west marches of England towards Scotland; and also to take, resume and retain into your hands, from the said feast, all the honours, castles, lordships, towns, townships, manors, lands, tenements, wastes, rents, reversions, fee-farms and services, with all their appurtenances, which were of the duchy of Lancaster, and passed out of your hands by your grants, confirmation or release, or by authority of parliament, or of which any person or persons were seised to your use, to the use of your said father, or to the performance of your or his will; to have, hold and retain all the aforesaid in and of the same estate, form and condition as you, or anyone else to your use, or to the use of your said father, or to the performance of his or your will, had them on the said first day, or at any time since, notwithstanding any act or ordinance by parliament, or any manner of letters patent, grants or estates made by you or any other person or persons of any of the foregoing in any way, to or for any person or persons at your request or desire or otherwise: all offices of your said duchy, such as on the said first day were offices there, and the fees, wages and rewards, then or previously to them had, accustomed or appertaining, excepted. And moreover, that all manner of grants of rents, rent charges, annuities, sum or sums of money made by you or any other person since the said first day, by inheritance, or term of life or term of years, to any person or otherwise to be taken or had in or of any of the things stated, or of any of your customs, subsidies, alnage or of the profits and revenues coming from your hanaper, or at or in the receipt of your exchequer, or in any other place within this your said realm, or in the said land of Ireland, or within Wales, Guisnes, Calais, or their marches, be invalid and of no effect from the said feast, to have, hold or occupy henceforth any of the foregoing. And that all manner of grants or releases made by you since the said first day to any person or persons, by inheritance, term of life or term of years, or otherwise, of any of the foregoing, or of the custody of any of them, or of any of your gaols, or of any herbage or pannage, fishing, pasture or common of pasture, warren, wood, wax, wine, clothing, furs, annuities, fee or any wages for doing or occupying any office or charge, which were not due, accustomed, belonging or pertaining to that office or charge on the said first day, be invalid and of no effect. And furthermore to ordain, by the advice, assent and authority aforesaid, that all grants made by you to any person or persons, of any office or offices which were not an office or offices [col. b] on the first day of your said reign or before, be invalid and of no force. And that all manner of grants made by you or any other person or persons since the said first day to any person or persons, whereby the person or persons to whom any such grant or grants was made should grant or have power to grant any prebend or prebends, church or churches, hospital or hospitals, free chapel or free chapels, or any manner of collation, office or offices, or to make any officer, the gift or presentation of which prebend or prebends, church or churches, hospital or hospitals, free chapel or free chapels, collation, office or offices, or of the making of the said officers, on the said first day or at any time since, belonged to you, be void and of no force or effect, with the intention that from such offices and other things stated it may please you to reward your household servants. Furthermore that all manner of grants made by you to any person or persons of any office or offices, which were offices on the said first day or before, and which involve and need actual exercise, or of the fee or wages belonging to them, granted in fee-simple or in fee-tail in any way, be of no force nor effect, but only for term of life of him or them to whom any such grants were made. And that all grants of the offices which the noble and worthy prince Humphrey, late duke of Gloucester, your late uncle, God rest his soul, had and occupied by your grant, which were granted by your highness during his life to any person or persons, to have after his decease or death, be invalid and of no effect. And that all manner of grants made by you or any other person or persons, by your great seal, privy seal, or seal of your duchy of Lancaster, since the said first day, of any shrievalty, or any office of shrievalty, or of any escheator, or of any office of escheator, clerk of the peace, or of any bailiwick or wapentake belonging to you, for term of life or term of years, to any person or persons, be invalid and of no effect. And also that all grants and releases made by you to any abbot, prior or any other person, of discharge, release or quitclaim of any corrodies or corrody, pension or pensions, tenths spiritual or fifteenths, or tenths temporal, or of the collection of the same rents or services, or of the payment of any knights' pence for coming to your parliament, be invalid and of no effect.
Item, that all grauntes made by you by your lettres patentes or othirwise, to eny persone or persones to be justice of your benche, or of the commune benche within your lond of Irelond, or of the office of keper of the rolles of your chauncerie of the same lond, for terme of lif, be voide and of none force ner effect. And also that all graunte or grauntes by you < made to eny person > or persones, of eny office or offices wherupon noo charge hangeth nor nedith to be of actuell excercise or occupacion, be voide and of no force nor effect. And also by the seid advise, assent and auctorite, ye will graunte, ordeigne and establissh, that every persone that hath any castelx, maners, londes, tenementes, rentes, services, offices, commoditees, advowsons, possessions, or eny enheritementes, of your graunte or grauntes, in eny eschaunge, or in or for eny recompense of or for eny maners, londes, tenementes, advousons, possessions or enheritementes, to you or to [...] eny othir persone or body corporate, to your or eny of theire use, at your desire or contemplacion, for eny rentes, annuitees, sommes of money or thyng, that shuld or myght have be taken or had of eny custumes or subsidies in eny your portes within this your realme, or in or at the receite of youre eschequier, if no yifte of eschaunge nor recompense for eny thyng be had be made; may have immediatly, and have, reteyne, [p. v-302][col. a] kepe, entre and enjoy peasibly, without eny maner suyte, or yit lette or distourbance of you, your heires or eny othir, from the said fest, aswell all the said maners, londes, tenementes, rentes, advousons, possessions and enheritementes, with theire appurtenaunce, in enywyse so yeven to you or to eny persone or body corporate, at your < desire or > contemplacion, by him, his auncestres, or by hym or her or theire predecessours, or by thoo whos estate eny suche your lieges hath or had in the londes, tenementes, rentes, possessions or enheritementz taken of you in eschaunge, as the seid rentes, annuitees and sommes of money, that he shuld or myght have had of eny custumes or subsidies, or at your receite aforeseid, if noo manere of eschaunge nor recompense had be taken of you therfore by him, nor by none his auncestres or predecessours, in like manere, fourme and state, as though no suche graunte or estate of eschaunge or recompence had be made. So alwey that the maners, londes, tenementes, rentes, annuitees, advousons, sommes of money and enheritementes afore reherced, yeven to you, or to eny othir persone or body corporate, or lefte to be take for eny of the seid eschaunge or recompense, were not yours ne none othir persone or persones to your use the first day of youre noble reigne, nor aftir, save onely by reason of eny of the < yeftes, grauntes, or causes aforesaid: > except and forprised oute of this acte of resumpcion, all the castelx, maners, londes, tenementes, rentes, services, possessions and enheritementes, with theire appurtenaunces, whereof eny persone or persones have had restitucion by auctorite of parlement, or restitucion by the cours of the commyn lawe: except also and forprisid every graunte and grauntes, every pardon and pardons, relessez or quitclayme of feefermes, profites, revenues, subsidies of wolle, offices, jurisdictions, commoditees or auctoritees, or of eny othir thyng by you made to eny maire and comminaltee; maire and shirrefs; maire, citezeins and comminaltee; citezeins; maire and burgeys; maire, citezeins and theire successours; maire, baillifs, burgeys and comminaltee; maire, shirefs and comminaltee; maire and baillifs; baillifs and burgeys; burgeys and baillifs; burgeys and comminaltee and theire successours; maire and aldermen; maire, baillifs and citezeins; citezeins, baillifs and burgeys; maire, baillifs and burgeys; maire and burgeys; to the burgeys or men of towne, or men and theire successours, or to them or theire, or of eny of theire successours, of eny citee, burgh, or towne of this realme, by what name that they or eny of theym be called; or to eny barons or jurates of eny of the .v. portes, or the barons of your .v. portes, or to eny maire and barons, or baillifs and barons, or maire and comminalte, or baillife and comminaltee, or to the inhabitauntes and tenauntes residentes, or men of eny toune of the .v. portes, or of eny nowe theire membres, by what name that ever they be called, so that all suche grauntes be made to theym or eny of theym, and to theire successours: except also all grauntes made to eny of youre lieges, of eny londes and tenementes of copie holde or auncien demesne: and except also and forprisid all offices, suche as the said first day were offices, and the fees and rewardes thanne to theim had, accustumed and apperteinyng, to the which office or offices longith, apperteinyth, and nedith actuell excercise, and were not grauntid by you to eny persone or persones in fee simple or in fee taille. And over that, except and forprisid all grauntes by you to eny persone or persones made, of kepyng of eny persone or persones as warde unto you, with the londes and tenementes and mariage of the same persone or persones so warde to you, or of the kepyng of eny idiotte or idiottes with theire londes and tenementes: except also all grauntes by you by auctorite of parlement, or by lettres [...] under youre grete seale, or prive [col. b] seale, by thavise and assent of youre counseill, made to or for the maire of your staple of Caleys, or to or for the maire and feloship of the same, or to or for eny of theym, or to or for eny othir persone or persones made, for money by theym or eny of theym to you lent. And also all grauntes by auctorite of parlement made for the paiement of the wages of your soudiours of youre toune, castell and marches of Caleys, and of your toure of Rysebank, or for the werkes of the seid castell, toune, marches and toure, or for the tresorer and viteiller of the same, of that that belongeth to the offices of tresorer and viteiller therof, so that eny acte therof abideth in writyng in your counseill, by thassent and advise of the said counseill made, or in your rolles of parlement. And that no persone nor persones, that had or resceyved eny thyng of the premisses afore the tyme of this resumpcion, be not chargeable by wey of accompt or otherwise for the same, ayenst you, your heires or successours, except thoo that by your grauntes afore the said resumpcion were accomptable. Also, that all grants made by you by your letters patent or otherwise, to any person or persons to be justice of king's bench or of the common bench within your land of Ireland, or of the office of keeper of the rolls of your chancery of the same land, for term of life, be invalid and of no force or effect. And also that all grant or grants made by you to any person or persons, of any office or offices whereupon no charge hangs and which does not need to be actually exercised or performed, be invalid and of no force or effect. And that also, by the said advice, assent and authority, you will grant, ordain and decree that every person who has any castles, manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, offices, commodities, advowsons, possessions or any hereditaments of your grant or grants, in any exchange, or in or for any recompense of or for any manors, lands, tenements, advowsons, possessions or hereditaments, to you or to any other person or body corporate, to your or their use, at your desire or request, for any rents, annuities, sums of money or thing, that should or might have been taken or had from any customs or subsidies in any of your ports within this your realm, or in or at the receipt of your exchequer, if no gift of exchange nor recompense for any thing had been made; may have immediately, and have, retain, [p. v-302][col. a] keep, enter and enjoy peaceably, without any manner of suit, let or disturbance by you, your heirs or anyone else, from the said feast, all the said manors, lands, tenements, rents, advowsons, possessions and hereditaments, with their appurtenances, in any way thus given to you or to any person or body corporate, at your desire or request, by him, his ancestors, or by him or her or their predecessors, or by those whose estate any of your lieges has or had in the lands, tenements, rents, possessions or hereditaments taken of you in exchange, and also the said rents, annuities and sums of money that he should or might have had from any customs or subsidies or at your aforesaid receipt, had no manner of exchange or recompense been taken from you for it by him, or by any of his ancestors or predecessors, in like manner, form and state, as though no such grant or estate of exchange or recompense had been made. Provided always that the manors, lands, tenements, rents, annuities, advowsons, sums of money and hereditaments mentioned above, given to you, or to any other person or body corporate, or given up to be taken in any said exchange or recompense, were not yours or of any other person or persons to your use on the first day of your noble reign, or later, save only by reason of any of the gifts, grants, or causes aforesaid: excepting and excluding from this act of resumption, all the castles, manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, possessions and hereditaments, with their appurtenances, of which any person or persons have had restitution by authority of parliament, or restitution by the course of the common law: excepting also and excluding every grant and grants, every pardon and pardons, releases or quitclaim of fee-farms, profits, revenues, subsidies of wool, offices, jurisdictions, commodities or authorities, or of any other thing made by you to any mayor and commonalty; mayor and sheriffs; mayor, citizens and commonalty; citizens; mayor and burgesses; mayor, citizens and their successors; mayor, bailiffs, burgesses and commonalty; mayor, sheriffs and commonalty; mayor and bailiffs; bailiffs and burgesses; burgesses and bailiffs; burgesses and commonalty and their successors; mayor and aldermen; mayor, bailiffs and citizens; citizens, bailiffs and burgesses; mayor, bailiffs and burgesses; mayor and burgesses; to the burgesses or townsmen, or men and their successors, or to them or their, or of any of their, successors, of any city, borough, or town of this realm, by whatever name they or any of them are called; or to any barons or jurats of any of the Cinque Ports, or the barons of your Cinque Ports, or to any mayor and barons, or bailiffs and barons, or mayor and commonalty, or bailiff and commonalty, or to the inhabitants and resident tenants, or men of any town of the Cinque Ports, or of any of their present members, by whatever name they are called, provided that all such grants were made to them or any of them, and to their successors: excepting also all grants made to any of your lieges of any lands and tenements of copyhold or ancient demesne: and excepting also and excluding all offices which were offices on the said first day, and the fees and rewards then to them belonging, accustomed and pertaining, to which office or offices there belongs, appertains and is required actual exercise, and which were not granted by you to any person or persons in fee-simple or in fee-tail. And in addition, excepting and excluding all grants made by you to any person or persons of the custody of any person or persons being ward to you, with the lands and tenements and marriage of the person or persons being ward to you, or of the custody of any idiot or idiot with their lands and tenements: excepting also all grants by you by authority of parliament, or by letters under your great seal or privy [col. b] seal by the advice and assent of your council, made to or for the mayor of your staple of Calais, or to or for the mayor and fellowship of the same, or to or for any of them, or to or for any other person or persons, for money lent by them or any of them to you. And also all grants made by authority of parliament for the payment of the wages of your soldiers of your town, castle and marches of Calais, and of your tower of Rysbank, or for the works of the said castle, town, marches and tower, or for the treasurer and victualler of the same, of that which belongs to the offices of treasurer and victualler thereof, provided that any act thereof remains in writing in your council, made by the assent and advice of the said council, or in your rolls of parliament. And that no person or persons who had or received anything from the foregoing before the time of this resumption, shall be liable by way of account or otherwise for the same towards you, your heirs or successors, except those who by your grants were accountable before the said resumption.
Provided alwey, that our soveraigne lady the quene, have, hold and reteigne < in her owne > handes, for terme of her lif, of suche possessions as she nowe is seisid and possessed of, at her choyse and eleccion .x. mille marcs yerely of value, this acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. And if eny thyng apperteynyng or belongyng to prince Edwardes enheritaunce be comprehendid or conteyned within the said somme of .x. mille marcs, and if the said possessions so reteigned will not atteigne to the somme of .x. mille marcs yerely, beside the princes enheritaunce, than the quene to be recompensed othirwise to the full perfourmyng of .x. mille marcs yerely. And that her possessions aforeseid excede not the yerely value of .x. mille marcs. Provided always that our sovereign lady the queen shall have, hold and retain in her own hands, for term of her life, possessions worth 10,000 marks a year from those of which she is now seised and possessed, by her choice and selection, notwithstanding this act of resumption. And if anything pertaining or belonging to Prince Edward's inheritance is included or contained within the said sum of 10,000 marks, and if the said possessions so retained do not reach the sum of 10,000 marks a year, besides the prince's inheritance, then the queen is to be compensated in some other way to make up the full 10,000 marks a year. And that her aforesaid possessions should not exceed the yearly value of 10,000 marks.
Provided alwey, that this acte be not prejudiciall to Edward prince of Wales, duke of Cornewaill and erle of Chestre, of eny thyng graunted or belongyng to hym of the same duchie, erledome or principaltee of Wales. Provided always that this act shall not be prejudicial to Edward, prince of Wales, duke of Cornwall and earl of Chester, with regard to anything granted or belonging to him of the same duchy, earldom or principality of Wales.
Provided also, that all grauntes of licence grauntid to any persone or persones, to founde or make fraternetteez, gildes, hospitalles, chaunteries, colleges, almeshouses, or to purchace londes and tenementes for the same or eny of theym, be except oute of this acte. Provided also that all grants of licence granted to any person or persons to found or make fraternities, guilds, hospitals, chantries, colleges, almshouses, or to purchase lands and tenements for them or any of them, shall be excepted from this act.
Provided also, that all grauntes made by you to eny persone or persones of eny londes and tenementes, wheryn ye were enfeoffed of trust, to the use of hym or theym that made the feoffement, and were not youres afore the seid feoffement, be except oute of this acte. Provided also that all grants made by you to any person or persons of any lands and tenements in which you were enfeoffed in trust to the use of him or them that made the enfeoffment, and which were not yours before the said enfeoffment, shall be excepted from this act.
Provided also, that all grauntes and confirmacions made by you of eny office or offices to any persone or persones, the which office or offices were offices the first day of your reigne or before, and to theym belongeth and nedith actuell excercise, and apperteyneth to suche possessions as the quene is possessed of, be except oute of this acte. Provided also that all grants and confirmations made by you of any office or offices to any person or persons, which office or offices were offices on the first day of your reign or before, and which need and require actual exercise, and pertain to such possessions as the queen possesses, shall be excepted from this act.
Provided alwey, that youre lettres patentes made to John Wenlok nowe knyght, by the name of John Wenlok, for the contentacion of .mxxxiij.li. .vi. s. .viij. d. by hym to you lent, stonde in < their force and be gode and effectuell, þis acte notwithstondyng. And þat > all lettres patentes by you made of eny of the premisses, except afore excepted, be fro the seid fest voide and of noo force: savyng to every of youre lieges, his < right, > title and interesse in every of the premisses, suche as < thei > have or had afore the seid grauntes, or such othir than they have or had by youre grauntes. And for asmoche as it is pleinly and universally conceyved thorough all this youre realme, that the goode spede of this acte of resumpcion, is to you full honorable, necessarie and behovefull, and to all youre liege [memb. 13] people [p. v-303][col. a] confortable, and grete relief of theire poverte which they be in, for many importable charges leide upon theym before [this tyme,] for that the seid resumpcion afore this tyme hath not be effectuelly hadde: we youre humble, true, obeisaunt and feithfull people, [commen] for the common of this youre reaume, and to this youre high court of parlement by youre auctorite roiall, in < þe most lowely wyse beseche you most > nobley, graciously and tenderly to considre the grete benefetes that shuld growe unto you, and to this your reame by the meane of this resumpcion; that it please your highnesse, that if so be that ye like, by thadvis of youre lordes spirituelx and temporelx in this present parlement assembled, to make eny provisions or exceptions other than be conteigned in this oure peticion, that than the seid provisions and excepcions be sende doune unto us, to that ende that we may gife oure assentz therto, if it be thought to us expedient and [behoefull;] and that by the same auctorite it be ordeyned, that if eny of youre liege people, after the seid fest of Seint Michell, take and receyve youre graunte or grauntes of eny of the premisses, except before except, then he or they, as ofte as he or they that so take or receyve, renne in the penaltee of the statutes of provisours. And over that, that he or they that so take or resceyve eny such < graunt or grauntes, except afore except, contrarie to > this oure desire, forfaite a .m. marc, as ofte as they so take or resceyve; wherof the oon half to be forfaited to you, and that to be applied to the contentyng of the wages of the soudeours of Caleys; and that other half to hym < þat wille sue. And he þat wille sue þerfore, may have an action of dette > ayenst eny such persone or persones, and such processe theryn, as lieth in an action of dette at the commyn lawe; and that the defendauntes in such suytes shall not be < essoyned, > wage theire lawe, nor ley protections in delay of the seid suytes; all grauntes to be made by your lettres patentes, by the bille of the tresorer of Englond for the tyme beyng of eny of the premisses; and also all grauntes to be made of olde offices which were offices the first day of youre reigne, to the which belongeth and nedeth actuell excercise, and fees and wages the same first day to the same offices < perteynyng or belongyng, except out > of the seid peynes. And that noo such persones to whom eny lesse or lesses, graunte or grauntes, shalbe made after the seid fest, terme of yeres or atte wille, of eny thyng parcell of the duchie of Lancastre, erledom of Chestre, and principaltee of Wales, Caleys and Guysnes, and the marches therof, or of eny thyng to theym or eny of theym belongyng or apperteynyng, be not hurt [nor] endamaged by the penaltee of this seid acte. Provided always that your letters patent made to John Wenlock, now knight, by the name of John Wenlock, for the satisfaction of £1,033 6s. 8d. lent by him to you, shall remain in force and be good and effectual, notwithstanding this act. And that all letters patent made by you on any of the foregoing, except those previously excepted, be invalid and of no force from the said feast: saving to all your lieges their right, title and interest in all of the things stated, such as they have or had before the said grants, or whatever else they have or had by your grants. And inasmuch as it is clearly and universally perceived throughout your entire realm that the success of this act of resumption is most honourable, necessary and fitting for you, and a comfort to all your liege [memb. 13] people, [p. v-303][col. a] and a great relief of the poverty they suffer because of the many intolerable charges imposed on them before this time, given that the said resumption before this has not been effectively carried out: we, your humble, true, obedient and faithful people, coming for the commons of this your realm to this your high court of parliament, by your royal authority, most humbly pray you to consider most nobly, graciously and sympathetically the great benefits which would accrue to you and to this your realm by means of this resumption; that it may please your highness that if you choose, by the advice of your lords spiritual and temporal assembled in this present parliament, to make any provisos or exceptions other than those contained in this our petition, that the said provisos and exceptions may be sent down to us, so that we may give our assent to them, if it seems to us expedient and necessary; and that by the same authority it is ordained that if any of your liege people, after the said Michaelmas, take and receive your grant or grants of any of the aforesaid, except those previously excepted, then he or they, as often as he or they shall so take and receive, shall incur the penalty of the statutes of provisors. And moreover, that he or they who so take and receive any such grant or grants, except those previously excepted, contrary to this our request, shall forfeit 1,000 marks each time they so take and receive; one half of which shall be forfeit to you, and applied to satisfying the wages of the soldiers of Calais; and the other half to him who chooses to sue. And he who chooses to sue for this may have an action of debt against any such person or persons, and such process therein as lies in an action of debt at the common law; and the defendants in such suits shall not be essoined, wage their law, or lay protections to delay the said suits; all grants to be made by your letters patents, by the bill of the treasurer of England at the time of any of the foregoing; and also all grants to be made of old offices which were offices on the first day of your reign, which involve and need actual exercise, and fees and wages on the same first day pertaining or belonging to the same offices, excepted from the said penalties. And that no such persons to whom any lease or leases, grant or grants, shall be made after the said feast, for term of years or at will, of any part of the duchy of Lancaster, earldom of Chester, and principality of Wales, Calais and Guisnes, and their marches, or of anything belonging or pertaining to them or any of them, shall be harmed or injured by the penalty of this said act.
Provided alwey, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall to prince Edward your first begoten son, nor Richard duc of York, of eny graunte made by you to theym or either of theym to be protectour and defensour of this youre noble reame, nor of eny thyng conteyned within youre lettres patentes to theym or either of theym therof made, nor to eny other auctorite or thyng to theym or either of theym in this present parlement or by auctorite therof graunted or made: nor that the seid prince Edward be endamaged nor renne in the penaltee aforeseid, for eny graunte by you to hym hereaftir to be made of the principaltee of Wales, and the erledom of Chestre. (fn. v-278-312-1) Provided always that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Prince Edward your first-born son, or Richard, duke of York, with regard to any grant made by you to them or either of them to be protector and defender of this your noble realm, or of anything contained within your letters patent made to them or either of them thereof, or to any other authority or thing granted or made to them or either of them in this present parliament or by its authority: and that the said Prince Edward shall not be injured or incur the aforesaid penalty because of any grant to be made by you to him hereafter of the principality of Wales and the earldom of Chester. (fn. v-278-312-1)
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
As touchynge this peticion of resumpcion, the kynge hath well conceyvid and undirstoude þe maters, articles and desires, conteynid in the same peticion. Wherefor the kynge, by þadvise and assent < of the lordes > spirituell and temporell beynge in this present parlement, and by auctoritee of the same, taketh and resumeth into his hondis, all maner þyngis conteyned in þe seid peticion, and þe same agreeth and acceptith; the penaltee [col. b] in the seid peticion conteyned, except and leyd apart; alwey his prerogatiff reserved. Forseyn alwaye, þat all such provisions and excepcions as been by his highnesse, by þadvice of the seid lordes spirituell and temporell made and agreed, or to be agreed, and in this same parlement put in writynge uppon ye premisses, be goode and effectuell, þe seid act notwithstondynge; for þe egalte and reason þat þe kynge aught to doo to his people, the which shall be to the < pleaser > of God, the honour of his highnesse, and the wele of all his lande and people. The tenours of which provisions and exceptions here aftir folowyn. (fn. v-278-315-1) Touching this petition of resumption, the king has well conceived and understood the matters, articles and requests contained in the same petition. Wherefore the king, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in this present parliament, and by authority of the same, takes and resumes into his hands all manner of things contained in the said petition, and accepts and agrees with the same; the penalty [col. b] contained in the said petition excepted and laid aside; his prerogative always reserved. Provided always that all such provisos and exceptions as have been made and agreed by his highness, by the advice of the said lords spiritual and temporal, or to be agreed, to the foregoing and put in writing in this same parliament, shall be good and effectual, notwithstanding the said act; for the justice and judgment which the king ought to provide for his people, which shall be to the pleasure of God, the honour of his highness, and the weal of all his land and people. The tenors of which provisos and exceptions follow hereafter. (fn. v-278-315-1)
< Graunte or feoffement. Lanc'. > [Enfeoffment of the duchy of Lancaster.]
Provided alwey, that this act extende not to any astate, graunt or feoffement of honours, castelles, lordshippes, tounshippes, maners, landes, tenementes, wastes, rentes, reversions, feefermes and services, with all < þeir > appurtenaunces, nor to any libertee or franchise, or any oþer thynge graunted [...] to be hadde on or in the same, that were of oure duchie of Lancastre, made by us to eny persone or persones to our use, to thentent to perfourme our wille. Grant or enfeoffment. Lancaster. Provided always that this act shall not extend to any estate, grant or enfeoffment of the honours, castles, lordships, townships, manors, lands, tenements, wastes, rents, reversions, fee-farms and services, with all their appurtenances, or to any liberty or franchise, or any other thing granted to be had on or in the same, which were of our duchy of Lancaster, made by us to any person or persons to our use, with the intention of performing our will.
The kynge, by the assente of his lordes spirituell and temporell, will, that this act of resumpcion or adnullacion, or any oþer act made or to be made in this present parlement, be not prejudiciall to Margaret Quene of Ingelond his mooste entierly belovyd wiff, soo that it be no hurte to his first begoton son prince Edward, aftir þe tyme that he be of .xiiij. yeres of age. [The queen and prince.]
The king, by the assent of his lords spiritual and temporal, wills that this act of resumption or annulment, or any other act made or to be made in this present parliament, shall not be prejudicial to Margaret, queen of England, his most entirely beloved wife, provided that it is of no harm to his first-born son Prince Edward when he is fourteen years of age.
< Archbisshop of Canterb'. > The archbishop of Canterbury.
Provided alsoo, þat this act extende not nor be prejudiciall to the reverent fader in God Thomas archbisshop of Caunterbury, of eny graunte made by us to hym, of eny gyft or collacion of eny benefice, which belongid unto our gifte and collacion. (fn. v-278-321-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to the reverend father in God Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, with regard to any grant made by us to him of any gift or collation of any benefice, which belonged to our gift and collation. (fn. v-278-321-1)
< Archbisshop of Yorke. > The archbishop of York.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall to our lettres patentes graunted to William archebisshop of York, to take durynge his liff in our forest of Shirwode .vi. stagges, othirwise callyd hertes. (fn. v-278-323-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to our letters patent granted to William, archbishop of York, to take six stags, otherwise called harts, in our forest of Sherwood during his lifetime. (fn. v-278-323-1)
< Abbott and priour of Westm'. > The abbot and prior of Westminster.
Provided alsoo, that the seid peticion of resumpcion extende not in enywise in prejudice or harme of the abbot, priour and covent of the church of Seint Petir of Westm', nor of their successours, of the graunt made by us by our lettres patentes the .ix. day of Juyll, the .xxiij. ti yere of our reigne, of the maners of Ledecombe and Offord Cluny, and of the londes, tenementes and possessions to the seid maners apperteynyng, uppon condicion that they shall yerly for evere observe and kepe in the seid church, the laste day save oon of August, the aniversarye of the full noble prince of blissid memorie our fader, Kynge Harry the V th aftir the conquest, whom God assoyle, and to distrybute the daye of his aniversarye yerly for ever .xx.li. in almesse, and .viij. tapers brennynge dayly at the high masse and evesong in the seid church, every tapre of .viij.li.; and to fynde .xxiiij. ti torches brennyng in the same church, the evyn and the daye of þe seid aniversary yerly, every torche berynge the weyght of .xxvi ti li.; and .xxiiij. ti poure men to bere and hold þe same torches þan brennyng in the same church, eche of hem takyng the seid even and day in almes .x. d.; and to fynde .iij. prestys monkys, dayly to say .iij. masses perpetuelly for þe soule of our fader late kynge, with oþer grete observances, costes and charges dayly, amountynge the value of þe same maners, londes and tenementes, or neygh to þe yerly value of hem: which abbot, priour, covent, and their successours, be bounde aswell by the same lettres patentes, as by the countre party of the same, ensealed with theire common seall, to observe and kepe the seid aniversarye, and distribute yerly the seid .xx.li. and to bere þe seid oþer coostes and charges yerly for ever, as in þe said lettres patentes more playnli it apperith: butte þat þe seid graunt and [p. v-304][col. a] lettres patents in and of þe premisses, be and stonde goode and effectuell, the seid peticion notwithstondyng. Provided also that the said petition of resumption shall not extend in any way to the prejudice or harm of the abbot, prior and convent of the church of St Peter of Westminster, or of their successors, with regard to the grant made by us by our letters patent on 9 July, in the twenty-third year of our reign [1445], of the manors of Letcombe Regis and Offord Cluny, and of the lands, tenements and possessions pertaining to the said manors, on condition that they shall forever annually observe and keep in the said church, on 30 August, the anniversary of the most noble prince of blessed memory our father, King Henry, the fifth since the conquest, whom God absolve, and distribute on the day of his anniversary each year forever £20 in alms, and eight tapers burning daily at high mass and evensong in the said church, each taper weighing eight pounds; and provide twenty-four torches burning in the same church on the eve and day of the said anniversary each year, each torch weighing twenty-six pounds; and twenty-four poor men to carry and hold the same torches then burning in the same church, each of them taking 10d. in alms on the said eve and day; and provide three monks who are priests to say three masses a day perpetually for the soul of our father the late king, with other great observances, costs and daily charges, amounting to the value of the same manors, lands and tenements, or almost the annual value: which abbot, prior, convent and their successors are bound by the same letters patent, as well as by the counterpart of the same, sealed with their common seal, to observe and keep the said anniversary, and distribute the said £20 each year, and to bear the other said annual costs and charges forever, as appears more fully in the said letters patent: but that the said grant and [p. v-304][col. a] letters patent with regard to the aforesaid, shall be and remain good and effectual, notwithstanding the said petition.
< Priour of Witham in Selwode in the county of Somersett, etc. > The prior of Witham in Selwood in the county of Somerset.
Provided alsoo, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor in eny wise be prejudiciall to eny graunt or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, made by us by our lettres patentes, to the priour and covent of Wytham in Selwode in the counte of Somers', of the ordre of charterhouse, ne to þeire successours, of the manours of Warmyngton in the counte of Warrewyk, Spectebury in the counte of Dorset, and Aston in the counte of Berk, with þeir appurtenaunces; nor to any graunte or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, made by us by our lettres patentez, to þe priour and covent of the house of < the place > of God of Henton in the seid counte of Somers', of the seid ordre, of .l. marcs to be takyn yerly to theym and to þeir successours for evermore, of the subsidie and awenage of sale clothes, in the counte of Wiltes', and in the towne of Newe Salysbury, by the hondes of the fermours, approwers < or > occupiers of the same subsidie and awenage for the tyme beynge, at the festes of Seint Michell and Pasche by evyn porcions, as in the seid lettres patentes þerof to them made more pleynly it apperith. Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to any grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, made by us by our letters patent, to the prior and convent of Witham in Selwood in the county of Somerset, of the Carthusian order, or to their successors, with regard to the manors of Warmington in the county of Warwick, Spettisbury in the county of Dorset, and Aston in the county of Berkshire, with their appurtenances; or to any grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, made by us by our letters patent, to the prior and convent of the house of the place of God of Hinton in the said county of Somerset, of the said order, of 50 marks to be taken yearly by them and to their successors forever, from the subsidy and alnage of cloths put on sale in the county of Wiltshire and in the town of Salisbury, by the hands of the farmers, approvers or occupiers of the same subsidy and alnage at the time, at Michaelmas and Easter in equal portions, as appears more fully in the said letters patent made to them.
Nor to any graunte made by us by our lettres patentez to the priour and monkes of the house of Jhesu of Bethlem of Shene, of the seid ordre, of oure patronage, and to < theire > successours, of .lxiiij. acres of lond liyng and joynyng to theire seid house: butte that our seid graunte < or > grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, and lettres patentes, be and stond to the seid priours and coventes, priour and monkes, and to everyche of theym, and to theire successours, and to the successours of everych of theym, good, effectuell and availlable, eny thyng in the seid acte of resumpcion conteyned notwithstondyng. [The prior of Sheen.]
Or to any grant made by us by our letters patent, to the prior and monks of the house of Jesus of Bethlehem at Sheen, of the said order, of our patronage, and to their successors, of sixty-four acres of land lying and adjoining their said house: but that our said grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, and letters patent, be and remain to the said priors and convents, prior and monks, and to each of them, and to their successors, and to the successors of each of them, good, effectual and valid, notwithstanding anything contained in the said act of resumption.
< Charterhouse nigh London. > The Charterhouse near London.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion extende not nor in eny wise be prejudiciall to eny graunt or grauntes made by us by oure severall lettres patentes to the priour and covent of the ordre of charterhous nygh London, of a ton of wyne; ne to the priour and covent of Mountgrace, of the same ordre, of a ton of wyne; ne to the priour and covent of the house of Seint Michell beside Hull, of the same ordre, of a ton of wyne; ne to the priour and covent of the house of the place of God of Henton, of the said ordre, of a ton of wyne, yerly to every of the said priours and coventes, and to theire successours, and to every of theym severally graunted of our almesse, to be takyn and had by þe hondes of our boteler of Englond for the tyme beynge, as by < our seid severell lettres > patentes þerof to theym made more playnly it apperith: but that our said graunt or grauntes, and lettres patentes, so by us severally made of the seid wyne or wynes, be and stand to the seid priours and coventes, and to their successours of everyche of theym, good and effectuell, this seid acte of resumpcion notwithstondynge. (fn. v-278-331-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to any grant or grants made by us by our several letters patent, to the prior and convent of the Charterhouse near London, of a tun of wine; or to the prior and convent of Mountgrace, of the same order, of a tun of wine; or to the prior and convent of the house of St Michael beside Hull, of the same order, of a tun of wine; or to the prior and convent of the house of the place of God in Hinton, of the said order, of a tun of wine, yearly to each of the said priors and convents, and to their successors, and to each of them individually granted of our alms, to be taken and had by the hands of our butler of England at the time, as appears more fully in our said individual letters patent made to them: but that our said grant or grants, and letters patent, thus individually made by us for the said wine or wines, be and remain to the said priors and convents, and to the successors of each of them, good and effectual, notwithstanding this act of resumption. (fn. v-278-331-1)
< Dean and chapiter of Lichfeld. > The dean and chapter of Lichfield.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall to the bisshop, dean and chaptre of the cathedrall church of Lychefeld, ne to their successours, or to the dean, chanons, vicaries, preestes, or othir ministres of the seid cathedrall church, ne to their successours, of any libertees or fraunchises by us to theym geven or graunted, which we have graunted unto theym for divers consideracions of inconvenientes don by our shirrefs and othir our officers, in arestynge and mysentretyng the ministres of the seid church in their habites and executyng divine service there, where þorough the seid church hath ben polute, and stonde inofficiat somme .xiiij. dayes to gedir, the which libertees and fraunchises strecchyn [col. b] no ferther butte within the barreers of the close there, the diches and the procincte of the same. (fn. v-278-333-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to the bishop, dean and chapter of the cathedral church of Lichfield, or to their successors, or to the dean, canons, vicars, priests, or other ministers of the said cathedral church, or to their successors, with regard to any liberties or franchises given or granted by us to them, which we have granted to them on account of the misdeeds of our sheriffs and other officers, in arresting and mistreating the ministers of the said church when robed and executing divine service there, whereby the said church has been polluted, and remained unusable for some fourteen days together, which liberties and franchises extend [col. b] no further than the boundaries of the close there, the ditches and the precinct of the same. (fn. v-278-333-1)
< Nicholl Osulbury, late wardein of Seint Mary College of Winchester in Oxenford. > Nicholas Osulbury, late warden of St Mary's College of Winchester in Oxford.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall to eny graunt or grauntes made by us by our lettres patentes to maister Nicholl Osulbury, late wardeyn of the collage of Our Lady of Wynchestre in Oxonford, Seynt Marie collage in Oxenford commonly called, ne to the scollers of the seid collage, ne to their successours for evermore, of the priory alyen of < Newenton > Longvile, sometyme belongyng to the house of Seint Feith of Longvile be yonde the see, called the maner of < Newenton > Longevyle, or by what othir name it be called in our seid lettres patentes, with all thappurtenaunces and dependentes of the same, by what name they be called in our seid graunt or grauntes: butte þat our lettres patentes þeruppon made be goode and effectuell in every poynt of the contynue of the same, this act notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-335-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or grants made by us by our letters patent, to Master Nicholas Osulbury, late warden of the college of Our Lady of Winchester in Oxford, commonly called St Mary's College in Oxford, or to the scholars of the said college, or to their successors forever, with regard to the alien priory of Newton Longville, once belonging to the house of Ste Foi de Longueville beyond the sea, called the manor of Newton Longville, or by whatever name it is called in our said letters patent, with all its appurtenances and dependencies, by whatever name they are called in our said grant or grants: but that our letters patent made thereon shall be good and effectual in every detail of their contents, notwithstanding this act. (fn. v-278-335-1)
< College of All Soules in Oxenford. > The college of All Souls in Oxford.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion extende not ner be prejudiciall to the wardeyn and college of All Soweles in Oxenford, ner to their successours, of eny maners, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions, fees, advousons, with þeire appurtenaunces, the which we had of the surrendre or feoffements of Henry Chycheley late archebisshop of Caunterbury, or of any oþer, to the entent for to geve or graunte the seid maners, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions, services, fees, advousons, with þeir appurtenaunces, to the seid wardeyn and college, or to eny of his predecessours in enywyse. (fn. v-278-337-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to the warden and college of All Souls in Oxford, or to their successors, with regard to any manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions, fees, advowsons, with their appurtenances, which we had by the surrender or enfeoffments of Henry Chichele, late archbishop of Canterbury, or anyone else, with the intention of giving or granting the said manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions, services, fees, advowsons, with their appurtenances, to the said warden and college, or to any of his predecessors in any way. (fn. v-278-337-1)
< For the same. > For the same.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall in enywise unto the wardeyn and college of All Soweles in Oxenford, ne to their successours, of eny graunt or grauntes by us made to þe seid wardeyn and college, or to any of their predecessours, of the prioryes and possessions aliens of Langennyth, of Newe Abbey besyde Abberbury, of Seint Clere, of Rommeney, and of Upcherch, with their appurtenaunces, ne of eny parcell of theym; ne that the seid prioryes ne eny parcell of theym, fees, advousons, churches, chapelles, glebes, parsonages, vicariages, maners, londes, tenementes, pensions, porcions, tithes, oblacions, obvencions, fraunchises, libertees and customes, ne noon othir þynge to the seid priories or to eny of theym belongyng or apperteynyng, be comprised, but clerely excepted in this acte. (fn. v-278-339-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the warden and college of All Souls in Oxford, or to their successors, with regard to any grant or grants made by us to the said warden and college, or to any of their predecessors, of the alien priories and possessions of Llangennith, of New Abbey beside Alberbury, of St Clears, of Romney and of Upchurch, with their appurtenances, or of any part of them; or that the said priories or any part of them, fees, advowsons, churches, chapels, glebes, parsonages, vicarages, manors, lands, tenements, pensions, portions, tithes, oblations, obventions, franchises, liberties and customs, or any other thing belonging or pertaining to the said priories or to any of them, shall be included, but excluded without reservation from this act. (fn. v-278-339-1)
< For the same. > For the same.
Provided alsoo, that the maner of Wedon and Weston, oþerwise called Wedon Pynkeney with his appurtenaunces, late graunted by us to Richard Andrewe, then wardeyn of the college of All Soules in Oxenford, and to the same college and to their successours for ever, be not comprised in this act of resumpcion. (fn. v-278-341-1) Provided also that the manor of Weedon and Weston, otherwise called Weedon Pinkney with its appurtenances, lately granted by us to Richard Andrew, then warden of the college of All Souls in Oxford, and to the same college and to their successors forever, shall not be included in this act of resumption. (fn. v-278-341-1)
[memb. 12]
< Oriell College in Oxeford. > Oriel College in Oxford.
Provided also, that the seid peticion or act of resumpcion, or eny othir act made or to be made in this present parlement, extende not nor be prejudiciall to þe provost and scollers of our collage in Oxenford called the Oryell, of eny graunt or grauntes or confirmacions made to theym by us, or eny othir persone or persones, of the manoir of Waddeley and Wykyngesham, othirwise callyd the < maners of Wadele and Wykyngesham, > somtyme callyd Worda in Berkshire, with þappurtenaunces, or eny part of the same. Provided also that the said petition or act of resumption, or any other act made or to be made in this present parliament, shall not extend or be prejudicial to the provost and scholars of our college in Oxford called Oriel, with regard to any grant or grants or confirmations made to them by us, or any other person or persons, of the manor of Wadley and Wicklesham, otherwise called the manors of Wadley and Wicklesham, once called Worth in Berkshire, with their appurtenances, or any part of the same.
< The college called Kings Haull in Cambridge. > The college called King's Hall in Cambridge.
Provided also, that this present peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not < nor in eny wyse > be prejudiciall nor hurte to eny lettres patentes graunted or made by us, to the maister or keper and the scollers of our college within the universitee of Cambrigge called the Kynges Halle, ne to their successours, in or of thappropriation of the parisshchirch of Chesterton in the counte of Cambrigge, with almaner of frutes and profites belongyng therto; ne in or of a voide [p. v-305][col. a] grounde with a conduyte theryn, late by and nowe within the seid college; ne in or of .xl. marcs to be takyn yerly by the hondis of the shirrefs of London and of Midd' for the tyme beyng, in recompense of the clothynge and furres that they have had mony yeres at oure grete warderobe, aftir the degrees in scoles singulerly of the seid scollers, the seid peticion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-345-1) Provided also that this present petition or act of resumption shall not extend or in any way be prejudicial or harmful to any letters patent granted or made by us, to the master or keeper and the scholars of our college within the University of Cambridge called the King's Hall, or to their successors, with regard to the appropriation of the parish church of Chesterton in the county of Cambridge, with all manner of fruits and profits belonging to it; or with regard to an empty [p. v-305][col. a] ground with a conduit in it, once near and now within the said college; or with regard to 40 marks to be taken yearly by the hands of the sheriffs of London and Middlesex at the time, as recompense for the clothing and furs that they have had for many years at our great wardrobe, according to the different academic degrees of the said scholars individually, notwithstanding the said petition. (fn. v-278-345-1)
< The college called Pembroke Hall in Cambrige. > The college called Pembroke Hall in Cambridge.
