BHO

Richard II: November 1391

Parliament Rolls of Medieval England. Originally published by Boydell, Woodbridge, 2005.

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In this section

1391 November

Introduction November 1391

Westminster

3 November - 2 December

(C 65/52. RP , III.284-296. SR , II.78-82)

C 65/52 is a roll of eight membranes, each approximately 330mm in width, sewn together in chancery style and numbered in a later hand. The condition of the roll is good, though membranes 8, 6, and 3 are stained with gallic acid. The text, written in the official hand of several scribes, occupies the rectos of the membranes only; the dorses are blank apart from a later heading, 'Parliamentum de anno 15 o R. 2 di . Pars prima', and later notes where the membranes are joined, 'Parliamentum anno 15 R. 2 pars unica'. The Arabic numerals, and the marginal notes, are of a later date. The roll appears to be complete.

The chronicler who wrote the continuation of the Eulogium Historiarum remarked laconically that 'nothing is written here for the year of Our Lord 1391, because the kingdom of England was in a bad state' ( in malo statu ). (fn. N1391int-1) He may well have been referring to the recurrence of the plague during the summer, or perhaps to the dearth and consequent high price of grain upon which most of the other chroniclers remarked. (fn. N1391int-2) On the political and military fronts, however, 1391 was for the English an uneventful year, in which much the same issues as had dominated the previous year remained to the fore, but none of them came to a head.

The search for a final peace with France continued, and at a meeting between English and French ambassadors on 14 February 1391, plans were made for a summit between Richard II and Charles VI, each to be accompanied by 400 knights and esquires, to be held on 24 June 1392 - leaving ample time, so it was evidently hoped, for the terms of a lasting treaty to be worked out. The price of wool continued to cause concern, despite the system of home staples established in the parliament of November 1390. And in June 1391 the papal nuncio, Nicholas abbot of Nonantola (in the diocese of Modena), arrived in England with letters from Pope Boniface IX urging Richard to abolish the Statute of Provisors. The king replied that what had been done in parliament could only be undone in parliament, but that, when parliament did meet, he would 'gladly do whatever can be done in this matter without disparagement of our crown'. To increase the pressure on parliament, a second papal emissary, Damian de Cataneis - who had also spent the winter of 1389-90 in England, and had thus witnessed at first hand the passing of the hated statute in the parliament of January 1390 - arrived on 17 October, and both he and the abbot of Nonantola seem to have attended the parliament. (fn. N1391int-3)

By this time, Richard was also keen to secure a further grant of taxation, and on 7 September, therefore, writs were issued for a parliament to meet at Westminster on the morrow of All Souls (3 November). (fn. N1391int-4) The returns of members of the commons are more or less complete, the names of 73 knights and 234 burgesses being known. (fn. N1391int-5) The only temporal lord summoned for the first time was Thomas, eldest surviving son of Hugh earl of Stafford (d. 1386), who had proved his age and succeeded to his father's earldom on 20 October 1390, just a few weeks too late, apparently, to receive a summons to the November 1390 parliament. Nicholas Audley of Heleigh and William Thorpe, both of whom had been summoned as peers in November 1390, had died without issue during the course of the year, and were consequently omitted from the list. The bishops summoned were the same as for the previous parliament, while the list of abbots and priors included the abbot of Waltham St Cross and the prior of Coventry, both of whom had been summoned in January 1390 but omitted in November.

Parliament duly assembled on 3 November to listen to the opening speech, delivered on this occasion by Thomas Arundel, archbishop of York, who had replaced William de Wykeham as chancellor on 27 September. The parliament, said Arundel, had been summoned for three main reasons: firstly, to make provision for the maintenance of law and order so as to ensure obedience to the king's commands; secondly, to devise measures to improve the price of wool, and to make financial provision for the possibility that war might break out with France again following the expiry of the current truce on 15 August 1392; thirdly, to re-consider the Statute of Provisors, in the hope of finding a way of satisfying the wishes of both king and pope.

Before any further discussion of these issues could take place, however, the attention of the king and lords was diverted to a quite different matter - the long-running and very personal dispute between Lord Richard Lescrope of Bolton, a peer of parliament, and Sir Robert Grosvenor. This quarrel, which concerned the right to bear the arms azur, a bend or , had erupted more than six years earlier, and had become something of a cause celebre , entailing prolonged sittings and the summoning of scores of witnesses before the Court of Chivalry. Rather surprisingly, the parliamentary roll makes no mention of its eventual settlement, the details being recorded only in a memorandum subsequently enrolled in chancery. (fn. N1391int-6) This states that on 3 November, the first day of the parliament, Lord Lescrope 'found Sir Robert Grosvenor in the parliament chamber at Westminster', where, in the presence of the duke of Lancaster, he 'requested the king to command Sir Robert not to leave the court until he should hear and do what reason required in regard to the costs and damages wherein he is condemned in the cause pending between them concerning his arms'. Grosvenor was duly charged to appear before the duke of Lancaster (acting as steward of England) on Thursday 9 November, which he did. Further hearings of the case were held, in the presence of numerous lords, knights and esquires, on 11, 13 and 16 November. Grosvenor admitted that he had been ordered to pay damages of 500 marks (£333) to Lescrope, but claimed that 'he had not the money to pay it', for which he begged Lescrope's forgiveness. The latter's response was to remind Grosvenor that 'the highest and most sovereign things a knight ought to guard in defence of his estate are his troth and his arms, and that in both of them Sir Robert had impeached him'. Grosvenor's defence was that he had said what he had said on the advice of his legal counsel, having been advised that this was the only way that he would be able to prosecute his appeal. Eventually, however, once his honour had been saved, Lescrope agreed to pardon Grosvenor both the 500 marks and the fact that he had 'averred against him such villainy', and, by command of the king, the two men embraced and were reconciled. A second memorandum, attached to the first, records that on Thursday 16 November the two men came into full parliament where, on being asked by the duke of Lancaster whether he was aware of any 'falsehood, untruth or reproach' attaching to Lescrope's name, 'with a calm countenance Sir Robert confessed that he knew or heard of none in word or deed'; he also agreed to his confession being enrolled in chancery, whereupon it was formally delivered to the chancellor, and there the matter seems to have ended.

The most contentious item of public policy to be aired during the parliament was the proposed repeal of the Statute of Provisors. As noted above, two papal emissaries were present during the proceedings, and, if the words of the Westminster chronicler are to be taken literally, one or both of them may even have taken part in the discussions. The roll of the parliament is characteristically terse on the subject, merely noting that the commons agreed to permit to the king, until the next parliament, such 'allowance' ( soefferance ) concerning the statute as seemed to him to be reasonable or profitable - in other words, that he might, with the assent of the lords, evade the strictures of the law in relation to papal provisions in certain cases - provided, however, that not a single article of the statute was actually repealed, and that no-one who had hitherto received a benefice should be disturbed in their possession of it by any act of papal provision; if, at the next parliament, it turned out that the commons 'disagreed' with this concession, they should be at liberty to request a return to full enforcement of the statute. This 'protestation', they added, should be formally recorded on the parliamentary roll - which it was (Item 8).

As the chronicles make clear, behind this self-evidently reluctant concession lay some hard bargaining. Walsingham states that both Richard II and John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, had initially urged the commons to accede to the pope's demands, but that the commons 'refused in any way to consent', and only conceded what they did out of a desire not to offend either the king or the pope. The Westminster chronicler commented that 'those who attended the parliament refused any repeal of the Statute of Provisors', although out of respect for the pope they agreed that anyone who wished might journey to the Roman Curia for purposes of devotion or in fulfilment of a vow: 'the papal nuncio', he went on, 'could get no other answer out of them, and with this he departed'. (fn. N1391int-7) Yet, while Boniface IX is unlikely to have been satisfied with such an outcome, Richard II may well not have been too displeased with it. In effect, it allowed him, in his negotiations with the pope over benefices, to insist on enforcement of the statute when it suited him to do so, but not when it did not. It also allowed him to continue to dangle the carrot of repeal before the pope's eyes, a useful bargaining counter in his multifarious dealings with Rome. Moreover, as will be seen, the 'allowance' granted to the king proved to be less temporary than the commons in 1391 doubtless hoped that it would be.

The other major item of business noted by the monastic chroniclers was the statute requiring persons of religion, gilds, fraternities and civic corporations who in the past had acquired property without licence from the king either to purchase such licences before Michaelmas (29 September 1392), or to forfeit any such properties to the king. This enactment was based on a petition from the commons, who complained that churches and religious houses were employing 'subtle and ingenious' devices (such as enfeoffments-to-use) to evade the terms of the Statute of Mortmain (or De Religiosis ) of1279 (Item 32). The root problem here was that once land had passed into the hands of 'perpetual' communities such as monasteries, the potential profits to the feudal overlord - or 'chief lord of the fee' - from sources such as wardship, marriage or escheat would either diminish or, more probably, disappear entirely. At the time of the Statute of Mortmain, enfeoffments-to-use and other such devices which involved the holding of land in trust 'to the use of' others were virtually unknown, but during the fourteenth century they had become much more widespread, and clearly it had not taken long for communities of various kinds to realise the potential they afforded for evasion of the ban on granting lands to religious houses.

In effect, then, what this statute was doing was closing a loophole in the law. Of course, the ban on granting lands to religious houses had never been absolute. Indeed it may be that one of Edward I's aims in passing the Statute of Mortmain had been to make money by selling licences for its evasion - and it may also be that one of the reasons why Richard II agreed to (and extended the scope of) the commons' petition in 1391 was because he too saw an opportunity for a windfall. If so, he seems not to have been disappointed, for, as the Westminster chronicler somewhat caustically remarked, the subsequent sale of such licences meant that the government 'had by Michaelmas accumulated untold sums of money to fill the royal treasury to overflowing'. Knighton went further, describing the legislation as a detestable ( exsecrabile ) and 'ungodly' ( prophanum ) statute against the church; for him, it was the most significant legislative act of this parliament.