Provided also, that this act extende not ne be prejudiciall to the wardeyn or maister, scollers, and their successours, of the college of Valence Marie, Pembroke Halle commonly called, within the universite of Cambrigg, of eny graunte made by us to the seid wardeyn, maister, scollers, and their successours, of the priory aliene of Lynton, with all the rightes and the appurtenaunces þerto longyng, and of the advouson of the vicariage of the same; ne to eny graunte by us made to the seid wardeyn, maister, scollers, and their successours, of a pension the which the abbot of Riallieu late paied unto the abbot of Pynne, othirwise called Pyn Aliene by yonde the see, for the church of Saham, or oute of the church forseid. Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to the warden or master, scholars and their successors, of the college of Valence Marie, commonly called Pembroke Hall, within the University of Cambridge, of any grant made by us to the said warden, master, scholars and their successors, with regard to the alien priory of Linton, with all the rights and appurtenances belonging to it, and with regard to the advowson of the vicarage of the same; or to any grant made by us to the said warden, master, scholars and their successors, of a pension which the abbot of Rewley lately paid to the abbot of le Pin [Vienne], otherwise called Pin Alien beyond the sea, for the church of Soham, or out of the aforesaid church.
< College of Foderinghey. > The college of Fotheringhay.
Provided also, that this act of resumpcion and adnullacion extende not nor in eny thynge be prejudiciall unto the maister, felowes, and their successours, of our college of Fodrynghey, of eny graunt or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, lees or leesses, made by us unto theym, and to their successours, of .xl. acres of wode, and the vesture of the same, in our forest of Rokkyngham within our counte of Northt': but that our seid graunt or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, lees or leesses, made by us in tyme passed unto theym, and to their successours, of these premisses be good and effectuell, this act notwithstondyng. Soo alwey that we, the quene, oure heires and successours, be prayde fore in the seid college for ever. (fn. v-278-349-1) Provided also that this act of resumption and annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the master, fellows and their successors of our college of Fotheringhay, with regard to any grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, lease or leases, made by us to them, and to their successors, of forty acres of wood and their produce in our forest of Rockingham in our county of Northampton: but that our said grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, lease or leases, made to them and to their successors by us in time past, of the aforesaid, shall be good and effectual, notwithstanding this act. Provided that we, the queen, our heirs and successors, shall be prayed for in the said college forever. (fn. v-278-349-1)
< College of Seint Gregory and St Martyn of Wy in Kent. > The college of St Gregory and St Martin of Wye in Kent.
Provided also, that this act of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall ne hurte to the provost or maister, and felowes, of the college of Seint Gregory and Seint Martyn of Wy in the counte of Kent, late founded by the reverent fader in God John Kempe, cardinall, and than archiebisshopp of York, for the priory alien of Newenton in the seid counte of Kent with hit appurtenaunces, the which excede not by yere over all charges and reprises .xiiijli. gyven by us to the seid John Kempe than archiebisshop of York; considerynge that he payd to us for the said priorie .ccc. marcs, as in our lettres patentes therof made to the said John than archiebisshupp of York more playnly apperith. (fn. v-278-351-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial or harmful to the provost or master, and fellows, of the college of St Gregory and St Martin of Wye in the county of Kent, lately founded by the reverend father in God John Kemp, cardinal, then archbishop of York, with regard to the alien priory of Newtown in the said county of Kent with its appurtenances, which does not exceed £14 a year over and above all charges and payments, given by us to the said John Kemp, then archbishop of York; considering that he paid us 300 marks for the said priory, as appears more fully in our letters patent made to the said John, then archbishop of York. (fn. v-278-351-1)
< College of Leyc'. > The college of Leicester.
Provided also, that this act of resumpcion or adnullacion extende not nor in eny wise be prejudiciall to the dean and chanons of the collegiall church of Our Ladye of Leycestr', nor to their successours, nor to eny graunt made to theym, and their successours, in pure and perpetuell almes, of an annuite of .c. marcs, to be takyn yerly of and in certayn maners, lordshuppes, londes and tenementes, parcell of our duchie of Lancastre, in the counte of Derby, by Henry late archiebisshopp of Caunterbury, Henry late cardinall of Engelond bysshop of Wynchestr', and Walter lorde Hungerford, than beynge seisid among othir of the seid maners, lordshippes, londes and tenementes, of the gifte and feoffement of the moste noble prynce of perpetuell memorie our fader, and confermed by us undir our seall of our seid duchie. (fn. v-278-353-1) Provided also that this act of resumption or annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the dean and canons of the collegiate church of Our Lady of Leicester, or to their successors, or to any grant made to them and their successors, in pure and perpetual alms, of an annuity of 100 marks, to be taken yearly from and in certain manors, lordships, lands and tenements, part of our duchy of Lancaster, in the county of Derby, by Henry, late archbishop of Canterbury, Henry, late cardinal of England, bishop of Winchester, and Walter, Lord Hungerford, then being seised among other things of the said manors, lordships, lands and tenements, by the gift and enfeoffment of the most noble prince of perpetual memory our father, and confirmed by us under our seal of our said duchy. (fn. v-278-353-1)
< Chapiters of Southwell. > The chapter of Southwell.
Provided also, þat this act of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall ne hurte to our lettres patentes graunted to the chapitur of the church of Blissid Marie of Southwell, of a mese and .c. acres of lond, and .ij. closes with þe appurtenaunce in Batheley. And of a mese and .xl. acres of lond with þe appurtenaunce in Northcarleton, into our hondes be vertue of an inquisicion seisid; considerynge that Kyng Richard the [col. b] secunde by his lettres patentes graunted and gave leve to William Gunthorp clerk, James Staunton clerk, and Walter Ulsby clerk, that they a mese and .xl. acres of lond with þe appurtenaunce in Northcarleton myghten gyve and assigne to the chapitur of the church of Blissid Marie of Southwell, in sustentacion of a preest, the masse of Blissid Marie in the seid church every daye by note to say. And that aftirward Kynge Herry the furth, by his lettres patentes graunted and gave licence to Thomas Haxy, chanon of the seid church, that he a mese, .cxx. acres of londe, and .vij. acres of medewe, with þe appurtenaunce, in Batheley, Northmuskam and Holme, in comitatu Notyngh', myght gyve and assigne to the chapitur of the seid churche, to have and to hold, to hit and to hit successours: by vertue of < þe > which lettres < patentes > of the forseid Kynge Richard, the seid William, James and Walter, by hemself, the forseid mese and londe with the appurtenaunce in Northcarleton, and the forseid Thomas by hym self, by force of the foreseid lettres patentes of forseid Kynge Henry the furth, the forseid mese, lond and medewe, with the appurtenaunce, in Batheley, Northmuskam and Holme, geven and assigned to the forseid chapitur and to their successours. By force of the which giftes, the said chapitur was seasid of the meses, londes and medewes beforseid, unto the tyme that the seid chapitur thorough colour of an inquisicion takyn at Cromwell in the morn of the apostillez of Symond and Jude, the yere of our reigne .xviij., was putte out, to grete hurte of the seid chapitre. (fn. v-278-355-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial or harmful to our letters patent granted to the chapter of the church of the Blessed Mary of Southwell, of a messuage and a hundred acres of land, and two closes with the appurtenances in Bathley. And of a messuage and forty acres of land with the appurtenances in North Carlton, seized into our hands by virtue of an inquisition; considering that King Richard II [col. b] by his letters patent granted and gave leave to William Gunthorp, clerk, James Staunton, clerk, and Walter Ulsby, clerk, to give and assign a messuage and forty acres of land with the appurtenances in North Carlton to the chapter of the church of the Blessed Mary of Southwell, to support a priest to sing the mass of Blessed Mary in the said church every day. And that later, King Henry IV by his letters patent granted and gave licence to Thomas Haxey, canon of the said church, to give and assign a messuage, 120 acres of land and seven acres of meadow, with the appurtenances, in Bathley, North Muskham and Holme, in the county of Nottingham, to the chapter of the said church, to have and to hold to it and its successors: by virtue of which letters patent of the aforesaid King Richard, the said William, James, and Walter, themselves, gave and assigned to the aforesaid chapter and to their successors the aforesaid messuage and land with the appurtenances in North Carlton, and the aforesaid Thomas himself, by force of the aforesaid letters patent of the aforesaid King Henry IV, gave and assigned the aforesaid messuage, land and meadow, with the appurtenances, in Bathley, North Muskham and Holme. By force of which gifts, the said chapter was seised of the messuages, lands and meadows abovesaid, until the said chapter was ejected by authority of an inquisition held at Cromwell on the day after [the feast] of the apostles Simon and Jude in the eighteenth year of our reign [28 October 1439], to the great harm of the said chapter. (fn. v-278-355-1)
< College of Southwell. > The college of Southwell.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall ne hurte to the chapitre of the church collegiall of Blissid Marie of Southwell, for the priore alien of Ravendale in the counte of Lincoln, with hit appurtenaunce, which priore the value of .xiiij.li. be yere over the charge and the reprises excedez not, gyven by us to the seid chapitre; considerynge that John Kempe late archiebisshopp of York for the seid priore paied to us .ccc. marcs, as in our lettres patentes þerof made to the seid chapitre more plainly apperith. (fn. v-278-357-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial or harmful to the chapter of the collegiate church of the Blessed Mary of Southwell, with regard to the alien priory of Ravendale in the county of Lincoln with its appurtenances, which priory does not exceed the annual value of £14, over and above the charges and expenses, given by us to the said chapter; considering that John Kemp, late archbishop of York, paid us 300 marks for the said priory, as appears more fully in our letters patent made thereon to the said chapter. (fn. v-278-357-1)
< College of Seint Stephen in Westminster. > The college of St Stephen in Westminster.
Provided also, that this act of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny graunte or grauntes made by us by < eny oure lettres patentes > to the dean and chanons, or dean and college, of our chapell of Seynt Stephyn within our palice of Westm', < and > to their successours, of the priory alien of Frampton, oþerwise called þe manoir < or priorie of Frompton in the shire > of Dorsett, with all þe membres and appurtenaunces to þe seid priorye or maner in eny wise perteynynge or belongyng; < nor of a carue of lond in þe same manoir; nor to eny graunte made to þeym in or of .vi. houses beside our seid palice, and nygh to þe habitacions of þe said chanons there, aswell for the > augmentynge and encresyng of þe divine service, and supportacion of diverse and grete charges to be born and don in the seid chapell perpetuelly, as for the susteynyng of the ministres of the same; nor to the graunt made by us to John Prenteys, late dean of the seid chapell, and to his successours, of a mansion for the dean there, sited betwene the toure called the clokhous, and the wall of our seid palice towardis Thamyse, beside the wollebrygge; which mansion þe deanes of the seid chapell have had alwey for their habitacion, from the tyme of the fundacion of the seid < capell hiderto; nor to eny graunt by us made in or of þe seid mansion, unto þe forseid nowe dean and chanons, and to þeir successours; nor in or of the toure called þe clokhous, wherin þe belles of the seid chapell been newely hanged, with .ij. olde logges therto joynyng and perteynyng; nor of the kepyng of the clok and the orilage within or of the same toure: > but that < oure lettres patentes > made in and of the premisses, [p. v-306][col. a] and eche parcell of theym, to þe seid dean and chanons, or dean and college, by what name soo ever they be callid, be and stonde good and effectuell, the seid acte of resumpcion notwithstondynge. (fn. v-278-359-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or grants made by us by any of our letters patent, to the dean and canons, or dean and college, of our chapel of St Stephen in our palace of Westminster, and to their successors, of the alien priory of Frampton, otherwise called the manor or priory of Frampton in the county of Dorset, with all the members and appurtenances pertaining or belonging to the said priory or manor in any way; or of a carucate of land in the same manor; or to any grant made to them in or of six houses next to our said palace, and near the dwellings of the said canons there, for the augmentation and increase of divine service, and the support of various great charges to be borne and done in the said chapel perpetually, as well as for the sustenance of the ministers of the same; or to the grant made by us to John Prenteys, late dean of the said chapel, and to his successors, of a house for the dean there, situated between the tower called the clockhouse, and the wall of our said palace towards the Thames, next to the wool bridge; which house the deans of the said chapel have always had for their habitation, since the time of the foundation of the said chapel until now; or to any grant made by us in or of the said house, to the aforesaid present dean and canons, and to their successors; or in or of the tower called the clockhouse, in which the bells of the said chapel have been newly hung, with two old lodges adjoining and pertaining to it; or of the custody of the clock and the orloge within or of the same tower: but that our letters patent made in and of the foregoing [p. v-306][col. a] and each part of them, to the said dean and canons, or dean and college, by whatever name they are called, shall be and remain good and effectual, notwithstanding the said act of resumption. (fn. v-278-359-1)
< College of St Nicolas at Cambrige. College of Eton. > The college of St Nicholas at Cambridge. College of Eton.
Provided also, that this act of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall in eny wyse to þe provost and scollers of our college roiall of Our Ladye and Seint Nicolas of Cambrigge, nor to their successours; nor to the provost and college roiall of Our Lady of Eton beside Wyndesore, nor to their successours, nor to eny of theym, in or of eny londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions, with þeir appurtenauncez, within the townes of Cambrigge and Eton abovesaid, where the seid colleges be founded, sett and stablysshed; nor in or of eny maners, londes, tenementes, with þeir appurtenaunces, nor eny advousons or patronages in which eny persone or persones or body corporate have enfeoffed us, or þerof made eny graunte or state unto us, to the use of < oure > < seid provost and scolers, or provost and > college, or of eny of theym, and their successours, or to the use of eny of their predecessours and their successours; which manoirs, londes, tenementes, advousons and patronages, were not oures before the tyme of such feoffementes, grauntes and states therof unto us made. Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the provost and scholars of our royal college of Our Lady and St Nicholas of Cambridge, or to their successors; or to the provost and royal college of Our Lady of Eton near Windsor, or to their successors, or to any of them, with regard to any lands, tenements, rents, reversions, with their appurtenances, within the abovesaid towns of Cambridge and Eton, where the said colleges are founded, situated and established; or with regard to any manors, lands, tenements, with their appurtenances, or any advowsons or patronages in which any person or persons or body corporate have enfeoffed us, or made any grant or estate thereof unto us, to the use of our said provost and scholars, or provost and college, or of any of them, and their successors, or to the use of any of their predecessors and their successors; which manors, lands, tenements, advowsons and patronages were not ours before the time of such enfeoffments, grants and estates thereof made to us.
Nor in or of eny hospitalx, priouries, possessions aliens, or othir possessions spirituelx, nor of the reversions of the same, < with þappurtenauncez, pensions, porcions, apportes or annuitees, to be takyn out > of churches, howeses and places spirituelx, advousons, patronages, donacions and collacions of churches, chapelx, priories, hospitalx, halles, and oþer benefices spiritualx, or of the kepynge of eny of the same. Or with regard to any hospitals, priories, alien possessions, or other possessions spiritual, or of the reversions of the same, with the appurtenances, pensions, portions, proceeds or annuities, to be taken out of churches, houses and places spiritual, advowsons, patronages, donations and collations of churches, chapels, priories, hospitals, halls, and other benefices spiritual, or of the custody of any of the same.
Nor in or of eny discharge, relesse or quyte clayme of dismes spirituelx, or .xv. mes , or dismes temporelx, subsidies or quotes, touchyng the londes, possessions, goodes and catalles of our seid provost and scolers, or provost and college, or [...] eny of þeir successours. Or with regard to any discharge, release or quit-claim of tenths spiritual, or fifteenths or tenths temporal, subsidies or quotas, touching the lands, possessions, goods and chattels of our said provost and scholars, or provost and college, or any of their successors.
Nor in or of eny discharge, releese or quytclayme of colleccions of all maner dismes spirituelx, or .xv. mes , or dismes temporell, subsidies nor quotes: butte that our grauntes, confirmacions, leesses, releesses and lettres patentes, of or uppon the premisses and of eche of theym, made joyntly and severally unto the seid provost and scolers, and their successours, or provost and college, and their successours, or to any of their predecessours < and þeire successours, be gode and effectuell unto þeym and every of þeym, after þe purportez and tenours of þe same, the seid acte notwithstondyng. So alwey that it be not in prejudice nor hurt of eny oþer persone, but oonly of us. > Or with regard to any discharge, release or quit-claim of collections of all manner of tenths spiritual, or fifteenths or tenths temporal, subsidies or quotas: but that our grants, confirmations, leases, releases and letters patent, of or upon the foregoing and of each of them, made jointly and individually to the said provost and scholars, and their successors, or provost and college, and their successors, or to any of their predecessors and their successors, shall be good and effectual to them and each of them, according to the purports and tenors of the same, notwithstanding the said act. Provided that it shall not be to the prejudice or harm of any other person, but only of us.
< College of Seint Nicholas at Cambrig'. > The college of St Nicholas at Cambridge.
Provided also, that this < seid > act extende not nor be prejudiciall unto the seid provost and scolers of oure college roiall of Oure Ladye and Seynt Nicolas of Cambrigge, nor to theire successours, in or of any graunte or grauntes made by us unto theym, or to eny of theire predecessours and theire successours, of the reversion of the advouson of the church of Chesthunt in the countee of Hertf', immediatly aftir þe decesse of Elizabeth somtyme the wiff of John Norbury squyer; nor of eny annuell pension, which thabbot, priour and covent of Seint Edmondesbury, for the tyme beynge, owe yerly for to yilde unto us; nor of þe undrewode and rowers < in a > woode called Sapley in the counte of Hunt', for theire perpetuell fuell; nor of the woode called Blakeley in the counte of Essex, for theire bildynge and yerly reparacions; nor of an ynne or a tenement, with þappurtenaunces, in the ward of castell Baynard in London. And alsoo that the seid act extende not nor be prejudiciall in any wise unto the seid provost and college roiall of Oure Lady of Eton, nor to their successours, of eny graunt or grauntes made by us unto theym, or to eny of their predecessours and [col. b] their successours, of certeyn waters and fysshyng in the ryver of Thamese, with þe ground therof in the towen and borough of Newe Wyndesore; nor of the manoir of Langley Marreys, and the reversion of the maner of Wyrardesbury, membre of the same maner of Langeley Marreys, with þappurtenaunces, in the counte of Buk': butte that oure grauntes, confirmacions, leesses, relesses and lettres patentes, < of or > uppon the premisses, and of eche of theym, made unto the seid provost and scolers, and their successours, or provost and college, and theire successours, or to any of theire predecessours and their successours, be goode and effectuell unto < þeym and eny of þeym, aftir þe purportez and > tenours of the same, the seid act notwithstondynge. Soo alwey that it be not in prejudice nor hurte of eny oþer persone, but oonly of us. Provided also that this said act shall not extend or be prejudicial to the said provost and scholars of our royal college of Our Lady and St Nicholas of Cambridge, or to their successors, with regard to any grant or grants made by us to them, or to any of their predecessors and their successors, of the reversion of the advowson of Cheshunt church in the county of Hertford, immediately after the death of Elizabeth, once the wife of John Norbury, esquire; or of any annual pension which the abbot, prior and convent of Bury St Edmunds at the time owe to us each year; or of the brush-wood and dead wood in a wood called Sapley in the county of Huntingdon, for their fuel forever; or of the wood called Blakeley in the county of Essex, for their building and yearly repairs; or of an inn or a tenement with the appurtenances, in the ward of Baynard's Castle in London. And also that the said act shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the said provost and royal college of Our Lady of Eton, or to their successors, with regard to any grant or grants made by us to them, or to any of their predecessors and [col. b] their successors, of certain waters and fishing in the river Thames, with the ground thereof in the town and borough of New Windsor; or of the manor of Langley Marish, and the reversion of the manor of Wyrardisbury, member of the same manor of Langley Marish, with the appurtenances, in the county of Buckingham: but that our grants, confirmations, leases, releases and letters patent, of or upon the aforesaid, and each of them, made to the said provost and scholars, and their successors, or provost and college, and their successors, or to any of their predecessors and their successors, shall be good and effectual to them and any of them, according to the purports and tenors of the same, notwithstanding the said act. Provided that it shall not be to the prejudice or harm of any other person, but only of us.
< Exchaunge. > Exchange.
Provided also, that this act extende not nor be prejudiciall unto eny persone or persones, commonalte or body corporate, their heires or successours, in or of eny lordshuppes, maners, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions, hospitalx, advousons, or othir possessions, with þappurtenaunces, fermes, pensions, porcions, apportes or annuitees, which they or eny of theym have or owe for to have, by force of any yifte, graunte, confirmacion, relesse or leesse, to theym or eny of theym made by us, in eschaunge or recompense for eny lordisships, manoirs, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions, advousons, or oþer possessions, with þeir appurtenaunces by theym or eny of theym, to us or eny oþer graunted, to the use of the seid provost and scolers, and their successours, or provost and college, and þeir successours, or of eny of their predecessours and their successours, or to eny of theym: howe be it that such eschaunge or recompense be not expressed in our grauntes and lettres patentes þeruppon made. Soo alweye þat it be not in prejudice nor hurte of eny oþer persone, but oonly of us. (fn. v-278-371-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to any person or persons, commonalty or body corporate, their heirs or successors, with regard to any lordships, manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions, hospitals, advowsons, or other possessions, with the appurtenances, farms, pensions, portions, proceeds or annuities, which they or any of them have or ought to have, by force of any gift, grant, confirmation, release or lease, made to them or any of them by us, in exchange or recompense for any lordships, manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions, advowsons, or other possessions with their appurtenances granted by them or any of them, to us or anyone else, to the use of the said provost and scholars, and their successors, or provost and college, and their successors, or of any of their predecessors and their successors, or to any of them: albeit that such exchange or recompense is not explicitly mentioned in our grants and letters patent made thereon. Provided that it shall not be to the prejudice or harm of any other person, but only of us. (fn. v-278-371-1)
[memb. 11]
< College of Pountefreyte. > The college of Pontefract.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny gifte or graunt or restitucion made by us to the maister and wardeyn, and chapeleyns, of the hospitall or college of the Holy Trinite in Pomfrette, called Knollesalmeshous, in the counte of York, ne to theire successours, in eny lordshupps, maners, londes, tenementes, rentes, services, rightez, or eny othir thyngis which were sumtyme Sir Robert Knolles, or eny oþer mannys to his use. (fn. v-278-373-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to any gift or grant or restitution, made by us to the master and warden and chaplains of the hospital or college of the Holy Trinity in Pontefract, called Knolles Almshouse, in the county of York, or to their successors, in any lordships, manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, rights, or any other things which were once Sir Robert Knolles's, or any other man's to his use. (fn. v-278-373-1)
< Offerings and tythes in the county of Guismes, [sic: read 'Guisnes,'] etc. > Offerings and tithes in the county of Guisnes.
Provided alsoo, that this act extende not nor be prejudiciall unto any spirituell persone or curate, in or of eny graunt made by us unto hym of eny offryngs and tithes beynge in the hondes of such persone or curate in the counte of Guysnes, the towne and marches of Caleys: butte that oure seid grauntes and lettres patentes þeruppon severally made be goode and effectuell unto every of theym, aftir þe purportes and tenures of the same, the seid act notwithstondynge. Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to any spiritual person or curate, with regard to any grant made by us to him of any offerings and tithes being in the hands of such person or curate in the county of Guisnes, the town and marches of Calais: but that our said grants and letters patent individually made thereon shall be good and effectual to each of them, according to the purports and tenors of the same, notwithstanding the said act.
< Mineresses without Allgate. > Minoresses outside Aldgate.
Provided alsoo, that this present act of resumpcion extende not to prejudice ne hurte the abbesse and covent of the susters mineresses without Algate, of our citee of London, ne their successours, of eny graunte by us to theym made of the priorye alien or manoir called Appeldrecombe, with all þappurtenaunces, ne be in eny wise to theym prejudiciall, neithir þat they be comprised in the acte of resumpcion aforseid. (fn. v-278-377-1) Provided also that this present act of resumption shall not extend to the prejudice or harm of the abbess and convent of the minoresses outside Aldgate, of our city of London, or their successors, with regard to any grant made to them by us of the alien priory or manor called Appuldurcombe with all the appurtenances, or that it shall be prejudicial to them in any way, or that they be shall included in the aforesaid act of resumption. (fn. v-278-377-1)
< Cathedrall churche of Chichester. > The cathedral church of Chichester.
Provided alsoo, that this acte of resumpcion or adnullacion extende not ne in eny wise be prejudiciall to the graunte or grauntes made by us by oure lettres patentes berynge date the .xxviij. day of July, in the yere of oure reigne .xxiiij., unto the cathedrall church of the Blissid Trinite and Seynt Richard of Chichestre, and to Adam late bisshopp of the seid church, and to his successours, and to þe dean, chanons and ministres of the seid church, and to þeir successours, or to [p. v-307][col. a] eny of tham joyntly or severally, of exemption of her tenauntes fro undergoyng the knowyng and jugyng of the admirall, and to be juged by us, or by oure commissioners therto to be assigned, as in our seid lettres patentes more pleynli is conteyned. (fn. v-278-379-1) Provided also that this act of resumption or annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the grant or grants made by us by our letters patent dated 28 July, in the twenty-fourth year of our reign [1446], to the cathedral church of the Blessed Trinity and St Richard of Chichester, and to Adam, late bishop of the said church, and to his successors, and to the dean, canons and ministers of the said church, and to their successors, or to [p. v-307][col. a] any of them jointly or individually, of the exemption of their tenants from the jurisdiction of the admiral, but to be judged by us, or by our commissioners assigned for that purpose, as is more fully contained in our said letters patent. (fn. v-278-379-1)
< Abbott of Seint Albone. > The abbot of St Albans.
Provyded alsoo, that this present act of resumpcion be not hurte nor prejudiciall to John, abbot of the monasterie and church of Seynt Albone, ne his successours, as touchynge þe court of < þe > marchalsie, nor the clerk of the market, nor touchynge .xij. c . < li. to be > deducte and contynuelly reteigned in the hondis of the said John nowe abbot, and his successours. That is to sey, of every hole disme at eny time here aftir by the clergie to be graunted, .xl.li. And of every half disme, .xx.li. And soo fro tyme to tyme, till þat the seid nowe abbot, and his < said > successours, be fully content and satisfied by waye of retayn of the seid summe of .xij. c li. And alsoo þat the seid acte hurte not ne be prejudiciall to the seid nowe abbot, ne his successours, as touchynge the confirmacion made by us to John late abbot of the seid monasterie, predecessour to the seid nowe abbot, and his successours, of the priorye of Pembroke in Southwales, the which priory they had of the yifte and graunt of the noble prince Humfrey late duke of Gloucestr'. And these premisses be for the content and recompense for divers and notable ornamentes of holi church, and juels of a grete valure < of your said suppliauntes, > that were in the possession of that noble prince Humfrey late duke of Gloucestr', on whos soule God have mercy; the which godes it pleasid us for to yeve and dispose to oure roiall colleges of oure Blissid Lady of Eton, and Seint Nicolas of Cambrigge. (fn. v-278-381-1) Provided also that this present act of resumption shall not be to the harm or prejudice of John, abbot of the monastery and church of St Alban, or his successors, as regards the court of the marshalsea, or the clerk of the market, or concerning £1,200 to be deducted and kept in the hands of the said John, now abbot, and his successors. That is to say, £40 of every whole tenth to be granted by the clergy at any time hereafter. And £20 of every half-tenth. And so on from time to time, until the said present abbot, and his successors, are in this manner fully contented and satisfied of the said sum of £1,200. And also that the said act shall not be to the harm or prejudice of the said present abbot, or his successors, as regards the confirmation made by us to John, late abbot of the said monastery, predecessor of the said present abbot, and his successors, of the priory of Pembroke in South Wales, which priory they had of the gift and grant of the noble prince Humphrey, late duke of Gloucester. And the foregoing are for the satisfaction and recompense of various notable ornaments of holy church, and jewels of great value belonging to your said suppliants, which were in the possession of that noble prince Humphrey, late duke of Gloucester, on whose soul God have mercy; which goods it pleased us to give and grant to our royal colleges of our Blessed Lady of Eton, and St Nicholas of Cambridge. (fn. v-278-381-1)
< Priour of Nostell in Yorkeshere. > The prior of Nostell in Yorkshire.
Provided alsoo, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall in eny wise to the priour and covent of the priorye of Seint Oswald of Nostell, in the diocise of York, nor to theire successours, of eny gift, graunt, confirmacion or ratificacion by us made to the seid priour and covent, and to their successours, of thospitall of Seint Nicolas in Pountfrett, with all manner londes, tenementes, fees, advousons, reversions, profitees, commoditees, rightes, and all oþer thynges to þe same hospitall belongyng or perteynynge. And that all yiftes, grauntes, confirmacions, ratificacions, lettres patentes by us made, and actes of parlementes had, of the premisses or of eny of theym, to or for the seid priour and covent, and to their successours, by what name or names so ever they be named in the same, be in their force and effect, this acte notwithstondyng: by the consideracion that we have resceyved to us and to oure heires dukes of Lancastre, landes and possessions to the yerly value of .xx. marcs, of the provision and ordenaunce of the seid priour and covent, and by auctorite of parlement, within the honour of Pountfrett aforsaid. Soo alwey that the ordenaunce and charges of the fundation of the seid hospitall be kept and supported at all tymes. Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the prior and convent of the priory of St Oswald of Nostell, in the diocese of York, or to their successors, with regard to any gift, grant, confirmation or ratification made by us to the said prior and convent, and to their successors, of the hospital of St Nicholas in Pontefract, with all manner of lands, tenements, fees, advowsons, reversions, profits, commodities, rights, and all other things belonging or pertaining to the same hospital. And that all gifts, grants, confirmations, ratifications, letters patent made by us, and acts of parliament, concerning the aforesaid or of any of them, to or for the said prior and convent, and to their successors, by whatever name or names they are called in them, remain in force and effect, notwithstanding this act: considering that we have received to us and to our heirs, dukes of Lancaster, lands and possessions to the yearly value of 20 marks, by the provision and ordinance of the said prior and convent, and by authority of parliament, within the honour of Pontefract aforesaid. Provided that the ordinance and charges of the foundation of the said hospital shall be kept and supported at all times.
< Abbott of Byland. > The abbot of Byland.
Provided alsoo, that where we by oure chartre endented, sealed under our seall of oure duchie of Lancastr', berynge date the .xx. day of March, the .xxiiij. yere of oure reigne, yaf and graunted, and by the same chartre confermed, to William, abbot of Byland, the manoir of Kilburne, with all þe appurtenaunces, in the shire of York; to have and to hold the same manoir, with the appurtenaunces, to þe seid abbot and his successours for evermore, yildyng to us and our heires dukes of Lancastr' .xvi.li. yerly, of the which .xvi.li. thanne of the issues of the same manoir, yerly to us was answered, and .v.li. over of encrese, yerly at the festes of Whytsonday and Seynt Martyn in wynter by even porcions, for all service seculer, as in the same chartre more plainli it apperith: that neithir the seid abbot ne his successours, in < or of the > seid manoir with [col. b] the appurtenaunces, ne eny parcell therof, be in any wise hurt ne prejudiced by this present acte of resumpcion. (fn. v-278-385-1) Provided also that where we by our charter indented, sealed under our seal of our duchy of Lancaster, dated 20 March, in the twenty-fourth year of our reign [1446], gave and granted, and confirmed by the same charter, to William, abbot of Byland, the manor of Kilburn with all the appurtenances in the county of York; to have and to hold the same manor with the appurtenances to the said abbot and his successors forever, yielding to us and our heirs, the dukes of Lancaster, £16 a year, which £16 from the issues of the same manor was yearly answered to us, with £5 increment, each year at Whitsun and Martinmas in equal portions, for all secular service, as appears more fully in the same charter: that neither the said abbot nor his successors, with regard to the said manor with [col. b] the appurtenances, or any part of them, are in any way harmed or prejudiced by this present act of resumption. (fn. v-278-385-1)
< Pryor of the Blessed Trynyte at Yorke. > The prior of the Blessed Trinity at York.
Provided alsoo, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall in enywise to the priour and covent of the Holi Trinite of York, ne to theire successours, of eny graunte by us at eny tyme made to the late priour and covent of the seid place, and to theire successours, of the kepynge of the hospitall of Seynt Nicolas of York, and of Scardeburgh, or eithir of hem, in what wise or maner they be named in eny of our seid grauntes; which grauntes were made in recompense by weye of eschaunge. So alwaye that the charges, as in fyndynge of pore men and othirwise, aftir þentent of the fundacion, be kepte and observed in both hospitalles. (fn. v-278-387-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the prior and convent of the Holy Trinity of York, or to their successors, with regard to any grant by us at any time made to the late prior and convent of the said place, and to their successors, of the custody of the hospital of St Nicholas of York, and of Scarborough, or either of them, by whatever name they are called in any of our said grants; which grants were made in recompense by way of exchange. Provided that the charges, as in supporting poor men and otherwise, according to the intention of the foundation, are kept and observed in both hospitals. (fn. v-278-387-1)
< Abbott of Seint Augustynes beside Canterbury. > The abbot of St Augustine's near Canterbury.
Provided alsoo, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny graunte or grauntes, pardon or pardons, confirmacions or declaracions of eny fraunchises or libertees, by us or eny of oure noble progenitours graunted to the abbot and covent, and successours, of the monasterie of Seynt Austyns beside Caunterbury. So alwey that it extende not to a relesse made by us of a feferme of .c. s. for the ferme of the hundred of Downehamford, Blengate and Ryngesse. (fn. v-278-389-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or grants, pardon or pardons, confirmations or declarations of any franchises or liberties, granted by us or any of our noble progenitors to the abbot and convent, and successors, of the monastery of St Augustine near Canterbury. Provided that it shall not extend to a release made by us of a fee-farm of 100s., for the farm of the hundred of Downhamford, Blengate and Ringslow. (fn. v-278-389-1)
< Abbott of Collchester. > The abbot of Colchester.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion be not prejudiciall nor extende to William Ardeley, abbot of the monasterie of Seint Johns of Colchestre, and to the covent of the same place, as for the lettres patentes made by us, where of the date is at Westm' the .xiij. day of May, the .xxxi. yere of oure reigne, unto the seid abbot and covent, by the name comprised in the same lettres patentes, of þe determinacion, limitacion and declaracion of the procinte of certeyn libertees to the predecessours of the seid abbot and covent by oure full noble progenitours graunted, and by us confermed, which is not prejudiciall ner hurt to us, but be effectuell and of such force, as the mater comprised in the same lettres patentes purporteth, notwithstondyng this present acte. Soo alwey that þer passe noo newe fraunchise or liberte þerby. (fn. v-278-391-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not be prejudicial or extend to William Ardeley, abbot of the monastery of St John of Colchester, and to the convent of the same place, with regard to the letters patent made by us, dated at Westminster on 13 May, in the thirty-first year of our reign [1453], to the said abbot and convent, by the name contained in the same letters patent, concerning the establishment, specification and statement of the extent of certain liberties granted to the predecessors of the said abbot and convent by our most noble progenitors, and confirmed by us, which is not prejudicial or damaging to us, but shall remain effectual and of the force intended by the matter contained in the same letters patent, notwithstanding this present act. Provided that no new liberty or franchise is confirmed thereby. (fn. v-278-391-1)
< Abbott of Abyndon. > The abbot of Abingdon.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall to William, abbot of the monastery of Oure Ladye of Abyndon and the covent of the same place, nor to their successours, of eny graunt made by us by oure lettres patentes, of .xx. ti bukkes and doous, to be had in certayn places by wey of eschaunge, in recompense for the tithe veneson in the forest of Wyndesore, and the parkes within the same, as it apperith in the same lettres patentes; the which tithes the predecessours of the seid abbot and covent had of the graunt of oure noble progenitour, that is to say, Henry the first aftir þe conquest. (fn. v-278-393-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to William, abbot of the monastery of Our Lady of Abingdon, and the convent of the same place, or to their successors, with regard to any grant made by us by our letters patent of twenty bucks and does, to be had in certain places by way of exchange, in recompense for the tithe of venison in the forest of Windsor and the parks within the same, as appears in the same letters patent; which tithes the predecessors of the said abbot and convent had of the grant of our noble progenitor, that is to say, Henry, the first since the conquest. (fn. v-278-393-1)
< Abbott of Tewkesbury. > The abbot of Tewkesbury.
Provided alsoo, that this act of resumpcion extende not nor in enywise be prejudiciall unto the abbot and covent of Teukesbury, nor their successours, in or of the priorie of Goldclyff in the march of Wales, with the members and appurtenaunces, by us unto theym late graunted; but that the same graunt, and our lettres patentes to theym theruppon made, be good and effectuell unto theym, aftir the purport and tenour of the same, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-395-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the abbot and convent of Tewkesbury, or their successors, with regard to the priory of Goldcliff in the march of Wales with the members and appurtenances, lately granted by us to them; but that the same grant, and our letters patent made to them thereon, shall be good and effectual to them, according to their purport and tenor, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-395-1)
< Pryory of Seint John at Pountefrect. > The priory of St John at Pontefract.
Provided alsoo, that this acte of resumpcion extende hym not nor be prejudiciall to the priour and covent of the priorye of Seint John thappostyll and evaungelist of Pountfrett, in the diocese of York, which is < of oure patronage > by reason of oure duchie of Lancastre, duryng the naturall liff of Nicoll Hall, nowe priour of the seid priorye, as for eny graunt made by us to the seid priour and covent, and theire successours, of the advouson and patronage of the deanry of the free chapell of Seint Clement, within our castell of Pountfret, which late belonged to oure patronage by reason of our [p. v-308][col. a] duchie beforseid; nor to any graunt made by us to the same priour and covent, and theire successours, of the deanry beforseid, with all the londes, tenementes, advousons, vicaries, installacions, dismes, oblacions, obvencions, porcions, pensions, and all oþer rightes, profittes and commoditees to the same deanry belongynge or perteynyng, to have immediatly after the seasyng or disease of maister John Lathum clerk, havynge the seid deanry, with the seid londes, tenementes, advousons, vicaries, installacions, dismes, oblacions, obvencions, porcions, pensions, and othir rightes, profittes and commoditees, to the seid deanry belongyng or perteynyng, of oure graunt for terme of his liff; by the consideracion that the seid chapell, among othir thyngs, in the first fundacion of the seid priorie, under certeyn fourme of wordes were confermed < to > the predecessours of the seid priour and covent. And alsoo by the consideracion of the grete and < importable expenses and chargez, which > þe same priour and covent have susteyned and dayly susteyn, in kepynge of hospitalitee, and in byldyng of theire possessions, notwithstondyng the grete diminution < of > the yerly value of theire londes and tenementes adjoinyng to the waters of Caldre and Ayre, in the counte of York, by the inundacions and effluentes of the same waters. And howe that the blissyd and holy erle, Thomas late erle of Lancastre, oure dere and nygh cosyn, is honorable tumylat and restyng within the priory of Seint John thappostill aforseid, to the honour and worshupp of God, pleasir and comfort of us; and howe þeris no propre mansion nor habitacion belongyng to the seid deanrye, the which hath caused divers and mony deans of the seid place in tyme passyd to be absent, and litill or nought reseaunt uppon the seid deanry, to the grete anyentesyng of divine service there: and that the seid priory is in the seid towne of Pountfrette, nygh adjoinyng to the seid castell, and noo persone perpetuell in the seid towne of Pountfrett, so convenient and expedient dayly to susteyne and kepe divine service in the seid deanry, to the honour and plesure of God, as the priour of the seid priory for the tyme beynge is. (fn. v-278-397-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to the prior and convent of the priory of St John the Apostle and Evangelist of Pontefract, in the diocese of York, which is of our patronage by reason of our duchy of Lancaster, during the natural life of Nicholas Hall, now prior of the said priory, with regard to any grant made by us to the said prior and convent, and their successors, of the advowson and patronage of the deanery of the free chapel of St Clement within our castle of Pontefract, which lately belonged to our patronage by reason of our [p. v-308][col. a] aforesaid duchy; or to any grant made by us to the same prior and convent, and their successors, of the aforesaid deanery, with all the lands, tenements, advowsons, vicarages, installations, tithes, oblations, fees, portions, pensions, and all other rights, profits and commodities belonging or pertaining to the same deanery, to have immediately after the resignation or death of Master John Lathum, clerk, who has the said deanery, with the said lands, tenements, advowsons, vicarages, installations, tithes, oblations, fees, portions, pensions, and other rights, profits and commodities, belonging or pertaining to the said deanery, of our grant for term of his life; considering that the said chapel, among other things, in the first foundation of the said priory, under a certain form of words, was confirmed to the predecessors of the said prior and convent. And also considering the great and intolerable expenses and charges which the same prior and convent have sustained and daily sustain, in giving hospitality and in maintaining their possessions, notwithstanding the great diminution of the yearly value of their lands and tenements beside the rivers Calder and Aire, in the county of York, by the inundation and flooding of the same rivers. And how the blessed and holy earl, Thomas, late earl of Lancaster, our dear and close cousin, is honourably entombed and resting within the priory of St John the Apostle aforesaid, to the honour and worship of God, the pleasure and comfort of us; and how there is no proper house or habitation belonging to the said deanery, which has caused many different deans of the said place in time past to be absent, and rarely or never resident in the same deanery, to the great injury of divine service there: and that the said priory is in the said town of Pontefract, close to the said castle, and there is no perpetual parson in the said town of Pontefract so convenient and suitable to sustain and keep daily divine service in the said deanery, to the honour and pleasure of God, as the prior of the said priory at the time. (fn. v-278-397-1)
< Abbesse of Seint Saveour, etc. > The abbess of St Saviour, etc. [at Syon].
Provided alsoo, that this peticion, ordenaunce or acte of resumpcion extende not nor in eny wise be prejudiciall to eny lettres patentes, graunte or grauntes, ratificacion, confirmacion, reformacion or relesse, by us made, or by eny othir persone or persones at our request, by eny lettres patentes, by auctorite of eny parlement, or in eny oþerwise, to the abbesse and covent of our monastery of Seint Saveour, and Seintes Marie the Virgyne and Brigitte of Syon, of the ordre of Seint Austyn, of Seint Saveour called in the counte of Midd', or to their predecessours or successours, or to eny oþer persone or persones to theire use, or to eny of theym, in or of eny priories, lordshuppes, maners, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions, services, feefermes, medewes, pastures, woodes, annuytees, corrodies, pensions, porcions, apportes, knyghtes fees, advousons of churches, and of othir benefices of holi church, or in or of eny othir possessions or thynges what so ever they ben, or of eny of theire appurtenaunces, in eny maner wyse: considerynge that the seid abbesse and covent have noon othir of the premisses of oure graunt, ratificacion or confirmacion, butte oonly such as were assigned unto theym by oure fader of blissid memorie their founder, and were graunted unto us by the feffees of oure seid noble fadir of truste, to the use of the seid abbesse and covent: consideryng alsoo that we were never answered of eny issuez, profittes, or othir yerly avayle temporell of eny of the premisses, sith the first day of oure reigne. (fn. v-278-399-1) Provided also that this petition, ordinance or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to any letters patent, grant or grants, ratification, confirmation, reformulation or release, made by us, or by any other person or persons at our request, by any letters patent, by authority of any parliament, or in any other way, to the abbess and convent of our monastery of St Saviour and St Mary the Virgin and St Bridget of Syon, of the order of St Augustine called of St Saviour in the county of Middlesex, or to their predecessors or successors, or to any other person or persons to their use, or to any of them, in or of any priories, lordships, manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions, services, fee-farms, meadows, pastures, woods, annuities, corrodies, pensions, portions, proceeds, knights' fees, advowsons of churches, and of other benefices of holy church, or in or of any other possessions or things whatever they are, or of any of their appurtenances, in any way: considering that the said abbess and convent have nothing of the aforesaid by our grant, ratification or confirmation, but only those things which were assigned to them by our father of blessed memory their founder, and were granted to us by the feoffees of our said noble father in trust, to the use of the said abbess and convent: considering also that we were never answered for any temporal issues, profits or other yearly proceeds from any of the foregoing, since the first day of our reign. (fn. v-278-399-1)
< Abbott of Selby. > The abbot of Selby.
Provided < alsoo, þat þis act or ordenaunce of resumpcion > extende not ne be prejudiciall to the abbot and covent of the monasterye of Seint Germayne of [col. b] Selby, in the diocise of York, durynge the liff of the abbot that nowe is, of or for eny graunte or lettres patentes of exoneration or acquitaill unto hem made of eny dismes or subsidies above the summe of .xv.li. aftir the taxe or quantite of an hole disme, graunted or to be graunted in the province of Caunterbury; and above the summe of .xxv.li. aftir the taxe or quantite of an hole disme, graunted or to be graunted in the province of York; and aftir the rate and quantite of hem more or lesse: butte that the grauntes or lettres patentes made to hem of or for the premisses, mowe stonde in her force, and so be utterly except and forprised out of this acte of resumpcion, durynge the liff of the seid abbot. (fn. v-278-401-1) Provided also that this act or ordinance of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to the abbot and convent of the monastery of St Germain of [col. b] Selby, in the diocese of York, during the life of the present abbot, with regard to any grant or letters patent of exoneration or acquittal made to them, of any tenths or subsidies above the sum of £15 according to the assessment or amount of a whole tenth, granted or to be granted in the province of Canterbury; and above the sum of £25 according to the assessment or amount of a whole tenth, granted or to be granted in the province of York; and so more or less, pro rata: but that the grants or letters patent made to them of or for the foregoing may remain in force, and so be completely excepted and excluded from this act of resumption, during the life of the said abbot. (fn. v-278-401-1)
[memb. 10]
< Duke, marquis, erle, viscount, etc. > Duke, marquis, earl, viscount, etc.
Provided alsoo, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion and adnullacion extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny duke, markes, erle or viscount of this realme, nor to the heires of eny of theym, of eny graunt or grauntes made to theym or eny of theym by us, of or for their astate, creacion or ereccion into the estate of duke, markes, erle or viscount, ne to their preemynence, place or setez in the high court of parlement or els where; ne be prejudiciall to the annuell fees graunted to theym or to eny of theym by us, in sustentacion of their grettest astate, with that his or their fees so graunted excede not the fees accustumed of his or their grettist estate: that is to sey, to a duke .xl.li. to a markes, .xxxv.li. to an erle, .xx.li. to a viscount, .xx. marcs. Forseyn alweys, if eny of the estates aforseid have ben creat or erectyd to .ij. or .iij. estates, that the graunte or grauntes made to theym or eny of theym of eny annuell fee for sustentacion of their lasse estate and estates, be voyde and of noo force. (fn. v-278-403-1) Provided also that this petition or act of resumption and annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial to any duke, marquis, earl or viscount of this realm, or to the heirs of any of them, with regard to any grant or grants made to them or any of them by us, of or for their estate, creation or promotion to the estate of duke, marquis, earl or viscount, or to their pre-eminence, place or seats in the high court of parliament or elsewhere; or be prejudicial to the annual fees granted to them or to any of them by us to support their highest title, provided that his or their fees thus granted do not exceed the fees customary for his or their highest title: that is to say, to a duke £40, to a marquis £35, to an earl £20, to a viscount 20 marks. Provided always that if any of the estates aforesaid have been created or promoted to two or three estates, that the grant or grants made to them or any of them of any annual fee for the sustenance of their lesser estate and estates, shall be void and of no force. (fn. v-278-403-1)
< Humfrey duke of Buckingham. > Humphrey, duke of Buckingham.
Provided alsoo, that this acte of resumpcion ne noo thyng in hit conteyned be prejudiciall ner hurte to Humfrey duke of Bukyngham, late capitayn of the toun and castell of Caleys, and of the toure of Riesbanke, as to or for an acte made for hym in our parlement holden and be gonne at Westm' the .vi. day of Novembre, in the yere of oure reigne .xxviij., and ended at Leycestre, as for unto his payment and contentacion of such summe and dewtees as then were or shuld be due or belongyng to hym, for the arrerages of the wages and rewardes of hym, his lyeutenaunts and soudeours, late entendynge for the saufgarde of the same toun, castell and toure, by all the tyme that the seid duke stode capitayn, as in the seid acte more pleynli is conteyned. (fn. v-278-405-1) And that the same duke and his executours have, take, perceyve and enjoy all maner of custumes and subsidies, commyng or growyng of all maner goodes and merchaundise what soo ever they be, which shall come into the porte of Sandewich, < and in > all othir places to the same port belongyng, there to put on londe, or to passe out of the same over the see by weye of marchandise, by the handes of the custumers and collectours of the same custumes and subsidies in the seid porte of Sandewich for the tyme beynge. And oon of theym to be named by the seid duke, and chargeable to hym accordyng to the seid acte of .xxviij. ti yere aboveseid, to the seid duke and his executours be fully payed and content of asmych of the seid summe and dewtees, as is to hym, his seid lyeutenaunts and soudeours dewe, not payed nor content. (fn. v-278-405-2) Provided also that this act of resumption and anything contained in it shall not be prejudicial or harmful to Humphrey, duke of Buckingham, late captain of the town and castle of Calais, and of the tower of Rysbank, with regard to an act made for him in our parliament held and begun at Westminster on 6 November, in the twenty-eighth year of our reign [1449], and ending at Leicester, concerning his payment and satisfaction of such a sum and dues as then were or should be due or belong to him, for the arrears of the wages and rewards of him, his deputies and soldiers, lately intended for the safeguard of the same town, castle and tower, for all the time that the said duke was captain, as is more fully contained in the said act. (fn. v-278-405-1) And that the same duke and his executors shall have, take, receive and enjoy all manner of customs and subsidies, coming or growing from all manner of goods and merchandise whatever they be, which shall come into the port of Sandwich and all other places belonging to the same port, to be landed there, or exported overseas by way of trade, by the hands of the customers and collectors of the same customs and subsidies in the said port of Sandwich at the time. And one of them to be appointed by the said duke, and answerable to him according to the said act of the twenty-eighth year abovesaid, to ensure that the said duke and his executors are fully paid and satisfied for as much of the said sum and dues as is owed to him, his said deputies and soldiers, and has not been paid or settled. (fn. v-278-405-2)
< For the same. > For the same.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Humfrey duc of Buk, nor to Humfrey nowe eldest soone and heire apparant of the seid duc, durynge the liff of eithir of theym oonly, of þoffice of constablery of oure castell of Dovorr, and of the kepynge of oure fyve portes; which office and kepynge we graunted and confermed to the seid duc, and to the heires males of his bodye begoten, by our lettres patentes beryng date at Westm' þe .xij. [p. v-309][col. a] daye of Juyn, the yere of oure reigne .xxix. ti ; nor to eny graunt made by us to the seid duc, by the same lettres patentes, of eny summes of money to be takyn in the seid office, aswell for sustentacion of hymsilf, as of preestes, servauntes, officers, wacchemen, and artificers there abidynge: butte that oure seid lettres patentes, duryng the lyves of the seid duke and Humfrey his seid sone and heire apparant, and of eithir of theym lenger lyvyng oonly, be and stond to theym and eythir of theym goode and effectuell; the seid acte of resumpcion or eny thynge þerin conteynid notwithstondynge. Alsoo that this acte extende not ne be prejudiciall to a graunt made by us by oure lettres patentes to the seid duke of Buk, and to his heires, of the game of wyld bestes in the haye of Hatfeld, within our forest of Waltham in the shire of Essex; of which haye, the soile and all ye wode, pannage and herbage of the same, was þenheritaunce of the seid duc the tyme of oure seid graunt, and afore. (fn. v-278-407-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Humphrey, duke of Buckingham, or to Humphrey now the eldest son and heir apparent of the said duke, during the life of either of them only, with regard to the office of the constableship of our castle of Dover, and the custody of our Cinque Ports; which office and custody we granted and confirmed to the said duke, and to the heirs male of his body, by our letters patent dated at Westminster, 12 [p. v-309][col. a] June, in the twenty-ninth year of our reign [1451]; or with regard to any grant made by us to the said duke, by the same letters patent, of any sums of money to be taken in the said office, for the support of himself, as well as of the priests, servants, officers, watchmen and artificers abiding there: but that our said letters patent shall only be and remain good and effectual to the said duke and Humphrey his said son and heir apparent in survivorship; notwithstanding the said act of resumption or any thing contained therein. Also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to a grant made by us by our letters patent to the said duke of Buckingham and to his heirs, of the hunting of wild beasts in the hay of Hatfield, within our forest of Waltham in the county of Essex; which hay, the soil and all the wood, pannage and herbage of the same, were the inheritance of the said duke at the time of our said grant, and before. (fn. v-278-407-1)
< Patronage and advouson of the deanry of Stafford. > The patronage and advowson of the deanery of Stafford.
And also, that this acte extende not in any wise to a graunt made by us to þe seid duc, and to the heires of his bodye commyng, of the patronage, advouson and collacion of the deanry of the free chapell of Stafford; which graunt was made by us to the seid duc, in and for recompence of the patronage of the priorye of Wawenswotton in the shire of Warr', graunted to us and to our heires by the seid duc. Ne that hit extende not < in anywise to a graunt > made by us to the seid duc and to his heires, of the maners of Pensherst, Enesfeld and Bayhalle, with þappurtenauncez in the countee of Kent, and þeavouson of the chaunterie within the seid maner of Pensherst, and of all the landes and tenementes, rentes, reversions and services, with þappurtenaunces, in Pensherst, Enesfeld, Haweden, Sopham, Bayhall and Hareden in the seid countee of Kent, which were late Humfrey duc of Gloucestr', with knyghtes fees, courts, libertees and fraunchises to the same maners, londes and tenementes or to any of theym in any wise belongyng; which aftir the deceasse of the said duc of Gloucestr' were graunted by us to the seid duke of Buk, in and for recompense of the patronage of the chirch of Fordyngbrigge, by hym graunted to us and to oure heires: butte þat oure lettres patentes by us made to the seid duc of Buk of the premisses, and every of theym, stond goode and effectuell, and availlable to the same duk of Buk, and to his heires, aftir þe tenour and purport of the same; this acte notwithstondyng. And also that this act shall not extend in any way to a grant made by us to the said duke, and to the heirs of his body, with regard to the patronage, advowson and collation of the deanery of the free chapel of Stafford; which grant was made by us to the said duke, in and as compensation for the patronage of the priory of Wootton Wawen in the county of Warwick, granted to us and to our heirs by the said duke. Nor that it extend in any way to a grant made by us to the said duke and to his heirs of the manors of Penshurst, Ensfield and Bayhall with the appurtenances in the county of Kent, and the advowson of the chantry within the said manor of Penshurst, and of all the lands and tenements, rents, reversions and services, with the appurtenances, in Penshurst, Ensfield, Havenden Court, Sopham, Bayhall and Hardon in the said county of Kent, which belonged to the late Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, with the knights' fees, courts, liberties and franchises belonging in any way to the same manors, lands and tenements, or to any of them; which, after the death of the said duke of Gloucester, were granted by us to the said duke of Buckingham, in and for recompense of the patronage of the church of Fordingbridge, granted by him to us and to our heirs: but that our letters patent made by us to the said duke of Buckingham of the foregoing, and each of them, shall remain good and effectual, and valid for the same duke of Buckingham and his heirs, according to their tenor and purport; notwithstanding this act.
< Edmond erle of Richemond. Jasper erle of Pembroke. > Edmund, earl of Richmond. Jasper earl of Pembroke.
Provided alsoo and forseyn, that this acte of resumpcion, neithir noon othir acte made in this present parlement, hurte not neithir in eny wise be prejudiciall to Edmond erle of Richemond, and Jasper erle of Pembroke, neithir to noon of theym, of or to eny gifte or graunte of eny thynge unto theym and to theire heires of their bodies begoten, or to eithir of theym, and to the heires of his bodie begoten, or to theym or eithir of theym, and to < þeir > heires male of < þeir bodies begoten, > or to eny of theym, and to his heires male of his bodye begoten, by us by oure lettres patentes, acte of parlement or oþerwise, by what summe ever name or names they or eithir of theym be named or callid in the seid lettres patentes or act; neithir to noon othir gift or graunte so made unto theym by us, or eithir of theym, severally or joyntly, in fee symple, as longe as they or eithir of theym hath or shall have issue male of his bodie lawefully begotyn: soo alwey that Richard erle of Salisbury be not in eny wise by force or colour of this purvieu or excepcion hurt in or of eny graunte by us to hym made. Savynge also, that the graunt made by us of the place at Baynardes Castell, late bildyd by oure uncle the duke of Gloucestr', be not comprised within this excepcion or provision. (fn. v-278-411-1) Provided also and on condition that this act of resumption and any other act made in this present parliament shall not harm or be prejudicial in any way to Edmund, earl of Richmond, and Jasper, earl of Pembroke, or to either of them, with regard to any gift or grant of anything to them and to the heirs of their bodies, or to either of them, and to the heirs of his body, or to them or either of them, and to their heirs male of their bodies, or to any of them, and to his heirs male of his body, [made] by us by our letters patent, act of parliament or otherwise, by whatever name or names they or either of them are named or called in the said letters patent or act; or to any other gift or grant thus made by us to them, or either of them, individually or jointly, in fee-simple, as long as they or either of them has or shall have male issue lawfully begotten of his body: provided that Richard, earl of Salisbury, shall not be harmed in any way by force or on the strength of this proviso or exception, in or of any grant made to him by us. Saving also that the grant made by us of the place at Baynard's Castle, lately built by our uncle the duke of Gloucester, shall not be included in this exception or proviso. (fn. v-278-411-1)
[col. b]
< Richard erle of Warwik. > Richard, earl of Warwick.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not unto the hurte or prejudice of Richard erle of Warwyk, and Anne his wiff, or to the heires of the same Anne, of eny graunt or grauntes by us to Henry late duk of Warrewik, brothir of the same Anne, whos heir she is, and to the heires of the same Henry made, of the manour of Barton of Brystowe, or of the hundred of Barton of Bristowe, with þappurtenaunces, within the shire of Gloucestr'; or of reversion of two parties of the castelx, lordships, maners, londes and tenementes, with þeir appurtenaunces, within the forest of Dean in the seid shire, the which Rauff Botiller, knyght, and John Beauchamp, knyght, hold terme of theire lyves of oure graunte; ne of the þrid part of all the same castelx, lordshuppes, maners, londes and tenementes, with theire appurtenaunces, the which Richard Wydevile, knyght, and Jaquette duchesse of Bedford, the wiff of the same Richard, hold in dower, terme of the liff of the same duchesse. (fn. v-278-413-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend to the harm or prejudice of Richard, earl of Warwick, and Anne his wife, or to the heirs of the same Anne, with regard to any grant or grants made by us to Henry, late duke of Warwick, brother of the same Anne, whose heir she is, and to the heirs of the same Henry, of the manor of Barton by Bristol, or of the hundred of Barton by Bristol with the appurtenances, within the county of Gloucester; or of the reversion of two parts of the castles, lordships, manors, lands and tenements with their appurtenances, within the forest of Dean in the said county, which Ralph Butler, knight, and John Beauchamp, knight, hold for term of their lives by our grant; or of the third part of all the same castles, lordships, manors, lands and tenements with their appurtenances, which Richard Woodville, knight, and Jacquetta, duchess of Bedford, the wife of the same Richard, hold in dower, for term of the life of the same duchess. (fn. v-278-413-1)
< For the same. > For the same.
Provided also, that this present acte of resumpcion be not prejudiciall ne in derogacion nor hurte to oure welbelovyd and trewe cosyn Richard erle of Warwik, of eny thynge comprised in a certeyn indenture, by the which we, of thadvice and assent of oure grete counseill, the .iiij. th day of August, the yere of oure reigne .xxxiij., have retayned oure seid cosyn toward us capitayn of oure towne and castell of Caleys, and of oure toure of Rysebank, and oure lieutenaunt in the marches there, in manere and fourme in the seid endenture more playnly < specified; > ne of eny thyng comprised in oure lettres patentes, made þerof to oure seid cosyn the .xiij. day of August, the yere aboveseid. (fn. v-278-415-1) Provided also that this present act of resumption shall not be prejudicial, detrimental or harmful to our well-beloved and true cousin Richard, earl of Warwick, with regard to anything contained in a certain indenture, by which we, by the advice and assent of our great council, on 4 August, in the thirty-third year of our reign [1455], have retained our said cousin as captain of our town and castle of Calais, and of our tower of Rysbank, and our deputy in the marches there, in the manner and form more fully specified in the said indenture; or of anything contained in our letters patent made thereof to our said cousin on 13 August, in the abovesaid year. (fn. v-278-415-1)
< Richard erle of Salesbury. > Richard, earl of Salisbury.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall unto Richard erle of Salisbury, of or to eny graunte or grauntes to hym by us made, ne of or to eny graunt or grauntes to hym and Alice his wiff by us made. Savynge and reservynge unto us the castell and town of Rychemond, and the feeferme of the same towne; and also the offices of justice, and justice in eyre, and keper of oure forests beyonde Trent, aftir the decesse of the seid erle, and of Richard erle of Warrewyk, sone to the seid erle of Salisbury: and also reserved and except to us, .iiij. xx li. of the feeferme of oure citee of Karlile. (fn. v-278-417-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Richard, earl of Salisbury, with regard to any grant or grants made to him by us, with regard to any grant or grants to him and Alice his wife made by us. Saving and reserving to us the castle and town of Richmond and the fee-farm of the same town; and also the offices of justice, and justice in eyre, and keeper of our forests beyond Trent, after the death of the said earl and of Richard, earl of Warwick, son of the said earl of Salisbury: and also reserved and excepted to us, £80 of the fee-farm of our city of Carlisle. (fn. v-278-417-1)
< John erle of Shrewesbury. > John, earl of Shrewsbury.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to John nowe erle of Shrouesbury, ner to his heires males of his bodye begoten, of ner for eny graunt or grauntes by us unto John late erle of Shrouesbury, and to his heires males of his bodie begotyn, fader to the seid John nowe erle, whos heire he is, by oure lettres patentes of the name of therle of Waterforde, with the stile, title and honour of the same, ner of therldom of the same, ner of none othir thynge by us to þe seid late erle yovyn, graunted or confermed by our seid lettres patentes to hym, and to his heires males of his bodye lawefully begoten, within our lond of Irlond. (fn. v-278-419-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to John, now earl of Shrewsbury, or to his heirs male of his body, with regard to any grant or grants made by us to John, late earl of Shrewsbury, and to his heirs male of his body, father to the said John, now earl, whose heir he is, by our letters patent of the name of earl of Waterford, with the style, title and honour of the same, or of the earldom of the same, or of any other thing given, granted or confirmed by us to the said late earl by our said letters patent to him, and to his heirs male of his body lawfully begotten, within our land of Ireland. (fn. v-278-419-1)
< For the same. > For the same.
Provided also, þat this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny graunte or licence made or yoven by auctoritee of parlement, and oure lettres patentes, to John late erle of Shroesbury, or to his executours, for .mm.li. to hym due, parcell of gretter summes of money by hym expendyd in oure service, and by oure high commaundement. (fn. v-278-421-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or licence made or given by authority of parliament and our letters patent, to John, late earl of Shrewsbury, or to his executors, for £2,000 due to him, part of a larger sum of money spent by him in our service and by our high command. (fn. v-278-421-1)
< James erle of Wilteshere. > James, earl of Wiltshire.
Provided also, that this present acte of parlement extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny graunte made by us to James erle of Wiltes', for terme of his lyf, of the offices of shirrefwyk of Carmarthyn and Cardygan in Southwales, with the fees and wages of olde tyme due and accustumed. (fn. v-278-423-1) Provided also that this present act of parliament shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant made by us to James, earl of Wiltshire, for term of his life, of the offices of the shrievalty of Carmarthen and Cardigan in South Wales, with the traditional and customary fees and wages. (fn. v-278-423-1)
[p. v-310]
[col. a]
< James erle of Douglas. > James, earl of Douglas.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion, revocacion or adnullacion extende not ne be prejudiciall to eny graunte or grauntes, by us by oure lettres patentes to James erle of Douglas made. (fn. v-278-425-1) Provided also that this act of resumption, revocation or annulment, shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or grants made by us by our letters patent to James, earl of Douglas. (fn. v-278-425-1)
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall in eny thyng to Robert Hungerford lorde Moleyns, and to Alianore his wyf, whiche Robert is nowe in the hondes of our adversarye in Fraunce, of eny graunte or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, made by us unto hym and to the said Alianore, and to theire heires, of tho .xij.li. yerely, whiche oon Symond, son and heire of Richard Combe, owed of the ferme of all the londes and tenementes, whiche Harry Caudan helde in Fetilton in the shire of Wiltshire; nor of eny graunte or grauntes, confirmacion or of confirmacions, by us made unto the said Robert, of tho .x.li. yerely to be taken durynge his lyf at Chestre, by the hondes of our chamberleyn there for the tyme beyng, of the issues, profittes and commoditees, commyng of our counte there. For the whiche annuitees, the said Robert and Alianore yaven and graunted divers londes, tenementes and rentes in Eton and Newe Wyndesore, with divers medewes and pastures within the parisshe of Eton aforesaid, and with almanere libertees and fraunchises to the said londes and tenementes in enywise apperteinyng or belongyng, atte our desire and contemplacion, unto us and unto our heires, to the use and profitte of our college roiall of Seint Marie of Eton. Howe be hit that in the lettres patentes by us made unto the said Robert and Alianore, and to their heires, of the said .xij.li. nouthir in eny of the lettres patentes by us made unto the same Robert terme of his lyf of the said .x.li. yerely, none expresse mencion is made of eny eschaunge or of recompense. (fn. v-278-427-1) [Robert, Lord Moleyns.]
Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any thing to Robert Hungerford, Lord Moleyns, and to Eleanor his wife, which Robert is now in the hands of our adversary of France, with regard to any grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, made by us to him and to the said Eleanor, and to their heirs, of the £12 a year which one Simon, son and heir of Richard Combe, owed for the farm of all the lands and tenements which Henry Caudan held in Fittleton in the county of Wiltshire; or of any grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, made by us to the said Robert of the £10 a year to be taken during his life at Chester, by the hands of our chamberlain there at the time, from the issues, profits and commodities coming from our county there. For which annuities the said Robert and Eleanor gave and granted various lands, tenements and rents in Eton and New Windsor, with various meadows and pastures within the parish of Eton aforesaid, and with all manner of liberties and franchises pertaining or belonging to the said lands and tenements in any way, at our desire and request, to us and to our heirs, to the use and profit of our royal college of St Mary of Eton. Albeit that in the letters patent made by us to the said Robert and Eleanor, and to their heirs, concerning the said £12, or in any of the letters patent made by us to the same Robert for term of his life, concerning the said £10 a year, no explicit mention is made of any exchange or compensation. (fn. v-278-427-1)
< Lord Fauconberge. > Lord Fauconberg.
Provided also, that our lettres patentes, beryng date the .xxv. day of Septembre, the yere of our reigne .xxx. ti , made to William Nevill, knyght, lord Faucombregge, keper of our castell of Rokesburgh, in the parties of Scotlond, of the somme of .mmmmcviij.li. .xviij. s. .x. d. q a ., unto him by us due of his wages for kepyng of our said castell, to be had and parceyved by him or by his attourney, in manere and fourme as in our said lettres patentes is plainly expressed and declared, be not by this acte of resumpcion hurte, prejudised, revoked ne adnulled, ne at [sic: read 'þat'] this said acte extende not therto: but that our said lettres patentes stond in strengtht and force, this < seid > acte or eny othir [...] notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-429-1) Provided also that our letters patent, dated 25 September, in the thirtieth year of our reign [1451], made to William Neville, knight, Lord Fauconberg, keeper of our castle of Roxburgh, in the regions of Scotland, of the sum of £4,108 18s. 10d. farthing which we owe him for his wages for keeping our said castle, to be had and received by him or by his attorney in the manner and form fully described and stated in our said letters patent, shall not be harmed, prejudiced, revoked or annulled by this act of resumption, and that this act shall not extend thereto: but that our said letters patent shall remain in strength and force, notwithstanding this said act or any other. (fn. v-278-429-1)
< Lord Sudeley. > Lord Sudeley.
Provided also and except, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not ne in enywise be prejudiciall to Rauf lord Sudeley, of or for eny graunte or grauntes by us to him made for terme of his lyf, of eny ferme of feeferme, or of eny office or offices, occupacion or occupacions, or kepyng of eny places, or oversight of eny game, by what name so evere he be called in the said graunte or grauntes; ne to the fees, wages or rewardes to the said Rauf by our said grauntes, be cause of the offices, occupacions, kepyng or oversight of eny of theym graunted: but that our said grauntes, and every of theym, be good and effectuell to the said Rauf, this acte or peticion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-431-1) Provided also and excepting, that this petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to Ralph, Lord Sudeley, with regard to any grant or grants made by us to him for term of his life, of any farm or fee-farm, or of any office or offices, responsibility or responsibilities, or the custody of any places, or supervision of any game, by whatever name he is called in the said grant or grants; or to the fees, wages or rewards granted to the said Ralph by our said grants, because of the offices, responsibilities, custody or supervision of any of them: but that our said grants, and each of them, shall be good and effectual to the said Ralph, notwithstanding this act or petition. (fn. v-278-431-1)
< Lord Welles. > Lord Welles.
Provided also, that the said acte of resumpcion extende not in eny wise to eny graunte made by us to Lyon Lord Welles, late our lyeftenaunt of our lond of Irlond, of .cxiij. marcs, to be taken yerely of the subsidie and ulnage of clothes put to sale, aswele within our countee and citee of York, and subbarbes of the same citee, as within our towne of Kyngeston uppon Hull, and the fraunchises of the same, and of half forfaitures of suche cloth put to sale, to suche tyme as the said Lyon were content for hym and his retenue of .ij. milleli. the whiche somme was due to hym by us at [col. b] the tyme of the said graunte, as it apperith by thaccomptes of the said Lyon, be him made before our tresorer and barons of our eschequer: but that the said graunte, so by us to the said Lyon made, stond good and effectuell, this said acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-433-1) Provided also that the said act of resumption shall not extend in any way to any grant made by us to Lionel, Lord Welles, lately our lieutenant of Ireland, of 113 marks, to be taken yearly from the subsidy and alnage of cloths put on sale within our county and city of York, and the suburbs of the same city, as well as within our town of Kingston upon Hull, and the franchises of the same, and of half the forfeitures of such cloth put on sale, until the said Lionel shall have been satisfied of £2,000 for him and his retinue, which sum we owed him at [col. b] the time of the said grant, as appears in the accounts of the said Lionel made by him before our treasurer and barons of our exchequer: but that the said grant thus made by us to the said Lionel shall remain good and effectual, notwithstanding this said act. (fn. v-278-433-1)
< John Beauchamp, knight of Powik. > John Beauchamp, knight, of Powick.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion or adnullacion extende not nor in eny thyng be prejudiciall unto our welbeloved knyght John Beauchamp of Powyk, nor to Richard < his son and > heire, for terme of their lyfes, of the office of chief justice in Southwales, with the fees < and wages > [...] therto of olde tyme due and accustumed; which office we graunted unto the said John and his heires males. Nor that the said acte be prejudiciall unto the said John, nor to the said Richard his sone, for terme of their lyfes, of thoffice of constablery of our castell of Gloucestre, with fees and wages therto of olde tyme due and accustumed; notwithstondyng that the graunte therof was made unto the said John in the lyf of our uncle Humfrey late duke of Glucestre, to have to hym and to his heires aftre the deth of our said uncle. Nor that the said acte in eny thyng be prejudiciall unto the said John, nor to Thomas his sone, of eny graunte or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, made by us unto theym for terme of their both lyfes, of the office of constablery of the castell of Ruthllan in Northwales, what so evere othir name [memb. 9] the said John, or Thomas, be named in our lettres patentes, with fees and wages therto of olde tyme due and accustumed: but that our graunte and grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, and lettres patentes, made by us of the said offices of chief justice in Suthwales, and constablery of our castell of Gloucestr', be and stond to the said John, and Richard his said sone, duryng the lyf of eythir of theym oonly, good and effectuell. And that also our said graunte and grauntes, confirmacion and confirmacions, made by us unto the said John, and Thomas, of the said office of constablery of the said castell of Ruthllan, be and stond unto theym and eithir of theym good and effectuell terme of their lyfes, this acte notwithstondyng. Provided also that this act of resumption or annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any thing to our well-beloved knight John Beauchamp of Powick, or to Richard his son and heir, for term of their lives, with regard to the office of chief justice in South Wales, with the traditional and customary fees and wages; which office we granted to the said John and his heirs male. Nor that the said act shall be prejudicial to the said John or to the said Richard his son, for term of their lives, with regard to the office of constable of our castle of Gloucester, with the traditional and customary fees and wages; notwithstanding that the grant of it was made to the said John in the lifetime of our uncle Humphrey, late duke of Gloucester, to have to him and to his heirs after the death of our said uncle. Nor that the said act shall be prejudicial in any respect to the said John or to Thomas his son, with regard to any grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, made by us to them for term of both their lives, of the office of constable of the castle of Rhuddlan in North Wales, by whatever other name [memb. 9] the said John or Thomas is called in our letters patent, with the traditional and customary fees and wages: but that our grant and grants, confirmation or confirmations, and letters patent made by us of the said offices of chief justice in South Wales and constable of our castle of Gloucester, shall be and remain good and effectual to the said John and Richard his said son, during the lifetime of either of them only. And that also our said grant and grants, confirmation and confirmations, made by us to the said John and Thomas of the said office of the constable of the said castle of Rhuddlan, shall be and remain good and effectual to them and either of them for term of their lives, notwithstanding this act.
< Richard Widevile. > Richard Woodville.
Provided also and forseyn, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to Richard Wydevill, knyght, and Jaquet his wyf, nor to eny of theym, duryng the lyf of the same Jaquet, of and for an annuell rent of .lxi.li. .xvij. d. graunted by our lettres patentes, yeven the .viij. day of Februar, the .xix. yere of our reigne, to the said Richard and Jaquet, terme of their lyfes. That is to say, of the maner of Gretton in the counte of Norhampton .xxv.li. of a mese, .xvi. yarde londe, .xvi. acres of medewe, .xix. s. in Watford in the same counte, and of the ferme, issues, profittes and revenuez growyng of all thassertis, wastes, purprestures, and small parcelles of the forest of Rokyngham, betwene the brigges of Staunford, and the yates of Oxonford, .xvi.li. .xvij. d. in the said lettres specified, the whiche annuell rent of .lxi.li. .xvij. d. by our lettres patentes, beryng date the .xviij. day of Juyn, the .xviij. yere of our reigne, was graunted to the said Richard and Jaquet, terme of lyf of the same Jaquet, with this clause of provision in the said lettres conteyned: that the same Richard and Jaquet, from every title, exaction and demaunde, by reason of eny dower to her belongyng aftre the deth of John late duke of Bedford, of and in the townes, maners, londes, tenementes, in Shylbotley, Gysyns, Renyngton, ball' of Beuley, Fairdon, Prudhowe, Hedley, Ovyngham, Whelpyngton, Ingowe, Horsley, Harlowe, Brytteley, Baronesford, the issues of the bailleswyk of the barony of Ovyngham, and the warde of the castell of Prudhowe, in the counte of Northumbr', ayenst us, our heires and our assignees, pleynerly shuld ben excluded. The whiche lettres, yeven the said .xviij. day, were restored into our chauncery, there to be cancelled the said .viij. day of [p. v-311][col. a] Feverer, to the entent that wee the said annuell rent of .lxi.li. .xvij. d. shuld graunte to the said Richard and Jaquet, for terme of bothe their lyves; and that our said graunte made to the said Richard and Jaquet the said .viij. day, be good and effectuell to theym, duryng the lyf oonly of the said Jaquet, the restitucion of the said lettres patentes yeven by us the said .viij. day, and the acceptacion of the said Richard and Jaquet of the said lettres patentes made to theym of that rent the said .viij. day of Feverer, notwithstondyng. And that this excepcion and provision be good and effectuell, by what manere name the said Richard and Jaquet, or eny of these premisses, be named or specified in the said lettres patentes beryng date the said .viij. day of Feverer, and all thynges specified in the same touchyng these premisses or eny of theym, duryng the lyf of the said Jaquette, be forqe prised and except out of this acte of resumpcion. Provided also and on condition that this petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Richard Woodville, knight, and Jacquetta his wife, or to either of them, during the lifetime of the same Jacquetta, with regard to an annual rent of £61 17d. granted by our letters patent, given on 8 February, in the nineteenth year of our reign [1441], to the said Richard and Jacquetta, for term of their lives. That is to say, from the manor of Gretton in the county of Northampton £25, from a messuage, sixteen yardlands, sixteen acres of meadow, 19s. in Watford in the same county, and from the farm, issues, profits and revenues growing from all the assarts, wastes, purprestures and enclosures of the forest of Rockingham, between the bridges of Stamford and the gates of Oxford, £16 17d. specified in the said letters, which annual rent of £61 17d. by our letters patent, dated 18 June, in the eighteenth year of our reign [1440], was granted to the said Richard and Jacquetta, for term of the life of the same Jacquetta, with this clause of proviso contained in the said letters: that the same Richard and Jacquetta should be entirely excluded from every title, exaction and demand by reason of any dower belonging to her after the death of John, late duke of Bedford, of and in the towns, manors, lands, tenements in Shilbottle, Guyzance, Rennington, the bailiwick of Budle, Fawdon, Prudhoe, Hedley, Ovingham, Whelpington, Ingoe, Horsley, Harlow, Birtley, Barrasford, the issues of the bailiwick of the barony of Ovingham, and the ward of the castle of Prudhoe, in the county of Northumberland, against us, our heirs and our assigns. Which letters, given on the said eighteenth day, were returned to our chancery, there to be cancelled, on the said 8 [p. v-311][col. a] February, with the intention that we should grant the said annual rent of £61 17d. to the said Richard and Jacquetta, for term of both their lives; and that our said grant made to the said Richard and Jacquetta on the said eighth day should be good and effectual to them during the lifetime of the said Jacquetta only, notwithstanding the restitution of the said letters patent given by us on the said eighth day, and the acceptance by the said Richard and Jacquetta of the said letters patent made to them of that rent on the said 8 February. And that this exception and proviso shall be good and effectual, by whatever name the said Richard and Jacquetta, or any of the foregoing, are called or described in the said letters patent dated the said 8 February, and that everything specified in the same touching the foregoing or any of them, during the lifetime of the said Jacquetta, shall be excluded and excepted from this act of resumption.
< For the same. > For the same.
Provided also and forseyn, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to Richard Wydevill, knyght, nor to Jaquette his wyf, in eny wise, neithir to eny of theym, duryng the lyf of the said Jaquette, of and for an annuell rent of .xliij.li. .xviij.s. .vij. d. graunted by our lettres patentes yeven the .viij. day of February, the .xix. yere of our reigne, to the same Richard and Jaquette, terme of their lyfes, to be taken of the ferme, issuez, profittes and revenuez growyng of all the assertis, wastes, purprestures, and othir parcelles of the forests with ynne the forest of Rokyngham arrented betwene the brygges of Staunford and the yates of Oxenford, in the countees of Norhampton, Huntyngdon and Bukkyngham, in the same lettres specified; and .xx.li. to be taken yerely to the same Richard and Jaquette of the issues and profittes growyng of the manere and towne of Bryggestok; and of .lvi. s. .i. d. to be take to theym yerly of the fermes, issues and proffittes growyng of the maner of Corby, duryng the lyf of the said Richard and Jaquette; the whiche annuell rent of .xliij.li. .xviij. s. .vij. d., and the annuell rent of .xx.li. and the annuell rent of .lvi. s. .i. d., by our lettres patentes beryng date the .xiij. day of Novembre, the .xix. yere of our reigne, was graunted to the said Richard and Jaquette, terme of the lyf of the same Jaquette, in recompense of thirde parte of the .ij. partes of the maner of Canford in the counte of Dorset, and of the .ij. partes of the manere of Wynterburne Erlys, and of the toune or burgh of Wylton, and of the maner of Chorleton Camvyll in the counte of Somers', whiche the said Richard and Jaquette helde in dower of the same Jaquette, to her belongyng aftre the deth of John late duke of Bedford. And the whiche said maner of Charleton, with the thirde parte of the maner of Caneford, and the .ij. partes of the maner of Wynterborne, with the towne or borugh of Wylton, the said Richard and Jaquette, at our commaundement, by thavis of our uncles the duke of Gloucestre, the cardinall of Englond, the cardinall of York, and othir lordes than beyng of our pryve counseill, knoweleged by fyne to < be > the right of Harry late cardinall of Englond, and othir specified in the same fyne. And that our said graunte made to the said Richard and Jaquette, the said .viij. day of Feverer, be good and effectuell to theym, onely duryng the lyf of the said Jaquette, the restitucion of the said lettres patentes beryng date the said .xiij. day of Novembre, the .xix. yere of our reigne, and the acceptacion of the said Richard and Jaquette of the said lettres patentes of the graunte or confirmacion to theym terme of their lyfes, made the said .viij. day of Feverer, notwithstondyng: and that this excepcion and provision be good and effectuell, by what manere name the said Richard and Jaquette, or eny of these premisses, be named in the said [col. b] lettres patentes. And that the said lettres patentes beryng date the said .viij. day of Feverer, and all thynges in hem specified touchyng the premisses or eny of theym, duryng the lyf of the said Jaquette, be forsqe prysed and except out of this acte of resumpcion. Provided also and on condition that this petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Richard Woodville, knight, or to Jacquetta his wife, in any way, or to either of them, during the lifetime of the said Jacquetta, with regard to an annual rent of £43 18s. 7d., granted by our letters patent given on 8 February, in the nineteenth year of our reign [1441], to the same Richard and Jacquetta, for term of their lives, to be taken from the farm, issues, profits and revenues growing from all the assarts, wastes, purprestures and other cultivated parts of the forests within the forest of Rockingham between the bridges of Stamford and the gates of Oxford, in the counties of Northampton, Huntingdon and Buckingham, specified in the same letters; and £20 to be taken yearly by the same Richard and Jacquetta from the issues and profits growing from the manor and town of Brigstock; and of 56s. 1d., to be taken by them yearly from the farms, issues and profits growing from the manor of Corby, during the lifetime of the said Richard and Jacquetta; which annual rent of £43 18s. 7d., and the annual rent of £20, and the annual rent of 56s. 1d., by our letters patent dated 13 November, in the nineteenth year of our reign [1440], were granted to the said Richard and Jacquetta, for term of the life of the same Jacquetta, as compensation for the third part of the two parts of the manor of Canford in the county of Dorset, and for the two parts of the manor of Winterbourne Earls, and of the town or borough of Wilton, and of the manor of Charlton Camville in the county of Somerset, which the said Richard and Jacquetta held in dower of the same Jacquetta, belonging to her after the death of John, late duke of Bedford. And the said manor of Charlton, with the third part of the manor of Canford, and the two parts of the manor of Winterbourne, with the town or borough of Wilton, the said Richard and Jacquetta acknowledged by fine to be the right of Henry, late cardinal of England, and others specified in the same fine, at our command, by the advice of our uncles the duke of Gloucester, the cardinal of England, the cardinal of York, and other lords then being of our privy council. And that our said grant made to the said Richard and Jacquetta, on the said 8 February, shall be good and effectual to them only during the lifetime of the said Jacquetta, notwithstanding the restitution of the said letters patent dated the said 13 November, in the nineteenth year of our reign, and the acceptance of the said Richard and Jacquetta of the said letters patent of the grant or confirmation to them for term of their lives made on the said 8 February: and that this exception and proviso shall be good and effectual, by whatever name the said Richard and Jacquetta, or any of the things stated were called in the said [col. b] letters patent. And that the said letters patent dated the said 8 February, and everything specified in them concerning the foregoing or any of them, during the lifetime of the said Jacquetta, shall be excluded and excepted from this act of resumption.
< Richard Widevile, knight, aforesaid. > Richard Woodville, knight, aforesaid.
Provided also and forseyn, that this provicion or acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to Richard Wydevill, knyght, nor Jaquette his wyf, ne to eny of theym, duryng the lyf of the same Jaquette, of and for the homage, services, feefermes, rentes and tenementes, annuitees, possessions, .cc. acres of turbarie in the marshe of Holand, and the thirde parte of the halvyndele of Holand fennes, the thirde parte of the profittes and emolumentes of waters, fishynges, mylnes, cranages, stallages, peisages, passages, mesures of oyle, lastages, perquisites of courtes, of veues of francplegge, sokenes, wapentakes, markettes, feires, wrecke of the see, weyves, estrayes, fynes, amerciamentes, catall of felons and of fugityves and of outlawed men, wastes, appromentes, and of the thirde parte of money growyng of the issues of the commoditees of all the libertees, and retournes of writtes, with pastures of bestes, profittes of housbote and heybote, with the avousons of the churche of Wylberton, and of the chapell of Wykes, with othir emolumentes, with theire appurtenauncez, in eny wise to the castell, the erledome, the honeur or lordship of Richemond in the counte of Lincoln, or to the maners, londes, tenementes, beforon or aftre expressed belongyng, that is to seyn, in Boston, Hytyngton, Grymesby, Burghwell, Ludford, Burton, Skyrkebekke, Frampton, Wykes, Fulbecke, Ledenham, Wassyngborugh, the soken of Mornby, othirwise called Munby, Donyngton and Multon, with free ingate and outgate to the premisses in the said counte; the whiche all rehersed, were assigned by William Stanlowe, late eschetour of the said counte, to the said Richard and Jaquette, to hold in dower of the said Jaquette, aftre the deth of John late duk of Bedford, by cause of acceptacion by the same Richard and Jaquette, of our lettres patentes beryng date the .viij. day of February, the .xix. yere of our reigne, made to the said Richard and Jaquette, terme of theire lyfes; nothir that the said lettres patentes be hurte, duryng onely the lyf of the same Jaquette; and that this excepcion and provision be good and effectuell, by what manere name or names the said Richard and Jaquette, or eny of these premisses, be named, or in the said lettres patentes specified. And that the said lettres patentes beryng date the said .viij. day, and all thynges in them specified touchyng the premisses or eny of theym, duryng the lyf of the said Jaquette, be forprised and except out of this acte of resumpcion. Provided also and on condition that this provision or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Richard Woodville, knight, or Jacquetta his wife, or to either of them, during the life of the same Jacquetta, with regard to the homage, services, fee-farms, rents and tenements, annuities, possessions, two hundred acres of turbary in the marsh of Holland, and the third part of half of Holland fens, the third part of the profits and emoluments of the waters, fishing, mills, cranages, stallages, pesages, passages, measures of oil, lastages, profits of courts, views of frankpledge, sokes, wapentakes, markets, fairs, wreck of the sea, waifs, strays, fines, amercements, chattels of felons and fugitives and outlawed men, wastes, approvements, and the third part of money growing from the issues of the commodities of all the liberties, and returns of writs, with pastures of beasts, profits from housebote and haybote, with the advowsons of the church of Wyberton and of the chapel of Wykes, with other emoluments, with their appurtenances, belonging in any way to the castle, earldom and honour or lordship of Richmond in the county of Lincoln, or to the manors, lands, tenements, mentioned above or below, that is to say, in Boston, Heighington, Grimsby, Burwell, Ludford, Burton, Skirbeck, Frampton, Wykes, Fulbeck, Leadenham, Washingborough, the sokes of Mumby, Donnington and Moulton, with free ingress and egress from the aforesaid in the said county; all of which, as listed, were assigned by William Stanlow, lately escheator of the said county, to the said Richard and Jacquetta, to hold in dower of the said Jacquetta, after the death of John, late duke of Bedford, by virtue of the acceptance by the same Richard and Jacquetta of our letters patent dated 8 February, in the nineteenth year of our reign [1441], made to the said Richard and Jacquetta, for term of their lives; and that the said letters patent be not harmed, during the lifetime of the same Jacquetta alone; and that this exception and proviso be good and effectual, by whatever name or names the said Richard and Jacquetta, or any of the foregoing, are named or specified in the said letters patent. And that the said letters patent dated the said eighth day, and everything specified in them concerning the foregoing or any of them, during the lifetime of the said Jacquetta, shall be excluded and excepted from this act of resumption.
< For the same. > For the same.
Provided also and forseyn, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to Richard Wydevill duryng his lyf, of and for the office of the maister rydere of the foreste of Saucy, and the kepyng of the same, with wages, fees, profittes and commoditees to the same office and kepyng accustumed or due; whiche office and kepyng, with all fees, wages, profites and commodites to the said office and kepyng in eny wise due and accustumed, by our lettres patentes beryng date the .xxvi. day of Juyll, the yere of our reigne .xxiiij., were graunted to the said Richard, and to his heires males of his body begoton. And that the said lettres patentes touchyng the premisses be good and effectuell to the said Richard duryng his lyf, by what somever name the same Richard, or eny of these premisses, be specified in the said lettres patentes. And that the seid lettres patentes touchyng the premisses, duryng the lyf of the said Richard, be forprised and except out of this acte of resumpcion. Provided also and on condition that this petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Richard Woodville during his lifetime, with regard to the office of master rider of the forest of Salcey, and the custody of the same, with the wages, fees, profits and commodities, due or customary for the same office; which office and custody, with all the fees, wages, profits and commodities in any way due or customary for the said office and custody, by our letters patent dated 26 July, in the twenty-fourth year of our reign [1446], were granted to the said Richard, and to the heirs male of his body. And that the said letters patent concerning the foregoing shall be good and effectual to the said Richard during his lifetime, by whatever name the same Richard, or any of the foregoing, are specified in the said letters patent. And that the said letters patent concerning the foregoing, during the lifetime of the said Richard, shall be excluded and excepted from this act of resumption.
[p. v-312]
[col. a]
< Lord Sudeley. > Lord Sudeley.
Provided also and except, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not ne in eny wyse be prejudiciall to Rauf lorde Suedeley, of or for eny graunte or grauntes by us to hym made of .xxxviij.li. to be take yerelye for terme of his lyf of the feeferme of Wynchecombe and Kiftesgate; and of .xvi.li. .xvi. s. .x. d. to be take yerely for terme of his life of the feeferme of Pynnokshire: but that oure said graunte or grauntes, by what name so evere the seid Rauf be called in the same, be good and effectuell, this peticion or acte not withstandyng. Provided also and except that this petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to Ralph, Lord Sudeley, with regard to any grant or grants made by us to him of £38, to be taken yearly for term of his life from the fee-farm of Winchecombe and Kiftsgate; and of £16 16s. 10d. to be taken yearly for term of his life from the fee-farm of Pinnock: but that our said grant or grants, by whatever name the said Ralph is called in them, shall be good and effectual, notwithstanding this petition or act.
< John Popham, knight. > John Popham, knight.