The monk of Evesham also noted this statute, one of only two acts of the parliament which he mentioned in his chronicle; the other was the decision to move the wool-staple back to Calais. (fn. N1391int-8) In fact, this involved a number of inter-related decisions: not only to reinstate Calais, with effect from 24 June 1392, as a compulsory overseas staple, but also to lift, with immediate effect, the ban on native merchants exporting wool which had been decreed at the previous parliament (Item 7). The intention, as Archbishop Arundel had made clear in his opening speech, was to improve the price of wool, to the benefit both of the government (through taxation of wool) and of the wool-merchants. As the Westminster chronicler remarked, 'the wool-staple had been of small profit to the king in the preceding year', (fn. N1391int-9) and the system of compulsory home staples established in the parliament of November 1390 was thus abandoned. In addition, and in order to try to improve the flow of bullion into the country - which was to a considerable extent dependent upon the price and volume of exports of wool - it was enacted that any merchant wishing to export wool would be obliged to bring back into England one ounce of gold for every sack of wool which he carried abroad. In fact, this enactment did not by any means mark the end of the system of home staples, for certain ports continued to be licenced to export wool elsewhere than to Calais, but what it did do was to restore to the native wool-merchants some of the advantages over their foreign competitors of which they had been deprived twelve months earlier. (fn. N1391int-10)

From a personal point of view, Richard II had good reason to be satisfied with the outcome of the parliament. In addition to his 'allowance' in relation to the Statute of Provisors, he also secured from the commons the first grant of direct taxation for over three years, and the first ever grant of direct taxation which was explicitly said to be for a purpose other than war (Item 10). (fn. N1391int-11) This came in the form of a half fifteenth and tenth (which would yield approximately £19,000), granted to pay for the king's intended journey to France in the summer of 1392 to meet Charles VI. In addition, the commons granted a further whole fifteenth and tenth, which however would only be levied should the peace talks break down and war once again break out. Admittedly, these grants were hedged about with conditions: if, for example, the proposed peace summit with the French king failed to materialise, the half fifteenth and tenth was to be kept in the treasury until such time as it might be used to finance the war, while the levying of the whole fifteenth and tenth was dependent upon the king leading a military expedition in person to either France or Scotland; yet, inevitably, a precedent had been set, and it would not be long before it was followed.

As in November 1390, Richard also took the opportunity to remind parliament that the debacle of 1386-8 had left no lasting stain on his kingship. Once again, this took the form of a petition from the commons, supposedly submitted on the last day of the parliament (2 December), to the effect that the king should be 'as free in his regality, liberty and royal dignity' as any of his predecessors, notwithstanding any statute or ordinance to the contrary, including any which might have been passed during the reign of Edward II; any statute which might be taken to imply the contrary was to be abolished (Item 13). Presumably this was a reference to the Commission of Government of 1386 (which was closely modelled on the act of 1310 which established the Lords Ordainer), but it is difficult to believe that the true origin of the 'petition' lay anywhere but with the king himself and his inner circle of counsellors. Nevertheless, Richard, having thanked the commons (as well as the lords, who had lost no time in associating themselves with the petition), declared himself well pleased with their request and 'fully agreed and assented to it'.

A number of other enactments of the November 1391 parliament are also worth noting. The former mayor of London, John of Northampton, who had been pardoned and released from prison at the request of the previous parliament, now had his pardon confirmed and was restored to the lands and goods which he had forfeited at the time of his condemnation in 1384, as were two of his former allies, Richard Norbury and John More (Items 33-35). The tin-staple, which had been established at Dartmouth (Devon) in the previous parliament, was moved with effect from June 1392 to Calais (rather than to Lostwithiel in Cornwall, as was requested in the petition: Item 48). Two petitions were also submitted concerning serfs. The first (Item 39) requested that no serf belonging to any religious house be permitted to purchase lands in fee, and that no serfs whatsoever be allowed to send their children to school 'in order to advance them through clergy'. The second (Item 51) was - very unusually, although understandably - a petition from 'the knights of the counties', rather than from the commons as a whole, complaining that serfs were fleeing their manors and going to live in enfranchised towns, from which the citizens and burgesses of the towns in question prevented their lords from recovering them, claiming the benefit of their franchises. The incidence of serfdom may have been declining rapidly in England by this time, but clearly the lords had no intention of allowing it to wither away without a struggle. The king was cautious, however, and replied to each of these requests that he wished to consider the matter further.

Finally, the commons requested - in a declaration in full parliament, rather than by petition - that since John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, was 'the most powerful person in the realm', it seemed sensible to them that he should be present at the proposed summit to be held between Richard II and Charles VI. This was not, as it might at first appear, an oblique criticism of the king, who was clearly in agreement with the suggestion, as was Gaunt himself. Rather, it was a recognition of the fact that, since Gaunt was now duke of Guyenne (Gascony), and since the future status of Gascony was the issue upon which the Anglo-French talks turned, it obviously made sense that he attend them. In the event, it would be another five years before the royal summit took place, for, instead of the king, it was Gaunt who in February 1392 crossed the Channel for several weeks of negotiations with the French king's uncles. Events soon conspired to frustrate the quest for peace, however: at a council held at Stamford in May 1392, which, according to the Westminster chronicler, was 'as well attended as a parliament', the knights present declared unambiguously that the peace terms proposed by the French were quite unacceptable. (fn. N1391int-12) Three months later, Charles VI of France suffered the first of the periodic bouts of insanity which, over the next thirty years, would progressively undermine his ability to rule his kingdom. Thus, for the moment, the peace talks faltered, and it would be other matters which, when parliament next met in January 1393, dominated the agenda.

Text and translation

[p. iii-284]
[col. a]
[memb. 8]
ROTULUS PARLIAMENTI TENTI APUD WESTM' IN CRASTINO ANIMARUM, ANNO REGNI REGIS RICARDI SECUNDI POST CONQUESTUM QUINTODECIMO. THE ROLL OF THE PARLIAMENT HELD AT WESTMINSTER ON THE MORROW OF ALL SOULS, IN THE FIFTEENTH YEAR OF THE REIGN OF KING RICHARD THE SECOND SINCE THE CONQUEST [3 November 1391].
1. Vendredy, lendemayn del almes, q'estoit le primer jour de cest parlement tenuz a Westm', l'an du regne nostre seignour le roi Richard second puis le conquest quinzisme, l'onurable pier en Dieu l'ercevesqe d'Everwyk, primat et chanceller d'Engleterre, par commandement du roi esteant present en parlement, prononcea et declara moult noblement et sagement la cause del somons de cest parlement, et dist, primerement, qe le roy voleit qe seinte esglise principalment, et puis les seignours espiritels et temporels, et auxint citees et burghes, eient et enjoient lour libertees et franchises si avant come ils les avoient et enjoierent en temps de ses nobles progenitours roys d'Engleterre, et auxint en son temps. 1. On Friday, the morrow of All Souls, which was the first day of this parliament held at Westminster, in the fifteenth year of the reign of our lord the king Richard, the second since the conquest [3 November 1391], the honourable father in God the archbishop of York, primate and chancellor of England, by order of the king then present in parliament, announced and declared most nobly and wisely the reason for summoning the parliament; and he said, firstly, that the king willed that holy church principally, and then the lords spiritual and temporal, and also the cities and boroughs, should have and enjoy their liberties and franchises as they had and enjoyed them in the time of his noble progenitors the kings of England, and also in his own time.
2. Et puis dist qe la somons de cest present parlement si estoit principalment pur trois enchesons. La primere encheson si est, ordeigner coment la pees et quiete de la terre q'ont estez cea en arere grandement emblemys et destourbez, sibien par detraccion et maintenance come en autre manere, purront meultz estre tenuz et gardez, et la ley meultz execut, et les mandementz du roy meultz obeiez. La second enchesoun, d'ordeigner et veer coment le pris des leyns, q'est outre mesure empirez et amenusez, purra meultz estre amendez et enhaucez. Et auxint, en cas qe la guerre soi prendra a le fyn des cestes presentz trieves, c'estassavoir, al Assumption Nostre Dame proschein avenir, d'ordeigner et veer coment, et de qoy, la dite guerre purra estre maintenuz a meindre charge du people. Et la tierce enchesoun si est, touchant l'estatut de provisours, d'ordeigner et veer coment nostre seint pier purra avoir ceo qe a luy appartient, et le roy ceo q'atteint a luy et a sa corone, juxta illud, Reddite que sunt cesaris cesari, et que sunt Dei Deo. (fn. iii-284-7-1) Et puis dist coment le roy avoit ordeignez et assignez certeins clerks pur resceivre petitions des matires appurtenantz au parlement, et certeins seignours pur trier et respondre mesmes les peticions en manere acustume, des queux < clerks et > seignours les nouns ensuent: 2. And then he said that the summoning of that parliament was chiefly for three reasons. The first reason was to decide how the peace and tranquillity of the land, which previously have been greatly impaired and hindered, both by detraction and maintenance and otherwise, might best be upheld and kept, and the law best enforced and the mandates of the king best obeyed. The second reason was to ordain and consider how the price of wool, which had been weakened and reduced beyond measure, might best be amended and increased. And also, if there should be an outbreak of war at the end of the present truce, namely, on the Assumption of Our Lady next coming [25 March 1392], to ordain and see how and by what means the said war might be maintained with the least burden on the people. And the third reason, concerning the statute of provisors, was to ordain and see how our holy father might have that which pertains to him, and the king that which pertains to him and his crown, according to the words - Render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and unto God the things that are God's. (fn. iii-284-7-1) And then he said that the king had ordained and assigned certain clerks to receive petitions upon the matters pertaining to parliament, and certain lords to try and answer the same petitions in the customary manner, the names of which clerks and lords are as follows:
[col. b]
3. Receivours des peticions d'Engleterre, Irland, Gales, et Escoce:

  • Sire Johan de Burton
  • Sire Thomas de Newenham
  • Sire Robert de Faryngton'
  • Sire Johan de Scarle, clerck del parlement.
3. Receivers of petitions from England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland:

  • Sir John Burton
  • Sir Thomas Newenham
  • Sir Robert Farington
  • Sir John Scarle, clerk of parliament.
4. Receivours des peticions de Gascoign, et d'autres terres et paiis depar dela la meer, et des Isles:

  • Maistre Richard de Rouhale
  • Sire Piers de Barton'
  • Sire Thomas de Middleton'
  • Sire Thomas de Stanley.
4. Receivers of petitions from Gascony and from other lands and countries overseas, and from the Channel Islands:

  • Master Richard Rouhale
  • Sir Piers Barton
  • Sir Thomas Middleton
  • Sir Thomas Stanley.
5. Et sont assignez triours des peticions d'Engleterre, Irland, Gales, et Escoce:

  • L'ercevesqe de Canterbirs
  • Le duc de Guyen' et de Lancastr'
  • L'evesqe de Londres
  • L'evesqe de Wyncestre
  • L'evesqe d'Ely
  • L'evesqe de Duresme
  • L'abbe de Westm'
  • L'abbe de Burgh' Seint Pier
  • Le count de Derby
  • Le count d'Arundell'
  • Le count de Warrewyk
  • Le count de Northumbr'
  • Le seignour de Wylughby
  • Monsire Richard le Scrop'
  • Monsire Wauter Clopton
  • Monsire Robert Cherleton'
  • William Thirnyng.
5. The following are assigned to be triers of petitions from England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland:

  • The archbishop of Canterbury
  • The duke of Guyenne and of Lancaster
  • The bishop of London
  • The bishop of Winchester
  • The bishop of Ely
  • The bishop of Durham
  • The abbot of Westminster
  • The abbot of Peterborough
  • The earl of Derby
  • The earl of Arundel
  • The earl of Warwick
  • The earl of Northumberland
  • Lord Willoughby
  • Sir Richard le Scrope
  • Sir Walter Clopton
  • Sir Robert Charlton
  • William Thirning
- toutz ensemble, ou sys des prelatz et seignours avantditz au meyns; appellez a eux chanceller, tresorer, seneschall, et chamberleyn, et auxint les sergeantz le roy, quant y busoignera. Et tendront lour place en la chambre < du chamberleyn, apres de > la chambre depeint. - to act all together, or at least six of the aforesaid prelates and lords; consulting with the chancellor, treasurer, steward, and chamberlain, and also the king's serjeants, when necessary. And they will hold their session in the chamberlain's room, beyond the Painted Chamber.
[p. iii-285]
[col. a]
6. Et sont assignez triours des peticions de Gascoign', et d'autres terres et paiis depar dela la meer, et des Isles:

  • Le duc d'Everwyk
  • L'evesqe de Seint David
  • L'evesqe de Bath' et de Welles
  • L'evesqe de Cestre;
  • L'abbe de Bataill'
  • L'abbe de Waltham
  • Le count de Kent
  • Le count de Salesbirs
  • Monsire Johan Lovell'
  • Johan Hull'
  • Wiliam Rikhull'
  • Johan Wadham.
6. The following are assigned to be triers of petitions from Gascony and from other lands and countries overseas, and from the Channel Islands:

  • The duke of York
  • The bishop of St Davids
  • The bishop of Bath and Wells
  • The bishop of Chester
  • The abbot of Battle
  • The abbot of Waltham
  • The earl of Kent
  • The earl of Salisbury
  • Sir John Lovell
  • John Hull
  • William Rickhill
  • John Wadham
- toutz ensemble, ou sys des prelats et seignours avantditz; appellez a eux chanceller, tresorer, seneschalle, chamberleyn, et les sergeantz le roi, quant il bosoignera. Et tendront lour place en la chaumbre marcolf. - to act all together, or at least six of the aforesaid prelates and lords; consulting with the chancellor, treasurer, steward, chamberlain and the king's serjeants, when necessary. And they will hold their session in the Marcolf Chamber.
Et ceux qi voillent liverer lour petitions les baillent < avant > parentre cy et jeofdy proschein avenir. And those who wish to submit petitions should deliver them between now and Thursday next [9 November 1391].
< L'estaple. > The staple.
7. Ordeynez est et accordez en cest present parlement, par assent de tout le parlement, pur profit du roi et de roialme, qe l'estaple soit es lieux deinz le roialme ou il est ordeigne pardevant par l'estatut de l'estaple fait l'an vint et septisme de le roi Edward [III] aiel nostre seignour le roy q'orest, (fn. iii-284-27-1) tanqe al feste de la Nativite de Seint Johan le Baptistre proschein avenir: et qe chescun marchant, alien et denzein, purra franchement achater et vendre toutz maners des leyns, quirs, et pealx lanutz en qeconqe partie, et de qeconqes persones deinz le dit roialme, sibien de ceux q'ount les berbys come d'autres, sanz estre empeschez ou grevez par ascun estatut ou ordeignance fait pardevant, et les amesner a les estaples; et qe les ditz marchantz les ditz leyns, quirs, et pealx lanutz, paiantz primerement les custumes et subsides ent duez purront carier et amesner as queux parties dela la meer qe lour plest tanq'al dit fest de la Nativite de Seint Johan: nientcontresteantz ascuns estatutz ou ordeinances ent faitz acontraire devant ces heures. Et enoutre, qe les ditz marchantz facent reporter en Engleterre durant le dit temps, as lieux a limiters deins le dit roialme par discrecions des seignours du conseille, de chescun sak de leyn un unce d'or a la bullioun. Et qe apres le dit fest de la Nativite de Seint Johan, soit la dite estaple en les portz et villes pluis proscheins a la meer, par l'ordenance de seignours de conseille, et la repaire des ditz marchantz ovesqe lour leyns et la dite bullion soient a Caleys tanq'al proschein parlement. Et qe ceste ordeinance et accorde teignent lieu et force lendemayn apres cest parlement finy. 7. It was ordained and agreed in this present parliament, with the assent of all parliament, for the profit of the king and kingdom, that the staple be in the places in the kingdom where it was ordained in the past by the statute of the staple made in the twenty-seventh year of King Edward [III], grandfather of our lord the present king, (fn. iii-284-27-1) until the feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist next [24 June 1392]: and that every merchant, alien and denizen, may freely buy and sell all kinds of wool, hides, and woolfells wheresoever, and from whomsoever within the said kingdom, as well from those who have sheep as of others, without being impeded or harmed by any statute or ordinance made in the past, and take them to the staples; and that the said merchants may carry and take the said wool, hides, and woolfells to whatsoever parts overseas they please until the said feast of the Nativity of St John [24 June 1392], first paying the customs and subsidies due thereon: notwithstanding any statutes or ordinances previously made thereon to the contrary. And further, that the said merchants shall bring back into England during the said time, to places in the said realm to be specified at the discretion of the lords of council, one ounce of gold bullion for each sack of wool. And that after the said feast of the Nativity of St John [24 June 1392], the said staple shall be in the ports and towns on the coasts of the sea, by the ordinance of the lords of the council, and the repair of the said merchants with their wool and the said bullion shall be to Calais until the next parliament. And that this ordinance and agreement shall take place and effect the day after the end of this parliament.
[memb. 7]
< L'estatut de provisours. > The statute of provisors.
8. Fait a remembrier touchant l'estatut de provisours (fn. iii-284-29-1) qe les communes, pur la grant affiance q'ils ont en la persone nostre seignour le roy, et en son tresexcellent sen, et en la grant tendresse q'il ad a sa corone et les droitz d'icelle; et auxint en les nobles et hautes discrecions des seignours, s'assenterent en plein parlement qe nostre dit seignour le roi, par advys et assent des ditz seignours, purra faire tielle soefferance tochant le dit estatut come luy semblera resonable et profitable tanq'al proschein parlement, parissint qe le dit estatut ne soit repellez en nulle article d'icelle. Et qe toutz ceux qe ont ascuns benefices par force du dit estatut devant cest present parlement, et auxi qe toutz ceux as queux ascun eide, tranquillite, ou avantage est accruz par vertue del dit estatut de les benefices de seinte esglise, des queux ils esteient lors en possession, sibien par my presentacioun ou [col. b] collacion du roy nostre seignour come des ordenairs ou religiouses qeconqes, ou par autre qeconqe manere ou voie, les puissent franchement avoir et enjoier, et pesiblement continuer lour possessions d'icelles, sanz ent estre oustez, ou ascunement chalengez, empeschez, molestez, inquietez, ou grevez desore par qeconqes provisours ou autres, contre la forme et effect de l'estatut avantdit, par cause du dite soefferance en ascun temps avenir. Et enoutre, qe les ditz communes se purront desagreer a dit proschein parlement a tielle soefferance pluis outre, et pleinement resorter al dit estatut si lour semblera affaire, ove protestacioun qe cest assent q'est novellerie et n'ad mye este fait devant ces heures, ne soit trait en ensample n'en consequence en temps avenir. Et prierent a nostre seignour le roi qe ceste protestacioun purroit estre entre de recorde en roulle du parlement; et le < roi > l'ottroia, et comanda del faire. 8. Be it remembered concerning the statute of provisors (fn. iii-284-29-1) that the commons - for the great trust which they have in the person of our lord the king and in his most excellent knowledge, and in the great affection which he has for his crown and the rights of the same, and also in the noble and high discretions of the lords - have agreed in full parliament that our said lord the king, by the advice and assent of the said lords, might make such allowance touching the said statute as shall seem reasonable and profitable to him until the next parliament, provided that no article of the said statute be repealed. And that all those who have any benefices by force of the said statute before this present statute, and also that all those to whom any aid, respite, or advantage has accrued by virtue of the said statute on the benefices of holy church, of which they shall then be in possession, as well by presentation or [col. b] collation of the king our lord as of ordinaries or religious whatsoever, or by any other method or means whatsoever, shall have and enjoy them freely, and continue peaceably in their possession of the same, without being ousted therefrom, or otherwise challenged, impeded, harassed, troubled, or harmed by any provisors or others contrary to the form and effect of the aforesaid statute, by reason of the said allowance in any time to come. And further, that the said commons might refuse further such allowance at the said next parliament, and openly refer to the said statute if they choose, with the protestation that this assent, which is a novelty and has not been given before this time, shall not be treated as an example or precedent in future. And they pray of our lord the king that this protestation might be entered on record in the roll of parliament; and the king approved and ordered it to be done.
< Frank tenements. > Free tenements.
9. Item, a la grevouse compleint des communes fait en plein parlement, de ce qe plusours liges du roi sont faitz venir devant les conseilx de diverses seignours, a y respondre de lour frank tenementz, et de plusours autres choses reales et personeles, qe deveroient estre demesnez par la ley de la terre, encontre l'estat et droit de nostre seignour le roi et de sa corone, et en defesance de la commune ley; accordez est et assentuz qe nulle lige du roi desore enavant soit arte, compelle, ne constreint par nulle voie, de venir, ne d'apparoir devant le conseille d'ascun seignour ou dame, pur y respondre de soun frank tenement, ne de chose qe touche frank tenement, ne de nulle autre chose reale ou personele q'appartient a la ley de la terre, en ascune manere; s'ils ne le voillent faire de lour bon gree et frank volunte. Et si ascun se sente grevez en temps avenir encontre ceste ordenance et accord, sue al chanceller qe ferra pur le temps, et il en ferra remede. (fn. iii-284-31-1) 9. Item, at the grievous complaint of the commons made in full parliament, that many lieges of the king were made to come before the councils of various lords to answer there for their free tenements, and for many other matters, real and personal, which should be determined by the law of the land, contrary to the estate and right of our lord the king and his crown, and to the undoing of the common law; it is agreed and assented that no liege of the king should henceforth be bound, compelled, nor constrained by any means, to come nor to appear before the council of any lord or lady to answer for his free tenement, nor for anything touching free tenement, nor for any other matter real or personal which pertains to the law of the land in any way, unless he should wish to do so of his own accord and free will. And if any in future feels injured contrary to this ordinance and agreement, let him sue to the chancellor of the time, and he shall provide a remedy. (fn. iii-284-31-1)
< Graunt de subsidies. > Grant of subsidies.
10. En ycest parlement les seignours et communes granterent a nostre seignour le roi une dimy disme et dimy quinzisme, d'estre levez de laies gentz, et paiez as oeptaves de Pasqe proschein avenir; et auxint une entiere disme et une entiere quinzisme, d'estre levez de laies gentz, come desuis, et paiez a le fest de la Nativite de Seint < Johan > le Baptistre proschein ensuant, sur certeine forme et condicions contenuz en une cedule livere par les ditz communes en plein parlement de mesme la grante, en les paroles q'ensuont: 10. In this parliament the lords and commons granted to our lord the king a half-fifteenth, to be levied upon the laity, and paid on the octave of Easter next [22 April 1392]; and also a whole tenth and fifteenth, to be levied upon the laity, as above, and paid on the feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist next following [24 June 1392], upon certain conditions concerning the same grant contained in a schedule submitted by the said commons in full parliament, in the following words:
A la reverence de Dieu, et pur l'onour et bien de nostre seignour le roi et de son roialme d'Engleterre, et nomement pur la tendresse et chierte qe nostre seignour le roi ad a sa povere commune, et qe en cest present parlement a ore en son plein age, est en entiere volunte et desire, par son bon sen, et haute discrecioun de luy et de ses seignours et commune, ad promis pur la quiete et tranquillite de ses povres liges communes de son dit roialme, a governer, sustenir et maintenir les bones loyes et custumes deinz son roialme, et faire plein droit sibien as povres come as riches, nient eiantz consideracioun a ascuny persone: les povres communes de son dit roialme d'Engleterre, par assent des seignours temporeles, en ese et supportacioun des ditz communes pur temps avenir, et pur la grant affiance q'ils ount a sa roiale mageste, grantent a nostre seignour le roi mesmes une demy quinzisme, et demy disme, a comencer d'estre levez des lays gentz a le fest de la Annunciacioun de Nostre Dame proschein avenir, et pur les paier a les oeptaves de Pasqe proschein ensuant, pur honorer son estat et viage en sa propre persone en les parties de France, pur les trewes ou final pees affermer ovesqe son adversair de France. In reverence of God, and for the honour and benefit of our lord the king and his kingdom of England, and especially for the affection and charity which our lord the king has for his poor commons, and because in this present parliament, he being now of full age, has promised of his entire free will and desire, by his good judgment and the high discretion of him and his lords and commons, for the quiet and tranquillity of his poor liege commons of his said kingdom, to govern, sustain, and maintain the good laws and customs in his kingdom, and fully to do right as well to the poor as to the rich, showing no favour to anyone: the poor commons of his said kingdom of England, by the assent of the lords temporal, in ease and support of the said commons in time to come, and for the great trust which they have in his royal majesty, grant to our lord the king the same half-fifteenth and half-tenth to be levied upon the laity on the feast of the Annunciation of Our Lady next to come [25 March 1392] and to be paid by the octave of Easter next coming [22 April 1392], to honour his estate and his expedition in person in the parts of France to confirm the truce or a final peace with his adversary of France.
Et si < aviegne, > qe le roi ne va mesmes en sa propre persone pur les trewes ou final pees affermer, come desuis, einz qe la guerre sourde par [p. iii-286][col. a] entre nostre seignour le roi suisdit et soun dit adversaire, qe adonqes la dite demy quinzisme, et disme, demurgent en la garde de tresorer d'Engleterre, ensemblement ovesqe un entiere quinzisme et disme, queux quinzisme et disme les ditz communes grantent a mesme nostre seignour le roi, sur condicioun q'ensuit: c'estassavoir, qe si le roi va mesmes en propre persone en defens de son roialme en les parties de France ou Escoce, q'adonqes mesme ceste entiere quinzisme et disme soit leve des leys gentz a le feste de Seint Johan le Baptistre proschein; et mesme celle entiere quinzisme et disme, ensemblement ovesqe la demy quinzisme et disme suisdite, soient despenduz pur son roial viage avauntdit, et le surplus de ceo pur defens de roialme, solonc les hautes sens et discrecioun de roi nostre seignour et des seignours de son conseille, sanz estre despenduz en autre oeps. Et si aviegne qe le roi ne va mesmes en sa propre persone en defens de son roialme en France ou Escoce, come desuis, ou trewes ou final pees soit pris parentre nostre seignour le roy et son dit adversaire, q'adonqes la dite entiere quinzisme et disme ne soient en ascune manere levez ne paiez en temps avenir. Et qe le dit tresorer d'Engleterre soit charge en cest present parlement par le roi mesmes, qe les ditz demy quinzisme et demy disme, et entiere quinzisme et disme, ne soient despenduz en null autre oeps, mes en manere come ils sont limitez par amont, come il vorra respondere a la commune de roialme de empeschement de ceo en proschein parlement. Et qe ce soit entre de recorde en roulle de parlement. And if the king should not go in person to confirm the truces or final peace, as above, so that war arises between [p. iii-286][col. a] our lord the king aforesaid and his said adversary, then the said half-fifteenth and tenth shall remain in the keeping of the treasurer of England, together with one whole fifteenth and tenth, which fifteenth and tenth the said commons grant to our same lord the king, on the following condition: namely, that if the king should go in person to the defence of his kingdom in the parts of France or Scotland, then the whole fifteenth and tenth shall be levied upon the laity on the feast of St John the Baptist next [24 June 1392]; and the same whole fifteenth and tenth, together with the aforesaid half fifteenth and tenth, shall be spent on his aforesaid expedition, and the surplus on the defence of the realm, at the discretion and high sense of the king our lord and the lords of his council, without being put to any other use. And if the king should not go in person to the defence of his kingdom in France or Scotland, as above, and truce or final peace be made between our lord the king and his said adversary, that then the said whole fifteenth and tenth shall not be levied in any way, nor paid in time to come. And that the said treasurer of England shall be charged in this present parliament by the king himself that the said half-fifteenth and half-tenth and whole fifteenth and tenth shall not be put to any other use, but only that which they have defined above, as he would answer to the commons of the kingdom on impeachment thereon in the next parliament. And that it be entered on record in the roll of parliament.
< Oier et terminer. > Oyer and terminer.
11. Item, les ditz communes prierent en plein parlement, de la grace du roi, pur greindre confort du poeple encontre la charge grante en ceste parlement, qe nulle eir ne treilbastoun soient tenuz ne grantez tanq'al proschein parlement, ne nulle general oier et terminer, sinoun en cas de grande necessite. Mesqe especiales oiers et terminers purront estre grauntez pur horrible trespas, solonc la forme de l'estatut ent fait. Et nostre seignour le roi eiant consideracioun a la grant et continuelle diligence des ditz communes entour le bon esploit de cest parlement, et aussint al eide a luy graunte, come desuis, de sa grace especiale ad ottroie lour dite priere a ceste foitz. Nient contresteant qe de droit de sa corone il poet granter et faire tenir tielx eirs et treilbastons quant y bosoignera. 11. Also, the said commons pray in full parliament, of the king's grace, for the great comfort of the people against the charge granted in this parliament, that no eyre nor trailbaston should be held nor appointed until the next parliament, nor any general oyer and terminer, unless in a cause of great need. But that special oyer and terminers might be granted for horrible trespass, according to the form of the statute made thereon. And our lord the king, considering the great and continual diligence of the said commons in forwarding the business of this parliament, and also in granting him the aid, as above, of his special grace agreed to their said prayer on this occasion. Notwithstanding that by the right of his crown he can grant and cause to be held such eyres and trailbastons whenever need may arise.
< Subsidies. > Subsidies.
12. Fait a remembrer qe l'entent du roi, seignours, et communes est qe la grante des subsides fait au roi en le darrein parlement estoise effectuel, et pleinement en sa force, non obstant ascune condicioun du dite grante, n'ascun enlargisement de passage de leines et autres marchandises touchantz l'estaple, n'ascune autre chose faite en cest present parlement. 12. Be it remembered that the intention of the king, lords, and commons is that the grant of the subsidies made to the king in the last parliament shall remain in effect and fully in force, notwithstanding any condition of the said grant, nor any increase of the passage of wool and other merchandise touching the staple, nor any other thing done in the present parliament.
< Regalie nostre seignour le roi. > The regality of our lord the king.
13. En ycest parlement, le second jour de Decembre, les communes prierent overtement en plein parlement qe nostre seignour le roi soit et estoise aussi frank en sa regalie, liberte et dignite roiale en son temps, come ascuns de ses nobles progenitours jadys rois d'Engleterre furent en lour temps: nientcontresteant ascun estatut ou ordinance fait devant ces heures acontraire, et mesment en temps le roi Edward second, qi gist a Gloucestre. Et < qe > si ascun estatut fuist fait en temps le dit roi Edward, en derogacioun de la liberte et franchise de la corone, q'il soit annulle, et de null force. Et puis toutz les prelatz et seignours temporeles prierent en mesme le manere. Et surce nostre dit seignour le roi mercia les ditz seignours et communes de la grant tendresse et affeccioun q'ils avoient a la salvacioun [col. b] de soun honour et de son estat. Et a cause qe lour ditz prieres et requestes luy semblerent honestes et resonables, il s'agrea et assenta pleinement a ycelles. 13. In this parliament, on 2 December [1391], the commons prayed openly in full parliament that our lord the king should be and remain as free in his regality, liberty and royal dignity in his time as any of his noble progenitors, once kings of England, were in their time: notwithstanding any statute or ordinance made before this time to the contrary, and likewise in the time of King Edward II who lies at Gloucester. And that if any statute was made in the time of the said King Edward to the derogation of the liberty and franchise of the crown, that it be annulled and of no force. And then all the prelates and lords temporal prayed likewise. Whereupon our said lord the king thanked the said lords and commons for the great tenderness and affection they had for the salvation [col. b] of his honour and estate. And because their said prayers and requests seemed honest and reasonable to him, he fully assented and agreed to the same.
< L'estatute d'estaple. > The statute of the staple.
14. Item, come contenu soit en l'estatut de l'estaple, (fn. iii-284-42-1) aufyn qe les contractes faitz deinz l'estaple soient le meutz tenuz, et les paiementz prestement faitz, Qe chescun mair de l'estaple eit poair de prendre reconissance des dettes qe homme voudra faire devant luy, en presence de conestables de l'estaple ou l'un d'eux, et q'en chescun des ditz estaples soit un seal demorant en la garde du dit mair souz les sealx des ditz conestables accordez est et assentuz qe le dit estatut soit fermement tenuz [...] et gardez, et qe nul meir de l'estaple preigne ne receive ascune reconissance de dette encontre la forme du dit estatut, sur peyne de paier au roi la moite de la somme devant luy reconisse. (fn. iii-284-42-2) 14. Also, as it is expressed in the statute of the staple (fn. iii-284-42-1) that contracts made within the staple should be upheld, and the payments readily made, That every mayor of the staple have the power to take recognizance of debts which any wish to make before him, in the presence of the constables of the staple or one of them, and that in every one of the said staples there shall be a seal in the keeping of the said mayor under the seals of the said constables, it was agreed and maintained that the said statute be firmly upheld and protected, and that no mayor of the staple take or receive any recognizance of debt contrary to the form of the said statute, on pain of paying the king half the sum acknowledged before him. (fn. iii-284-42-2)
< Treite de peas. > A treaty of peace.
15. Fait a remembrer qe les communes disoient en plein parlement qe si treite de pees ou trewe se devera prendra parentre nostre seignour le roi et son adversaire de France, q'il sembla a eux expedient et necessaire, s'il plerroit au roi, qe monseignour de Guyen', a cause q'il est le pluis sufficeant persone de roialme, irroit al dit trete. Et le roi dist q'il < le > vorroit bien, s'il plust a mon dit seignour de Guyen'. Et sur ceo monseignour de Guyen disoit q'il vorroit de tresbon coer travailler et faire chose qe purra tourner al honour et profit du roi et de roialme. 15. Be it remembered that the commons said in full parliament that if a treaty of peace or truce should be reached between our lord the king and his adversary of France, it seemed to them expedient and necessary, if it pleased the king, that messire of Guyenne, because he was the most sufficient person of the kingdom, should attend the said treaty. And the king said that it would please him well, if it pleased my said lord of Guyenne. Whereupon messire of Guyenne said that he would wholeheartedly do and perform whatever might lead to the honour and profit of the king and kingdom.