Provided also, that this acte and peticion of resumpcion extende not nor in eny wise be prejudiciall to oure welbeloved servaunt John Popham, knyght, late tresorer of oure houshold, in or of .xl. marcs yerely, parcell of an .c. marcs, by us by oure lettres patentes undre oure grete seall to hym graunted for terme of his lyf, to be receyved yerely of the feeferme of the castell and cantrede of Bueld, with appurtenaunces, in the shire of Hereford, by the hondes of the heires of Roger Mortymer late erle of the Marche, tenauntes, fermours, receyvours, or other occupiers of the feeferme aforseid for the tyme beyng; which .c. marcs we graunted to the seid John Popham, for .c. marcs graunted < to > hym by oure moste dere fader, by his lettres patentes, by us aftirward confermed, for the service by the seid John to hym doone and to be doon, to be taken yerely at his eschequier, or at the eschequier of his heires, for terme of the lyfe of the seid John Popham; which lettres patentes of the graunte of oure seid noble fadre, and oure < lettres > patentes of confirmacion, the seid John hath restored into oure chauncerie, and there been cancelled as it apperith of record: wherfor that oure seide lettres made to the seid John Popham, as to and for the seid .xl. marcs, parcell of the seid .c. marcs, to be taken yerely in the maner and fourme afore rehersed of the seid feeferme of the castell and cantrede aforseid for terme of his lyfe, oute of the seid acte of resumpcion be except and utterly forprised, yf the seid John will agree to be contented with the seid .xl. marcs; and if he will < not > agree hym so to have the seid .xl. marcs, parcell of the seid .c. marcs, that thenne the same .c. marcs be resumed into oure handes, and the seid John to resorte to his former graunt, accordyng to the desyre in the seid peticion of resumpcion. (fn. v-278-447-1) Provided also that this act and petition of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to our well-beloved servant John Popham, knight, late treasurer of our household, with regard to 40 marks yearly, part of 100 marks granted by us by our letters patent under our great seal to him for term of his life, to be received yearly from the fee-farm of the castle and cantref of Builth with the appurtenances, in the county of Hereford, by the hands of the heirs of Roger Mortimer, late earl of March, the tenants, farmers, receivers or other occupiers of the fee-farm aforesaid at the time; which 100 marks we granted to the said John Popham, for 100 marks granted to him by our most dear father by his letters patent, later confirmed by us, for the service done and to be done to him by the said John, to be taken yearly at his exchequer, or at his heirs' exchequer, for term of the life of the said John Popham; which letters patent of the grant of our said noble father, and our letters patent of confirmation, the said John has returned to our chancery, where they have been cancelled as it appears on record: wherefore our said letters made to the said John Popham, with regard to the said 40 marks, part of the said 100 marks, to be taken yearly in the manner and form described above, from the said fee farm of the castle and cantref aforesaid for term of his life, shall be excepted and completely excluded from the said act of resumption, if the said John will agree to be content with the said 40 marks; and if he will not agree to have the said 40 marks, part of the said 100 marks, that then the same 100 marks shall be resumed into our hands, and the said John shall resort to his former grant, according to the request in the said petition of resumption. (fn. v-278-447-1)
< Willyam Beauchamp, knight, Lord Seint Aumaund. > William Beauchamp, knight, Lord St Amand.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion and adnullacion extende not ne in eny thyng be prejudiciall unto oure welbeloved William Beauchamp, knyght, late oon of oure kervers, Lord Seint Amaund and what somever othir name he be named and called in oure lettres patentes, for terme of his life, of eny graunte or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, made by us unto the seid William of eny office or offices whiche he nowe hath, with fees, wages and rewardes, of olde tyme due and accustumed unto theym; and that duryng the lyfe of the seid William, oure said lettres patentes so made unto hym of the seid offices which he nowe hath, with fees, wages and rewardes, of olde tyme due and accustumed, be goode and effectuell in all thyngs, this present acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-449-1) Provided also that this act of resumption and annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to our well-beloved William Beauchamp, knight, lately one of our carvers, Lord St Amand and by whatever other name he is named and called in our letters patent, for term of his life, with regard to any grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, made by us to the said William of any office or offices which he now has, with the traditional and customary fees, wages and rewards; and that during the life of the said William our said letters patent thus made to him of the said offices which he now has, with the traditional and customary fees, wages and rewards, shall be good and effectual in everything, notwithstanding this present act. (fn. v-278-449-1)
< Theires of William Phillipp, knight, late Lord Bardolf. > The heirs of William Philip, knight, late Lord Bardolf.
Provided also, that this acte or peticion of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall unto the eires of the bodies of William Phellipp, knyght, late Lord Bardolf, and of Johanne his wife, doughter and oon of the eires of Thomas somtyme lord Bardolfe, nor to Anne som tyme wyfe to William Clifford, knyght, anothir of the doughters and heires of the said Thomas lorde Bardolf, nor to John viscount Beaumond, which wedded Elizabeth doughter and heire of the said William lorde Bardolfe and Johanne his wife, ne to eny yifte or graunte unto theym or eny of theym, of eny honour, lordship, manoirs, londes, tenementes, rentes, services, [col. b] reversions, fees, advousons, or eny othir thyng, with theire appurtenaunce, whiche somtyme Thomas Lorde Bardolf, William Bardolfe his brothir, or William Phelipp late Lorde Bardolf, by what name they or eny of theym were called or named in the said yiftes or grauntes; for it hath be evidently shewed afore us, and the lordes spirituell and temporell, oure juges and serjeauntes present in parlement afore this, and wele understondyn by the lordes in this present parlement, howe that the said honours, maners, londes and tenementes, rentes, services, reversions, fees and avousons, etc., were and arne entayled to William nowe lorde Bardolf, and he as hole heire in the taylle to the said Thomas, his said doughters, and William, inheritable to theym, and the lettres patentes of Kyng Harry the IIII th , made to the same doughters of Thomas lorde Bardolf, proven the same: and so it is thought to the lordes in this present parlement, as it hath be thought in othir parlementes, that the saide yiftes and grauntes were made by goode deliberacion, avice, consciens and reason. (fn. v-278-451-1) Provided also that this act or petition of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to the heirs of the bodies of William Philip, knight, late Lord Bardolf, and of Joan his wife, daughter and one of the heirs of Thomas, sometime Lord Bardolf, or to Anne, sometime wife to William Clifford, knight, another of the daughters and heirs of the said Thomas, Lord Bardolf, or to John, Viscount Beaumont, who married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of the said William, Lord Bardolf, and Joan his wife, or to any gift or grant to them or any of them of any honour, lordship, manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, [col. b] reversions, fees, advowsons, or any other thing, with their appurtenances, which sometime belonged to Thomas, Lord Bardolf, William Bardolf, his brother, or William Philip, late Lord Bardolf, by whatever name they or any of them were called or named in the said gifts or grants; for it has been clearly shown before us, and the lords spiritual and temporal, our judges and serjeants present in parliaments before this, and well understood by the lords in the present parliament, how the said honours, manors, lands and tenements, rents, services, reversions, fees and advowsons, etc., were and are entailed to William [Beaumont], the present Lord Bardolf, as whole heir in tail to the said Thomas, his said daughters and William, and the letters patent of King Henry IV, made to the same daughters of Thomas, Lord Bardolf, prove the same: and so it is the belief of the lords in this present parliament, as it was the belief in other parliaments, that the said gifts and grants were made by good deliberation, advice, conscience and reason. (fn. v-278-451-1)
< Thomas Stanley, knight, Lord Stanley. > Thomas Stanley, knight, Lord Stanley.
Provided also, that this acte or peticion of resumpcion be not prejudiciall nor extende to any graunte, leese or demyse made by us by oure lettres patentes un to Thomas Stanley, knyght, of eny severall grownde, herbage, pasture or wastes within oure forest of Macclesfeld, which he hath taken for savyng of oure dere in the same forest, yildyng therfore .v.li. by yere; and the which, if it were not kepte from the depasturyng of catell and bestes, shulde be destruction of oure said dere, and also anyentisment of oure game there. (fn. v-278-453-1) Provided also that this act or petition of resumption shall not be prejudicial or extend to any grant, lease or demise, made by us by our letters patent to Thomas Stanley, knight, of any separate ground, herbage, pasture or wastes within our forest of Macclesfield, which he has taken to save our deer in the same forest, paying for this £5 a year; for if it were not kept from being grazed by cattle and beasts, it would destroy our said deer and also ruin our game there. (fn. v-278-453-1)
< For the same. > For the same.
Provided also, that this acte or peticion of resumpcion, or eny other acte in this present parlement made, extende not nor in eny wise be prejudiciall un to Thomas Stanley knyght lorde Stanley, oure chamberleyne, or by what name so ever he be called, in, of, or to eny graunte or grauntes made by us by oure lettres patentes undre the seall of oure countee palatyn of Chestre to the same Thomas, for terme of his lyf joyntly or severally, of the maister fostershipps of the forestes of Macclesfeld, Mare and Moundreme, within the said counte, and of the ridership of the same; nor to the fees and wages unto the seid office or offices of olde tyme due and accustumed: but that oure seid graunte and grauntes, by oure said lettres patentes made, may be goode and effectuell accordyng to the purportes and tenours of the same. (fn. v-278-455-1) Provided also that this act or petition of resumption, or any other act made in this present parliament, shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to Thomas Stanley, knight, Lord Stanley, our chamberlain, or by whatever name he is called, with regard to any grant or grants made by us by our letters patent, under the seal of our county palatine of Chester to the same Thomas, for term of his life jointly or individually, of the master foresterships of the forests of Macclesfield, Delamere and Mondrum within the said county, and of the ridership of the same; or to the traditional and customary fees and wages for the said office or offices: but that our said grant and grants made by our said letters patent may be good and effectual according to their purports and tenors. (fn. v-278-455-1)
[memb. 8]
< Gyles Seynclowe, squyer. > Giles Seynclowe, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Giles Seynclowe, squier, in or of a graunte made by us unto him of the bailliage of the water of Wygenhale in the counte of Norff'; and of the office of gaugeour of the tounes of Lynne and Yermouth, for terme of his lif, with such fees, profites and commoditees as were to the same bailliage and office of olde tyme apperteynyng or belongyng. (fn. v-278-457-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Giles Seynclowe, esquire, with regard to a grant made by us to him of the bailiwick of the water of Wiggenhall in the county of Norfolk; and of the office of gauger of the towns of Lynn and Yarmouth, for term of his life, with such fees, profits and commodities, as traditionally pertained or belonged to the same bailiwick and office. (fn. v-278-457-1)
< Thomas Staunton. > Thomas Staunton.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor in no wyse be prejudiciall to, of, or in any graunte or grauntes made by us by oure lettres patentes to Robert Waleys nowe dede, and to Thomas Staunton huissher of oure chambre, joyntly or severally, for terme of theire lifes, and for the lif of him that lenger lyves, of the office of arbalastry within oure toure of London; nor to, of, or in .xij. d. by the day, to the seid Thomas by oure lettres patentes graunted for terme of his life, to be taken of the issues, < profitz > and revenuez yerely commyng of the shires of Warr' and Leyc', by the handes of the shiref of the said shires for the tyme beyng, if the seid .xij. d. by day were due and accustumed to the seid office the first day of oure reigne or before. (fn. v-278-459-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way with regard to any grant or grants made by us by our letters patent to Robert Waleys, now deceased, and to Thomas Staunton, usher of our chamber, jointly or individually, for term of their lives in survivorship, of the office of crossbowman in our Tower of London; or of 12d. a day, granted to the said Thomas by our letters patent for term of his life, to be taken from the issues, profits and revenues yearly coming from the counties of Warwick and Leicester, by the hands of the sheriff of the said counties at the time, if the said 12d. a day was due and customary for the said office on the first day of our reign or before. (fn. v-278-459-1)
< Alexander Iden. > Alexander Iden.
Provided also, that this present acte or ordenaunce extende not in nowyse neither be hurt or prejudiciall to eny graunte made by us < to oure servaunt > Alexander [p. v-313][col. a] Iden, of, to, or for the kepyng of oure castell of Rouchestre in oure counte of Kent; neither of, to, or for the .xxxvi.li. for terme of his lif, by us for diverse consideracions, aswell for his < goode > and notable service doon to us upon the see as elswhere, and in especiall for the takyng and depressyng of that grete and orrible traytour John Cade, graunted, and to be taken yerely at the fest of Seint Andrewe the appostill, of a yerely rent or castelwarde, which of the seid wardes be or owen to be levyed. So alwey that .xvi.li. parcell of the seid .xxxvi.li. yerely be emploied in and aboute the reparacion of oure castell aboveseid. (fn. v-278-461-1) Provided also that this present act or ordinance shall not extend in any way or be harmful or prejudicial to any grant made by us to our servant Alexander [p. v-313][col. a] Iden of the custody of our castle of Rochester in our county of Kent; or the £36 for term of his life granted by us for various considerations for his good and notable service done us upon the sea as well as elsewhere, and especially for the capture and subjugation of that great and terrible traitor John Cade, to be taken yearly at the feast of St Andrew the Apostle [27 April], from a yearly rent or castleward which is or should be levied from the said wards. Provided that £16 of the said £36 is spent yearly on and about the repair of the aforesaid castle. (fn. v-278-461-1)
< Kyngeston uppon Hulle. > Kingston upon Hull.
Provided also, that for eny provision made to the maire, aldermen and burgeyses, theire heires and theire successours, or to the maire and aldermen, theire heires and theire successours, or to the maire and burgeyses, theire heires and theire successours, or to the maire and comminaltee, theire heires and theire successours, of oure toune of Kyngeston upon Hull; that by force of that provision, neither the seid maire, aldermen and burgeyses, theire heires nor theire successours, nor the maire and aldermen, theire heires nor theire successours, nor the maire and burgeyses, theire heires nor theire successours, nor the maire and comminalte, theire heires nor theire successours, ne any of theym, or eny of theire heires or successours, of the said toune of Kyngeston upon Hull, shall have or excercise eny jurisdiccion, auctorite or power within the walles or closure of the chartrehouse of Seint Michell beside the said toune, nor < in > eny londes, possessions or tenementes therto belongyng withoute the walles of the said toune in eny maner wyse: that the said provision, or this acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-463-1) Provided also that because of any proviso made to the mayor, aldermen and burgesses, their heirs and their successors, or to the mayor and aldermen, their heirs and their successors, or to the mayor and burgesses, their heirs and their successors, or to the mayor and commonalty, their heirs and their successors, of our town of Kingston upon Hull; that by force of that proviso, neither the said mayor, aldermen and burgesses, their heirs or their successors, nor the mayor and aldermen, their heirs or their successors, nor the mayor and burgesses, their heirs or their successors, nor the mayor and commonalty, their heirs or their successors, nor any of them, or any of their heirs or successors, of the said town of Kingston upon Hull, shall in any way have or exercise any jurisdiction, authority or power within the walls or enclosure of the Charterhouse of St Michael next to the said town, or in any lands, possessions or tenements belonging to it, outside the walls of the said town: notwithstanding the said proviso or this act of resumption. (fn. v-278-463-1)
< Willyam Say, squyer. > William Say, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto William Say squyer, in or of the office of warenner of the warenne of oure castell of Dovorre, graunted by us unto him, by the name of William Say yoman of the coroune, to have and occupie for terme of his life, with the fees, wages and profitz therto of olde tyme due and accustumed. (fn. v-278-465-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to William Say, esquire, with regard to the office of warrener of the warren of our castle of Dover granted by us to him, by the name of William Say, yeoman of the crown, to have and occupy for term of his life, with the traditional and customary fees, wages and profits. (fn. v-278-465-1)
< Thomas Barton, squier. > Thomas Barton, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte extende not ne be prejudiciall unto Thomas Barton squier, sergeaunt of oure panetrie, in or of a graunte made by us unto him, by the name of Thomas Barton oon of the yomen of oure coroune, for terme of his life, of the kepyng of oure parc, called the newe parc of Shene in the counte of Surr', with the wages of .ij. d. by day, to be take of the issues, profites, fermes and revenues commyng of our lordship of Hamme in the seid counte, with .vij. acres of mede, liggyng in the mede beside the brigge of Chartesey, in the counte of Midd', for the sustentacion of oure dere within oure seid parc in wynter tyme. Nor in or of a graunte made by us unto him by the same name, of .ij. d. by day, to be take for terme of his lif of the issues, profitz and revenuez commyng of oure seid lordship of Hamme, and of oure lordship of Petresham in the seid counte of Surr', for to fynde sufficient reparacion in pales and hegges of oure seid parc: but that oure seid grauntes and lettres patentes þeruppon made be good and effectuell unto him, after the tenours and purportes of the same, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-467-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Thomas Barton, esquire, sergeant of our pantry, with regard to a grant made by us to him, by the name of Thomas Barton, one of the yeomen of our crown, for term of his life, of the custody of our park called the new park of Sheen in the county of Surrey, with the wages of 2d. a day, to be taken from the issues, profits, farms and revenues coming from our lordship of Ham in the said county, with seven acres of meadow, lying in the meadow near Chertsey bridge, in the county of Middlesex, for the sustenance of our deer within our said park in winter time. Nor with regard to a grant made by us to him by the same name, of 2d. a day, to be taken for term of his life from the issues, profits and revenues coming from our said lordship of Ham, and from our lordship of Petersham in the said county of Surrey, to enable adequate repair of the stakes and hedges of our said park: but that our said grants and letters patent made thereon shall be good and effectual to him, after their tenors and purports, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-467-1)
< Dame Alyanore Hulle. > Lady Eleanor Hull.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny graunte made by us by oure lettres patentes to Dame Alianore Hull, and to Sire Edward Hull, late oon of oure esquiers attendyng aboute oure body, of .l. marc to be perceyved yerely by the handes of the abbot, priour and covent of Seint Albons for tyme beyng: but that the seid graunte stonde in his force for the said Dame Alianore, this acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-469-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant made by us by our letters patent to Lady Eleanor Hull and to Sir Edward Hull, lately one of our esquires attending our body, of 50 marks received yearly by the hands of the abbot, prior and convent of St Albans at the time: but that the said grant shall remain in force for the said Lady Eleanor, notwithstanding this act of resumption. (fn. v-278-469-1)
< John Penycocke, squier. > John Penycoke, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto John Penycok, squier for oure body, by what name so ever he be called, in or of a graunte [col. b] made by us unto him of .l. marc to be take yerely for terme of his life of the feeferme of the toune of Suthampton: but that oure < seid > graunte and lettres patentes therupon made be good and effectuell unto him, after the tenour and purport of the same, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-471-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to John Penycoke, esquire for our body, by whatever name he is called, with regard to a grant [col. b] made by us to him of 50 marks, to be taken yearly for term of his life from the fee-farm of the town of Southampton: but that our said grant and letters patent made thereon shall be good and effectual to him, after their tenor and purport, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-471-1)
< John Banham, squier, cooke, etc. > John Banham, esquire, cook, etc.
Provided also, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to John Banham, squier, late maister cooke for oure mouth, which is blynde by Goddes visitacion, of .c. s. yerely, parcell of .c. s. .iiij. d. yerely by us to him graunted by oure lettres patentes beryng date .xij. th day of Decembre, the .xxx. th yere of oure reigne, to be take yerely duryng his lif of the fermes, issues or profitez of the subsidie and aunage of sale clothes, of the countees of Norht' and Rotel', and of the moite of the forfaiture of the same clothes in the seid countees commyng and growyng, by the handes of the fermours, receyvours, occupiours or approwers there for the tyme beyng: but that oure seid lettres patentes as to and for the seid .c. s. yerely, parcell of the seid .c. s. .iiij. d., be and stond good and effectuell, the seid acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-473-1) Provided also that this petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to John Banham, esquire, late master cook for our mouth, who is blind by God's visitation, of 100s. a year, part of the 100s. 4d. a year granted by us to him by our letters patent dated 12 December, in the thirtieth year of our reign [1451], to be taken yearly during his lifetime from the farms, issues or profits of the subsidy and alnage of the sale of cloths, from the counties of Northampton and Rutland, and from half the forfeiture of the same cloths, coming and growing from the same counties, by the hands of the farmers, receivers, occupiers or approvers there at the time: but that our said letters patent with regard to the said 100s. a year, part of the said 100s. 4d., shall be and remain good and effectual, notwithstanding the said act of resumption. (fn. v-278-473-1)
< Johanne Martyn. > Joan Martin.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion and adnullacion extende not nor be prejudiciall to Johane, the wyf of Thomas Martyn of oure citee of Caunterbury, by what name she be named or called, of a .i. d. by day, parcell of oure graunte of .xiiij. d. wokely to her made, to be taken of the feeferme of Caunterbury: but that oure seid graunte and lettres patentes therupon made, to and for the seid .i. d. by day, be good and effectuell, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-475-1) Provided also that this act of resumption and annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial to Joan, the wife of Thomas Martin of our city of Canterbury, by whatever name she is named or called, of 1d. a day, part of our grant of 14d. a week made to her, to be taken from the fee-farm of Canterbury: but that our said grant and letters patent made thereon, with regard to the said 1d. a day, shall be good and effectual, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-475-1)
< Willyam Nele. > William Neel.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion or adnullacion extende not nor in anywyse be prejudiciall unto William Neel, by the name of William Neel oon of oure gromes of oure chambre, in or of a graunte made by us unto him, of tho .vi.li. .vi. s. .viij. d. which Geffrey Lescrop and his heirs to us yerely owe for to yelde, of the residue of the manoirs of Bowedon and Haverbergh, in the counte of Leyc', for terme of .viij. yeres: but that [...] oure seid graunte made unto the seid William, and lettres patentes therupon made, be good and effectuell unto him, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-477-1) Provided also that this act of resumption or annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to William Neel, by the name of William Neel, one of our grooms of our chamber, with regard to a grant made to him by us, of the £6 6s. 8d., which Geoffrey Le Scrope and his heirs owe us each year from the residue of the manors of Bowden and Harborough in the county of Leicester, for the term of eight years: but that our said grant made to the said William and the letters patent made thereon, shall be good and effectual to him, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-477-1)
< Walter Halyday and others. > Walter Haliday and others.
Provided also, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to Walter Haliday, William Maysham, Robert Marshall, William Wykes, John Clyff, John Panell, William Bredestrete, William Panel, Nicholas Gildesborowe and William Godyere, oure ministralles, nor to any of theym, of .c. s. yerely for every of theym, parcell of .x. marc, yerely by us to every of theym severally graunted, to be taken atte receyte of oure eschequier, by the handes of the tresorer and chamberleyns there for the tyme beyng: but that our seid severalle grauntes and lettres patentes, to everych of theym theruppon made, as to and for the seid .c. s. yerely for every of theym, parcell of the seid .x. marc yerely, in the fourme aboveseid graunted, be and stond to every of theym good and effectuell, the seid acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-479-1) Provided also that this petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Walter Haliday, William Maysham, Robert Marshall, William Wykes, John Clyff, John Panell, William Bredestrete, William Panel, Nicholas Gildsborough and William Godyere, our minstrels, or to any of them, with regard to 100s. a year for each of them, part of the 10 marks a year granted individually to each of them by us, to be taken at the receipt of our exchequer, by the hands of the treasurer and chamberlains there at the time: but that our said several grants and letters patent made thereon to each of them of the said 100s. a year for each of them, part of the said 10 marks a year, granted in the form abovesaid, shall be and remain good and effectual to each of them, notwithstanding the said act of resumption. (fn. v-278-479-1)
< Thomas Rothewell. > Thomas Rothwell.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion or adnullacion extende not nor be prejudiciall to Thomas Rothewell and Dame Elizabeth his wyf, late the wif of Sir Thomas Swynford, knyght, for terme of [...] lif of the seid Elizabeth, of any maners, londes and tenementes, the which the said Elizabeth hath by the graunte or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, by the most blessid prince oure fadre, whom God assoile, or by his feoffes in perfourmyng of his wille; nor of the maners of Tiberton, Rye, Roddeley and Eltlowe, with the appurtenaunces, in the shire of Gloucestre, duryng the lif of the said Elizabeth, the which the said Thomas and Elizabeth hath by an acte made in our parlement, holden at Westm' the .xx. yere of our reigne, in recompense [p. v-314][col. a] of the maner of Snayth, with the soke therof in the counte of York; which maner of Snayth, the said Elizabeth, long afore the seid parlement, had terme of her lif, of the graunte of the said feoffees, in perfourmyng of the said wille of oure said fadre: consideryng that the will of oure seid fadre was, that the said Elizabeth shuld have, terme of lif, londes and tenementes to the value of .cc.li. above all charges, where as all the londes and tenementes which the said Elizabeth hath of our said fadre yefte, extende not to the value of .cc.li. (fn. v-278-481-1) Provided also that this act of resumption or annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial to Thomas Rothwell and Lady Elizabeth his wife, lately the wife of Sir Thomas Swinford, knight, for term of the life of the said Elizabeth, of any manors, lands and tenements, which the said Elizabeth has by the grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, of the most blessed prince our father, whom God absolve, or of his feoffees for the performance of his will; or of the manors of Tibberton, Rye, Rodley and Etloe, with the appurtenances, in the county of Gloucester, during the lifetime of the said Elizabeth, which the said Thomas and Elizabeth have by an act made in our parliament held at Westminster in the twentieth year of our reign [1441], in recompense [p. v-314][col. a] for the manor of Snaith and its soke in the county of York; which manor of Snaith the said Elizabeth, long before the said parliament, had for term of her life by the grant of the said feoffees for the performance of the said will of our said father: considering that the will of our said father was that the said Elizabeth should have, for term of her life, lands and tenements to the value of £200 over all charges, whereas all the lands and tenements which the said Elizabeth has by gift of our said father are not worth £200. (fn. v-278-481-1)
< Phillipp Wentworth, knight. > Philip Wentworth, knight.
Provided also, that this peticion and acte of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall to Philip Wentworth, knyght, of our graunte or lettres patentes made by us unto him, to be baillif and our eschetour of Stayncliff in Craven, in the counte of York and wapentach there, for terme of his lif, with the fees and wages to the same office of olde tyme due and accustumed. (fn. v-278-483-1) Provided also that this petition and act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Philip Wentworth, knight, with regard to our grant or letters patent made by us to him, to be bailiff and our escheator of Staincliffe in Craven, in the county of York, and the wapentake there, for term of his life, with the traditional and customary fees and wages for the same office. (fn. v-278-483-1)
< Thomas Tirell, knight. > Thomas Tyrell, knight.
Provided, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall to sire Thomas Tyrell, knyght, of or to eny graunte < made to hym > and to his heirs by us, by oure lettres patentes beryng date the .xvij. day of Marche, the .xxx. yere of oure reigne, of the patronage or thadvouson of the church of Est Thorndon in our counte of Essex: consideryng the long and agreable service that the same Thomas daily doth, and of long tyme hath doon unto our highnesse, havyng noo lyvelode, annuite or other possessions as yit of oure graunte, and that the seid church is of litill value, for which cause the seid Thomas hath oure licence to purchace certeyn lyvelode to the yerely value of .x.li. for the augmentacion of the same. (fn. v-278-485-1) Provided that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Sir Thomas Tyrell, knight, with regard to any grant made by us to him and to his heirs, by our letters patent dated 17 March, in the thirtieth year of our reign [1452], of the patronage or advowson of East Thorndon church in our county of Essex: considering the long and agreeable service that the same Thomas daily performs, and has long performed for our highness, having no livelihood, annuity or other possessions as yet of our grant, and that the said church is of little value, for which reason the said Thomas has our licence to purchase a certain livelihood to the annual value of £10, to augment the same. (fn. v-278-485-1)
< Bartillmewe Halley. > Bartholomew Halley.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall or in anywise hurtyng unto Bartilmewe Halley, squier, ussher of oure chambre, in or of a graunte by us made unto hym, by the name of Bartilmewe < Halley, > of the office of joynour within oure toure of London, to have and occupie for terme of his lif, with the wages of .xij. d. by the day, to be taken yerely of thissues, revenuez and profitz commyng of the counte of Wiltes', by the handes of the shirefe of the same shire for the tyme beyng. (fn. v-278-487-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial or harmful in any way to Bartholomew Halley, esquire, usher of our chamber, with regard to a grant made by us to him, by the name of Bartholomew Halley, of the office of joiner in our Tower of London, to have and occupy for term of his life, with the wages of 12d. a day, to be taken yearly from the issues, revenues and profits coming from the county of Wiltshire, by the hands of the sheriff of the same county at the time. (fn. v-278-487-1)
< John Faceby, phisicion. > John Faceby, physician.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto maister John Faceby oure phisicion, in or of a graunte made by us unto him of .c.li. to be take yerely for terme of his lif of the issues and profitez of certaine maners, < and of > other revenues and diverses places, specified in oure lettres patentes beryng date the .xx. day of May, the .xxxiij. ti yere of oure reigne. (fn. v-278-489-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Master John Faceby, our physician, with regard to a grant made by us to him of £100, to be taken yearly for term of his life from the issues and profits of certain manors, and from other revenues and various places, specified in our letters patent dated 20 May, in the thirty-third year of our reign [1455]. (fn. v-278-489-1)
< Willyam Hattecliffe. > William Hatcliff.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto maister William Hattecliffe, doctour in medicyns and phisicion, sworn for the saufte of oure persone, in or of .xx.li. yerely, parcell of .xl.li. yerely by us unto hym graunted, to be take yereley for terme of his lif, at the receipte of oure eschequier. (fn. v-278-491-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Master William Hatcliff, doctor of medicine and physician, sworn to the safety of our person, with regard to £20 a year, part of the £40 a year granted by us to him, to be taken yearly for term of his life at the receipt of our exchequer. (fn. v-278-491-1)
< Andrewe Lowe. > Andrew Lowe.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Andrewe Lowe, in or of a graunte made by us unto him, by what name so ever he be called, of .x. marc by yere, to be take for terme of his lif of the issues and profites of oure duchie of Lancastre, by the handes of oure generall receyvour of the same duchie for the tyme beyng. Nor in or off a graunte made by us unto the seid Andrewe, by what name so ever he be called, of thoo yerely .viij. marc which thabbot and covent of Dieulencras, othirwise called Dieu L'encresse, be bounde to pay to us at oure eschequier of Chestre, for certeyn londes and tenementes that they hold of us in Rudheth, to be take for terme of the lif of the seid Andrewe, by the handes of the seid abbot and covent and theire successours. (fn. v-278-493-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Andrew Lowe, with regard to a grant made by us to him, by whatever name he is called, of 10 marks a year, to be taken for term of his life from the issues and profits of our duchy of Lancaster, by the hands of our receiver general of the same duchy at the time. Nor with regard to a grant made by us to the said Andrew, by whatever name he is called, of those 8 marks a year which the abbot and convent of Dieulacres, otherwise called Dieu L'encresse, are bound to pay us at our exchequer of Chester for certain lands and tenements which they hold of us in Rudheath, to be taken for term of the life of the said Andrew, by the hands of the said abbot and convent and their successors. (fn. v-278-493-1)
[col. b]
< Symon Nory. > Simon Nory.
Provided also, that this acte strecche not nor be prejudiciall or in any maner wise hurtyng to eny graunte or grauntes in any wise made to Simon Nory merchaunt of Florence, by what name he be called, or to his factours or attourneis, for reteinyng or paiement of any sommes of money to us by the said Simon in eny wyse lent: but that the seid Simon, his factours and attourneis, may use and enjoy all the seid graunte and grauntes, for contentacion and satisfaccion of the seid sommes, this acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-495-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial or in any way harmful to any grant or grants made in any way to Simon Nory, merchant of Florence, by whatever name he is called, or to his agents or attorneys, for retaining or payment of any sums of money lent to us by the said Simon in any way: but that the said Simon, his agents and attorneys, may use and enjoy all the said grant and grants for the settlement and satisfaction of the said sums, notwithstanding this act of resumption. (fn. v-278-495-1)
< Henry de Monte, merchaunt. > Henry de Monte, merchant.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion strecche not nor be prejudiciall or in any maner wyse hurtyng to certeyn lettres patentes made .xij. day of Septembre, the yere of oure reigne .xxxi., and directe to Harry de Monte merchaunt of Ligur, to ship or do be shipped .cccc. sakkes of our wolle, in carrakis, galeis, shippes or other vesselles, at oon tyme or diverse tymes, in the porte of London; and the seid wolle to carie and lede, or do be caried, to any parties beyng of oure amitee, as in the seid lettres it apperith more at large: but that the seid Harry may use and enjoye the said lettres, and all thynges in theim conteyned, after the fourme of the same, this said acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial or harmful in any way to the letters patent made on 12 September, in the thirty-first year of our reign [1452], and sent to Henry de Monte, merchant of Liguria, to ship or cause to be shipped 400 sacks of our wool, in carracks, galleys, ships or other vessels, at one time or various times, in the port of London; and to carry and take the said wool, or cause it to be carried, to any places at peace with us, as appears more fully in the said letters: but that the said Henry may use and enjoy the said letters, and everything contained in them, according to the terms of the same, notwithstanding this said act of resumption.
< John Peycocke. > John Peacock.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto John Peycok, in or of a graunte made by us unto him of .vi. d. by day, to be take of oure eschequier of Chestre, by the handes of oure chamberleyn there for the tyme beyng, of the issues of his office: but that oure said graunte and lettres patentes therupon made be good and effectuell unto him for terme of the lif of Thomas Peycok < his > fadre, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-499-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to John Peacock, with regard to a grant made by us to him of 6d. a day, to be taken from our exchequer of Chester by the hands of our chamberlain there at the time, from the issues of his office: but that our said grant and letters patent made thereon shall be good and effectual to him for term of the life of Thomas Peacock his father, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-499-1)
< Robert Brooke. > Robert Brook.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Robert Broke, of oure prive spicerie, whom we have ordeyned and made oure apprower of the fennes in the counte of Lincoln, within oure honoure of Bolyngbroke, in or of the same office, with the wages of .iiij. d. by day to be take of the same approwement, in the maner and fourme as Thomas Simond, to God passed, had and toke in the same in his life: but that oure lettres patentes unto the seid Robert therof made, be good and effectuell unto him, after the tenour and purport of the same, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-501-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Robert Brook, of our privy spicery, whom we have ordained and made our approver of the fens in the county of Lincoln, within our honour of Bolingbroke, with regard to the same office, with the wages of 4d. a day to be taken of the same approvement, in the manner and form in which Thomas Simon, who has passed to God, had and took the same in his lifetime: but that our letters patent to the said Robert made thereof shall be good and effectual to him, according to their tenor and purport, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-501-1)
< Willyam Erington, squier. > William Erington, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall ne hurte to eny graunte made by us to oure humble servaunt William Erington esquier, of the londes and tenementes that were Thomas Soules in the Heugh and Standfordham in the counte of Northumbr', by the seid Thomas forfaited, to the value of .xxx. s. by yere; and of .xxx. s. of fre rent in Ulleston beside Haukewell, within the seid counte; of a tenement in Ingowe called the pasture felde, in the same counte, of the yerely value of .vij. s. after the decease of John Felton, knyght; and the toune of Newebyggyng beside Wodhorn, within the seid counte, of the value of .c. s. by yere, beyng in oure handes by the forfeiture of John Beliall, late kyng of Scottes. (fn. v-278-503-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial or harmful to any grant made by us to our humble servant William Erington, esquire, of the lands and tenements which belonged to Thomas Soul, in Heugh and Stamfordham in the county of Northumberland, forfeited by the said Thomas, to the value of 30s. a year; and of 30s. of free rent in Ulleston beside Hawkwell, within the said county; of a tenement in Ingoe called the pasture field, in the same county, of the annual value of 7s., after the death of John Felton, knight; and the town of Newbiggin beside Woodhorn, within the said county, worth 100s. a year, being in our hands by the forfeiture of John Balliol, late king of the Scots. (fn. v-278-503-1)
< Thomas Scargill, squier. > Thomas Scargill, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Thomas Scargill, squier, in or of a graunte made by us unto him by the same name, of .vi. d. by day, to be take for terme of his lif, of the issues, services, revenuez, profites and othir commoditees, commyng of the counte of Yorke, by the handes of the shiref of the same counte for the tyme beyng: but that oure seid graunte and lettres patentes theruppon made, beryng date the .xvi. day of Marche, the .xxx. yere of oure reigne, be good and effectuell unto him, after the tenour and purport of the same, the said acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-505-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Thomas Scargill, esquire, with regard to a grant made by us to him by the same name, of 6d. a day, to be taken for term of his life from the issues, services, revenues, profits and other commodities coming from the county of York, by the hands of the sheriff of the same county at the time: but that our said grant and letters patent made thereon, dated 16 March in the thirtieth year of our reign [1452], shall be good and effectual to him, according to their tenor and purport, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-505-1)
[p. v-315]
[col. a]
[memb. 7]
< John Mathewe, squier. > John Matthew, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not in eny manerwyse to abregge or abate .xx. marc yerely, parcell of .l.li. yerely by us to John Mathewe, esquier, by oure lettres patents graunted, to be taken yerely for terme of his lif by the handes of the tresorer and chamberleyns of oure eschequier, as in oure seid lettres patentes more pleinly apperith: but that oure seid graunte and lettres patentes theruppon made, abide and stond to the seid John, as to and for the seid .xx. marc yerely, parcell of the seid .l.li. in theire force and effecte, eny thing conteyned in the seid peticion or acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-507-1) Provided also that this act of resumption does not result in any reduction or diminution of the 20 marks a year, part of the £50 a year granted by us to John Matthew, esquire, by our letters patent, to be taken yearly for term of his life by the hands of the treasurer and chamberlains of our exchequer, as appears more fully in our said letters patent: but that our said grant and letters patent made thereon shall stay and remain in force to the said John with regard to the said 20 marks a year, part of the said £50, in their force and effect, notwithstanding anything contained in the said petition or act of resumption. (fn. v-278-507-1)
< John Holt, esquier. > John Holt, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to John Holt, squier, and Margarete his wyf, nor to the heires of the seid John, of eny graunte made unto theym of the manoir of Aston beside Birmyngeham in Warwyk shire, with libertees, fraunchises and quietaunces therto belongyng, .iiij. meses, .iiij. plowe londe, with theire appurtenaunces, in Dodeston and Bordesley in the same shire: but that the seid John and Margarete, and the heires of the same John, or eny other to theire or eny of theire use, may have and rejoise the said manoir, meses, londes, libertees, fraunchises and quietaunces, accordyng to an acte made in the last parlement, begonne and holden at Redyng and ended at Westm'; the said peticion or acte of resumpcion, or eny thyng therynne conteyned, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-509-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to John Holt, esquire, and Margaret his wife, or to the heirs of the said John, of any grant made to them of the manor of Aston near Birmingham in Warwickshire, with the liberties, franchises and releases belonging to it, four messuages, four ploughlands with their appurtenances, in Duddeston and Bordesley in the same county: but that the said John and Margaret, and the heirs of the same John, or anyone else to the use of them or any of them, may have and enjoy the said manor, messuages, lands, liberties, franchises and releases, according to an act made in the last parliament, begun and held at Reading and ending at Westminster; notwithstanding the said petition or act of resumption, or anything contained therein. (fn. v-278-509-1)
< Willyam Paston and others. > William Paston and others.
Provided also, that a provision and acte of parlement, made in oure parlement holden at Westm' the .xx. yere of oure reigne, whereby was ordeyned and enacted that William Paston, Robert Clere and Edmond Clere shuld hold to hem and to theire heires of the seid William, .xxxvi. acres and an halfe, .ix. perches, a quarter and an half of a perche, and a pekke of lond, pasture, heth and mareys, called copyhold, with two mansions edified in certeinz parcell therof, in Paston and Edithorp in the counte of Norff'; and the fourth part of a rodde of lond specified in the same acte; in recompense of .xxxvi. acres and an halfe, .xxvi. perches and an halfe, half a quarter of a perche, halfe a pekke and a nayle of lond, pasture and heth, of the seid William, Robert and Edmond, called chartreholde, within two mansions edified in certeinz parcell therof in the same tounes, as in the seid provision and acte more pleinly apperith, stond good and effectuell, and abide in force in perpetuite, this acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-511-1) And that this acte of resumpcion be not prejudiciall to eny persone or persones intitled in the seid londes and tenementes, or to eny parcell therof, by the seid provision and acte made the .xx. yere of oure reigne. (fn. v-278-511-2) Provided also that a proviso and act of parliament, made in our parliament held at Westminster in the twentieth year of our reign [1441], whereby it was ordained and enacted that William Paston, Robert Clere and Edmund Clere should hold to them and to the heirs of the said William, thirty-six and a half acres, nine perches, three quarters of a perch and a peck of land, pasture, heath and marsh, called copyhold, with two dwellings built on parts of it, in Paston and Edingthorpe in the county of Norfolk; and the fourth part of a rood of land specified in the same act; in recompense for thirty-six and a half acres, twenty-six perches and a half, half a quarter of a perch, half a peck and a nail of land, pasture and heath, of the said William, Robert, and Edmund, called charterhold, with two dwellings built on parts of it in the same towns, as more plainly appears in the said proviso and act, shall remain good and effectual, and stay in force in perpetuity, notwithstanding this act of resumption. (fn. v-278-511-1) And that this act of resumption shall not be prejudicial to any person or persons entitled to the said lands and tenements, or to any part of them, by the said proviso and act made the twentieth year of our reign. (fn. v-278-511-2)
< Robert Whitingham, squier. > Robert Whittingham, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall to Robert Whityngham, squier, of or for the manoir of Salden, by what name ever hit be called, with all the membres and appurtenaunces unto the same manoir belongyng; the which manoir, with the members and appurtenaunces, Robert Whityngham fadre of the seid Robert, with other cofeoffees, had of oure graunte, by oure lettres patentes beryng date the .xi. day of August, the yere of oure reigne .xxviij., as in the same lettres patentes more pleinly it apperith: the which manoir, with the membres and appurtenaunces, Henry late cardinall of Englond purchased and bought of us by oure desire, by thassent, advis and aggrement of our counseill, and paied for theym unto us to the value: but that oure seid lettres patentes made to the seid Robert, fadre of the seid Robert, with othir cofeoffees named in the same, be good and effectuell, this acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-513-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Robert Whittingham, esquire, with regard to the manor of Salden, by whatever name it is called, with all the members and appurtenances belonging to the same manor; which manor, with the members and appurtenances, Robert Whittingham, father of the said Robert, with other co-feoffees, had of our grant, by our letters patent dated 11 August, in the twenty-eighth year of our reign [1450], as appears more fully in the same letters patent: which manor with the members and appurtenances Henry, late cardinal of England, purchased and bought from us at our request, by the assent, advice and agreement of our council, and paid us the full value: but that our said letters patent made to the said Robert, father of the said Robert, with other co-feoffees named in the same, shall be good and effectual, notwithstanding this act of resumption. (fn. v-278-513-1)
< John Doreward, squier. > John Doreward, esquire.
Provided also, that the seid peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny graunte made by us by oure lettres patentes to John [col. b] Doreward of Bockyng in the counte of Essex the elder, squier, of a place with thappurtenaunces in the parisshes of Seint Marie Strainglane and Seint Olof in London: but that oure seid graunte and lettres patentes be and stond good and effectuell, the seid peticion or acte of resumpcion notwithstomdyng. Consideryng that the seid place was but a voide grounde, and passed not the value of .x. s. by the yere, unto the tyme it was bilded by the seid John at his grete charge and costes, and of the value at this day atte most but of .xl. s.; which place the seid John hath yeven to a meson Dewe founded by hym by oure licence in the seid toune of Bockyng, and to the provost and .vi. pore men of the seid meson Diewe. In fundacion wherof, we and oure dere modre of blessid memorie Quene Kateryne been set chief perpetuelly and most specially to be prayed fore for ever, and for the entent of sustentacion of the said prayer, the seid place is so yeven as is above rehersed. (fn. v-278-515-1) Provided also that the said petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant made by us by our letters patent to John [col. b] Doreward of Bocking in the county of Essex, the elder, esquire, of a place with the appurtenances in the parishes of St Mary Staining and St Olaf in London, but that our said grant and letters patent shall be and remain good and effectual, notwithstanding the said petition or act of resumption; considering that the said place was but an empty ground, and did not exceed the value of 10s. a year, until it was built on by the said John at his great cost and expense, and is now worth only 40s. at most; which place the said John has given to a maison dieu founded by him by our licence in the said town of Bocking, and to the provost and six poor men of the said maison dieu. Of which foundation we and our dear mother of blessed memory Queen Katherine have been set first among the founders in perpetuity, to be most especially prayed for forever, and so that the said prayers may be sustained the said place has been given as described above. (fn. v-278-515-1)
< Thomas Burneby, squier. > Thomas Burnby, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion or adnullacion extende not ne in enywyse be prejudiciall to Thomas Burneby, squier, to, for, or of any graunte or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, made by us unto him of thoffice of eschetour in oure counte of Angles' in Northwales: ne that the seid peticion or acte of resumpcion strecche to eny fees, wages and rewardes, if they to the same office of olde tyme were due, and by us graunted unto him by reason of the seid office accustumed: but that oure lettres patentes made unto him, by what name so ever he be called in the same, of the seid office, stand in theire force and strength, accordyng to the tenure, tenures and purport of the same, this said acte of resumpcion or adnullacion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-517-1) Provided also that this act of resumption or annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to Thomas Burnby, esquire, with regard to any grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, made by us to him, of the office of escheator in our county of Anglesey in North Wales: and that the said petition or act of resumption shall not apply to any fees, wages and rewards, if they were traditionally and customarily due to the same office, and granted by us to him by reason of the said office: but that our letters patent made to him, by whatever name he is called in the same, of the said office, shall remain in force and strength, according to their tenor, tenors and purport, notwithstanding this said act of resumption or annulment. (fn. v-278-517-1)
< Willyam Beaufitz. > William Beaufitz.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion or adnullacion extende not nor in anywyse be prejudiciall to William Beaufitz, of a licence graunted by us unto him by oure lettres patentes the .xxviij. day of Feverer, the .xxxiij. yere of oure reigne, for to shippe certeine wolles over the montaynes, by the straits of Marrok: nor of a graunte made by us unto him, the same day and yere, by oure lettres patentes, for to have and take certeine sommes of money of oure custumes and subsidies in diverse portes within oure royame of Englond: but that the seid licence and graunte, and all in oure seid lettres patentes therupon made, be good and effectuell unto the said William, after the tenour of the same lettres, the seid acte in anywyse notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-519-1) Provided also that this act of resumption or annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to William Beaufitz, with regard to a licence granted by us to him, by our letters patent of 28 February, in the thirty-third year of our reign [1455], to ship certain wool over the mountains [or] by the straits of Gibralter: or to a grant made by us to him, on the same day and year, by our letters patent, to have and take certain sums of money from our customs and subsidies in various ports within our realm of England: but that the said licence and grant, and everything in our said letters patent made thereon, shall be good and effectual to the said William, according to the tenor of the same letters, notwithstanding the said act in any way. (fn. v-278-519-1)
< John Stanley, squier. > John Stanley, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion, or any other acte made in this present parlement, extende not nor be prejudiciall unto John Stanley, squier, by what name that he be called, in or of a graunte made by us unto him for terme of his lif of the shiref of the counte of Anglesey within the principaltee of Northwales: nor in or of a graunte made by us of daily wages, the which is right nedefull for certeine souldiours in a crue, beyng upon the saufgarde of oure toune and castell of Caernervan: but that oure seid grauntes and severalx lettres patentes, and oure lettres of prive seale upon the same grauntes made, be good and effectuell to the seid John, after the tenoures and purportes of the same lettres, the seid acte of resumpcion, or eny other acte made in this present parlement, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-521-1) Provided also that this act of resumption, or any other act made in this present parliament, shall not extend or be prejudicial to John Stanley, esquire, by whatever name he is called, with regard to a grant made by us to him for term of his life, of the shrievalty of the county of Anglesey within the principality of North Wales; or with regard to a grant made by us of daily wages which are most necessary for a company of soldiers defending our town and castle of Caernarvon, but that our said grants and individual letters patent, and our letters of privy seal made on the same grants, shall be good and effectual to the said John according to the tenors and purports of the same letters, notwithstanding the said act of resumption, or any other act made in this present parliament. (fn. v-278-521-1)
< Richard Molyneux, squier. > Richard Molyneux, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte or peticion of resumpcion, or eny other acte in this present parlement made, extende not nor in any wise be prejudiciall unto Richard Molyneux, esquier, oon of the huisshers of oure chambre, or by what name soever he be called, in, of, or to eny graunte or grauntes made by us by oure lettres patentes, undre the seale of oure duchie of Lancastr', unto the same Richard for terme of his lif, joyntly or severally, of the constableship of oure castell Lyverpole, [p. v-316][col. a] the stewardships of West Derbyshire and Salfordshire, and the maisterships of oure forest of Simonswode, and of oure parkes of Croxtath, within oure counte of Lancastre; nor to the fees and wages unto the said office or offices of old tyme due and accustumed: but that oure seid graunte or grauntes by oure lettres patentes made may be good and effectuell accordyng to the tenours and purportes of the same. (fn. v-278-523-1) Provided also that this act or petition of resumption, or any other act made in this present parliament, shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to Richard Molyneux, esquire, one of the ushers of our chamber, or by whatever name he is called, with regard to any grant or grants made by us by our letters patent, under the seal of our duchy of Lancaster, to the same Richard for term of his life, jointly or individually, of the constableship of our castle of Liverpool, [p. v-316][col. a] the stewardships of West Derbyshire and Salfordshire, and the masterships of our forest of Simonswood and of our parks of Croxteth, within our county of Lancaster; or to the traditional and customary fees and wages for the said office or offices: but that our said grant or grants made by our letters patent may be good and effectual according to their tenors and purports. (fn. v-278-523-1)
< John Slifirst. > John Slifirst [and other yeomen of the crown].
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto John Slifirst, Thomas Est, John Sutton, Henry Rosyngton, Robert Wilne, Nicholas Walton, Andrewe Lowe, John Wellisborn, Thomas Tyle, Yon Awdeles, Richard Houghton, John Raulyns, John Burley, John Burgh, Henry Castwode, John Alfrey, John Whit, Richard Clerk, Robert Westcots, Thomas Sharp, Richard Mecowe, John Barlowe, Piers Preston and William Grymmesby, yomen of the coroune, nor to any of theym, in or of .vi. d. by day, by us severally graunted to every of theym, to be take for terme of theire lyfes, and the lif of every of theym, in maner and fourme as in oure severall lettres patentes therupon to every of theym made it is expressid more at large: but that oure seid grauntes and lettres patentes be good and effectuell unto every of theym, after the tenours and purportes of the same; the acte abovesaid, and that the names of the seid yomen, or the name of any of theym here expressed, be not accordyng unto theire names, or the name of any of theim conteyned and specified in the seid lettres patentes, or any other variaunce or omission of eny mater or substaunce had or made in this be half, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-525-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to John Slifirst, Thomas Est, John Sutton, Henry Rosington, Robert Wilne, Nicholas Walton, Andrew Lowe, John Wellisborn, Thomas Tyle, Yon Awdeles, Richard Houghton, John Raulyns, John Burley, John Burgh, Henry Castwood, John Alfrey, John Whit, Richard Clerk, Robert Westcots, Thomas Sharp, Richard Mecowe, John Barlow, Piers Preston and William Grimsby, yeomen of the crown, or to any of them, with regard to 6d. a day, individually granted by us to each of them, to be taken for term of their lives, and the life of each of them, in the manner and form described more fully in our individual letters patent thereon made to each of them: but that our said grants and letters patent shall be good and effectual to each of them, according to their tenors and purports; notwithstanding the act abovesaid, or that the names of the said yeomen, or the name of any of them here given, do not accord with their names, or the names of any of them contained and specified in the said letters patent, or any other variance or omission of any matter or substance had or made in this matter. (fn. v-278-525-1)
< Harry Abyndon. > Henry Abingdon.
Provided also, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to Harry Abyndon, oure servaunt, in or of certein rent of .viij.li. to be taken [...] by the said Harry for terme of his lif of thissues and profites of Hadley Ree and Legh Ree in the counte of Essex commyng; the which rent of .viij.li. was graunted by the lettres patentes of oure uncle Humfrey late duc of Gloucestre unto the seid Harry, for his good service doen to oure seid uncle, doon and to be doon, and afterwarde to the seid Harry by us graunted and confermed: but that oure seid graunte and confirmacion be and stond to the seid Harry good and effectuell after the tenure of the same, the seid acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-527-1) Provided also that this petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Henry Abingdon, our servant, with regard to a certain rent of £8 to be taken by the said Henry for term of his life from the issues and profits coming from Hadleigh Ree and Leigh Ree in the county of Essex; which rent of £8 was granted by the letters patent of our uncle Humphrey, late duke of Gloucester, to the said Henry, for his good service done and to be done to our said uncle, and later granted and confirmed by us to the said Henry: but that our said grant and confirmation shall be and remain to the said Henry good and effectual according to the tenor of the same, notwithstanding the said act of resumption. (fn. v-278-527-1)
< John Norfolk. > John Norfolk.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne in anywyse be prejudiciall to John Norfolk, oon of the seler for oure mouth, to, of, or for any graunte or confirmacion made by us unto him of thoffice of eschetourship of oure counte of Caerner' in Northwales, for terme of his lif, with wages, fees, profites and other commoditees therto due and of olde tyme accustumed; ne that the seid acte in anywyse strecche to the adnullyng of his seid lettres patentes, ne of any conteyned within theym touchyng the said office, but that oure seid lettres patentes stond in their force, accordyng to the tenure and purport of the same, the said acte of resumpcion, or any other acte to the contrarie made, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-529-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to John Norfolk, servant of the cellar for our mouth, with regard to any grant or confirmation made by us to him, of the office of the escheatorship of our county of Caernarvon in North Wales, for term of his life, with the traditional and customary wages, fees, profits and other commodities; and that the said act shall not extend in any way to the annulment of his said letters patent or of anything contained within them concerning the said office, but that our said letters patent shall remain in force according to their tenor and purport, notwithstanding the said act of resumption, or any other act made to the contrary. (fn. v-278-529-1)
< George Tromy. > George Tromy.
Provided also, that this present acte of resumpcion be in nowise hurte ne prejudiciall unto George Tromy, for his clothyng that we have graunted hym yerely to be taken in oure grete warderobe: but that the seid graunte and lettres patentes to him therof made be good and effectuell, the seid acte notwithstondyng: which George hath been in oure service this .xxxiij. wynter and more. (fn. v-278-531-1) Provided also that this present act of resumption shall not be harmful or prejudicial in any way to George Tromy, for his clothing that we have granted him each year to be taken in our great wardrobe: but that the said grant and letters patent to him made thereon shall be good and effectual, notwithstanding the said act: which George has been in our service thirty-three winters and more. (fn. v-278-531-1)
< Soulldiours wages. > Soldiers' wages.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion, nor noon other acte made in this present parlement, extende not nor be prejudiciall to, of, or in any graunte or grauntes made by us of daily wages, the which been right nedefull for certeyn souldiours in eny crue, beyng upon the [col. b] saufegarde of ony of oure tounes, castell, or kepynges of gates within Northwales: but that oure lettres patentes, and lettres waraunts of prive seall upon the seid grauntes, made to ony of oure capiteins, constables or kepers of gates there, joyntly or severally, be good and effectuell after the tenours and purportes of oure seid lettres, this acte or eny other notwithstondyng; unto the tyme that we send to theim or eny of theim a sufficiaunt discharge by prive seall. (fn. v-278-533-1) Provided also that this act of resumption, or any other act made in this present parliament, shall not extend or be prejudicial with regard to any grant or grants made by us of daily wages, which are most necessary for the companies of soldiers [col. b] defending any of our towns, castles or gates within North Wales: but that our letters patent and letters warrant of privy seal on the said grants made to any of our captains, constables, or keepers of gates there, jointly or individually, shall be good and effectual according to the tenors and purports of our said letters, notwithstanding this act or any other; until such time as we shall send them or any of them an adequate discharge by privy seal. (fn. v-278-533-1)
< John Heron, squier. > John Heron, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte or peticion of resumpcion extende not nor in enywyse be prejudiciall to oure graunte made by us by oure lettres patentes to John Heron, squier, in, to, for or of thoffice of conestable and oversight of oure castell and lordship of Bameburgh, ne to the wages, fees and rewardes to the same of olde tyme due and accustumed: ne to oure graunte made by the same lettres patentes to the same John, of .xl.li. yerely, to be take of thissues, rentes, profites and revenuez of the seid castell and lordship commyng. So alwey that if the seid wages, fees and rewardes atteigne to the somme of .xl.li. by yere, than the seid graunte of .xl.li. yerely be not comprisid within this provision. And if the seid wages, fees and rewardes atteigne not to the summe of .xl.li. by yere, then the seid graunte of .xl.li. yerely, and lettres patentes therof, to and for asmoche as so shall atteigne to the summe of .xl.li. with the wages, fees and rewardes, be and stond good and effectuell and availlable, be cause of the kepyng and charge of the seid castell, aswell in tyme of werre, as in tyme of peas. (fn. v-278-535-1) Provided also that this act or petition of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the grant made by us by our letters patent to John Heron, esquire, with regard to the office of constable and surveyor of our castle and lordship of Bamburgh, or to the traditional and customary wages, fees and rewards for the same; or to our grant made by the same letters patent to the same John, of £40 a year to be taken from the issues, rents, profits and revenues coming from the said castle and lordships. Provided that if the said wages, fees and rewards reach the sum of £40 a year, then the said grant of £40 a year shall not be included within this proviso. And if the said wages, fees and rewards do not reach the sum of £40 a year, then the said grant of £40 a year, and letters patent thereof, for the sum needed to make up £40, shall be and remain good and effective and valid for the custody and charge of the said castle in time of war as well as in time of peace. (fn. v-278-535-1)
< Thomas Vaghan, squier. > Thomas Vaughan, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Thomas Vaghan, squier, by what name soever he be called, for terme of his lif, in or of a graunte made by us unto him of a mese, and certaine housyngs and gardeynes in Colmanstrete of London: nor in or of a graunte made by us unto him, of a mese called Garlek, with a gardeyn therto annexid, in the parisshe of Stebenhith, in the counte of Midd': but that oure seid grauntes and lettres patentes severally made of the premisses be good and effectuall unto the seid Thomas, after the tenour and purport of the same grauntes and lettres patentes, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-537-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Thomas Vaughan, esquire, by whatever name he is called, with regard to a grant made by us to him for term of his life, of a messuage and certain houses and gardens in Colman Street, London; or with regard to a grant made by us to him of a messuage called Garlic, with an attached garden, in the parish of Stepney, in the county of Middlesex: but that our said grants and letters patent individually made of the aforesaid shall be good and effectual to the said Thomas, according to the tenor and purport of the same grants and letters patent, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-537-1)
< Thomas Pulford, squier. > Thomas Pulford, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion, or eny other acte made in this parlement, extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Thomas Pulford, squier, in or of any grauntes made by us unto him for terme of his lif of any offices that were offices the first day of oure reigne or before, with wages, fees, profites and commoditees to the same offices of olde tyme due and accustumed: but that oure seid grauntes and lettres patentes upon theym made be good and effectuell unto him, by what name soever he be called, after the tenours and purportes of the same, the seid actez notwithstondyng. So alwey that oure graunte of thoffice of plummership of the castels of Carnarvan, Beaumares and Hardlagh be not comprisid within this provision. (fn. v-278-539-1) Provided also that this act of resumption, or any other act made in this parliament, shall not extend or be prejudicial to Thomas Pulford, esquire, with regard to any grants made by us to him for term of his life of any offices which were offices on the first day of our reign or before, with the traditional and customary wages, fees, profits and commodities for the same offices: but that our said grants and letters patent made on them shall be good and effectual to him, by whatever name he is called, according to their tenors and purports, notwithstanding the said acts. Provided that our grant of the office of plumber of the castles of Caernarvon, Beaumaris and Harlech is not included within this proviso. (fn. v-278-539-1)
< Richard Whetehill, merchaunt. > Richard Whetehill, merchant.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Richard Whetehill, marchaunt, in or of any graunte by us made unto him for terme of certeyn yeres, by oure lettres patentes, of two wynde milles within oure toune of Caleys, with a soile or a voide grounde called the mille hille, as it lieth nygh to the seid .ij.milles towardes the south, with thappurtenaunce: but that oure seid graunte be unto the seid Richard good and effectuell, after the contenue and purport of oure seid lettres patentes to him therupon made, this acte of resumpcion or peticion notwithstondyng. So alwey that if the seid Richard die within the terme of the seid yeres, that than his heirs or executours have the seid milles, soile or voide grounde, with the appurtenaunce, unto the tyme that they [p. v-317][col. a] be content of such sommes of money, as by the seid Richard shall be expended upon the bildyng of the same, and .xl.li. above. (fn. v-278-541-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Richard Whetehill, merchant, with regard to any grant made by us to him for the term of years, by our letters patent, of two windmills within our town of Calais, with a piece of land or empty ground called the mill hill, lying near the said two mills towards the south, with the appurtenances: but that our said grant to the said Richard shall be good and effectual, according to the content and purport of our said letters patent made to him thereon, notwithstanding this act of resumption or petition. Provided that if the said Richard should die within the term of the said years, that then his heirs or executors shall have the said mills, land or empty ground, with the appurtenances, until such time as they shall [p. v-317][col. a] be satisfied the sum of money spent by the said Richard on building the same, and £40 more. (fn. v-278-541-1)
< Harry Langton, esquier. > Henry Langton, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not or be prejudiciall unto Harry Langton, squier, in or of a graunte made by us unto him of .vi. d. by day, to be take for terme of his lif, of the issues, fermes, profites and commoditees commyng of the counte of York, to be paied by the handes of the shiref of the said countee for the yere beyng: but that the seid graunte and lettres patentes therupon made, beryng date the .xvi. day of Marche, the .xxx. yere of oure reigne, be good and effectuell unto him, after the tenure and purport of the same, the seid acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng, unto the tyme that he have an office of oure yifte to the value of .vi. d. by the day. And if he have at this day an office of oure graunte to the value of .vi. d. by the day, then the graunte of the seid .vi. d. by the day be voide. (fn. v-278-543-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to Henry Langton, esquire, with regard to a grant made by us to him of 6d. a day, to be taken for term of his life from the issues, farms, profits and commodities coming from the county of York, to be paid by the hands of the sheriff of the said county for that year: but that the said grant and letters patent made thereon, dated 16 March, in the thirtieth year of our reign [1452], shall be good and effectual to him, according to their tenor and purport, notwithstanding the said act of resumption, until such time as he shall have an office of our gift to the value of 6d. a day. And if he already has an office by our grant to the value of 6d. a day, then the grant of the said 6d. a day is to be void. (fn. v-278-543-1)
< Robert Dauson. > Robert Dawson.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Robert Dauson, oon of the yomen of the corone, in or of .iij. d. by day, parcell of .vi. d. by day, by us to him graunted, to be take for terme of his lif of the issues and profites commyng of the counte of Devonshire: but that oure seid graunte and lettres patentes therupon made, as to and for the seid .iij. d. by day, parcell of the seid .vi. d., be good and effectuell unto him, after the tenour and [memb. 6] purport of the same, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-545-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Robert Dawson, one of the yeomen of the crown, with regard to 3d. a day, part of the 6d. a day granted by us to him, to be taken for term of his life from the issues and profits coming from the county of Devon: but that our said grant and letters patent made thereon, with regard to the said 3d. a day, part of the said 6d., shall be good and effectual to him, according to their tenor and [memb. 6] purport, notwithstanding the said act. (fn. v-278-545-1)
< Lord Duras. > Lord Duras.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion be not prejudiciall to a graunte made by us by oure lettres patentes to Gualliard de Durafort, knyght, lord of Duras and of Blanquafort, in oure duchie of Guyenne, of a .c.li. to be taken yerely at the receipte of oure eschequier, into the tyme < he > be restored to his lordshippis in the said duchie of Guyenne, or otherwise recompensid. (fn. v-278-547-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not be prejudicial to a grant made by us by our letters patent to Gaillard de Durfort, knight, lord of Duras and of Blanquafort, in our duchy of Guyenne, of £100, to be taken yearly at the receipt of our exchequer, until such time as he shall be restored to his lordships in the said duchy of Guyenne, or otherwise recompensed. (fn. v-278-547-1)
< Chauncelour of England. > The chancellor of England.
Provided also, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion be not prejudiciall nor hurte to oure chaunceller of Englond for the tyme beyng, nor to the clerke of oure parlement, nor to the clerke of oure hanaper, nor to the clerkes of oure corone in oure chauncerie, nor to othir officers in oure said chauncerie, in, of, or for eny paiement that owe or shuld be made to eny of theym of or for theire fees, wages, clothyng or rewardes, to theym or eny of theym belongyng, be cause of theire said offices or occupacions, to theym or eny of theym by oure lettres patentes graunted for the cause aforesaid. (fn. v-278-549-1) Provided also that this petition or act of resumption shall not be prejudicial or harmful to our chancellor of England at the time, or to the clerk of our parliament, or to the clerk of our hanaper, or to the clerks of our crown in our chancery, or to the other officers in our said chancery, with regard to any payment which ought or should be made to any of them, of or for their fees, wages, clothing or rewards belonging to them or any of them because of their said offices or occupations, granted to them or any of them by our letters patent for the aforesaid reason. (fn. v-278-549-1)
< Thomas Liseux, gentilman. > Thomas Liseux, gentleman [keeper of the privy seal].
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny graunte or assignement made or to be made to maister Thomas Liseux, keper of oure prive seall, for his wages to the said office of olde tyme due and accustumed; that is to say, .xx. s. by day, by oure lettres patentes or otherwise. (fn. v-278-551-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or assignment made or to be made to Master Thomas Liseux, keeper of our privy seal, for his traditional and customary wages for the said office; that is to say, 20s. a day, by our letters patent or otherwise. (fn. v-278-551-1)
< John Fortescue, knight. > John Fortescue, knight.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion be not prejudiciall nor extende to the graunte which we have made by oure lettres patentes to John Fortescu, knyght, of .ij. tunne of wyne, to be taken yerely in the porte of London for terme of his lif. (fn. v-278-553-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not be prejudicial or extend to the grant which we have made by our letters patent to John Fortescue, knight, of two tuns of wine, to be taken yearly in the port of London for term of his life. (fn. v-278-553-1)
We woll, with the assente of the lordes spirituell and temporell in this present parlement assembled, that the acte made by auctorite of oure parlement holden the .xviij. yere of oure reigne, for the paiement of the fees, rewardes, and clothyngz of oure justices, serjauntz and attourney, stonde and abide in his force and effecte, this acte of resumpcion, or eny other acte made or to be made in this present parlement, notwithstondyng. So alwey that it be not prejudiciall nor hurt to oure chaunceller of Englond, clerk of oure parlement, clerk of oure hanaper, ne to noon other officer of < or in > oure chauncerie for the tyme beyng. (fn. v-278-555-1) [Justices, serjeants-at-law and attorney.]
We will, with the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal assembled in this present parliament, that the act made by authority of our parliament held in the eighteenth year [1439], for the payment of the fees, rewards and clothing of our justices, serjeants and attorney, should stay and remain in force and effect, notwithstanding this act of resumption, or any other act made or to be made in this present parliament. Provided that it shall not be prejudicial or harmful to our chancellor of England, clerk of our parliament, clerk of our hanaper, or to any other officer of or in our chancery at the time. (fn. v-278-555-1)
[col. b]
< Baron of thexchequier. > A baron of the exchequer.
Provided also, that this acte and ordenaunce of resumpcion be not prejudiciall to Gilbert Haltost, secundarie baron of oure escheker, of or for .xx.li. yerely, graunted by us to him terme of his lif, by oure lettres patentes beryng date the .xxij. ti day of Marche, the .xxxi. yere of oure reigne: but that oure seid graunte and lettres patentes be to him good and effectuell, after the contenue of the same, this acte and ordenaunce of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-557-1) Provided also that this act and ordinance of resumption shall not be prejudicial to Gilbert Haltost, second baron of our exchequer, with regard to £20 a year, granted by us to him for term of his life, by our letters patent dated 22 March, in the thirty-first year of our reign [1453]: but that our said grant and letters patent shall be to him good and effectual according to their contents, notwithstanding this act and ordinance of resumption. (fn. v-278-557-1)
< Thomas Kent, clerke of the counsell. > Thomas Kent, clerk of the council.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion be not prejudiciall unto maister Thomas Kent, clerk of oure counseill, and secundarie in the office of oure prive seall, of or for .xl.li. yerely, graunted by us unto him duryng his lif, by oure lettres patentes beryng date the .xxiiij. ti day of Novembre, the .xxx. ti yere of oure reigne, to be taken of the issues, profittes and revenuez of oure countees of London < and > Midd': nor of nor for .l. marcs yerely graunted unto him by the name of maister Thomas Kent, secundarie in the office of oure prive seall and clerk of oure counseill, by oure lettres patentes beryng date the .xxi. day of Juyll, the yere of oure reigne .xxxi., to be taken of the issues, profittes, fermes, revenues, and othir commoditees of the countees of Oxon' and Berk commyng: ner to the seid maister Thomas and Isabell his wyf, of oure graunte made to theym of oure maner and parke of Langley, with the appurtenaunces, within oure counte of Kent, by oure lettres patentes beryng date the first day of < Decembre, > the .xxx. yere of oure reigne: but that oure seid grauntes and lettres patentes be good and effectuell, after the contenue of everyche of the same, this acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-559-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not be prejudicial to Master Thomas Kent, clerk of our council, and secondary in the office of our privy seal, with regard to £40 a year, granted by us to him during his lifetime, by our letters patent dated 24 November, in the thirtieth year of our reign [1451], to be taken from the issues, profits and revenues of our counties of London and Middlesex: or with regard to 50 marks a year, granted to him by the name of Master Thomas Kent, secondary in the office of our privy seal and clerk of our council, by our letters patent dated 21 July, in the thirty-first year of our reign [1453], to be taken from the issues, profits, farms, revenues and other commodities coming from the counties of Oxford and Berkshire; or to the said Master Thomas and Isabel his wife, of our grant made to them of our manor and park of Langley with the appurtenances, in our county of Kent, by our letters patent dated 1 December, in the thirtieth year of our reign [1451]: but that our said grants and letters patent shall be good and effectual, according to the content of each of them, notwithstanding this act of resumption. (fn. v-278-559-1)
< Stewardes. > Stewards [of the duchy of Lancaster].
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall unto oure stewardes of oure duchie of Lancastre, nor to eny of theym, in, to, or of eny of theire offices of suche stewardeship, nor in, to, or of eny thyng concernyng, touchyng or belongyng to eny of theym, by reason or cause of eny suche office, in eny manere wyse. (fn. v-278-561-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to our stewards of our duchy of Lancaster, or to any of them, with regard to any of their stewardships, or with regard to anything concerning, touching or belonging to any of them by reason or because of any such office, in any way. (fn. v-278-561-1)
< John Faukes. > John Faukes.
Provided also, that this peticion or acte of resumpcion extende not nor in enywyse be prejudiciall to eny graunte made by us by oure lettres patentes to John Faukes, oon of the clerkes of oure chauncerie, of the office of clerk of oure parlement, with the fees of .xl.li. by yere to be taken of the issues of oure hanaper of oure chauncerie, as in oure seid lettres patentes therof made more plainly apperith: but that oure seid graunte and lettres patentes be and stonde to the said John good and effectuell, eny thing in the seid peticion or acte of resumpcion conteyned notwithstondyng; consideryng that John Rome, John Frank, William Prestwyke, John Bate and Thomas Kirkeby, beyng successively clerkes of the parlement, had .xl.li. yerely by wey of annuytee, for such tyme as they so were clerkes of the parlement. (fn. v-278-563-1) Provided also that this petition or act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to any grant made by us by our letters patent to John Faukes, one of the clerks of our chancery, of the office of clerk of our parliament, with fees of £40 a year to be taken from the issues of our hanaper of our chancery, as appears more fully in our said letters patent made thereof: but that our said grant and letters patent shall be and remain to the said John good and effectual, notwithstanding anything contained in the said petition or act of resumption; considering that John Rome, John Frank, William Prestwick, John Bate and Thomas Kirkby, being successively clerks of the parliament, had £40 a year by way of annuity for as long as they were clerks of the parliament. (fn. v-278-563-1)
< Gervaise le Vulre. > Gervase le Vulre.
Provided also, that the seid peticion or acte of resumpcion be not prejudiciall to maister Gervais le Vulre, of .l. marc yerely, parcell of annuytee of .c. marke by yere by us graunted to the said Gervais by oure lettres patentes for terme of his lif, for the office of oure secretarie of Fraunce, to be taken of the custumes and subsidies in oure porte of Suthampton. (fn. v-278-565-1) Provided also that the said petition or act of resumption shall not be prejudicial to Master Gervase le Vulre, with regard to 50 marks a year, part of the annuity of 100 marks a year, granted by us to the said Gervase by our letters patent for term of his life for the office of our French secretary, to be taken from the customs and subsidies in our port of Southampton. (fn. v-278-565-1)
< Office for terme of lif. > Office for term of life.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall to eny persone or persones, for terme of his lif or theire lifes, for or of eny office or offices with wages and fees of olde tyme accustumed, and to suche office or offices perteynyng, and by oure lettres patentes to him or to theym graunted, the which office or offices nede actuell excercise. And that this provision extende not to eny office or offices, the which were noon offices nor office the first day of oure reigne, nor afore. Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to any person or persons, for term of his life or their lives, with regard to any office or offices, with the customary wages and fees traditionally pertaining to such an office or offices, and granted by our letters patent to him or to them, which office or offices require actual exercise. And that this proviso shall not extend to any office or offices which were not offices or an office on the first day of our reign, or before.
[p. v-318]
[col. a]
< Harry late cardinall. > Henry, late cardinal.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion and adnullation extende not ne be prejudiciall to Harry late cardinall of Englond, his heires ne his assignees, of eny graunte or grauntes, confirmacion or confirmacions, leesse or leesses, made by us unto him and unto his heires of eny manoirs, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions and services, or othir possessions, or eny maner of charges goyng < oute > of theym or eny of theym, with theire appurtenaunces, within this oure reaume; ne to non othir persone or persones havyng the seid cardinalle estate to theire use, or to the use of eny othir persone or persones, in and of the said manoirs, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions and services, or eny of the premisses, with theire appurtenaunces, or in and of eny parcell of the same; the which said manoirs, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions, services, and charges < goyng out of þeim or eny of þeim, > with theire appurtenaunces, the said late cardinall purchased and bought of us by oure desire, by thassent, advise, and agrement of our counseill, and paied for the said manoirs, londes, tenementes, rentes, reversions and services, with the charges goyng out of theym or eny of theym, with theire appurtenaunces, unto us, to the value after the cours of sellyng of londes and tenementes within this oure said reaume. (fn. v-278-569-1) Provided also that this act of resumption and annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial to Henry, late cardinal of England, his heirs or his assigns, with regard to any grant or grants, confirmation or confirmations, lease or leases, made by us to him and to his heirs, of any manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions and services, or other possessions, or any kind of charges going from them, with their appurtenances, within this our realm; or to any other person or persons having the said cardinal's estate to their use, or to the use of any other person or persons, in and of the said manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions and services, or any of the foregoing, with their appurtenances, or in and of any part of them; which said manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions, services, and charges going from them or any of them with their appurtenances, the said late cardinal purchased and bought from us at our request, by the assent, advice, and agreement of our council, and paid to us for the said manors, lands, tenements, rents, reversions and services, with the charges going from them or any of them, with their appurtenances, the value calculated on the basis usual when lands and tenements are sold within our said realm. (fn. v-278-569-1)
< For the same. > For the same.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende hym not nor be prejudiciall [...] to oure lettres patentes made undre oure grete seell to our grete uncle Harry late cardinall of Englond, or to eny othir persone or persones to his use, of eny manoirs, londes, tenementes, rentes, services, advousons and reversions, or ellis of eny othir thing purchaced of us by oure seid grete < uncle > Harry late cardinall, or ellis by eny other persone or persones to his use, yeven and graunted to the maister or wardeyn, and the brethern of the hospitall of Seint Crosse beside Wynchestre, and to theire successours. (fn. v-278-571-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to our letters patent made under our great seal to our great uncle Henry, late cardinal of England, or to any other person or persons to his use, of any manors, lands, tenements, rents, services, advowsons and reversions, or of any other thing purchased from us by our said great uncle Henry, late cardinal, or by any other person or persons to his use, given and granted to the master or warden and the brethren of the hospital of St Cross near Winchester and to their successors. (fn. v-278-571-1)
< Richard Harington, knight. > Richard Harrington, knight.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to oure menyall servaunt Richard Haryngton, knyght, countroller of oure houshold, of, in, nor to an annuell rente or fee of .xl.li. by us by oure lettres patentes undre oure seale of oure duchie of Lancastre to the said Richard made, to be taken by the handes of the receyvour of oure honoure of Pountfret for the tyme beyng, duryng the lif of the said Richard, by what name so ever the seid Richard be named in oure seid lettres patentes, unto the tyme that he be rewarded with an office to the yerely value of .xl.li.; < or ellis > if it happe the said Richard to be rewarded with an office of oure graunte to the yerely value of .xx.li. that than he have but .xx.li. parcell of the said annuitee of .xl.li. forthewith suche office to the yerely value of .xx.li.: by consideracion that the said Richard < by > longe tyme hath done notable and agreable service, aswell to the most victorious prince oure fadre, on whom God have mercy, as to us within oure reaume of Fraunce and duchie of Normandie, and within this oure reaume of Englond, havyng none other reward ner fee of oure said fadre nor of us, othir than the said .xl.li. for the notable and agreable service abovesaid. (fn. v-278-573-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to our household servant Richard Harrington, knight, controller of our household, with regard to an annual rent or fee of £40, made by us by our letters patent under our seal of our duchy of Lancaster to the said Richard, to be taken by the hands of the receiver of our honour of Pontefract at the time, during the lifetime of the said Richard, by whatever name the said Richard is named in our said letters patent, until he is rewarded with an office to the annual value of £40; or else if it happens that the said Richard is rewarded with an office of our grant to the annual value of £20, that then he shall have but £20 of the said annuity of £40, along with the office to the annual value of £20; considering that the said Richard has for a long time done noteworthy and agreeable service, to the most victorious prince our father, may God have mercy on him, as well as to us, within our realm of France and duchy of Normandy, and within this our realm of England, having no other reward or fee from our said father or from us, other than the said £40, for the abovesaid noteworthy and agreeable service. (fn. v-278-573-1)
< Edmond Hungerford, knight. > Edmund Hungerford, knight.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion, revocacion and adnullacion extende not ne be prejudiciall to eny graunte or grauntes by us made by oure lettres patentes to Edmond Hungerford, knyght, oon of oure kervers, by what soever name he be called in the same lettres patentes, for terme of his lif, of the office or offices of the constableship of Devyse in the counte of Wiltes', the kepynges of oure park of Devyse, and of oure forestes of Milkesham, Pevesham and Chippenham, in the same counte; the office of porter of our said castell; the office of parker of oure said parke; ne of almaner and singuler offices of foresters and raungers [col. b] of oure said forestes, with almaner wages, fees, profites and commoditees to the said offices and kepynges of olde tyme due, accustumed and apperteynyng: but that oure said lettres patentes, duryng the lif of the said Edmond, of and in the premisses, and in everiche of theym, be good and effectuell unto the said < Sir Edmond > for terme of his lif, this acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-575-1) Provided also that this act of resumption, revocation and annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or grants made by us by our letters patent to Edmund Hungerford, knight, one of our carvers, by whatever name he is called in the same letters patent, for term of his life, of the office or offices of the constableship of Devizes in the county of Wiltshire; the custody of our park of Devizes and of our forests of Melksham, Pewsham and Chippenham in the same county; the office of porter of our said castle; the office of parker of our said park; and of each and every office of forester and ranger [col. b] of our said forests, with all manner of wages, fees, profits and commodities traditionally and customarily pertaining to the said offices and keeperships: but that our said letters patent, during the lifetime of the said Edmund, of and in the things stated and in each of them, shall be good and effectual to the said Sir Edmund for term of his life, notwithstanding this act. (fn. v-278-575-1)
< Richard Tunstall, knight. > Richard Tunstall, knight.
Provided also, that this peticion and acte of resumpcion extende not ne be prejudiciall to oure lettres patentes and graunte by us made unto Richard Tunstall, knyght, by the name of Richard Tunstall squier for oure body, of .l. marcs yerely terme of his lif, parcell of an annuitee of .xl.li. yerely, for terme of his life by us graunted, to be taken of the issues, profites and revenuez of oure manoirs, londes and tenements, and < of > othir oure possessions within oure counte of Lancastre, by the handes of oure resceyvours there for the tyme beyng: for that among othir that the said Richard made unto us the first comfortable relacion and notice that oure most entierly belovyd wyf the quene was with child, to oure most singuler consolacion, and to all oure true liege people < grete > joy and comfort. (fn. v-278-577-1) Provided also that this petition and act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to our letters patent and grant made by us to Richard Tunstall, knight, by the name of Richard Tunstall, esquire for our body, of 50 marks a year for term of his life, part of an annuity of £40 a year, granted by us for term of his life, to be taken from the issues, profits and revenues of our manors, lands and tenements, and from our other possessions within our county of Lancaster, by the hands of our receivers there at the time: because, among other things, the said Richard gave us the first comforting report and news that our most entirely beloved wife the queen was with child, to our most singular consolation, and a great joy and comfort to all our true liege people. (fn. v-278-577-1)
< Lord Dudley. > Lord Dudley.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne in enywyse be prejudiciall to John lord Duddeley, in avoydyng or adnullyng oure lettres patentes made unto him of the free disposition of the advouson and patronage of oure free chapell and deanry of the college of Wolvronhampton, in the counte of Staff', for the next vacacion oonly: but that oure said lettres patentes to him so made be and stond in theire force and strength, aftir the tenure and purpos of the same, this said acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-579-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to John, Lord Dudley, in cancelling or annulling our letters patent made to him of the free disposal of the advowson and patronage of our free chapel and deanery of the college of Wolverhampton, in the county of Stafford, for the next vacancy only: but that our said letters patent thus made to him shall be and remain in force and strength, according to their tenor and purpose, notwithstanding this said act of resumption. (fn. v-278-579-1)
< Willyam Ellton. > William Elton.
Provided, that this acte of resumpcion be not prejudiciall to William Elton, squyer, of .xij.li. graunted to him by us, by oure lettres patentes beryng date the .xvij. day of May, in the .xxxi. yere of oure reigne, to be taken for terme of his lif, of the feeferme of the toune of Malmesbury, with three hundredes to the same toune perteynyng, by the handes of thabbot and covent of Malmesbury and his successours; the seid acte of resumpcion, or by what name or names soever the seid William Elton be named in the seid graunte, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-581-1) Provided that this act of resumption shall not be prejudicial to William Elton, esquire, with regard to £12 granted to him by us, by our letters patent dated 17 May, in the thirty-first year of our reign [1453], to be taken for term of his life from the fee-farm of the town of Malmesbury, with the three hundreds pertaining to the same town, by the hands of the abbot and convent of Malmesbury and his successors; notwithstanding the said act of resumption, or by whatever name or names the said William Elton is named in the said grant. (fn. v-278-581-1)
< John Merston, squyer. > John Merston, esquire.
Provided also, that the seid acte and ordenaunce of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to John Merston, squier, of or for .xij.li. yerely, to be take and paied unto him terme of his life, by the handes of the abbot and covent of Glouc' for the tyme beyng. Provided also that the said act and ordinance of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to John Merston, esquire, with regard to £12 a year to be taken and paid to him for term of his life by the hands of the abbot and convent of Gloucester at the time.
< John Asteley. > John Astley.
Provided also, that oure lettres patentes beryng date the first day of Juyn, the .xxx. yere of oure reigne, made to John Asteley, knyght, by what soever name he be called, of the graunte of .xl.li. to be had and taken yerely for terme of his lif, aswel of the custom of wolles, hydes and wolfelles, in the port of the toun of Suthampton, as of the pety custom there, commyng by the handes of the collectours or custumers of the same custom and pety custom for the tyme beyng, atte termes of Seint Michell and Pasche, by evyn portions, be not comprehended in this acte, nor prejudised, nor lese theire force or effecte by the same acte: but that the same lettres patentes stand in theire strength, and be to hym as beneficiall and effectuell as they were at the tyme that they were first graunted and had; eny statut, acte, ordenaunce, < restreynt, > or othir thing what soever it be to the contrarie < therof > made, or to be made, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-585-1) Provided also that our letters patent dated 1 June, in the thirtieth year of our reign [1452], made to John Astley, knight, by whatever name he is called, of the grant of £40, to be had and taken yearly for term of his life from the custom on wool, hides and woolfells in the port of the town of Southampton, as well as from the petty custom there, by the hands of the collectors and customers of the same custom and petty custom at the time, at the terms of Michaelmas and Easter in equal portions, are not included in this act, or prejudiced or their force and effect lost by the same act: but that the same letters patent shall remain in force and be as beneficial and effectual to him as they were at the time when they were first granted and had; notwithstanding any statute, act, ordinance, restraint, or other thing whatever made or to be made to the contrary. (fn. v-278-585-1)
< John Skellton, esquier. > John Skelton, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion be not prejudiciall ne extende to John Skelton, squier, of any graunte or grauntes made to hym by us of an annuite of .xl. marcs, in recompense of .m. marcs paied for his finaunce to oure enemyes of Fraunce. And also in recompense of an annuite of .xx.li. and of certeyn londes, [p. v-319][col. a] of the yerely value of .c. marcs, which he had of the graunte of the full noble prince of blessid memoire oure fader. (fn. v-278-587-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not be prejudicial or extend to John Skelton, esquire, with regard to any grant or grants made to him by us of an annuity of 40 marks, in recompense for 1,000 marks paid for his ransom to our enemies of France. And also in recompense for an annuity of £20, and of certain lands [p. v-319][col. a] of the yearly value of 100 marks, which he had by the grant of the most noble prince of blessed memory our father. (fn. v-278-587-1)
< John Merston. > John Merston.
Provided also, that this seid acte and ordenaunce of resumpcion extende not nor be prejudiciall to eny graunte or grauntes made by us by oure lettres patentes, or by eny othir persone or persones, to John Merston and Rose his wyfe, of a tenement called Leden Porche, extendyng into the Croked Lane and Seint Martyn Orgar Lane in London: but that the seid John and Rose, < may have > and possede the seid tenement, with thappurtenauncez, duryng theire both lyves; the seid peticion or acte of resumpcion, or eny thing therein conteyned, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-589-1) Provided also that this said act and ordinance of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial to any grant or grants made by us by our letters patent, or by any other person or persons, to John Merston and Rose his wife, of a tenement called Leaden Porch, between Crooked Lane and St Martin Orgar Lane in London: but that the said John and Rose may have and possess the said tenement with its appurtenances during both their lives; notwithstanding the said petition or act of resumption, or anything contained therein. (fn. v-278-589-1)
< The kings noryie. > The king's wet-nurse.
Provided also, that oure lettres patentes made to oure servaunt and late oure norys Johane Asteley, wydowe, late the wyf of Thomas Asteley, squier, as to and for .xl. mark yerely, parcell of .l. marc yerely by the same lettres patentes to her graunted, to be had duryng her lif, of thissues, profites and revenuez commyng of the countees of Warrewyk and Leycestr', by the handes of the shiref of the same countees for the tyme beyng, atte festes of Estre and Seint Michell by evyn porcions, be not comprehended in this acte of resumpcion, nor prejudiced, ne lese theire force or effecte by the same acte, by what soever name the said Johane be named in the seid lettres patentes: but that the same lettres patentes stand in theire strength, and be to her as effectuell, as they were atte tyme of the first graunte of theym to her made, as to and for the seid .xl. marc yerely, parcell of the seid .l. marc; eny statut, acte, ordenaunce, restreynt, or other thyng what soever it be to the contrarie desirid, or in this present parlement therof made, or to be made, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-591-1) Provided also that our letters patent made to our servant and former wet-nurse Joan Astley, widow, late the wife of Thomas Astley, esquire, with regard to 40 marks a year, part of the 50 marks a year granted to her by the same letters patent, to be had during her life from the issues, profits and revenues coming from the counties of Warwick and Leicester, by the hands of the sheriff of the same counties at the time, at Easter and Michaelmas in equal portions, are not included in this act of resumption, or prejudiced or their force or effect lost by the same act, by whatever name the said Joan is called in the said letters patent: but that the same letters patent shall remain in force and be as effectual to her as they were at the time of the first grant of them made to her, with regard to the said 40 marks a year, part of the said 50 marks; notwithstanding any statute, act, ordinance, restraint, or any other thing sought to the contrary, or made or to be made in this present parliament. (fn. v-278-591-1)