[memb. 6]
< Pour le priour de Holande. > For the prior of Upholland.
16. Robert, priour de Holand el counte de Lancastr', mist avant une peticion en cest parlement, en la fourme q'ensuit: 16. Robert, prior of Upholland in Lancashire, submitted a petition in this parliament in the following form:
A son tresredote et trespuissant seignour le roi d'Engleterre et de France supplie treshumblement soun povre oratour et chapellein Robert priour de Holand: qe come le dit priour et ses predecessours ount eu en lour oeps l'esglise de Whitewyk en le counte de Leycestr', la viendrent Henry Tebbe de Threnguston', William soun frer, Richard Sisselson', Robert Grubber, Richard Sprot, et Johan Grenelowe ove plusours autres mesfesours, et le dit priour ove fort mayn hors de sa dite esglise boterunt et enchacerunt, et cent souldz des oblacions le dit priour al haut auter en la dite esglise pristerunt, et mistrent en un gause et emporterunt, et le dit priour manasserunt de tuer s'il entrast en la dite esglise; et le dit priour et ses servantz unqore manassont de vie et de membre, la ou le dit priour et ses servantz feurent desouthe vostre tresreverente proteccioun a ycelle temps; et plusours autres horribles trespasses et tortz le dit Henry et les autres mesfesours ount fait a dit priour et ses servantz, les queux le dit priour est prest a monstrer devant vous son tresgraciouse et trespuissant seignour: c'estassavoir, qe la ou le dit priour avoit vendu certeines dismes a dit Henry, pur queux le dit Henry et autres feurent obligez par une obligacioun a dit priour en qatorse marcz d'argent, apaier a certein jour, a quel jour le dit Henry ne paia point, et le dit priour vient al dit Henry et luy pria de paier les ditz deniers, et le dit Henry demanda vieue de dit obligacioun, et le dit priour monstra la dite obligacioun a dit Henry et William son frere, et la les ditz < Herry [sic: read 'Henry'] et > William debruserunt et enraserunt la dite obligacioun, et le dit Henry ne vodroit paier les ditz deniers a dit priour. Sur quoi le dit priour suist briefs a viscont de Leycestr', d'arester le dit Henry et les autres mesfesours, tanqe ils eussent trove seurtee de la pees a dit priour et ses servantz: le quel Henry et les autres sont tant favore ove le dit viscont, issint qe le dit viscont ne voet eux prendre ne les ditz briefs servir. To his most redoubtable and potent lord the king of England and of France, his poor orator and chaplain Robert, prior of Upholland, most humbly prays that whereas the said prior and his predecessors have had for their use the church of Whitwick in the county of Leicester, Henry Tebbe of Thringston, William his brother, Richard Sisselson, Robert Grubber, Richard Sprot and John Greenlow came there with many other malefactors and beat and chased the said prior with brute force out of his said church, and took a hundred shillings of the oblations of the said prior on the high altar in the said church, and put them in a cloth and carried them off, and they threatened to kill the said prior if he entered the said church; and they still threaten the said prior and his servants with life and limb, even though the said prior and his servants were under your most reverend protection at that time; and the said Henry and the other malefactors have committed many other horrible trespasses and wrongs against the said prior and his servants, which the said prior is ready to explain before you his most gracious and most potent lord: namely, that although the said prior had sold certain tithes to the said Henry, for which the said Henry and others were obliged by a bond to the said prior for fourteen marks of silver to be paid on a certain day, on that day the said Henry paid nothing at all, and the said prior came to the said Henry and asked him to pay the said money, and the said Henry demanded to see the said bond, and the said prior showed it to the said Henry and William his brother, and then the said Henry and William ripped and tore up the said bond, and the said Henry would not pay the said money to the said prior. Whereupon the said prior sued writs to the sheriff of Leicester to arrest the said Henry and the other malefactors until they should find surety of peace with the said prior and his servants: which Henry and the others are in such favour with the said sheriff that the sheriff will not arrest them nor serve the said writs.
[p. iii-287]
[col. a]
Sur quoy supplie treshumblement le dit povre priour a vostre tresgraciouse et trespuissant seignourie qe vous plese comander briefs as ditz mesfesours, sur grevouse peyne de venir devant vous et vostre tresnoble et tressage conseille en plein parlement, a certein jour, de respondre des horribles trespasses et tortz a seinte esglise et luy faitz, et auxi de trover sufficeante seurte a dit priour et les soens de lour vie et de membre, pur l'amour de Dieu, et en oevre de charite., (fn. iii-284-47-1) Whereupon the said poor prior most humbly prays of your very gracious and very potent lordship that it may please you to send writs to the said malefactors ordering them to come before you and your most noble and most wise council in full parliament, upon grievous pain, on a certain day, to answer to the horrible trespasses and wrongs committed against holy church and himself, and also to find sufficient surety to the said prior and his companions for their life and limb, for love of God and by way of charity. (fn. iii-284-47-1)
La quelle peticioun lieue en parlement, agardez feust q'une commissioun serroit maintenant faite a un sergeant d'armes pur amesner les ditz mesfesours en cest parlement, a y respoundre de la matire comprise en la dite peticioun. Et surceo Johan de Elyngham, sergeant d'armes, par force d'une commissioun a luy ent faite, amesna les ditz Henry Tebbe et Johan Grenelowe, qe feurent principalx mesfesours celle partie, devant le roy mesmes et seignours en parlement. Et illoeqes opposez et aresonez de la dite matire, confesserent et granterent q'ils feurent coupables de les trespasses a eux par le dit priour en la dite peticioun surmys, et se mistrent en la grace du roi et du dit priour. Parount les ditz Henry Tebbe et Johan Grenelowe, pur l'orribilite et malveys ensample du dit trespas, par agarde du roi mesmes et des seignours feurent agardez et commys en la prisoun de Flete, a y demurer a volunte du roi. Et puis les ditz Henry et Johan firent fyn au roi en la chancellarie, et gree al dit priour, et troverent seurte de lour bon port: et ensi feurent deliverez. Which petition having been read in parliament, it was decided that a commission should be issued at once to a serjeant-at-arms to bring the said malefactors to this parliament, to answer to the matter contained in the said petition. Whereupon John Ellingham, serjeant-at-arms, by force of a commission to him, brought the said Henry Tebbe and John Greenlow, who were the principal malefactors in the matter, before the king himself and the lords in parliament. And there, being questioned and examined on the said matter, they confessed and acknowledged that they were guilty of the offences alleged against them by the said prior in the said petition, and they submitted to the grace of the king and of the said prior. Wherefore the said Henry Tebbe and John Grenelowe, for the horrible and evil nature of the said offence, by decision of the king himself and the lords were sentenced and committed to the Fleet prison, there to remain at the king's will. And then the said Henry and John made fine to the king in the chancery, and compensated the said prior, and found surety of their good bearing: and thereupon they were freed.
< L'abbe de Seint Osithe. > The abbot of Saint Osyth.
17. L'abbe de Seint Osithe mist avant une peticioun en cest parlement, en les paroles q'ensuent: 17. The abbot of St Osyth submitted a petition in this parliament in the following words:
A nostre tresexcellent et tresredoute seignour le roi, et as honurables seignours en cest present parlement, monstre, si vous plest, et supplie, vostre povre chapeleyn et oratour l'abbe de Seint Osithe, en le counte d'Essex: qe come le dit suppliant, a darrein parlement tenuz a Westm', pursuist une bille devers Johan Rokelle, de plusours grevances faitz al dit suppliant, et specialment de .ccc. marcz en queux le dit abbe fuist taxee par une falx enqueste, a le suyte d'un William Newman et autres, par maintenance, procurement, et embracierie, del dit Johan Rokelle: et surce, par advys des seignours del dit parlement, et justices sibien del un bank come de l'autre, sur sa responce le dit John fuist agarde al tour de Loundres. Et puis apres, sibien le dit Johan come le dit suppliant eux submistrent en haut et bas en la tresdreite ordinance et agarde mon tresnoble seignour de Guyen', quel agarde le dit Johan n'ad mye accomplez, ne unqore rien fait. A cause de quel le dit suppliant ore estoise en graunt peril, et nomesment pur ce qe le dit suppliant avoit un supersedeas tanqe a ceste present parlement touchant le jugement des ditz .ccc. marcz, le quel supersedeas ore ad perdue sa force. To our most excellent and most redoubtable lord the king and to the honourable lords in this present parliament, your poor chaplain and orator the abbot of St Osyth in Essex shows and prays, if you please: whereas the said supplicant, at the last parliament held at Westminster, sued a bill against John Rokely for many injuries done to the said supplicant, and especially for three hundred marks in which the said abbot was taxed by a false inquest, at the suit of one William Newman and others, by the maintenance, procurement, and embracery of the said John Rokely: and thereupon, by the advice of the lords of the said parliament and the justices of both Benches, on his answer the said John was committed to the Tower of London. And then later, both the said John and the said supplicant submitted themselves entirely to the most rightful ordinance and sentence of my most noble lord of Guyenne, which judgment the said John did not and has not yet observed. Wherefore the said supplicant now remains in great peril, and especially because the said supplicant had a supersedeas until this present parliament concerning the judgment on the said three hundred marks, which supersedeas has now lost its force.
Qe plese a vostre tresnoble et tresgraciouse seignourie, de considerer le grant tort, travaille, perde, et costages queux le dit abbe ad suffert, et d'ordeigner tiel remedie al dit suppliant, si q'il soit descharge en tout; et enoutre resonable amendes et redresse solonc vostre treshaut et tressage discrecioun, pur Dieu, et en oevre de charite. May it please your most noble and most gracious lordship to consider the great wrong, trouble, loss and expense which the said abbot has suffered, and to ordain such a remedy for the said supplicant that he be entirely discharged; and also reasonable amends and redress at your most high and most wise discretion, for God and by way of charity.
Et la dite peticioun lieu, le dit Johan Rokell' fuist fait venir en parlement; et sur ce monseignour de Guyen rehercea l'agard q'il avoit fait parentre les parties suisdites: le quel agard engrosse par certeins justices a ce assignez, et escript en une endenture enseallez desouz le seal mon dit seignour de Guyen', le dit abbe puis bailla avant en parlement, en les paroles q'ensuent: And, the said petition having been read, the said John Rokely was brought to parliament; and thereupon messire of Guyenne rehearsed the award he had made between the aforesaid parties: which award engrossed by certain justices assigned thereto, and written in an indenture sealed with the seal of my said lord of Guyenne, the said abbot then delivered in parliament, in the following words:
[col. b]