< Thomas Burneby, squier. > Thomas Burnby, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion or adnullacion extende not nor in enywyse be prejudiciall to Thomas Burneby, squyer, nor to eny graunte to him by us made of the office of eschetour in the counte of Anglesey in Northwales; nor to any graunt to him by us made of the office of the shirefe of the counte of Merionneth in Northwales, with < all maner of wages, fees, profites > and commodites, to the said offices of olde tyme due and accustumed. (fn. v-278-593-1) Provided also that this act of resumption or annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to Thomas Burnby, esquire, or to any grant made to him by us of the office of escheator in the county of Anglesey in North Wales; or to any grant made to him by us of the office of sheriff of the county of Merioneth in North Wales, with all manner of wages, fees, profits and commodities traditional and customary for the said offices. (fn. v-278-593-1)
< John Hiend. > John Hiend.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion extende not ne in enywyse be prejudiciall to John Hiende, oon of oure mareshalles of oure halle, to, of, or for eny graunte < or > confirmacion made by us unto him of thoffice of shiriefship of oure countee of Caern' in Northwales, for terme of his lif, with wages, fees, profites and other commoditees therto of old tyme due and accustumed; ne that the seid acte in eny wyse strecche to the adnullyng of his seid lettres patentes, ne to eny thyng conteigned within theym touchyng the seid office: but that oure seid lettres patentes, [...] stonde in theire force and effecte, accordyng to the tenure and purport of the same, the said acte of resumpcion, or eny other acte to the contrarie made, notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-595-1) Provided also that this act of resumption shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to John Hiend, one of our marshals of our hall, with regard to any grant or confirmation made by us to him of the office of sheriff of our county of Caernarvon in North Wales, for term of his life, with the traditional and customary wages, fees, profits and other commodities, and that the said act shall not in any way extend to the annulment of his said letters patent, or to anything contained within them concerning the said office: but that our said letters patent shall remain in force and effect, according to their tenor and purport, notwithstanding the said act of resumption, or any other act made to the contrary. (fn. v-278-595-1)
< Edmond Blake, squier. > Edmund Blake, esquire.
Provided also, that any acte made in this present parlement in nowise be prejudiciall to oure servaunt Edmund Blake, squyer, in, to, of or for thoffice of clerk of oure werkes by us graunted unto him, with such wages, fees, profites, commoditees and clothyng as was to the seid office of olde tyme due and accustumed. (fn. v-278-597-1) Provided also that any act made in this present parliament shall not be prejudicial in any way to our servant Edmund Blake, esquire, with regard to the office of clerk of our works, granted by us to him, with such wages, fees, profits, commodities and clothing as are traditional and customary for the said office. (fn. v-278-597-1)
[memb. 5]
< Gerard de la Hay. > Gerard de la Hay.
Provided also, that this acte extende nor nor be prejudiciall unto Gerard de la Hay of oure eschequier, in or of a graunte made by us unto him of a buk and a doo, nor of .xij. cartefull wode rowers, to be take yerely for terme of his life in oure forest of Wabrigge, in the counte of Hunt', in the name of .vi. trees called rowers, by us to him graunted, to be taken yerely in the seid forest. (fn. v-278-599-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Gerard de la Hay of our exchequer, with regard to a grant made by us to him of a buck and a doe, or of twelve cartfuls of dead wood, to be taken each year for term of his life in our forest of Weybridge, in the county of Huntingdon, in satisfaction of six dead trees, granted by us to him, to be taken each year in the said forest. (fn. v-278-599-1)
< Gilbert Parr, squyer. > Gilbert Parr, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto Gilbert Par, squier, nor unto Agnes [col. b] his wyf, by what name or names they or either of theim be called, in or of a graunte made by us unto theym, of .x.li. to be take yerely for termes of theire lyves, and the life of either of theim lenger lyvyng, of the feeferme of the citee of Wynchestre, by the handes of the citezeins, baillifs, or other ministres of the same citee for the tyme beyng, at the termes of Pasche and Seint Michell by evyn porcions. (fn. v-278-601-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to Gilbert Parr, esquire, or to Agnes [col. b] his wife, by whatever name or names they or either of them are called, with regard to a grant made by us to them of £10, to be taken yearly for the terms of their lives in survivorship from the fee-farm of the city of Winchester, by the hands of the citizens, bailiffs, or other officials of the same city at the time, at the terms of Easter and Michaelmas in equal portions. (fn. v-278-601-1)
< Henry Roos, squier. > Henry Roos, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte of resumpcion and of adnullacion extende not nor in enywyse be prejudiciall to oure welbelovyd squier Henry Roos, son and heire of Robert Roos nowe dede, and somtyme oon of oure kervers, the which Robert daily in his lif contynued in oure service, of eny graunte or grauntes made by us unto the seid Robert, and to his heirs males of his body lawfully begoten, of the kepyng of oure castell of Rokyngham, nor of the stiwardship and kepyng of oure forest of Rokyngham, nor of the kepyng of our parke of Brigstoke, and of the foreyn woodes there called Brigstokebailly, nor of the oversight of verte and venyson in all the parkes and all the baillifwykes within the said forest, stiwardship and kepyng, nor of eny wages, fees and all other libertees, profites and commoditees to the said office or eny of theym of olde tyme due, accustumed and apperteynyng; nor of eny graunte, confirmacion, ratificacion and approbacion, made by us after the deth of the seid Robert, to the seid Henry and to his heirs males of his body laufully begoten, of all the said offices, with wages, fees, and all othir libertees, profites and commoditees to the said offices or eny of theym of old tyme due, accustumed and apperteynyng; nor of eny graunte, confirmacion, ratificacion and approbacion, made by us after the dethe of the seid Robert, to the seid Henry, and to his heires males of his body lawefully begoten, of all the said offices, with wages, fees and all other libertees, profites and commoditees, to the said offices or eny of theym of olde tyme due, accustumed and apperteynyng; [sic: read 'rep'] nor of eny graunte made by us to the seid Robert and to his heirs males of the kepyng of oure park of Multon and of oure wareyn there, nor of eny wages, < fees, > and other libertees, profites and commoditees of the same park and wareyn, and either of theym, of old tyme due and accustumed. Which wages, fees, libertees, profites and [...] commoditees of olde tyme due and accustumed to the occupiours of all the said offices, over the charges, excede not the yerely value of .x.li.; of the which offices the said Henry by vertue of the said grauntes is possessed. But that the seid Henry, in eny of the premisses and of every of theym, by vertue of the seid grauntes, confirmation, ratification and approbation, and every of theym, have estate for terme of his lif oonly. (fn. v-278-603-1) Provided also that this act of resumption and annulment shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to our well-beloved esquire Henry Roos, son and heir of Robert Roos now deceased, once one of our carvers, which Robert served us daily during his life, with regard to any grant or grants made by us to the said Robert and to the heirs male of his body lawfully begotten, of the custody of our castle of Rockingham, or of the stewardship and custody of our forest of Rockingham, or of the custody of our park of Brigstock, and of the outlying woods there called Brigstock bailiwick, or of the supervision of vert and venison in all the parks and all the bailiwicks within the said forest, stewardship and keepership, or of any wages, fees and all other liberties, profits and commodities traditionally and customarily pertaining to the said office or any of them; or of any grant, confirmation, ratification and approval made by us after the death of the said Robert to the said Henry, and to his heirs male of his body lawfully begotten, of all the said offices, with the wages, fees and all other liberties, profits and commodities traditionally and customarily pertaining to the said offices or any of them; or of any grant made by us to the said Robert and to his heirs male of the custody of our park of Multon, and of our warren there, or of any traditional and customary wages, fees and other liberties, profits and commodities of the same park and warren, and either of them. Which fees, liberties, profits and commodities, traditional and customary for the occupiers of all the said offices, after the charges have been met, do not exceed the annual value of £10; which offices the said Henry possesses by virtue of the said grants. But that the said Henry shall have estate for term of his life only, in any and each of the foregoing, by virtue of the said grants, confirmation, ratification and approval, and every one of them. (fn. v-278-603-1)
< John Hampton, squier. > John Hampton, esquire.
Provided also, that this acte extende not nor be prejudiciall unto John Hampton, squier, in or of .xl. marc by yere, parcell of .l. marc, by oure lettres patentes beryng date the .xvi. day of May, the .xxx. yere of oure reigne, to him by the name of John Hampton, squier for oure body, graunted, to be take yerely for terme of his lif by severall parcelles and at severall places, in the same lettres patentes limited and assigned; the seid .xl. marc, parcell of the seid .l. marc, to be taken of such severall parcelles and at such severall places, in manere and fourme folowyng. That is to sey, .x.li. therof of the feeferme of the milnes of Pendelston, by the handes of the burgeyses of the toune of Bruges in the counte of Salop for the tyme beyng, at the festes of Pasche and Seint Michell, by evyn portions; and .vi.li. .iij. s. .viij. d. therof, of the feeferme of the seid toune of Bruges, by the handes of the men of the said toune for the tyme beyng, at the said festes, by evyn porcions; and other .x.li. therof, of the ferme of the toune of Worcestr', by the handes of the citezeins of [p. v-320][col. a] the same toune for the tyme beyng, at the seid festes, by evyn portions; and .ix. s. .viij. d., residue of the seid .xl. marc, parcell of .viij. s. .iij. s. [sic: read 'vijli. iijs.'] residue of the seid .l. marc, of the feeferme of the manoir of Roweley, by the handes of the fermours or othir occupiours of the same for the tyme beyng, at the seid festes, by evyn porcions: but that oure seid lettres patentes, as for the seid .xl. marcs, parcell of the seid .l. marc, the seid .xl. marc to be taken in manere and fourme aboverehersed, be and stond unto the seid John Hampton, by what soever name he be called, good and effectuell, the seid acte notwithstondyng. (fn. v-278-605-1) Provided also that this act shall not extend or be prejudicial to John Hampton, esquire, with regard to 40 marks a year, part of the 50 marks granted by our letters patent dated 16 May, in the thirtieth year of our reign [1452], to him by the name of John Hampton, esquire for our body, to be taken yearly for term of his life, piecemeal from a number of places specified and appointed in the same letters patent; the said 40 marks, part of the said 50 marks, to be taken piecemeal from a number of places in the following manner and form. That is to say, £10 of it from the fee-farm of the mills of Pendlestone, by the hands of the burgesses of the town of Bridgnorth in the county of Shropshire at the time, at Easter and Michaelmas in equal portions; and £6 3s. 8d. of it from the fee-farm of the said town of Bridgnorth, by the hands of the men of the said town at the time, at the said feasts in equal portions; and another £10 of it from the farm of the town of Worcester, by the hands of the citizens of [p. v-320][col. a] the same town at the time, at the said feasts in equal portions; and 9s. 8d., the rest of the said 40 marks, part of £7 3s. the rest of the said 50 marks, from the fee-farm of the manor of Rowley, by the hands of its farmers or other occupiers at the time, at the said feasts in equal portions: but that our said letters patent shall be and remain good and effectual to the said John Hampton, by whatever name he is called, notwithstanding the said act, for the said 40 marks, part of the said 50 marks, the said 40 marks to be taken in the manner and form described above. (fn. v-278-605-1)
< Robert Passemere and others. > Robert Passemer and others.
Provided also, that this acte, or eny other acte of resumpcion, be not hurt ne prejudiciall nor extende to any graunte made by oure severall lettres patentes to oure servauntes Robert Passemer, Thomas Pope, John Bridde, Walter Chamberleyn, John Fauceby, James Damport, John More, Thomas Osbarn, Edward Skelton, James Manthorp, Thomas Darwent, Thomas Belgrave, John Houghton, John Bury, Walter Bright, Richard George, William Medowe, John Welbek, Richard Wardall, Alisaunder Shefeld and < John > Rypon, oure sergeauntez at armes, ne to any of theym, of and for the office of sergeauntz at armes, ne to the wages and fees of .xij. d. by the day, ne to clothyng to theym or any of theym graunted be cause of the seid office: but that the seid lettres patentes, and every of theym, be good, effectuell and availlable, this acte or any other acte notwithstondyng. So alwey that after the decease of eny of the seid sergeauntez at armes, noo persone be admitted into his place, to the tyme that it shall come to the nombre of such sergeauntz used in the daies of oure fadre of noble memoire, whom God pardon, and that nombre to be kept and noo gretter. Provided also that this act or any other act of resumption shall not be harmful or prejudicial or extend to any grant made by our individual letters patent to our servants Robert Passemer, Thomas Pope, John Bridde, Walter Chamberlain, John Fauceby, James Damport, John More, Thomas Osbarn, Edward Skelton, James Manthorp, Thomas Darwent, Thomas Belgrave, John Houghton, John Bury, Walter Bright, Richard George, William Meadow, John Welbeck, Richard Wardall, Alexander Sheffield and John Ripon, our serjeants-at-arms, or to any of them, with regard to the office of serjeant-at-arms, or to the wages and fees of 12d. a day, or to clothing granted to them or any of them because of the said office: but that the said letters patent, and each of them, shall be good, effectual and valid, notwithstanding this act or any other act. Provided that after the death of any of the said serjeants-at-arms, no person shall be admitted into his place until the number of sergeants employed in the days of our father of noble memory, whom God absolve, has been reached, and that number, and no larger, is to be maintained.
< Abbott of York. > The abbot of York.
Provided also, where we, the .xiij. day of Februar, the .xxx. yere of oure reigne, understondyng by a supplicacion made unto us on the behalve of the abbot and convent of the monasterie of Seint [editorial note: The name is omitted and no space for it has been left.] of York, howe the seid abbot and convent, and theire predecessours, of olde tyme payed to us and oure progenitours dukes of Lancastre .cc. marcs yerely, for the manoir of Whitgift, with the pertinences, in the counte of York; and that the said manoir of Whitgift, and other diverse landes and tenementes of the seid abbot and convent, by grete and sodayn habundance of waters than late were surunded, and the valure and profitez of the said manoir of Whitgift, in eny yere of .xl. yere than last passed, extende not to the somme of .xl. marcs yerely, over necessarie costes for reparacion and supportacion of waterbankes, and for reparacion of the seid manoir yerely borne and made; and that nought or litill might be takyn in enywyse of the seid ferme, rent or profitz of the said manoir, unto the tyme that the water than beyng were removed and put away, which without grete and importable costes and expenses of the seid abbot and covent might not be doon, to theire grete impoverysshyng. We than consideryng the premissez, and in relevyng and supportacion of the grete charges, costes and expensez aforesaid, graunted to the seid abbot and convent, and to theire successours, that they shuld have the said manoir to theym, or to theire successours, paiyng to us, < and oure > heires and assignees, therfore yerely, duryng terme of .x. yere next ensuyng the seid .xiij. day of February, .c. marcs yerely, of the seid .cc. marcs, duryng the seid .x. yere. And that the seid abbot and convent, and theire successours, yerely duryng the seid .x. yere, of an .c. marcs, parcell of the seid .cc. marcs, shuld be discharged and quiete, ayenst us, and oure heirs, as in oure seid graunte it apperith more at large: that this acte of resumpcion, or eny other acte made or to be made in this present parlement, extende not nor in enywyse be prejudiciall to the seid abbot and convent, or to theire successours, in or of [col. b] the premissez; but that they may reteigne in theire handes, by vertue of oure seid graunte and lettres patentes therupon made, .l. marcs yerely, parcell of the seid .cc. marcs that they were wont to paye to us yerely for the seid manoir, as long and unto the tyme that they have reteyned in theire seid handes such and as many sommes of money as they shuld have doo if oure seid lettres patentes stode in theire first force and strength, the seid peticion or acte of resumpcion notwithstondyng. Provided also that where we, on 13 February, in the thirtieth year of our reign [1452], understood by a petition made to us on behalf of the abbot and convent of the monastery of St [Mary] of York, that the said abbot and convent, and their predecessors, traditionally paid us and our progenitors, the dukes of Lancaster, 200 marks a year for the manor of Whitgift with its appurtenances in the county of York; and that the said manor of Whitgift, and various other lands and tenements of the said abbot and convent, had lately been flooded by a great and sudden abundance of water, and the value and profits of the said manor of Whitgift had not reached the sum of 40 marks a year in any of the past forty years, after the necessary costs for the repair and maintenance of riverbanks, and for the repair of the said manor had been yearly borne and met; and that little or nothing could be had in any way from the said farm, rent or profits of the said manor, until the water had been drained away, which could not be done without great and intolerable cost and expense to the said abbot and convent, to their great impoverishment. We then considering the foregoing, and to relieve and support the great charges, costs and expenses aforesaid, granted to the said abbot and convent, and to their successors, that they should have the said manor to them, or to their successors, paying to us, and our heirs and assigns, each year, for a period of ten years following the said 13 February, 100 marks a year of the said 200 marks. And that the said abbot and convent, and their successors, each year during the said ten years should be discharged and quit of 100 marks, part of the said 200 marks, towards us and our heirs, as appears more fully in our said grant: that this act of resumption, or any other act made or to be made in this present parliament, shall not extend or be prejudicial in any way to the said abbot and convent, or to their successors, with regard to [col. b] the aforesaid; but that they may retain in their hands, by virtue of our said grant and letters patent made thereon, 50 marks a year, part of the said 200 marks which they used to pay us each year for the said manor, for as long and until such time as they have retained in their said hands such and as much money as they should have done if our said letters patent had remained in their first force and strength, notwithstanding the said petition or act of resumption.
[memb. 4]
Pro hospicio regis. [Assignment of revenues for the royal household.]
48. Memorandum it pleaseth the kyng oure soverayne lord, by thavis and assent of the lordes spirituell and temporell, and commyns in this present parlement assembled, to graunte, ordeyne and establissh, in the same parlement, and by auctorite therof, the sommes of .mmmix c xxxiiij.li. .xix. s. .iiij. d. ob. q a . of money to be emploied unto the expenses of his honorable houshold, and to be taken and resceyved in manere and forme as foloweth hereafter: 48. For the king's household. Be it remembered that it pleases the king our sovereign lord, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and the commons assembled in this present parliament, to grant, ordain and decree, in the same parliament and by its authority, the sum of £3,934 19s. 4d. three farthings of money to be spent on the expenses of his honourable household, and to be taken and received in the following manner and form:
All thees sommes to be levyed of the revenuez that shall growe of the premisses, fro the last day of Septembre, the yere of the reigne of oure soverayne lord the kyng .xxxiiij., unto the last day of Septembre than next folowyng. (fn. v-278-616-1) All these sums to be levied from the revenues which shall grow from the foregoing, from the last day of September, in the thirty-fourth year of the reign of our sovereign lord [1455], until the last day of September then next following. (fn. v-278-616-1)
Prerogacio parliamenti. Prorogation of parliament.
49. Memorandum quod terciodecimo die Decembris, dicto anno tricesimo quarto, venerabilis in Cristo pater Thomas Cantuar' archiepiscopus, cancellarius Anglie, nobili et valenti duce Ebor', commissario domini regis in presenti parliamento, ac dominis spiritualibus et temporalibus, necnon communibus regni Anglie ad idem parliamentum convocatis, tunc presentibus, declarabat; qualiter prefatus commissarius, certis de causis dominum regem moventibus, ac pro solempnizacione festi Natalis domini adtunc approximantis; necnon pro necessaria et celeri arreptione itineris ipsius ducis versus partes occidentales dicti regni, ob diversorum murdrorum, oppressionum, extorsionum et depredacionum, ac aliorum quamplurium lamentabilium facinorum inibi, ut relatum fuit, indies commissorum et perpetratorum repressionem, ac committencium et perpetrancium inde punicionem et < subditionem, > de avisamento dominorum predictorum, pretextuque litterarum patentium ipsius domini regis prefato duci inde confectarum, presens parliamentum, ab eodem tertiodecimo die Decembris, usque quartumdecimum diem Januarii tunc proximum futurum censuit prorogandum, et illud realiter prorogavit; omnibus et singulis quorum interfuit firmiter injungendo, quod dicto quartodecimo die Januarii, apud dictum palacium Westm' in locis consuetis personaliter convenirent, ad procedendum ulterius in materiis pro quibus dictum parliamentum fuit summonitum. Tenor vero litterarum patencium de quibus supra fit mentio, sequitur in hiis verbis. 49. Be it remembered that on 13 December, in the said thirty-fourth year [1455], the venerable father in Christ Thomas, archbishop of Canterbury, chancellor of England, announced to the noble and powerful duke of York, commissary of the lord king in the present parliament, and the lords spiritual and temporal, and also the commons of the kingdom of England gathered in the same parliament, and then present, that the aforesaid commissary, for certain reasons prompting the lord king, and for the celebration of the feast of Christmas then approaching; and also for the necessary and speedy departure of the duke to the western parts of the said kingdom to repress various murders, oppressions, extortions and depredations, and many other lamentable crimes daily committed and perpetrated there, as it was reported, and for the punishment and subjugation of the offenders and perpetrators; by the advice of the aforesaid lords, and by authority of the letters patent of the lord king made to the aforementioned duke, had decided the present parliament should be prorogued from the same 13 December until the following 14 January, and he did indeed prorogue it; firmly ordering everyone concerned that on the said 14 January they should assemble in person at the said palace of Westminster in the usual places to continue with the business for which the said parliament had been summoned. The tenor of which letters patent, mentioned above, follows in these words.
Henricus, Dei gratia, rex Anglie et Francie, et dominus Hibernie, omnibus ad quos presentes littere pervenerint, salutem. Sciatis quod cum nos, undecimo die Novembris ultimo preterito, de assensu consilii nostri, pro eo quod nos parliamento nostro, quod nono die Julii ultimo preterito apud palacium nostrum Westm' tenuimus, et tricesimo primo die Julii tunc proximo sequenti, usque ad duodecimum diem Novembris ultimo preteritum, ad palacium nostrum predictum prorogavimus et adjornavimus, ob certas justas et racionabiles causas in persona nostra interesse non possimus, de circumspeccione et industria carissimi consanguinei nostri Ricardi ducis Ebor' plenam fiduciam reportantes, [col. b] eidem consanguineo nostro, ad parliamentum predictum nomine nostro tenendum, et in eodem procedendum, et ad faciendum omnia et singula que pro nobis et per nos, pro bono regimine et gubernacione regni nostri Anglie, et aliorum dominiorum nostrorum eidem regno nostro pertinentium ibidem forent faciendum, necnon ad parliamentum illud finiendum et dissolvendum, plenam commiserimus potestatem, prout in litteris nostris patentibus inde confectis plenius continetur. Nos jam, ob certas varias et notabiles causas, nos et dictum consilium nostrum specialiter moventes, de avisamento et assensu ejusdem consilii nostri, damus et committimus prefato consanguineo nostro, plenam potestatem et auctoritatem ad parliamentum predictum, pro nobis et nomine nostro a terciodecimo die instantis mensis Decembris, usque ad quartumdecimum diem Januarii proximum futurum, et ad dictum palacium nostrum Westm' prorogandum et adjornandum; ac parliamentum illud ad diem illum et extunc tenendum, ac in eodem procedendum, et ad faciendum omnia et singula que pro nobis et per nos, pro bono regimine et gubernacione regni nostri predicti, et aliorum dominiorum nostrorum eidem regno nostro pertinentium ibidem fuerint faciendum, necnon ad parliamentum illud finiendum et dissolvendum. Dantes ulterius, de assensu ejusdem consilii nostri, tam universis et singulis archiepiscopis, episcopis, abbatibus, prioribus, ducibus, comitibus, vicecomitibus, baronibus et militibus, quam omnibus aliis quorum interest, ad parliamentum nostrum predictum conventuris, tenore presencium firmiter in mandatis, quod eidem consanguineo nostro intendant in premissis in forma predicta. In cujus rei testimonium, has litteras nostras, fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud Westm', duodecimo die Decembris, anno regni nostri tricesimo quarto. Henry, by the grace of God, king of England and France, and lord of Ireland, to all to whom these present letters shall come, greeting. Know that where we, on 11 November last, with the assent of our council, because we could not be present in person for various just and reasonable causes at our parliament, which we held on 9 July last at our palace of Westminster, and which we prorogued and adjourned on the following 31 July, until 12 November last, at our aforesaid palace, wholly trusting in the circumspection and industry of our most beloved kinsman Richard, duke of York, [col. b] gave full authority to our same kinsman to hold the aforesaid parliament in our name, and to proceed with it, and to do each and every thing for us and by us which is to be done there for the good rule and governance of our kingdom of England, and our other dominions pertaining to our kingdom, and also to end and dissolve that parliament, as is more fully contained in our letters patent made thereon. We now, for various important reasons especially prompting us and our said council, with the advice and assent of our same council, give and commit to our aforementioned kinsman full power and authority to prorogue and adjourn the aforesaid parliament for us and in our name from the thirteenth day of the present month of December until the fourteenth day of January next, to our said palace of Westminster; and to hold that parliament from that day forwards, and to proceed in the same, and to do each and every thing which should be done there for us and by us, for the good rule and governance of our aforesaid kingdom, and our other dominions pertaining to our same kingdom, and also to end and dissolve the same parliament. Moreover, we firmly order by the tenor of the present letters, with the assent of our same council, that each and every archbishop, bishop, abbot, prior, duke, earl, viscount, baron and knight, as well as all others present, assembled at our aforesaid parliament, assist our same kinsman in the foregoing in the form aforesaid. In witness of which we caused these our letters patent to be made. Witness myself at Westminster, on 12 December, in the thirty-fourth year of our reign [1455].
Per breve de privato sigillo. By writ of privy seal.
Exoneracio protectoris. The discharge of the protector.
50. Memorandum quod licet dominus rex, decimo nono die Novembris, anno regni sui tricesimo quarto, de avisamento et assensu tam dominorum spiritualium et temporalium, quam de assensu communitatis sui Anglie, in instanti parliamento suo existencium, ac auctoritate ejusdem parliamenti, ordinaverit et constituerit carissimum consanguineum suum Ricardum ducem Ebor', predicti regni sui Anglie et ecclesie Anglicane protectorem et defensorem, ac consiliarium suum principalem; et quod idem dux, ejusdem regni sui Anglie et ecclesie Anglicane predictorum protector et defensor, ac principalis consiliarius, esset et nominaretur, quousque idem dux, de occupacione sive onere et nomine hujusmodi per prefatum dominum regem in parliamento, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in parliamento existencium, exoneratus fuisset, in et juxta vim, formam et effectum cujusdam actus in dicto instanti parliamento, dicto decimo nono die Novembris ultimo preterito habiti et concordati, prout in eodem actu plene liquet; idem tamen dominus rex, vicesimo quinto die Februarii tunc proximo sequenti, in dicto instanti parliamento suo personaliter existens, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in eodem parliamento existencium, prefatum ducem, de occupacione sive onere et nomine protectoris et defensoris predicti regni sui Anglie, ac principalis consiliarii sui hujusmodi, exoneravit: ac quod idem dux, de omni ulteriori occupacione sive onere et nomine hujusmodi nullo modo intromittat, actu predicto in aliquo non obstante. Et breve suum inde sub magno sigillo suo prefato duci dirigi fecit in hec verba: 50. Be it remembered that although the lord king, on 19 November, in the thirty-fourth year of his reign [1455], with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal as well as with the assent of his commons of England being in the present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament, ordained and appointed his most beloved kinsman Richard, duke of York, protector and defender of his aforesaid kingdom of England and the English church, and head of his council; and that the same duke should be and be named protector and defender of his same kingdom of England and the English church, and principal councillor, until the same duke should be released from the business or burden and name of the same by the aforementioned lord king in parliament, with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in parliament, in and according to the force, form and effect of a certain act had and agreed on the said 19 November last, in the said present parliament, as appears more fully in the same act; nevertheless, the same lord king, on the following 25 February, being present in person in his said present parliament, with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in the same parliament, discharged the aforementioned duke of the responsibility or burden and name of protector and defender of his aforesaid kingdom of England, and his principal councillor: and that the same duke should not intervene in any way in any further responsibility or charge and the name of the same, notwithstanding the aforesaid act in any way. And he caused his writ thereon under his great seal to be sent to the aforementioned duke in these words:
Henricus, Dei gratia, rex Anglie et Francie, et dominus Hibernie, carissimo consanguineo suo Ricardo duci Ebor', salutem. Licet nos nuper, de [p. v-322][col. a] avisamento et assensu tam dominorum spiritualium et temporalium, quam de assensu communitatis regni nostri Anglie, in instanti parliamento nostro existencium, ac auctoritate ejusdem parliamenti, ordinaverimus et constituerimus vos regni nostri Anglie, et ecclesie Anglicane protectorem et defensorem, ac consiliarium nostrum principalem; et quod vos ejusdem regni nostri Anglie et ecclesie Anglicane predictorum protector et defensor, ac principalis consiliarius noster, essetis et nominaremini, quousque vos de occupacione sive onere et nomine hujusmodi per nos in parliamento, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in parliamento existencium, exonerati fueritis, in et juxta vim, formam et effectum cujusdam actus in dicto instanti parliamento, decimo nono die Novembris ultimo preterito [col. b] habiti et concordati, prout in eodem actu plene liquet; quia tamen nos, hac instanti vicesimo quinto die Februarii, in dicto instanti parliamento nostro, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in eodem parliamento existencium, vos de occupacione sive onere et nomine < hujusmodi > exoneravimus. Vobis mandamus, quod vos de omni ulteriori occupacione sive onere et nomine protectoris et defensoris predicti regni nostri Anglie, ac principalis consiliarii nostri predictorum, nullatenus intromittatis. Volumus enim vos de occupacione sive onere et nomine predictis penitus exonerari, actu predicto in aliquo non obstante. Teste meipso apud Westm', vicesimo quinto die Februarii, anno regni nostri tricesimo quarto. Henry, by the grace of God, king of England and France, and lord of Ireland, to his most beloved kinsman Richard, duke of York, greeting. Although we recently, with [p. v-322][col. a] the advice and assent both of the lords spiritual and temporal, and with the assent of the commons of our kingdom of England, being in our present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament, ordained and appointed you protector and defender of our kingdom of England and the English church, and our principal councillor, and that you should be and be called protector and defender of our same kingdom of England and the English church, and our principal councillor, until you were released from the responsibility or charge and name of the same by us in parliament, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in parliament, in and according to the force, form and effect of the same act had and agreed in the said present parliament, on 19 November last, [col. b] as appears fully in the same act; nevertheless we, on this present 25 February, in our said present parliament, with the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal being in the same parliament, have discharged you from the responsibility or charge and name of the same. We order you not to intervene at all in any further responsibility or charge and the name of the protector and defender of our aforesaid kingdom of England, and our principal councillor of the aforesaid. For we wish you to be completely discharged of the responsibility or charge and name of the aforesaid, notwithstanding the aforesaid act in any way. Witness myself at Westminster, on 25 February, in the thirty-fourth year of our reign.
Per ipsum regem et consilium in parliamento. By the king and council in parliament.
[memb. 3]
ITEM, DIVERSES COMMUNES PETICIONS FEURENT BAILLEZ EN MESME LE PARLEMENT PAR LEZ COMMUNES D'ICELLE, LES TENOURS DEZ QUEUX, OVESQE LOURS RESPOUNCES, CY ENSUENT. ITEM, VARIOUS COMMON PETITIONS WERE SUBMITTED IN THE SAME PARLIAMENT BY THE COMMONS OF THE SAME, THE TENORS OF WHICH, WITH THEIR ANSWERS, FOLLOW HERE.
[col. a]
< Spoyle. > [Against looting the goods of the recently dead.]
51. To the kyng oure soverain lorde, please it youre highnesse graciously to consider, howe that of late tyme diverse menyell servauntes, aswell of lordes as of other persons of good degree, have sone after the deth of their said lordes and maisters, riotously with force takyn, dispoiled and departed emong hem such goodes as were theire seid lordes and maisters the tyme of < their > dethe, in lettyng of the perfourmyng of the wille of theire seid lordes and maisters, to the grete displeiser of God, and agayn theire feith and trough which they ought to have had to theire seid lordes and maisters, and to a full perilous insample hereafter, but if due remedie be purveied in that partie. 51. Spoil. To the king our sovereign lord, may it please your highness graciously to consider that recently, various household servants of lords as well as of other persons of good degree, soon after the death of their said lords and masters, have riotously taken by force, despoiled and distributed among themselves such goods as belonged to their said lords and masters at the time of their death, hindering the execution of the will of their said lords and masters, to the great displeasure of God, and against the faith and truth which they ought to have had towards their said lords and masters, and setting a dangerous example for the future, unless due remedy is provided in that matter.
Wherfore like it your noble grace to ordeigne and establissh be the auctorite of this your parlement; that after pleigne informacion made to your chaunceller of Englond for the tyme beyng, be thexecutours of any such lordes or persone, or two of the same executours, of any such riote, takyng and dispoilyng made, or hereafter to be made by the menyell servauntez of theire said testatour after his dethe, the same chaunceller have power to make, by thavyse of the chief justices of your bench, and the commune place, and the chief baron of the escheker for the tyme beyng, or two of hem, asmany and such writtes, to be directid to such shirrefs by theire discrecion, as to them shall be thought necessarie in that behalf, to make open proclamacion in such citees, burghs or townes, in two market dayes, within .xij. daies next after the lyveree of the same writtes, as < to > the same chaunceller by the said advise shall be thought resonable, that the said misdoers appere afore you, or youre heires, in youre benche, atte such day as by the said writte shall be limited, so that the same last proclamacion be made .xv. daies before the same day of apparaunce. And if any such writte be retourned atte < the > day conteyned in the same writte, and the writte be served, that proclamacion theruppon is hadde and made accordyng to this acte: and thanne if the said persons or persone as shuld appere by reason of the said proclamacion, atte day specified in the said writte make [col. b] defaute and appere not, they or he so makyng defaute be atteint of felonie. And if such persons or persone appere atte suche day, thenne the justices of the said bench have power be this seid acte to committe such persone or persones so apperyng to prison, there to abide be the discrecion of the said juges, unto the tyme the said misdoers answere in the said bench to the said executours, in such actions as the said executours will declare ayenst theym or any of theym, be bill or be writte, for the said riote, takyng and dispoilyng; and that the same actions be determined, so that the said actions be sued with effecte and not feyntly, to thentent to kepe the said persones or persone in prison. And if such persones or persone shall be enlarged oute of prison by the said juges, that thanne the same persones or persone fynde sufficeaunt persones to be bounde with theym to the seid executours in certaine sommes of money, by wey of reconisaunce in the seid bench, be the discrecion of the juges, to kepe such dayes as he or they shall have by the same courte. And if the kepers of the [...] prison where the said persones or persone shall be committed, enlarge theym oute of prison of his owne auctorite, withoute the awarde and rule of the seid juges, thanne the said keper forfaite and lose to the seid executours .iiij. c li. And that noo protection be allowed in any action to be takyn uppon this acte. Wherefore may it please your noble grace to ordain and decree by the authority of this your parliament, that after full information has been given to your chancellor of England at the time, by the executors of any such lords or person, or two of the same executors, of any such riot, seizure and spoliation made or to be made in future by the household servants of the said testator after his death, the same chancellor shall have the power to cause, on the advice of the chief justices of king's bench and common pleas, and the chief baron of the exchequer at the time, or two of them, as many and such writs to be sent to such sheriffs at their discretion as shall be thought necessary by them in that matter, to make public proclamation in such cities, boroughs or towns, on two market days, within twelve days of the delivery of the same writs, as shall be thought reasonable by the same chancellor by the said advice, that the said offenders appear before you or your heirs, in king's bench, on the day specified in the said writ, provided that the last proclamation is made a fortnight before the same day of appearance. And if any such writ is returned on the day contained in the same writ, and the writ is served, that proclamation thereon is had and made according to this act. And then if the said persons or person who should appear by reason of the said proclamation, on the day specified in the said writ [col. b] default and do not appear, they or he so defaulting shall be convicted of felony. And if such persons or person appear on that day, then the justices of the said bench shall have the power by this said act to commit the person or persons thus appearing to prison, there to remain at the discretion of the said judges, until such time as the said offenders shall answer in the said bench to the said executors, in such actions as the said executors will bring against them or any of them, by bill or by writ, for the said riot, seizure and spoilation; and that the same actions shall be determined, provided that the said actions are sued effectually and not dragged out with the intention of keeping the said persons or person in prison. And if such persons or person are released from prison by the said judges, that then the same persons or person shall find adequate persons to be bound with them to the said executors in certain sums of money, by way of recognizance in the said bench, at the discretion of the judges, to attend on the days ordered by the same court. And if the keeper of the prison where the said persons or person shall be committed releases them from prison on his own authority, without the award and command of the said judges, then the said keeper shall forfeit and lose to the said executors £400. And that no protection shall be allowed in any action to be taken upon this act.
Le roy le voet. (fn. v-278-640-1) The king wills it. (fn. v-278-640-1)
< County of Lancaster. > [Indictments within Lancashire.]
52. For asmoche as oure humble and true liegez, subgettez and inhabitauntz, withinne oure counte palatine of Lancaster, be and at all tymes have been redy to do, and also have doon to us and oure progenitours service, aswell in this oure roialme of Englond, as in Scotland, Fraunce and other parties, < and have bene > governed and ruled by and under oure lawes, and not hurt by the same, in other than other oure lieges inhabitauntez with oute oure seid counte in this oure realme hath been; unto nowe late at ther was an acte made at oure last parlement holdyn at Redyng, by the which [p. v-323][col. a] acte it was ordeigned that noo persons of oure lieges, ayenst whom any exigent shuld be awarded, or outlawrie pronunced, at oure suyte, or at suyte of partie, in oure seid counte, shuld forfaite any godes or catels, londes and tenementez, in any other shire, but oonly the goodes and catelles, londes and tenementes, the which the persones so outlawed, or thoos ayenst whom such exigent shuld be awarded in the seid counte, have in the same counte of Lancastre, and by reason of any such outlawrie, at oure suyt and at the suyte of any other person pronunced, withinne the same counte, be not forbarred nor disabled of any maner < of action, > nother to clayme any maner of enheritaunce oute of the same counte, nor disabled to sue any maner of accion, nother to clayme any maner of enheritaunce out of the same counte, nor disabled to sue any maner action oute of the same counte, notwithstondyng such outlawrie ayenst hom pronunced, as in the same acte more pleinly apperith. (fn. v-278-643-1) And by reason of the same acte, if eny foreyn man come into oure seid counte palatine, and killed eny of our lieges, or ellys do eny treason, murder, rape, roberie, or eny other felonie or trespas, or made any contracte, or any other offence did withinne oure seid counte of Lancastre; that than he shuld have noon other punysshement in this behalfe nor forfeitour, but oonly of such goodes as such foreyns doyng such orrible offences have withinne oure said counte palatine, the which for the most parte hath noo thyng within the same countee. Wherfore the said foreyns knowyng noo perell, punysshement, nor losse of goodes in oure lawe, [...] to restreyne theim of such treasons, murdres and felonies, causeth and daily enboldith thayme to do such thinges withinne oure seid counte, gretly ayenst oure lawes, oure corone and oure dignite in that partie, and also in restreynyng of oure lawes, to the grete hurte and utter distruction of oure seid subgettes and lieges in oure seid counte palatyne. 52. The county of Lancaster. Our humble and true lieges, subjects and inhabitants within our county palatine of Lancaster are and have always been ready to do, and also have done, to us and our progenitors service in this our kingdom of England as well as in Scotland, France, and other places, and have been governed and ruled by and under our laws, and have been no more harmed by the same than our other lieges living outside our said county in this our realm; until recently when an act was made at our last parliament held at Reading, by which [p. v-323][col. a] act it was ordained that none of our lieges against whom exigent should be awarded, or outlawry pronounced, at our suit, or at suit of party, in our said county, should forfeit any goods or chattels, lands and tenements, in any other county, but only the goods and chattels, lands and tenements which the persons so outlawed, or those against whom such exigent was awarded in the said county, have in the same county of Lancaster, and by reason of any such outlawry declared at our suit and at the suit of any other person within the same county, should not be barred or prevented from any manner of action to claim any manner of inheritance outside the same county, or prevented from suing any manner of action or claiming any manner of inheritance outside the same county, or prevented from suing any manner of action outside the same county, notwithstanding the outlawry pronounced against them, as appears more fully in the same act. (fn. v-278-643-1) And by reason of the same act, if any outsider comes into our said county palatine and kills any of our lieges, or else commits any treason, murder, rape, robbery or any other felony or trespass, or makes any contract, or commits any other offence within our said county of Lancaster; that then he should have no other punishment or forfeiture in this matter, but only of such goods as such outsiders committing such terrible offences have within our said county palatine, who for the most part have nothing within the same county. Wherefore the said outsiders knowing that no peril, punishment or loss of goods in our law restrains them from such treasons, murders and felonies, are daily emboldened to do such things within our said county, much against our laws, our crown and our dignity in that matter, and also restricting our laws, to the great hurt and complete destruction of our said subjects and lieges in our said county palatine.
Wherfore we consideryng the premisses, will, graunte, ordeigne, enacte and establissh, by the advise of oure lordes spirituelx and temporelx, and oure commons, assembled in this oure present parlement, and by auctorite of the same; that the seid acte afore reherced, and at oure said last parlement made at Redyng, be adnulled, voide and of noo strength. And moreover for the conservacion, tranquillite, ease and pease of all oure lieges, aswell withinne oure seid counte palatyne, as of other oure lieges withoute oure seid counte, withinne this oure realme; we, by thadvice and auctorite aforeseid, graunte, ordeigne, enacte and establisshe, that every enditement in tyme to come to be takyn before any of oure justices withinne oure seid counte palatyne of Lancastre, or before any shiref in his tourne in the seid counte, by the which eny person or persons, supposed by the same enditement to be or have been < enhabitantz > or conversauntz withoute the said shire of Lancastre, and withinne any other shire withinne this oure realme of England, shall be takyn and hadde by the verdict of .xij. men, eche of them havyng londes, tenementez, or any oþer person or persons to theire use, withinne the same shire of Lancastre, to the yerely value of .c. s.; and noo processe shall be made oute of eny such enditement, before tyme it be duely enquered and examined before oure justices withinne oure seid counte of Lancastre for the tyme beyng, whether the seid enditours and iche of theim, at the tyme of such enditement, have hadde londes and tenementes, withinne the said counte of Lancastre, to þe yerely value of .c. s. over all charges. And if it be founde by examinacion of oure justices for the tyme beyng withinne oure seid counte, that the seid enditours and eche of theim, the tyme of such enditement so takyn, have not londes and tenementes to the yerely value aboveseid, that then the same enditement, as to eny such person [col. b] or persons so endited, supposed by the seid enditement to be < enhabitantz > or conversantz withoute the said shire of Lancastre, to be voide and of noon effect. < And also > we, by the advise of oure lordes spirituelx and temporelx, and oure commons, assembled in this oure present parlement, wille, graunte, ordeigne, enacte and establisshe, that every enditement in tyme to come to be takyn withinne any shire of this oure realme, and withoute the said counte of Lancastre, before any of oure justices, or shiref in his tourne, by the which any person or persones, supposed by the same enditement to be or have been < enhabitantz > or conversantz withinne the seid counte of Lancastre, and withoute suche shire as such enditementz happes to be taken, shall be taken by the verdit of .xij. men, eche of theym havyng londes and tenementes, or eny other person or persons to theire use, withinne the same shire where the said enditementz be takyn, to the yerely value of .c. s. And that noo processe shal [editorial note: 'shal' appears in the margin in a contemporary hand, and is marked for insertion in the text.] be made oute of eny suche enditementz, before tyme it be duely examined and enquered before oure justices, havyng power to awarde any processe uppon such enditementz, whether the seid enditours and eche of theym, at the tyme of suche enditementz taken, hadde londes and tenementes, or any other person or persones to theire use, to the yerely value of .c. s. withinne the same counte, over all charges, where suche enditementz happes to be taken. And if it be founde before us, or before any of oure justices, that the seid enditours or any of theim, the tyme of suche enditement so taken, nor no man to theire use, have not londes and tenementes to the yerely value of .c. s. that upon the said enditement, as to any such other person or persons, supposed by such enditementz to be or have been < enhabitantz > or conversantz within the said counte of Lancastre, to be voide and of noon effecte. Wherefore we, considering the aforesaid, will, grant, ordain, enact and decree, by the advice of our lords spiritual and temporal, and our commons, assembled in this our present parliament, and by authority of the same; that the said act previously rehearsed, and made at our said last parliament at Reading, be annulled, void and of no strength. And moreover for the preservation, tranquillity, ease and peace of all our lieges within our said county palatine, as well as of our other lieges outside our said county within this our realm; we, by the advice and authority aforesaid, grant, ordain, enact and decree that every indictment taken in future before any of our justices within our said county palatine of Lancaster, or before any sheriff in his tourn in the said county, by which any person or persons, supposed by the same indictment to be or have been inhabitants or dwellers outside the said county of Lancaster, and within any other county in this our realm of England, shall be taken and had by the verdict of twelve men, each of them, or any other person or persons to their use, having lands and tenements within the same county of Lancaster to the yearly value of 100s.; and no process shall be made on any such indictment until it has been duly enquired into and examined before our justices within our said county of Lancaster at the time, whether the said accusers and each of them, at the time of such indictment, have lands and tenements within the said county of Lancaster to the yearly value of 100s. over all charges. And if it is found by the examination of our justices at the time within our said county that the said accusers and each of them at the time when such an indictment was taken do not have lands and tenements to the yearly value abovesaid, that then the same indictment, with regard to any such person [col. b] or persons so indicted, supposed by the said indictment to be inhabitants or dwellers outside the said county of Lancaster, shall be invalid and of no effect. And also we, by the advice of our lords spiritual and temporal, and our commons, assembled in this our present parliament, will, grant, ordain, enact and decree that every indictment taken in future within any county of this our realm outside the said county of Lancaster, before any of our justices, or sheriff in his tourn, by which any person or persons, supposed by the same indictment to be or have been inhabitants or dwellers within the said county of Lancaster, and outside the county in which such indictments happen to be taken, shall be taken by the verdict of twelve men, each of them, or any other person or persons to their use, having lands and tenements within the same county where the said indictments are taken to the yearly value of 100s. And that no process shall be made on any such indictments until it has been duly examined and enquired into before our justices, having the power to award any process upon such indictments, whether the said accusers and each of them, at the time when such indictments were taken, or any other person or persons to their use, had lands and tenements to the yearly value of 100s. over all charges, within the same county where such indictments happen to be taken. And if it is found before us, or before any of our justices, that the said accusers or any of them, or any man to their use, at the time when such indictments were taken, did not have lands and tenements to the yearly value of 100s., that the said indictment, with regard to any such other person or persons, supposed by such indictments to be or have been inhabitants or dwellers within the said county of Lancaster, shall be invalid and of no effect.
Le roy le voet. (fn. v-278-648-1) The king wills it. (fn. v-278-648-1)
< Eschecker. > [Fees charged in the exchequer.]
53. Prayen the communes in this present parlement assembled, that where as divers officers in your eschequer taken fees and wagez of you, for theym and theire clerkez, for doyng of theire offices in the said eschequier, notwithstandyng the said officers and theire clerkes taken of shirryves, eschetours, and of all other accomptauntz in your said eschequer, grete and outragious yeftes, fees and rewardes, for doyng of thaire offices, ayenst all reason and conscience, and their office will not doo to the deliveraunce of your said accomptauntz, till tyme they have suche outerageous fees, rewardes and yiftes; the which causen shirryves, eschetours, and other accomptauntz to take outerageous and excessive fees, yiftes and rewardes, for their seid offices doyng, of your liege people in the shires where theire offices been, so that the excessive takyng is to the grete hurt < and destruction > of all youre said accomptauntz, and of all youre said liege people. Also, where it apperteineth to divers officers in the said eschequer, by reason of the fees and wages that they take of you, to entre plees aswell betwene you and the partie, and for < to > entre pardons, writtez of allouance, jugementz, and other maner of entrees, without fees, yiftez or rewardes; the said officers and everiche of theim, notwithstondyng their said fees and wages, will entre noo plee, though hit conteine but half a rolle, but they have for the said entre .iiij. nobles, .xx. s. or .xiij. s. .iiij. d. at the lest. Also for entre of allouance of every pardon or writte that they or any of theim entre, be hit never so shorte, .x. s. And over that, the chief clerk of everiche of the seid officers taketh for his labour asmuche of the seid parties and accomptauntz as amounteth to the thrid part of that his maister taketh, which yiftes and rewardes of somme [p. v-324][col. a] accomptauntz attaingith to the somme of .xx. marcs, of somme .x.li. .x. marcs of the leest, to the grete hurt, oppression and undoyng of your liege people. And also, where diverse special commissions been directe to divers of youre justices of the peax, and to other, in everiche of youre shires in Englond, for deliveraunce of felons and other causes, by vertue of which commissions the justices so assigned at somme tyme sitten and delivere the felons after the tenure of the commission, and at somme tyme there ne is such commission delivered. And notwithstondyng somme of youre said officers by vertue of their offices woll make distresse ayenst such commissioners retournable at a certaine day, to retourne theire commission with all issuez forisfaicte; at the which day though somme commissioners appere and swere for theire excuse as the lawe woll, that they sate and delivered the prisoners after the fourme of the commission, or elles that noon such commission came to theire handes, in the which case they been discharged in lawe, yet notwithstondyng the said officers woll write newe distressez ayenst your commissioners to distrayne thaim, and infinitly, till suche tyme your said commissioners have made fyne with him at his will. 53. The exchequer. The commons assembled in the present parliament pray that although various officers in your exchequer take fees and wages from you, for them and their clerks, for performing their offices in the said exchequer, notwithstanding this the said officers and their clerks take from sheriffs, escheators and all other accounting officials in your said exchequer, great and outrageous gifts, fees and rewards for performing their offices, against all reason and conscience, and they will not perform their office to the deliverance of your said accounting officials until they have these outrageous fees, rewards and gifts; which causes sheriffs, escheators and other accounting officials to take outrageous and excessive fees, gifts and rewards for performing their said offices from your liege people in the counties where they hold office, so that the excessive payments are to the great harm and destruction of all your said accounting officials and of all your said liege people. Also, where it pertains to various officers in the said exchequer, by reason of the fees and wages that they take from you, to enter pleas between you and the party, and to enter pardons, writs of allowance, judgments, and make other kinds of entries, without fees, gifts or rewards; the said officers and each of them, notwithstanding their said fees and wages, will enter no plea, even if it covers only half a roll, unless they have 4 nobles, 20s. or 13s. 4d. at least for the said entry. Also, 10s. for the entry of the allowance of every pardon and writ, which they or any of them enter, be it never so short. And in addition, the chief clerk of each of the said officers takes for his labour, from the said parties and accounting officials, a sum amounting to a third of what his master takes, which gifts and rewards from some [p. v-324][col. a] accounting officials come to the sum of 20 marks, or £10, or 10 marks at least, to the great harm, oppression and undoing of your liege people. And also, where various special commissions have been sent to various of your justices of the peace, and to others, in each of your counties in England, for the deliverance of felons and other reasons, by virtue of which commissions the justices so assigned sit and deliver the felons according to the tenor of the commission, and sometimes there is no such commission delivered. And notwithstanding this, some of your said officers, by virtue of their offices, will make distraint against such commissioners returnable on a certain day, to return their commission with all the issues of forfeitures; on which day although some commissioners appear and swear for their excuse as the law requires, that they sat and delivered the prisoners according to the form of the commission, or else that no such commission came into their hands, in which case they are discharged in law, yet notwithstanding this the said officers will make new distraints against your commissioners to distrain them indefinitely, until such time as your said commissioners have made fine with them at their will.
Please hit youre highnes to considre the premisses, and theruppon, by thassent of youre lordes spirituell and temporell in this present parlement assembled, and by auctorite of the same parlement, to ordeine and estable, that every officer in your said eschequier, that taketh any fees or wages of you for his office doing, that they and everiche of theim delivere in resonable tyme all accomptauntz in youre seid eschequier, in that that perteineth to theire office. And that they nor noon of theim, nor noon of theire clerkes, take eny yiftez, fees, rewardez, promisse or suertee, for any thing that they shuld doo in theire seid office for any accomptauntz, except the said wages and fees that he taketh of you for the same office doyng. Savyng alwey, that eche of the said officers to whom hit perteineth by reason of thaire offices to entre plees, pardons, writtez of allouaunce, and jugementz, may take for entre of plee, pardon, writte, recorde or of an jugement that conteineth < half > a rolle, after the lenght and breede of olde tyme used in the seid eschequier, .ij. s. and no more; and for that plee, pardon, writte, recorde or jugement that conteineth al an hool rolle, .iiij. s. and no more; and for that plee, pardon, writte, recorde or judgement that conteineth lesse than half a rolle, .xx. d.; and for that plee, pardon, writte, recorde or jugement that conteineth more, after the afferaunt. And that noon of the said officers, nor of theire clerkes, take no maner fees nor wages, nor noon other maner < of > availe, of any collectours of dismes, quinzismes, from this tyme forward to you graunted or to be graunted. And that such officers in youre said eschequier [memb. 2] that haven powaire to write by reason of their offices, distraigne ayenst your justice of the peax, or any othir commissioners, to bring in their estraitis; that he, nor noon of his clerks, after that the seid justicis or commissioners have made due excuse as hit is above reherssed, or their estraitis have brought in to the court, shall make noo newe distresse nor oþer processe ayenst youre seid justices or commissioners that have so excused theym, or brought in their estraitis. May it please your highness to consider the aforesaid, and to ordain and decree thereon, by the assent of your lords spiritual and temporal assembled in this present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament, that all officers in your said exchequer who take any fees or wages from you for performing their office shall all deliver all accounting officials in your said exchequer in a reasonable time, in what pertains to their office. And that neither they nor any one of them, nor any of their clerks, shall take any gifts, fees, rewards, promise or surety for anything they do in their said office for any accounting officials, except the said wages and fees that they take from you for performing the said office. Saving always, that each of the said officers to whom it pertains by reason of their offices to enter pleas, pardons, writs of allowance and judgments, may take for entering a plea, pardon, writ, record or a judgment which covers half a roll, according to the length and breadth traditionally used in the said exchequer, 2s., and no more; and for a plea, pardon, writ, record or judgment which covers a whole roll, 4s., and no more; and for a plea, pardon, writ, record or judgment which covers less than half a roll, 20d.; and for a plea, pardon, writ, record or judgment which covers more, a proportionate amount. And that none of the said officers, or their clerks, shall take any kind of fees or wages, or any other kind of remuneration, from any collectors of tenths and fifteenths, granted or to be granted to you from this time onwards. And as for those officers in your said exchequer [memb. 2] who have the power by reason of their offices to distrain your justices of the peace, or any other commissioners, to bring in their estreats; that neither he, nor any of his clerks, after the said justices and commissioners have made due excuse as described above, or have brought their estreats into the court, shall make new distraint or other process against your said justices or commissioners who have so excused themselves, or brought in their estreats.
And if any of the seid officers, or any of their clerks, doo the contrarie to any of thees articules above rehersed, that þan they and everiche of theym shall leese .xx.li. as ofte tymes as they shall be founde defectyve þerin: and that oon moite of the seid .xx.li. so forfaited, ye oure soveraigne lord shall have, and that such persone or personnes that woll sue, shall have the othir moite. And that sute to be taken, hold and determyned, by an accion of dette bifore the barons of the seid eschequier, or elles before þe justice of the commune place, ayenst [col. b] eny officers or clerks of the seid eschequier that dothe or taketh contrarie to þe seid ordinaunce: any privelage or usage of the said eschequier notwithstondyng. And that the same processe be had in the same action before the seid justices, as it is had in an action of dette sued upon an obligacion at þe commen lawe. Except alwey, that noon officer that hath any office in enheritaunce in fee in the seid eschequier, be precluded to take the fees of olde tyme hath be laufully to þis office due and belongyng, and no more. And that þis present acte < and > ordinaunce begynne to take effect in the fest of Paske next commyng. Savyng alweye, that your said officers and their clerks may take an resonable rewarde for serches and copies made by theim in your said eschequier of any recorde, at þe sute of any of your liege people, this acte notwithstandyng. And if any of the said officers, or any of their clerks, go against any of these articles rehearsed above, that then they and each of them shall lose £20 every time they shall be found at fault therein: and that you our sovereign lord shall have half the said £20 so forfeited; and that such person or persons who choose to sue shall have the other half. And that the suit shall be taken, held and determined by an action of debt before the barons of the said exchequer, or else before the justice of common pleas, against [col. b] any officers or clerks of the said exchequer who have acted or taken money contrary to the said ordinance: notwithstanding any privilege or usage of the said exchequer. And that the same process should be had in the same action before the said justices, as is had in an action of debt sued upon an obligation at the common law. Except always that no officer who has any office by inheritance in fee in the said exchequer shall be precluded from taking the fees which have traditionally been lawfully due and attached to this office, and no more. And that this present act and ordinance shall begin to take effect at Easter next. Saving always that your said officers and their clerks may take a reasonable reward for searches and copies made by them in your said exchequer of any record, at the suit of any of your liege people, notwithstanding this act.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
The kyng woll, that by thavis of his counseill, a direccion be take in that behalfe by twene this and Michelmasse next comyng such as shall be thought resonable, and elles this peticion to stond in strenght for terme of .v. yeres. (fn. v-278-657-1) The king wills that by the advice of his council, a ruling shall be made on that matter between now and Michaelmas next, such as shall be thought reasonable, and otherwise that this petition shall remain in force for the term of five years. (fn. v-278-657-1)
< Brewers in Kent. > Brewers in Kent.
54. Prayen the commons of your countee of Kent, that where as it hath be used and accustumed from the tyme that is out of mynde, that all bruers within your seid countee of Kent that brued ale to þe sale, bought their malt in þe open marketts in the seid shire, where the seid bruers myght chese malt that was good and holsom for your people, and leve that malt that was not good. And it is soo that nowe of late tyme the seid bruers have confedrid to geder, and made a unresonable ordinaunce for their owne singuler availle and lucre, that every bruer shall make his owen malt with in his owne hows, and no malt bye of any people of the seid countee, but oonly barlye; so that suche of the seid bruers which brued most, and made somtyme in his hous but an .c. quarters of malt in a yere atte most, nowe at this tyme he maketh in his hous in a yere a .m. quarters malt, and some bruer .xviij. .c. quarters in a yere, and whether þe malt be bad or good, all is cast togeder in soo grete a multitude, that noo man can kepe it from wormes called wevels, which wevels and malt be grounde togeder, and therof they make ale, which is cause of manny mannes sikenes, aswell of the seid countee, as of your other peple that come and dailly resort to þe same countree. And thus is þe malt markett lost, and þe seid commen peple that were wonte to be malt makers grevously hurt and gretely hynderid, and all is to thentent that no man shold make malt but oonly bruers within hemselfe: in so moche that by þe seid unresonable ordinance, the husbond fermours, and every other persone havyng barley for to selle, which must of necessite have money in all wise to pay his ferme, his servauntis, and to fynde his houshold, shall be fayn to selle his goods half for nought, unto their undoyng, and unto the grevous hurt and hyndryng of every lord spirituall and temporall, knyght, squyer, gentilman and yoman, that have lordshippes, maners, londes and tenements in the same countee, which for that cause every yere must abate a grete part of their liflode. 54. The commons of your county of Kent pray that it has been the custom and practice from time immemorial that all brewers in your said county of Kent who brewed ale for sale, bought their malt in open market in the said county, where the said brewers might choose malt which was good and wholesome for your people, and leave the malt which was not good. And it is the case that the said brewers have recently joined forces and made an unreasonable ordinance for their own private advantage and profit, that every brewer shall make his own malt within his own house, and buy no malt from any people of the said county, but only barley; so that those of the said brewers who brewed most, and once made in their houses only a hundred quarters of malt a year at most, now make in their houses each year a thousand quarters of malt, and some brewers make eighteen hundred quarters a year, and whether the malt is good or bad, it is all thrown together in so large a heap that it cannot be kept free of worms called weevils, which weevils and malt are ground together, and from this they make ale, which makes many people ill, people from the said county as well as your other people who come and daily visit the same county. And so the malt market is ruined, and the said common people who used to be malt-makers are grievously hurt and greatly hindered, and all this is with the intention that no man should make malt except only the brewers for themselves: so that, because of the said unreasonable ordinance, the husbandmen and every other person having barley to sell who needs money with which to pay his farm, his servants, and to provision his household, shall be forced to sell his goods at half price, to their undoing, and to the grievous hurt and hindrance of every lord spiritual and temporal, knight, esquire, gentleman and yeoman, who have lordships, manors, lands and tenements in the same county, who for that reason lose a great part of their livelihood every year.
Hit please therfore unto your highnes, for to have in youre tender consideracion aswell these premisses, as howe the multitude of the yong people of the seid counte, which were accustumed for to begynne their encrese with malt makyng, som with oo quarter malt, some .ij. quarter of malt, some .ij. quarter and half of malt, and so more or lesse, nowe by þe seid unresonable ordinaunce have lost their seid encreas, and for noon occupacion of malt makyng be in grete idelnesse, which is introduction of all vices; and upon these consideracions, [p. v-325][col. a] of your most noble and benigne grace, by thavis and assent of þe lordes spirituelx and temporelx assembled in this present parlement, and by auctorite of þe same parlement, for to ordeyne and establissh that noo persone that brueth comonly ale or bere unto sale in the seid counte, make any malt, nor doo to be made in his hows or any othir place unto his use, at his costes and expenses, overe an .c. quarter in a yere, uppon peyne of forfeiture the somme of .x.li. in < every > yere that he so makith or doth to be made above þe seid .c. quarter; that oon half unto you soverayn lord, and the tother half unto hym or theym that shall sue in this behalve. And this acte to take effecte the first day of Juyn next comyng, and to endure for .xij. yere than next after folowing, and this for the love of God, and in wey of charitee. May it please your highness, therefore, to consider the foregoing sympathetically, and also how most young people of the said county, who used to start building up wealth with malt making, some with one quarter of malt, some with two quarters of malt, some two and a half quarters of malt, and so more or less, have now because of the said unreasonable ordinance lost their said profit, and because they are not employed in making malt they live in great idleness, which is the root of all vices; and upon these considerations, [p. v-325][col. a] of your most noble and kind grace, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal assembled in this present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament, to ordain and decree that no person who commonly brews ale or beer to sell in the said county shall make more than a hundred quarters of malt, or cause it to be made, in his house or any other place to his use, at his cost and expense, on pain of forfeiting the sum of £10 every year that he so makes or causes to be made more than the said hundred quarters; half of which shall be paid to you sovereign lord, and the other half to him or them who shall sue on this matter. And this act to take effect on 1 June next coming, and to last for twelve years following, and this for the love of God and by way of charity.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy le voet, a durer pur synk aunz. (fn. v-278-665-1) The king wills it, to last for five years. (fn. v-278-665-1)
< Silke wemen. > Silkwomen.
55. Sheweth unto youre grete wisdoms, and also prayen and besechen the silkewymmen and throwestres of the craftes and occupacion of silkewerk within the citee of London, which be and have been craftes of wymmen within þe same citee of tyme that noo mynde renneth unto the contrarie, that where it is pleasyng to God that all his creatures be set in vertueux occupacion and labour accordyng to their degrees, and convenient for thoo places where their abode is, to þe norisshing of vertue, and eschewyng of vices and ydelnes. And where upon the same craftes, before this tyme, many a wurshipfull woman within the seid citee have lyved full honourably, and therwith many good housholdes kept, and many gentilwymmen and other in grete noumbre like as there nowe be moo than a mille, have be drawen under theym in lernyng the same craftes and occupacion ful vertueusly, unto þe plesaunce of God, wherby afterward they have growe to grete wurship, and never any thing of silke brought into þis lande concerning the same craftes and occupacion in eny wise wrought, but in rawe silk allone unwrought; unto nowe late that divers lombardes and other aliens estraungers, ymagenyng to destroye þe same craftes, and all such vertueux occupacions for wymmen within þis lande, to thentent to enriche them self and put such occupacions to oþer landes, bring nowe daily into þis lande wrought silk, throwen rybens, and laces falsly and deceyvably wrought, corses of silke, and all oþer thyng touching or bilongyng to þe same craftes and occupacions redy wrought, and no silke woll bring unwrought unto þis lande to make eny such thing of, but of þe wurst refuse that they mowe have, to þe grete hurt of all such as shall were or occupie the same, and þe utter destruccion of all þe same craftes and occupacions: the sufferaunce wherof hath caused and is like to cause grete ydelnes amongs yonge gentilwymmen and oþer apprentices of þe same craftes within þe said citee, and also leying doun of many good and notable housholdes, of them that have occupied the same craftes, which be convenient, wurshipfull and accordyng for gentilwymmen, and oþer wymmen of wurship, aswele within þe same citee, as all oþer places within this reaume, and therby also likly to ensue many oþer inconvenientes, as God defende. 55. The silkwomen and spinners of the crafts and occupation of silkworking in the city of London, which have been the crafts of women within the same city time out of mind, show to your great wisdoms and also pray and beseech that it is pleasing to God that all his creatures should be placed in virtuous employment and work according to their degree, and convenient for those places where they live, to foster virtue and avoid vices and idleness. And whereas many a worshipful woman within the said city has lived most honourably on the same crafts before this time, and many good households have been maintained, and many gentlewomen and others in numbers so great that there are now more than a thousand, have been apprenticed to them to learn the same crafts and occupation most virtuously, to the pleasure of God, whereby afterwards they have attained great standing, and no worked silk was ever brought into this land that pertained to the same crafts and occupations, but only unworked raw silk; until recently when various Lombards and other alien foreigners, planning to destroy the same crafts and all such virtuous occupations for women within this land, with the intention of enriching themselves and placing such occupations in other lands, now bring daily into this land manufactured silk, spun ribbons and laces, falsely and deceitfully made, silk bands, and all other things concerning or belonging to the same crafts and occupations ready-made, and they will bring no unworked silk into this land to make any such thing with, except the worst refuse they have, to the great harm of all who shall wear or use it, and the complete destruction of all the same crafts and occupations: the toleration of which has caused, and is likely to cause, great idleness among young gentlewomen and other apprentices of the same crafts within the said city, and also the ruin of the many good and notable households of those who have been employed in the same crafts, which are appropriate, worshipful and suitable for gentlewomen and other women of standing, within the same city as well as in all other places within this realm, and thereby many other troubles are likely to ensue, which God forbid.
In reformacion wherof, hit may please your grete wisdoms of youre good and favourable disposicions, the premisses tenderly considered, and howe it is no commoditee nor thing abidyng to the enrichyng of þis lande, but things of plesaunce for theym that liken to have them, which every wele disposed persone of þis lande, < by reason and naturall > favour, wold rather that wymmen of their nacion born and owen blode hadde the occupacion therof, than strange people of oþer landes, to pray the kyng oure soverayn [col. b] lorde, that < he > of his benigne favour, by thassent of his lordes spirituell and temporell in this present parlement assembled, and by auctorite of þe same, will ordeyne, enacte and establisshe, that if eny Lombard, or any other persone estraungier or denisyn, bring or cause to be brought by wey of merchaundise any wrought silke, throwen ribans, laces, corses of silke, or eny oþer thing wrought touching or concernyng silke wymmens crafte, the corses that comen out of Geene only except, into ony port or place of this lande fro beyonde þe see, that þe same wrought silke, throwen ribens, laces, corses, and oþer things so brought and wrought touchyng þe same craftes, be forfaited: and also that every Lombard, and every oþer persone estraungier or denizen, that doth þe contrarie unto þis ordenaunce, at every tyme that he soo doeth forfaite .xx.li. that one half þerof to be leveyed and [had to] þe use of þe expenses of þe kynges houshold, and he that will sewe þerfor to have that oþer half. And that it be lefull to every persone of þe kynges lieges to have and maynten action or actions of dette at every tyme, aswell for the same forfaiture of .xx.li. as for þat thing soo forfaited, and processe of outlawry þerin, and all oþer processe as in accion of dette in þe commyn lawe, and that þerin be no proteccion ner esson allowable. And that the maire of þe said citee for þe tyme being, have auctorite to assigne .ij., .iij., or .iiij. men of þe same citee, sufficient and credible persones, by his discrecion, to be sworn upon a boke to make due serche within þe said citee and libertee of þe same, as often tymes as shalbe thought expedient, of all thinges had or doon contrarie to þe premisses; and þerof to make due relacion to the maire and aldermen of þe said citee for the tyme beyng, for more plain enformacion in þat behalf to the kynges highnesse, and to hem þat woll sue þerfore: and this at the reverence of God, and Oure Blissed Lady, and in wey of charitee. To correct this, may it please your great wisdoms, of your good and favourable disposition, having sympathetically considered the foregoing, and how it is not a commodity or item essential to the enrichment of the land, but a thing of pleasure for those who like to have it, which every well-disposed person of this land by reason and natural favour would rather that women born of their nation and own blood had the working of, than strange people of other lands, to pray the king our sovereign [col. b] lord, that he, of his kind favour, by the assent of his lords spiritual and temporal assembled in the present parliament, and by authority of the same, ordain, enact and decree that if any Lombard or any other person, foreigner or denizen, brings or causes to be brought by way of merchandise, any manufactured silk, spun ribbons, laces, silk bands, or any other thing produced touching or concerning the silkwomen's craft, the bands that come from Genoa only excepted, into any port or place of this land from beyond the sea, that the same manufactured silk, spun ribbons, laces, bands and other things so brought and produced touching the same crafts should be forfeited: and also that every Lombard, and every other person, foreigner and denizen, who goes against this ordinance, shall forfeit £20 every time he so acts, half of it to be levied and used to meet the expenses of the king's household, and he who chooses to sue for it shall have the other half. And that it shall be lawful for every one of the king's lieges to have and maintain an action or actions of debt on each occasion, both for the same forfeiture of £20 and for the thing so forfeited, and process of outlawry therein, and all other processes as in an action of debt in the common law, and that no protection or essoin shall be allowable therein. And that the mayor of the said city at the time shall have the authority to appoint at his discretion two, three or four men of the same city, sufficient and trustworthy persons, to be sworn upon a book to make a proper inspection within the said city and its liberty, as often as shall be thought expedient, of everything had or done contrary to the foregoing; and to make a proper report of them to the mayor and aldermen of the said city at the time, so that the king's highness and those who wish to sue for this may be more fully informed in that matter: and this at the reverence of God and Our Blessed Lady, and by way of charity.
Soit fait come il est desire, et a commenser d'apprendre sa force et effect al feste del Pasque proschein venaunt, et d'endurer pur cynk ans adonqes proschein ensuantz. (fn. v-278-672-1) Let it be done as it is desired, and begin to take force and effect at Easter next, and to last for the following five years. (fn. v-278-672-1)
< Abbott of Fonteyns. > The abbot of Fountains.
56. Besecheth mekely youre devote and continuell oratours, John thabbot of the monasterie of Oure Lady Saint Marie of Fonteyns in þe counte of Yorke, and þe convent of þe same place, that where they and their predecessours have of long tyme been, and yet be daily, ayenst conscience and withoute cause, be feyned actions grevously impleted and vexed in diverse courtes of wapentakes, and oþer courtes baronees, to þe noumbre of .xx. and moo, within þe said countee of Yorke, and þe countee of Cumbreland, and in þe counte of þe citee of Yorke, within þe which shires þe substaunce of þe possessions of there said monasterie been lying, as wele be procurement and excitacion of þe baillifs, stuards and officers of þe said courtes of wapentakes and courtes baronees, fermours of diverse of þe same for ther singulere lucre and availe, as be oþer malicious and evyll disposed persones, fenyng querels ayenst your seid besechers, and affermyng in diverse of þe said courtees of wapentakes, and courtes baronees, at summe oon court .ccc. severallz playntes or moo. And howe be it that the commen lawe of Englond will, that every persone enpleted for eny cause in the which he is admittible to wage is lawe, that þe same persone so empleted shuld wage his lawe be his attorney havyng sufficiaunt auctorite þerto; and that notwithstondyng, the predecessours of þe seid nowe abbot, and oþer abbottz and priours in the seid courtees, myght in no wise be receyved be sich baillifs, stuardis and officers to wage þer lawe be þer attourney in siche courtez and wapentakes, unto þe [p. v-326][col. a] tyme that for þat myschefe and compleynte had in that behalve, it was late ordeyned be auctorite of parlement, that all þe abbottz and priours, and oþer religious of Englond, and their successours, shuld in such cases be ther attorneys generallz or generall, in every hundreth or wapentakes within þe reaume of Englond, eche of theym under þer commen seall, severally pleted in such courtez, such plees as in lawe were pledables and in lawe were allowables; and þat every stuard or baillif for þe tyme beyng, within þe said courtees shuld resceyve such attourneys, without amercyng of such abbotz, priours and religious, or eny of them, upon þe peyne of forfeitour of .x.li. And yit notwithstondyng, when the seid abbot be his attourney hath waged his lawe in the seid playntes in such severall courtes, < then þe seid baillyfs, stuardes and officers have > oftymes for þer singulere lucre, and be covyne had be twix them and þe seid malicious people affermyng þe seid playntes, prefixed to the seid abbot oon day to do his lawe in iche oon of þe said severall courtes and wapentakes, all at oon day at severall places, iche oon being soo ferre frome other, that youre seid besechers in no wise myght appere and come to doo his lawe in his propir persone, as þe lawe requires: and so he be þat cause, in diverse of þe said courtes and wapentakes, oft tymes have ben condempned in þe said plaintz, and amercyed in diverse of them, somme there in .c. marcs, and summe there in more, and at þe lest in .xl.li. where never cause of accion was had, nethir by lawe ne by conscience. 56. Your devout and continual orators, John the abbot of the monastery of Our Lady St Mary of Fountains in the county of York and the convent of the same place, meekly pray that where they and their predecessors have been for a long time, and still are, every day, against conscience and without cause, grievously impleaded and vexed by false actions in various courts of wapentakes and other courts-baron, to the number of twenty and more, within the said county of York and the county of Cumberland, and in the county of the city of York, within which counties the bulk of the possessions of their said monastery lie, by the procurement and instigation of the bailiffs, stewards and officers of the said courts of wapentakes and courts-baron, and the farmers of some of them for their private profit and advantage, as well as by other malicious and ill-disposed persons, feigning complaints against your said petitioners, and affirming in some of your said courts of wapentakes and courts-baron, at any one court, three hundred or more separate plaints. And although the common law of England wills that every person impleaded for any cause in which he is allowed to wage his law should wage his law by his attorney, having adequate authority thereto, that notwithstanding, the predecessors of the said present abbot, and other abbots and priors in the said courts, might in no way be received by such bailiffs, stewards and officers to wage their law by their attorney in such courts and wapentakes, until, [p. v-326][col. a] because of the trouble and complaint concerning that matter, it was lately ordained by authority of parliament that all the abbots and priors, and other religious of England, and their successors, should in such cases in every hundred or wapentake within the realm of England, each of them under their common seal, by their attorneys general or attorney general, individually plead in such courts such pleas as in law were pleadable and allowable; and that every steward or bailiff at the time within the said courts should receive such attorneys, without amercing the abbots, priors and religious, or any of them, upon pain of forfeiting £10. But this notwithstanding, when the said abbot by his attorney has waged his law in the said plaints in these several courts, then the said bailiffs, stewards and officers have often for their private profit, and by conspiracy between them and the said malicious people affirming the said plaints, given the said abbot one day on which to do his law in each of the several courts and wapentakes, all on one day at several places, each one being so far from the others that your said petitioner can in no way appear or come to do his law in person, as the law requires: and so for that reason, in some of the said courts and wapentakes, he has often been condemned in the said plaints, and amerced in some of them, some for 100 marks, and some for more, and for £40 at least, where there was no cause of action, either by law or by conscience.
And also when þe seid abbot was at diverse tymes commyng to diverse of the seid courtes of wapentakes, and courtes baronees, to have doon his lawe in siche plaintz, than þe seid abbot have be put in suche feere of bodely herme to be doon to hym, bothe by assaught made upon hym, and be diverse manyshyng and thretyng by þe seid malicious people, affermyng þe said playntes, þat he in noo wyse [memb. 1] for drede of bodely herme and deth durst appere at þe seid courtes of wapentakes, wherby he hath been condempned and amercyed in grete sommes in þe said courtes. And at oþer tymes when þe seid abbot comme to any of þe seid courtez redy to doo his lawe, then þe seid malicious people, affermyng þe said playntes, wold be and were nounsued þerin, and anone after afferme .ccc. or .cccc. newe playntes in somme oon court ayenst þe seid abbot, at summe oon courte day; and so fro courte to courte þe said persones have contynued þer malicios purpos and intent aforesaid, unto þe tyme the seid abbot agreed with the seid stewardes, officers and baillifs, and with þe seid malicious people affermyng and fenyng such plaintz, at þer owne volunte, payng to theym in summe yere .c. marcs in þis party, summe yere .xl.li. and when he paied leest .xx. marcs, the labores, vexacions and costes ar like ever to be continued and incresed, to þe over grete and importable hurtes of þe said howse and besechers, withoute summe remedy, gracious socour and helpe be purved for þe said howse in this present parlement. And also when the said abbot was at various times journeying to some of the said courts of wapentakes and courts-baron, to do his law in such plaints, he was put in such fear that physical injury would be done to him, both by assault made on him and by various menaces and threats by the said malicious people affirming the said plaints, that he [memb. 1] dared not appear at all at the said courts of wapentakes, through dread of physical injury and death, in consequence of which he has been condemned and amerced for great sums in the said courts. And at other times when the said abbot came to any of the said courts ready to do his law, then the said malicious people affirming the said plaints would be and were non-suited therein, and soon after affirmed three or four hundred new plaints in a particular court against the said abbot, on a particular court day; and so from court to court the said persons have continued their malicious purpose and intention aforesaid, until such time as the said abbot settled with the said stewards, officers and bailiffs, and with the said malicious people affirming and feigning such plaints, at their own will, paying some years 100 marks in this matter, and some years £40, and at least 20 marks. The labours, vexations and costs are likely to be continued and increased forever, to the most great and intolerable harm of the said house and orators, unless some remedy, gracious succour and help is provided for the house in the present parliament.
Please it þerfore your highnesse graciously to considre thes premisses, and þeruppon to graunte, ordeigne and astables, be þe avice of your lordes spirituelz and temporels, and of your commons, assembled in this your present parlement, and by þe auctorite of þe same parlement; that þe same abbot and his successours, ayenst whome eny querele or playnte are, or in tyme to come shall hap to be attaymed or taken in ony of the seid courtees or wapentakes, shall mowe wage þer lawe be þer attourney or attourneys, of þe maters conteyned or to be contened in every suche playnte, where þe lawe will suffre them so to do: and that they þer lawe so waged, may doo þe seid lawe or lawes be a commoyne of þe same place, with oþer persones with [col. b] hym, to þe noumbre of .vi. persones, or elles be another persone assigned and depute by þabbot of þe said howse for þe tyme being, under þe common seale of þe said monasterie of Fonteyns, with .vi. persones with hym, þe seid lawes to do for þabbot of þe same howse: and that þe baillifs, stuards and officers of þe seid wapentakes and courtz for þe tyme beyng, admitte, suffre and receyve þe seid lawes to be doon in þe fourme aforesaid: and that all þe lawes aforesaid so waged and doon be als effectuall and of such strengh in þe lawe, as if þe seid abbot or his successours had doon them in þer propir persones, after þe course of þe common lawe of þis lande. And over þat, to ordeyne by þe auctorite aforesaid, þat if any baillifs, stuardes or officers of ony of þe said courtes or wapentakes, will not admitte þe said lawes to be doon in the fourme aforesaid, or elles in ony wise disobey or observe not thentent of þe premisses on þer party afore rehersed to be doon, or myght or on þer party do þe contrary to eny of thees premisses; then þe same baillif, stuard or officere so offendyng, forfett for every tyme þat he shall hap to do þe contrarie, or offend in eny of þees premisses before rehersed on þer party to be doon, .xx.li.: and every man that will suee in this case, mowe have a writt of dett, and declare upon þis act and ordinaunce, and he to have þe oon half for his labour, and þe soverayn lord þe kyng the other half of þe same .xx.li. And your said besechers shall ever more pray to God for youre goode and hight astate. May it therefore please your highness graciously to consider the foregoing, and thereupon to grant, ordain and decree, by the advice of your lords spiritual and temporal, and of your commons, assembled in this your present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament, that the same abbot and his successors, against whom there is any quarrel or complaint, or who in time to come shall happen to be convicted or taken in any of the said courts or wapentakes, shall be able to wage their law by their attorney or attorneys, concerning the matters contained or to be contained in every such plaint, where the law will allow them to do so: and that when they have so waged their law, may do the said law or laws by a fellow monk of the same place, with other persons with [col. b] him, to the number of six persons, or else by another person assigned and appointed by the abbot of the said house at the time under the common seal of the said monastery of Fountains, with six persons with him, to do the said laws for the abbot of the same house: and that the bailiffs, steward and officers of the said wapentakes and courts at the time shall admit, allow and receive the said laws to be done in the aforesaid form: and that all the laws aforesaid so waged and done, shall be as effectual and of such strength in the law as if the said abbot or his successors had done them in person, according to the course of the common law of this land. And furthermore, to ordain by the aforesaid authority that if any bailiffs, stewards or officers of any of the said courts and wapentakes will not allow the said laws to be done in the aforesaid form, or else in any way disobey or do not observe the intention of the foregoing on their part to be done as described above, or might on their part go against any of the foregoing; then the same bailiff, steward or officer so offending shall forfeit every time he acts to the contrary, or offends in any of the aforesaid, £20: and every man who chooses to sue in this case shall have a writ of debt, and declare upon this act and ordinance, and he shall have half the same £20 for his labour, and the sovereign lord the king the other half. And your said petitioners shall ever more pray to God for your good and high estate.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soit fait come il est desire. (fn. v-278-681-1) Let it be done as it is desired. (fn. v-278-681-1)
< Attorneis. > Attorneys [in Norfolk and Suffolk].
57. Prayen the commons, that whereas of late were but .vi. or .viij. common attorneys within youre cite of Northwyche, and countees of Norffolk and Suffolk, at þe moost, that resorted unto youre courts, in which tyme þer was grete quiete and peas in your seid citee and countees, and litell trouble or vexacion had by foreyn or wrongfull sewtes; and hit is so nowe, that þer be in the said citee and countees, .iiij. xx attorneys or moo, the most parte of theym not havyng any oþer lyving, but oonly þer wynnyng by þer seid attorneyshep, and the moost part also of theym not beyng of sufficient konnyng to be any attorney, which goo to every faire, merkette, and oþer places where congregacion of peouple is, and stere, procure, meve and excite the people to take untreue seutes, foreyn sewtes, and sewtes for lite trespasses, lite offenses, and smale sommes of dette, the actions of whome be triable and determinable in court baron, affermyng and promysing þe seid people for to have recovere with grete damages for their costages; the which causeth many a sewte to be take for evill wille and malice, without resonable cause. And also þe seid attorneys, before any recovere or remedie had for their clientes, sewe þe same clyentes for their fees, and have theym in exigents, and often tyme outlawe theym or they be ware; and than woll þe seid attorneys not ende with their seid clyentes, but if they have their costes and fees atte þer owen wille, as well for þe secunde accion, as for þe firste, to þe grete and importable damages, many fold vexation and trouble of þe inhabitauntes of þe seid citee and countees, to þe perpetuell distruccion of all þe courtees baron in the seid countees, oonlesse þan þe souner remedie be had in this behalf. 57. The commons pray that whereas of late there were but six or eight common attorneys at most within your city of Norwich, and the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, who resorted to your courts, during which time there was great quiet and peace in your said city and counties, and little trouble or vexation caused by foreign or wrongful suits; it is now the case that there are in the said city and counties eighty attorneys or more, most of whom have no other living, but only the rewards of their said attorneyship, and most of whom do not have enough skill to be an attorney, who go to every fair, market and other places where there are gatherings of people, and stir, instigate, prompt and incite the people to bring false suits, foreign suits and suits for minor trespasses, minor offences and small debts, which actions are triable and determinable in the court-baron, affirming and promising the said people recovery of their costs with great damages; which causes many a suit to be brought out of ill-will and malice, without reasonable cause. And also the said attorneys, before any recovery or remedy is had for their clients, sue the same clients for their fees, and have them in exigents, and often outlaw them before they are aware of it; and the said attorneys do not finish with their said clients until they have their costs and fees at their own will, for the second action as well as for the first, to the great and intolerable injury, manifold vexation and trouble of the inhabitants of the said city and counties and the permanent destruction of all the courts-baron in the said counties, unless speedy remedy is provided in this matter.
Hit please therfore unto youre < highnesse > for to have thees premisses in your tender consideracion, and theruppon of youre moost noble and benigne grace, by thadvis and assent of þe lordes spirituellx and temporellx of þis youre noble reaume of Englond, assembled in this present parlement, and by auctorite of þe same parlement, for to ordeyne and stablissh, that at [p. v-327][col. a] all tymes hereafter, ther be but .vi. common attorneys in the seid countee of < Norff', > and .vi. common attorneys in the seid countee of Suff', and .ij. common attorneys in the seid citee of Norwiche, to be attourneys in court of record; and that all þe seid .xiiij. attorneys, be electe and admitte be youre too chieff justices for the tyme being, of the moost sufficient and best lerned after her wise discrecion; and that the election and admission of all attorneys, that be electe and admitted be the seid justices for the tyme beyng over the seid noumbre in the seid countees, be voide and of noon auctorite ne recorde. And if that ther be any persone or persons that presumeth or take uppon hem for to be attorney in court of record in the seid countees or cite, otherwise than is above specified, and hit so founde by inquisicion take be fore the justices of þe pees in the seid citee or countees, which by force of [col. b] this ordinaunce shall have power to enquere therof in their cessions, or in any othir wise lawfully proved, that than he or they that so presume, if he be lawfully therof convicte, forfaite .xx.li. as often as he or they so be convicte, the oon moitee therof to be take unto youre use, and that other moitee to hym that wolle sewe therfor. And that he that wolle sewe therfore may have an action of dette agayns any suche persone that so presumeth for to be attorney, and such processe and recovere therin, as lieth in an accion of dette att the common lawe upon an obligacion; for the love of God, and in wey of charitee. Provided alwey, that this acte begynne and furst take effect at the fest of Estre next commyng and not afore. May it therefore please your highness to consider the aforesaid sympathetically, and thereupon of your most noble and benign grace, by the advice and assent of the lords spiritual and temporal of this your noble realm of England, assembled in this present parliament, and by authority of the same parliament, to ordain and decree that at [p. v-327][col. a] all times hereafter, there shall be but six common attorneys in the said county of Norfolk, and six common attorneys in the said county of Suffolk, and two common attorneys in the said city of Norwich, to be attorneys in court of record; and that all the said fourteen shall be chosen and admitted by your two chief justices at the time, from among the most sufficient and learned, at their wise discretion; and that the selection and admission of all attorneys who are chosen and admitted by the said justices at the time in excess of the said number in the said counties shall be void and of no authority or record. And if there be any person or persons who presumes or takes it upon himself to be an attorney in the court of record in the said counties or city, otherwise than is specified above, and it is thus discovered by enquiry held before the justices of the peace in the said city or counties, who by force of [col. b] this ordinance shall have power to enquire into this in their sessions, or it is lawfully proven in any other way, then he or they who so presume, if lawfully convicted thereof, shall forfeit £20 each time he or they are thus convicted, one half of it to be taken for your use, and the other half for him who chooses to sue for it. And that he who chooses to sue for it may have an action of debt against any such person who so presumes to be an attorney, and such process and recovery therein as lies in an action of debt at the common law upon an obligation; for the love of God, and by way of charity. Provided always that this act shall begin and first take effect at Easter next and not before.
The following answer is written in a different, contemporary hand.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
< The kyng graunteth > þis peticion, if it be thought to the juges resonable. (fn. v-278-689-1) The king grants this petition, if it is thought reasonable by the judges. (fn. v-278-689-1)