18. Johan fitz de roi d'Engleterre, duc de Guyen' et de Lancastre, conte de Derby, de Nicole et de Leycestr', seneschalle d'Engleterre, a toutz ceux qi cestes noz lettres endentees verront ou orront, salutz. Sachez qe come au parlement tenuz a Westmonster lendemayn de Seint Martyn, l'an du regne de nostre tresredoute seignour le roi Richard second puis le conquest qauntorzisme, Johan Rokell' du contee d'Essex' feust agardez a la toure de Loundres, a la suyte de l'abbe de Seinte Osithe de mesme le contee, compleynant par bille < baille > en mesme le parlement, de la quelle bille le tenour s'ensuit: 18. John son of the king of England, duke of Guyenne and of Lancaster, earl of Derby, Lincoln, and Leicester, steward of England, to all those who shall see or hear these our indented letters, greeting. Know that whereas at the parliament held at Westminster on the morrow of Martinmas, in the fourteenth year of the reign of our most redoubtable lord King Richard, the second since the conquest [12 November 1390], John Rokely of Essex was committed to the Tower of London, at the suit of the abbot of St Osyth of the same county, complaining by bill submitted in the same parliament, the tenor of which bill follows:
A nostre tresexcellent et tresredoute seignour le roi, et as honurables seignours de cest present parlement, supplie vostre povre chapellein et oratour l'abbe de Seint Osythe en contee de Essex: qe come un Johan Rokell', ove ses fautours, maliciousement et par long temps ymaginantz a destruer la dite meisoun; et pur acompler mesme le purpos, ad procurez et abettez plusours tenantz et dettours du dit abbe d'estre rebelles, et souztreier lour duytees et services: et aussi il mesmes tenant a dit abbe ad souztreit ses duytees et services duz au dit abbe, li quel Johan ad retenuz ovec luy et embracez toutz les grandes jurrours du dit contee, pur luy servir en chescun purpos. A cause de quelle le dit abbe n'ose my demander ses services ne duytes, ne pursuir la commune ley en celles parties; li quel Johan est champartour, commun maintenour de toutz les querelles de mesme le paiis pur avoir partie en tout d'icelle. Et entre autres debates queux le dit Johan ad fait moever contre la dite meisoun, par la ou le dit abbe ore tarde demanda ses dismes de certein boys dismable deinz sa paroche, envers William Neweman, Johanne Neweman, Johan Dryvere, Johan Colman, Johan Baldewyn', Johan atte Crouch', q'avoient achatez mesme le boys d'un Johan Sencler; les queux achatours se accorderent de paier les dites dismes, et a quele accorde perfourner les ditz achatours de lour eyn degree firent mercher certeins arbres en dit boys pur les dismes au dit abbe: la vient le dit Johan Rokell, et procura et fist les ditz achatours de refuser la dite accorde, et contrepleder la droit du dit abbe, emparnant de mainteigner la dite querelle, les promettant qe si le dit abbe feusse si hardy de moever plee ou querell pur les dismes suisdites, le abbe susdit serroit adonqes condempnez en une grande somme nient portible. To our most excellent and most redoubtable lord the king, and to the honourable lords of this present parliament, your poor chaplain and orator the abbot of St Osyth in Essex prays that whereas one John Rokely, with his supporters, plotted maliciously and for a long time to destroy the said house; and to achieve that purpose incited and abetted many tenants and debtors of the said abbot to rebel and withdraw their duties and services: and also he himself, holding of the said abbot, withdrew his duties and services owed to the said abbot; which John retained and embraced all the great juries of the said county to serve him in every purpose. Wherefore the said abbot dare not demand his services or dues, nor pursue the common law in this matter; which John is a champertor, a common maintainer of all the pleas of the same county to have party in all the same. And amongst other complaints which the said John caused to be made against the said house, whereas the said abbot lately demanded his tithes from a certain titheable wood within his parish, against William Newman, John Newman, John Driver, John Colman, John Baldwin, and John atte Crouch, who had bought the same wood from one John St Claire; which purchasers agreed to pay the said tithes, and for the performance of which agreement the said purchasers on their own initiative caused certain trees in the said wood to be cut down for the said abbot's tithes: the said John Rokely came and incited and caused the said purchasers to reject the said agreement, and counter-plead the right of the said abbot, and he undertook to maintain the said case, promising them that if the abbot were so bold as to plead or bring a plaint for the aforesaid tithes, he would then be condemned to an unbearable sum.
Sur quoi mesme l'abbe pursua en court Cristiene pur les ditz dismes, dont les ditz achatours, par procurement du dit Johan Rokell', suerent une prohibicioun directe au dit abbe sur une faux suggestioun. Apres quelle prohibicioun, le dit abbe par exhibicioun de soun libelle en la chancellarie, avoit une consultacion de proceder avant en mesme le plee. Et non obstante la dite consultacioun, par procurement et maintenance du dit Johan Rokell' par faux suggestioun, les ditz achatours pursuerent un attachement sur la dite prohibitioun envers le dit abbe. Par quel pursuit le dit abbe feust condempnez as ditz achatours par faux enquest des jurrours du dit contee, procurez et embracez par le dit Johan Rokell', en trois centz marcz, la ou les ditz dismes demandes par le dit abbe n'amonterent my a quatre livres en tout, li quel boys ne feust qe de petit encrestre, qar il n'estoit arbre en ycelle boys qe passa la value de tresze deniers, forsqe un qe fuist vendu a vingt deniers, et la greindre partie del value de deux deniers, trois deniers ou quatre deniers: et nientcontresteant qe le dit abbe toutdiz devant la commencement d'aucun plee vers les ditz achatours se profra de mettre toute sa demande esteante en debate en suspence, sur le discussioun de nostre dit seignour le roy et seignours de parlement. Et aussi entre autres tortz, extorcions, et oppressions queles le dit Johan Rokell fist au temps q'il feust eschetour en dit contee, il prist du dit abbe quatre marcs, atant [p. iii-288][col. a] luy manaceant qe s'il ne ferroit fyn ovec luy, le dit Johan luy metteroit as grandz coustages, damage, et diseases, et ce par colour de son office. Whereupon the same abbot sued in the court Christian for the said tithes, whereupon the said purchasers, at the instigation of the said John Rokely, sued a prohibition directed at the said abbot on a false suggestion. After which prohibition, the said abbot by exhibition of his bill in chancery had an advice to proceed with the same plea. And notwithstanding the said advice, by the procurement and maintenance of the said John Rokely by false suggestion, the said purchasers sued an attachment on the said prohibition against the said abbot. By which suit the said abbot was condemned against the said purchasers by false inquest of the jurors of the said county, procured and embraced by the said John Rokely, for three hundred marks, even though the said tithes demanded by the said abbey did not amount to four pounds in total, which wood had scarcely grown, since there was no tree in that wood which exceeded the value of three pence except one which was sold for twenty pence, the greater part being worth two, three or four pence: and notwithstanding that the said abbot before the beginning of any plea against the said purchasers continually offered to place his disputed demand in suspense, for the discussion by our said lord the king and lords of parliament. And also amongst other wrongs, extortions, and oppressions which the said John Rokely committed during the time when he was escheator in the said county, he took from the said abbot four marks, [p. iii-288][col. a] threatening him that if he did not make fine with him the said John would cause him great expense, harm, and trouble, and that by colour of his office.
Qe plese a vostre hautesse ent ordeigner due remede, en destruccioun de tieux oppressions, maintenances, champarties et extorsions; et considerer qe plusours ministres, officers, baillifs, et toutz autres communes jurrours du dit contee sont de sa vesture, retenuz, covyn ou affinitee, si qe le dit Johan Rokell' riens ne charge de quanqe il face, a cause q'il n'ad doute d'encourger nulle punysshement par la cours ne reddour de commune ley, sur l'affiance q'il ad des officers, baillifs, jurrours, et retenue avantditz: et q'a chescune sa venue a Westmonster par colour de la ley, il amesne ovec luy une jurre entierre, de plus grandz jurrours du paiis de soun embracement, pur passer et acompler aucun tiel purpos, issint qe le dit abbe n'ose pursuer pur ses duytes et services a luy souztrez en nulle manere par la commune ley. May it please your highness to ordain due remedy to end such oppressions, maintenances, champerties and extortions; and to consider that many ministers, officers, bailiffs, and all other common jurors of the said county are of his livery, retinue, faction or affinity, so that the said John Rokely does not care what he does because he has no fear of incurring any punishment by the course nor rigour of the common law, given his confidence in the aforesaid officers, bailiffs, jurors and retinue: and that on each of his appearances at Westminster in connection with the law, he brings with him a whole jury of the most important jurors of the county of his embracement to achieve and accomplish any such purpose, so that the said abbot dare not sue for his dues and the services withdrawn from him in any way by the common law.
Et en apres, a mesme le parlement, sibien le dit abbe come le dit Johan Rokell' soy mystrent en l'ordinance et agarde de nous touchant touz les debates entre les ditz parties esteantes, sibien comprises deinz la dite bille come autres. Nous, a la reverence de Dieu, et pur accorde et bone pees faire entre les suisdites parties, les avons examinez de l'une part et de l'autre par bone deliberacioun et avys: et pur mieulz avoir enformacioun de veritee en les dites matires, avons aussi examinez autres persones indifferentz, a nostre escient, et mielz ent cognissantz. Et purce qe, par bone et due examinacioun nous sumes bien enformez qe la dite pursuite en bank le roi par brief d'attachement sur la dite prohibicioun vers le dit abbe, en la quelle pursuyte damages estoient taxez par enquest a trois centz marcz, come desuis, estoit fait entierment a la procurement et abbettement du dit Johan Rokell', et ce non duement et sanz cause resonable; qant a cel article, nous avons ordeigne et agardez qe le dit Johan Rokell' face descharger finalement le dit abbe et ses successours de la somme de trois centz marcz avantdites, et aussi de toutz accions qe poent estre prises en temps avenir par les dites persones q'estoient pleintifs en la dite pursuite en bank le roi, et autres semblablement procurez par le dit Johan Rokell' par cause de la pursuyte faite en court Cristiene devant ces heures par reson de les dismes avantdites. Et qe le dit Johan Rokell' face aussi sufficeante seurete come poet estre divisez par la ley resonablement, de parfourner ceste nostre ordeignance et agarde en toutz pointz. And later, at the same parliament, both the said abbot and the said John submitted themselves to our ordinance and decision upon all the disputes between the said parties, both those contained in the same bill and others. We, for the reverence of God, and for the reaching of an agreement and good peace between the aforesaid parties, questioned both parties by good deliberation and advice: and to reach the truth more easily in the said matters, we also questioned other impartial persons known to us who were most knowledgeable thereon. And because after good and proper examination we were reliably informed that the said suit in the King's Bench by writ of attachment on the said prohibition against the said abbot, in which suit damages were assessed by inquest at three hundred marks, as above, had been made wholly at the procurement and instigation of the said John Rokely, and that not duly and without just cause; as to that article, we have ordained and decided that the said John Rokely cause the said abbot and his successors finally to be discharged of the aforesaid sum of three hundred marks, and also of all actions which might be held in time to come by the said persons who were plaintiffs in the said suit in the King's Bench, and others similarly procured by the said John Rokely by virtue of the suit made in the court Christian in the past by reason of the aforesaid tithes. And that the said John Rokely also make sufficient surety as may be reasonably determined by the law, to perform this our ordinance and award in all respects.