Appendix: 1455

1

Source : RP , v, 328; PRO C49/30/7

Petition from the commons rehearsing that the charge on sheriffs is now so burdensome (because the county revenues have been diminished by the franchises and liberties granted by the king) that men of good will are not prepared to take on the office, to the detriment of keeping the law and the peace. All liberties, franchises, privileges, hundreds, leets, views of frankpledge, fines, issues and amercements and wapentakes granted since the beginning of the reign should be resumed. Any letters patent granted before 14 February 1456 and not enrolled within three months should be void and also any letters granted after the same day and not enrolled within a month. A number of standard exemptions follow, and the petition is also not to extend to the exceptions contained within the other petition of resumption passed by the commons [item 47 on the roll].

Address: To the kyng our soverain lord

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

Endorsement: Huic bille domini non concenserunt

2

Source : RP , v, 329-30; PRO C49/30/8

Petition from the commons to repeal the act of resumption passed in the Reading parliament, 6 March 1453, which is rehearsed, on the grounds that it raises doubts about the loyalty of many of the king's true liegemen.

Address: Prayen the Communes in this youre present parlement assembled

Answer: Le roy le voet

Endorsement [not printed in RP ]: Communes peticiones lecte et response anno xxxiij o

3

Source : RP , v, 330; PRO C49/30/9

Petition from the commons to resume grants of wardship and marriage made since Michaelmas 1448 including those made during the lifetime of an ancestor of the heir, because many were granted as a result of improper pressure and the king has lost the revenues which might have come to him and which might be used to support his household. Exemptions for the queen, and for the earls of Richmond and Pembroke concerning the wardship and marriage of Margaret Beaufort.

Address: To the kyng our soverain lord

Answer: Le roy s'avysera

Endorsement: Memorandum that is thought to the kyng and to all the lordes that this bille is unresonable and therfore the kyng woll that it be leyd a parte

4a

Source : RP , v, 330-1; PRO C49/30/10

Petition from the commons rehearsing that various people have sued to the king and his officers for licence to ship wool to places other than Calais, sometimes without the payment of duty. Those licensed from 1 September 1450 should pay 4m for every sack of wool and for every 240 wool fells, and likewise those trading in the king's name. Anyone pleading a pardon or royal letters to halt proceedings for the recovery of the money should be fined 2,000 marks. Exemptions for those granted such licences to recover money lent by them to the king, and for Lord Fauconbridge and William Beaufitz.

Address: To the kyng oure soveraigne lord

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

Endorsement [not printed in RP ]: Communes peticiones non concesse de anno xxxiij o

4b

Source : PRO C49/30/21

Petition from the commons rehearsing that by improper means many licences have been granted to ship wool elsewhere than to Calais, or people avoid payment of duty by shipping secretly by night or openly by might. From next Easter wool should be shipped only from ports where there are collectors of customs and only to Calais. Everyone shipping wool after that date should find surety that it is going only to Calais and receive a certificate from the appropriate official at Calais, upon pain of forfeiting the wool - half to the expenses of the royal household and half to whoever sues the case. Exemptions for wool taken at sea and for wool produced between Tees and Tweed and in Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmorland and the bishopric of Durham. Letters patent to the earl of Shrewsbury to remain in force with certain exceptions.

Address: To the kyng oure soveraigne lord

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

Endorsement: Communes peticiones [erasure] anno xxxiij o

5

Source : RP , v, 331; PRO C49/30/11

Petition from the commons rehearsing that the parliament at Reading granted poundage and a wool subsidy to the king but exempted all denizen merchants from all the subsidy on cloth and 10s on every sack of wool and 240 woolfells for certain years. Denizen merchants, the king's liegemen born, should also be quit during the same term of the 12d in the pound on all their woollen cloth exported from the country.

Address: To the kyng oure soverain lorde

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

Endorsement: Huic bille domini non concenserunt

6

Source : RP , v, 331-2; PRO C49/30/12

Petition from the commons rehearsing that by the contrivance of merchant strangers and English wool packers who buy wool for the said strangers, wool has become dangerously under-priced. Wool packers ought to act as judges between buyer and seller, identifying different qualities of wool, and cannot be both buyer and judge. Henceforth no wool packer should buy more than four sacks of wool a year, to make cloth for his household, on pain of forfeiting any sacks over that limit and imprisonment for a year. Anyone buying extra sacks on behalf of the wool packer to be fined £5 and imprisoned for a year. This for the common weal of your liege people and by way of charity.

Address: To the king our souverain lord

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

7

Source : RP , v, 332; PRO C49/30/13

Petition from the commons rehearsing that many subjects are arrested on suspicion of felony and kept in prison without bail in spite of being of good name, because justices of the peace have no power to make a supersedeas in that matter. They should be given that power, so that those arrested may appear at the next sessions of the peace; and justices of the peace should have power of gaol delivery.

Address: Pray the communes in this your present parlement assembled.

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

8

Source : RP , v, 332; PRO C49/30/14 [see also appendix items 32-33]

Petition from the commons that because many great riots have been committed in Cornwall, Devon and Somerset by the earl of Devon and Lord Bonville and their supporters, the earl and the lord should be arrested and held in prison without bail until a commission of oyer et terminer is issued to impartial commissioners. And because the sheriff is thought to favour Bonville he should play no part in the process.

Address: To the kyng oure soverain lord

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

9

Source : RP , v, 332-3; PRO C49/30/15

Petition from the commons that because Edmund duke of Somerset, Thomas Thorp and William Joseph estranged the king from the duke of York and the earls of Warwick and Salisbury, the king should resume all royal grants made to Thorp and Joseph and they should hold no office within the royal households, and be imprisoned for twelve years and fined £1,000 to be paid to the treasurer of Calais. No pardon granted or to be granted to them is to be effective in this respect.

Address: Prayen the communes in this present parlement assembled

Answer: Le roy s'advysera

10

Source : RP , v, 333-4; PRO C49/30/16

Petition from the commons that because many felonies are committed by clerics, any cleric once convicted of felony who is accused of or confesses to a further felony should be judged to have committed high treason. And if any person who claims benefit of clergy for such felonies is disowned by their ordinary then the justices should have power to award execution, and this to be retrospective. Justices should keep a record of persons handed over to the ordinary, and if anyone is brought before them a second time and this can be proved, have power to hear the case.

Address: To the kyng oure soverain lorde

Reply: Le roy s'advisera

11

Source : RP , v, 334-5; PRO C49/30/17

Petition from the commons rehearsing that because many Italian merchants travel round the county to buy woollen cloth, wool, wool fells and tin they are able to see the poverty of the people and, by offering to pay for the goods with ready cash, keep prices low. From 21 February 1456 they should be allowed to buy those goods only in the ports of London, Southampton and Sandwich, upon pain of forfeiting the goods bought. And the said merchants should sell all their imported goods to the king's lieges within four months, and if they fail to sell them may export them without paying custom. But if they do not sell to the king's lieges and do not depart as soon as weather permits after four months they should forfeit all their goods. If they are storm driven to another port they may buy woollen cloth there.

Address: To the kyng oure soveraigne lord

Reply: Le roy s'advisera

12

Source : RP , v, 335; PRO C49/30/18

The commons petition for the rehabilitation of Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, and for proclamation to be made that he was the king's true liegeman until his death.

Address: Praieth the commons.

Reply: Soit fait come il est desire

The king's sign manual

13

Source : RP , v, 335-6; PRO C49/30/20

Petition from the commons that John Wood, clerk to the treasurer of England, be made to answer to the charge that he shipped 1226 sacks of wool in the king's name to a port other than Calais and ensured that the king's factors did not interfere in the transaction. If Wood tries to plead a royal pardon he is to forfeit 10,000 marks.

Address: Prayn the commons

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

Endorsement: Huic bille domini non concenserunt

14

Source : RP , v, 337; PRO SC8/28/1387

Petition of Thomas Young, knight of the shire for Bristol in various parliaments, for recompense for his imprisonment in the Tower for things said by him in the house of commons, notwithstanding the commons' old liberty to say what they wish without challenge, charge or punishment.

Address: To the right wise and discreet commons in this present parlement assembled

Answer: The kyng wolle that the lordes of his counseill do and provyde in this partie for the seid suppliant as by theire discrecions shal be thought convenyent and resonable

15

Source : RP , v, 337-8; PRO SC8/28/1388

Petition of the mayor and burgesses of Oxford that, because the inhabitants of the town cannot meet the charges upon it or serve the members of the university, every burgess of the town may take apprentices in the same manner as the citizens of London, even though the fathers of the apprentices do not have freehold possessions within the realm, contrary to statute. Saving the privileges of the chancellor of the university.

Address: To the right wise and discret communes of this present parlement

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

16

Source : RP , v, 338; PRO SC 8/115/5704

Petition of the bailiffs and commonalty of the town of Gloucester for authority to order property holders within the town to repair the pavement in front of their properties and, if they fail, to distrain them for the cost of the necessary repairs.

Address: To the right wyse and discrete communes in this present parlement assemblid

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

17

Source : RP , v, 338-9; PRO SC8/109/5422

Petition that, as was the case in the past, the king's sworn officers in the exchequer should not be removed unless proved to have offended against the king or his people, and that all persons removed since Easter 1454 should be reinstated. Provided that the act shall not extend to Thomas Thorp.

Address: To the right wise and discrete commons of this present parlement

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

18

Source : RP , v, 339; PRO SC8/28/1389

Petition to the commons to consider the impoverishment of various creditors of Humphrey late duke of Gloucester because no one dares to administer his will and to pray the king to ordain that the archbishop of Canterbury arrange for the administration of the duke's goods and chattels. And because this will not suffice to meet the duke's debts, to ordain the archbishop and others to enter specified land purchased by the duke and apply the revenues to settling the duke's debts; the land to revert to the king once the debts are met.

Address: Please it unto the right wise and discrete comons in this present parlament assembled

Answer: Le roy s'advisera

19

Source : RP , v, 339-40; PRO SC8/28/1390; CPR 1452-61, p. 278 (dated 3 March 1456 and warranted by king and council in parliament)

Petition of Alice, widow of Sir William Lovell, for the issue of letters patent licensing her to enter all the land of her deceased sister Margaret, late wife of Ralph lord Cromwell.

Address: To the king our soverain lord

Answer: Memorandum quod dominus rex, tercio die Marcii, anno regni sui tricesimo quarto, de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in presenti parliamento existentium concessit istam billa prout petitur

Endorsement: diversi memoranda et actus parliamenti

20

Source : RP , v, 340-1; PRO SC8/28/1391

Petition of Henry Wodhous rehearsing that his father's feoffees enfeoffed Thomas Danyell and John Dowevebiggyng with four Norfolk manors to the use of Henry's mother for life, with reversion to Henry, who was to marry Danyell's sister Elizabeth. Henry wooed her, unaware that she was already married, and enfeoffed Danyell and Dowevebiggyng with other land. The enfeofments and other agreements should be revoked, and the petitioner hold all his land as if his father's enfeofments had not been made.

Address: To the right wise and discriet communes in this present parlement assembled

Answer: The kyng havyng consideracion that the said Herry, the tyme of the makyng of the said alienacions, reconysances by fyne and other sueretees, was accombred and blynded with unsad trust and promysse of mariage, so that for lak of discrecion that the said Herry shuld have had at that tyme was not able to make suche alienacions and reconysances, wil therfor and graunteth that this peticion and all the contenue therof be had and doon in maner and fourme as it is desired by the same. Provided alwey that neyther the said Thomas Danyell nor John Dowevebyggyng, nor eny othir theire cofeffees, or eny of theire heires or assignees, be bounde by this acte to answere to the said Herry of any issues or profittes resceyved of these premisses before the first day of this present parlement.

21

Source : RP , v, 341; PRO SC8/28/1392

Petition of Richard earl of Warwick, who has agreed with the king to be captain of Calais and Ruysbank for seven years from 4 August 1455, and is now prevented from entering, that he shall not be held responsible for anything that happens while he is excluded.

Address: To the wise and discrete comunes of the roialme of Englond in this present parliament assembled

Answer: Soit fait come il est desire

22

Source : RP , v, 343; PRO C49/30/22

Petition that all offices, fees and annuities granted by the king to Thomas Thorp and William Joseph be resumed.

Address: [none]

Answer: Le roy le voet, et a commencer d'apprendre sa force et effect le xiij iour de Decembre proschein venaunt

23

Source : RP , v, 342; PRO SC8/105/5239

Petition of Sir Walter Devereux, indicted of treason before Edmund late duke of Somerset and others on 9 August 1452 and arraigned before the justices at Hereford on 20 July 1453, where he pleaded a royal pardon which was allowed, to be reputed the king's true liegeman and the indictment voided.

Address: To the right wise and discreet commons in this present parlement assembled

Answer: Soit faite come il est desire

24

Source : RP , v, 342-3; PRO SC8/28/1393

Petition of Richard Forde rehearsing that he was put out of the office of treasurer's remembrancer in the exchequer by Thomas Thorp and only regained it by paying an annuity of 40 marks to William Fallan, the third baron, in return for his vacating his office in favour of Thorp. The obligation to pay the annuity should be annulled.

Address: To the right wyse, notable and discrete commons of this present parlement assembled

Answer: Soit fait come il est desire

25

Source : RP , v, 343-4; PRO SC8/152/7597

Petition of Richard duke of York and others to reach a settlement with the abbot of Kirkstall, involving inter alia the appropriation of the church of Middleton in Pickeringlithe.

Address: To the kyng our soveraygn lord

Answer: Soit faite come il este desire en la peticion

Endorsement [not printed in RP ]: particulares peticiones lecte & expedite anno xxxiij o

26

Source : RP , v, 451-3 (printed from the patent roll); CPR 1452-61, p. 282 (dated 21 November 1455) The patent roll version is an inspeximus of two documents, described there as a petition and a schedule. The former is now PRO SC8/29/1409. The latter, originally attached to the petition, is the commons' petition from the 1453 parliament calling for Oldhall's attainder, now PRO C49/29/11.

Petition of Sir William Oldhall to the commons, rehearsing his loyalty to the king, his father and grandfather and his service to them in France. Instead of enjoying his old age he was maliciously reputed a traitor by an act in the Reading parliament (the tenor of which is annexed in the attached schedule) for giving counsel to Cade and others, whereupon he was indicted of treason and outlawed. The outlawry has been reversed and he has been acquitted of treason in king's bench. He petitions for the act to be voided and for him to be restored to his good name and to be able to enjoy all his lands and to sue in all legal actions.

Address: To the right wise and discrete comons in this present parlement assembled

Answer: Soit fait come il est desire

27

Source : PRO SC8/152/7596; CCR 1454-61, pp. 108-9 (dated 2 February 1456)

Petition of Richard duke of York rehearsing that Thomas Thorp owed him £210 and delivered an obligation for that amount which proved invalid; he prays that the chancellor may execute the bond on the bodies of Thomas and his fellow surety William Benyngton, plus damages and costs.

Address: To the kyng oure souverain lord

Answer: Soit fait come il est desire

28

Source : PRO C49/69/4; CPR 1452-61 p. 278 (dated 9 March 1456 and warranted by king and council in parliament)

Richard duke of York rehearses his appointment as protector by letters patent on 3 April 1454 and requests payment of his wages from that day until 9 February 1455.

Address: none [the bill is the text of the desired grant, with a proviso added in a different hand before the Teste clause]

Endorsed: Memorandum quod dominus rex ix o die Marcij anno regni sui xxxiiij o de avisamento et assensu dominorum spiritualium et temporalium in presenti parliamento existentum ac communitatis eiusdem parliamenti necnon auctoritate eiusdem concessit istam billam prout petitur.

29

Source : PRO SC8/96/4766A; CPR 1452-61, p. 288 (grant dated 9 March 1456 and warranted by the king and council in parliament). PRO SC8/96/4765 is another petition from Burton for an exemption of his grant of £5 on the terms agreed by the lords.

Petition of William Burton for exemption from the act of resumption made in the present parliament in respect of his grant of £5 p.a. from a rent of £15 called Chokes Fee, which he had recovered for the king after the grant had been made on 5 June 1453. The grant was his only reward for this good service to the king, queen and prince.

Address: To the king oure souverain lorde

Marginal note beside the required wording of the proviso: respectuatur et inquiratur

Endorsed: Md that the lordes spirituelx and temperelx in consideracion that William Burton by his laboure and at his grete costes gate in to the kynges handes as he surmytteth by this bille the fee of Chokes in the counties of Northt, Bed, Buk, Lincoln and Leyc' to the yerely value of xv li wherof the kyng was not answerd of a peny as the saide William also surmytteth with in this bill is aggreed that the same William have the seid fee to ferme if he wyll, yeldyng to the kyng xv li by yer and to reteyn in his awn handes C s yerly, fyndyng to the kyng sufficient suertee to pay to hym yerly x li, and if the said William wilnot so take the said fee to ferme that the C s desired to be provyded for be resumed in to the kynges handes.

30

Source : PRO SC8/115/5703; abstracted by W. Rees, Calendar of Ancient Petitions Relating to Wales (Cardiff, 1975) pp. 184-6

Petition of Griffith ap David ap Thomas rehearsing that Griffith ap Nicholas has unlawfully imprisoned him in the castle of Carmarthen and does other great injuries to the king's lieges in south Wales; he prays that Griffith be ordered to deliver him before 12 January next and if he defaults to be barred forever from holding office in Wales or the marches on pain of £1000, half to go to the treasurer of Calais; and that Griffith also be ordered to deliver Carmarthen and Aberyswyth to the duke of York.

Address: To the right wise and discret comons in this present parlement assembled

Answer: Le roy ad graunte cest peticion en maner et fourme si come il est desire purveu tousfortz que proclamacion de ceo soit fait devaunt le dit xij e iour de janvrier en le dit countee de Hereford.

31

Source : PRO SC8/96/4769 [undated, but this is the most probable parliament]

Petition of William Bykton and Roger Pountesbury of Shrewsbury rehearsing their ill-treatment in Lancashire at the hands of Robert Bolde and others in autumn 1454. They pray that they may have writs out of chancery directed to the sheriff of Derbyshire, as being the county adjoining Lancashire, commanding him to make proclamation that the malefactors appear in king's bench on 25 June.

Address: To the right wise & discreet commons of this present parlement

Answer: Soit fait come il est desire

Endorsement: particulares petitiones lecte & response etc

32

Source : PRO SC8/138/6864; printed by G. H. Radford, 'Nicholas Radford 1385(?)-1455', Reports and Transactions of the Devonshire Association 35 (1903), 264-8 [the resulting writ was dated 23 January 1456: ibid ., 278]

Petition of John Radford, executor of Nicholas Radford, rehearsing the murder of the latter by Thomas Courtenay of Tiverton, son of the earl of Devon, and others on the night of 23 October 1455 and seeking justice on the murderers.

Address: To the kyng oure soverain lorde

Answer: Soit faite come il est desire

33

Source : CPR 1452-61, pp. 310-11

A

commission dated 20 July 1456 to arrest thirty-eight men, predominantly from the estates of the earl of Devon in the south west, who are described as attainted of certain felonies by the authority of parliament.

34

Source : PRO SC8/141/7012; CPR 1452-61 p. 283 (grant dated 21 February 1456 and warranted by king and council in parliament)

Petition of Thomas Smyth, vicar of St Clement's, Sandwich, who does not have a vicarage house and seeks a licence to acquire land and rents in mortmain to the value of 4m in Sandwich and its suburbs.

Address: To the kyng our soverain lord

Note at foot: per Ricardum ducem Ebor' xxiiij o Januarij

Answer: The kyng by thavice of the lordes spirituelx and temporelx beyng in this present parlement the xxj day of Feverer the yer of his reigne xxxiiij graunted this bille as it is desyred