Et outre ce, touchant les dismes avantdites, avons ordeignez et agardez qe quatre bons gentz soient esluz, des queux deux soient sages et apris de la ley de seinte esglise, et les autres deux soient sages et coignissantz la custume de paiis, queux [surveieront] le boys dont les dismes suisdites estoient demandees; et si avys serra a mesmes les quatre persones, qe le dit boys par la ley de seinte esglise, et par la custume du paiis, soit dismable, qe le dit abbe soit paiez de mesmes les dismes dues devant ces heures, et en temps avenir sanz contredit. Et si avys soit as dites quatre persones, qe le dit boys ne soit pas dismable, le dit abbe cessera desore de son claym en celle partie, et soeffra les possessours et achatours du dit boys estre en pees. Et purce qe le dit abbe soy ad compleint qe le dit Johan Rokell' ad retret le paiement de certein rente duz a dit abbe, nous avons ordeignez et agardez qe ce qe poet estre trovez duz au dit abbe par ses remembrances et evidences suffisantz, le dit Johan Rokell' paiera desore enavant bien et loialment, ovec les arrerages ent du temps passez. Et pur ce qe le dit abbe ad este mys a grandz coustages et dispenses, et ad soeffert plusours damages par cause de la procurement et abbettement du dit Johan Rokell', come devant est dit, nous avons ordeignez qe le dit Johan Rokell' [col. b] ferra une recoignissance de quarante livres en la chancellarie au dit abbe, sur quele le dit Johan Rokell' auera une deffesance du dit abbe, qe si le dit Johan Rokell' se porte bien devers le dit abbe et ses successours, et ne face ne procure estre fait au dit abbe ne a ses successours notable damage, grevance, ne disheritisoun queconqe, en prive n'en apert, a le meisoun avantdite a ce qe semblera as chanceller, tresorer et gardein de prive seal de nostre dit seignour le roi, qe pur le temps serront, quant de tiel notable damage, etc., ils serront enformez, adonqes la dite recoignissance soit tenue pur nulle, autrement estoise en sa force. < En > tesmoignance de quele chose nous avons fait faire cestes noz lettres patentes endentees. Doun souz nostre seal a Loundres, le .xxviij. jour de Novembre, l'an du regne de nostre tresredoute seignour le roi Richard second puis le conquest quinzisme. And further, touching the aforesaid tithes, we have ordained and decided that four good persons should be elected, of whom two be wise and learned in the law of holy church, and the other two wise and knowledgeable in the custom of the land, who shall survey the wood from which the aforesaid tithes were demanded; and if the advice of the same four persons is that the said wood by the law of holy church, and by the custom of the land, be titheable, that the said abbot shall be paid the same tithes due before this time, and in time to come without hindrance. And if the advice of the said four persons is that the wood be not titheable, the said abbot shall desist henceforth in his claim in that regard, and leave the owners and purchasers of the said wood in peace. And because the said abbot complained that the said John Rokely had withdrawn the payment of certain rent owed to the said abbot, we have ordained and decided that if it can be found due to the said abbot by his sufficient memoranda and proof, the said John Rokely shall pay it henceforth, well and faithfully, together with the arrears thereon from time past. And because the said abbot was put to great cost and expense, and suffered many injuries because of the procurement and abetting of the said John Rokely, as said above, we have ordained that the said John Rokely [col. b] make a recognizance of forty pounds in chancery to the said abbot, on which the said John Rokely would have a defeasance from the said abbot, that if the said John Rokely should behave well towards the said abbot and his successors, and inflict no damage, injury, or disinheritance whatsoever, nor cause it to be inflicted on the said abbot nor his successors, in secret nor in public, at the aforesaid house, as it shall appear to the chancellor, treasurer, and keeper of the privy seal of our said lord the king then in office, when of such notable damage they shall be informed, then the said recognizance shall be held at naught, or otherwise remain in force. In testimony whereof which we have caused these our indented letters to be made patent. Given under our seal at London on 28 November, in the fifteenth year of the reign of our most redoubtable lord the king Richard II [1391].
Le quell agard le dit Johan Rokell' granta en parlement de perfourner en toutz pointz. Et surce le chanceller feust charge de compeller le dit Johan Rokell' de tenir et pleinement perfourner l'agard avantdit. Which decision the said John Rokely accepted in parliament to be performed in all respects. And thereupon, the chancellor was charged to compel the said John Rokely to uphold and fully discharge the aforesaid decision.
[memb. 5]
< William Brian, chivaler. > William Brian, knight.
19. Purce qe William Brian, chivaler, avoit purchace une bille de nostre seinte pier en la court de Rome, directe a les arcevesqes de Canterbirs et Everwyk, et a l'evesqe de Londres, d'enquerre de ceux q'avoient entrez une mesoun du dit William en la citee de Londres, et illoeqes debruse une cofre, et d'illoeqes pris et emportez plusours lettres, privileges, chartres, et munimentz touchantz son heritage, et ses autres accions et droitz, encontre sa volunte, et de les escomenger et compeller de lui restorer ses dites lettres, privileges, chartres, et munimentz et de lui faire due satisfaccioun pur les trespasses suisditz; et mesme la bulle avoit baille par sa main demesne durant le parlement al dit ercevesqe d'Everwyk, chanceller d'Engleterre, lui requirant d'ent faire execucioun. Et par enchesoun q'il sembla overtement au roi mesmes, et a toutz les seignours en parlement, qe la dite bulle q'estoit lieue en parlement, fuist prejudicielle au roi et a sa corone, et en derogacioun de la ley de la terre, et qe le dit seignour William avoit fait grant contempt au roi, sibien en purchaceant la dite bulle, come en pursuant pur l'execucioun d'icelle, il estoit agarde par le roi mesmes, del assent del seignours, a la toure de Londres, a y demurer a la volunte du roi. 19. Whereas William Brian, knight, purchased a bull of our holy father in the court of Rome, addressed to the archbishops of Canterbury and York and the bishop of London, to enquire into those who had entered a house of the said William in the city of London and broken into a chest and taken and removed many letters, privileges, charters, and muniments touching his inheritance and his other actions and rights, against his will, and to excommunicate them and force them to restore to him his said letters, privileges, charters, and muniments, and make due reparation for the aforesaid trespasses; and he himself delivered the same bull during the parliament to the said archbishop of York, chancellor of England, requesting that he execute it. And because it seemed clear to the king himself, and to all the lords in parliament, that the said bull which had been read in parliament was prejudicial to the king and his crown and in derogation of the law of the land, and that the said lord William had shown great contempt of the king, as well in purchasing the said bull as in suing for its execution, he was sentenced by the king himself, with the assent of the lords, to the Tower of London, to remain there at the king's will.
< L'empeschement de Thomas Harding. > The impeachment of Thomas Harding.
20. Thomas Hardyng de Manytre empeschea et accusa en parlement, sibien par bille come par bouche, Sire Johan Sutton', chivaler, et seignour Richard de Sutton', chivaler, son frere, de ce qe le dit Thomas estoit nient droiturelment emprisone par un an en Flete, a cause d'une desloiale suggestioun faite au conseill nostre seignour le roi par conspiracie des ditz Johan et Richard, touchant le manoir de Bradewell', el counte d'Essex': dont oiez les resons d'une parte et d'autre presentz en parlement, pur ce qe y sembla pleinement au roi et as seignours qe les ditz empeschement et accusacioun feurent faitz tantsoulement par malice; et auxint, pur ce qe tesmoigne fuist par plusours seignours en parlement qe les ditz Johan et Richard feurent prodes hommes, et de bones condicions, et aussint de bon port en lour paiis, le dit Thomas estoit agardez et commys a la prisone de la Flete, a y demurer a la volunte du roi. 20. Thomas Harding of Manningtree impeached and accused Sir John Sutton, knight, and Sir Richard Sutton, knight, his brother, in parliament, as well by bill as by word of mouth, for that the said Thomas was unjustly imprisoned for one year in the Fleet because of a disloyal suggestion made to the council of our lord the king by conspiracy between the said John and Richard touching the manor of Bradwell in Essex: and the arguments on both sides present in parliament having been heard, because it seemed clear to the king and to the lords that the said impeachment and accusation had been made wholly out of malice; and also because many lords in parliament had testified that the said John and Richard were worthy men, and of good condition, and also of good repute in their county, the said Thomas was sentenced and committed to Fleet prison, to remain there at the king's will.
< John Shodwell comys a la prison. > John Shodwell committed to prison.
21. John Shodwell, de Boghstede el counte de Sussex, avoit fait pleint devant le parlement au roi mesmes del ercevesqe de Canterbirs, de ce qe le dit ercevesqe deust avoir escomenge le dit Johan et ses veisins torcenousement, pur temporele cause qe deust apparteigner a la corone, encontre reson et la ley de la [p. iii-289][col. a] terre; la quele matire puis fuist ajourne en cest parlement. Et illoeqes oiez ove bone deliberacioun les resons d'une parte et d'autre, a cause qe y sembla au roi et as seignours qe le dit Johan s'avoit compleint et esclaundre le dit ercevesqe tantsoulement par malice, il fuist agarde et commys a la prisone de Flete, a y demurer a la volunte du roi. 21. John Shodwell of Boxted in Sussex made complaint before the parliament to the king himself concerning the archbishop of Canterbury, that the said archbishop had wrongly excommunicated the said John and his companions for a temporal cause which ought to have pertained to the crown, contrary to reason and the law of the [p. iii-289][col. a] land; which matter was then adjourned to this parliament. And there, the arguments on both sides having been heard and thoroughly considered, because it seemed to the king and lords that the said John had wrongfully slandered and complained of the said archbishop solely in malice, he was sentenced and committed to Fleet prison, to remain there at the king's will.
< Pour Johan Shepeie, prebendere. > On behalf of John Sheppey, prebendary.
22. Johannes Shepeye, clericus, prebendarius prebende de Nassyngton' in ecclesia cathedrali beate Marie Lincoln', exhibuit quandam peticionem suam in presenti parliamento, in hec verba: 22. John Sheppey, cleric, prebendary of the prebend of Nassington in the cathedral church of the Blessed Mary of Lincoln, showed a certain petition in the present parliament in these words:
A nostre tresdote seignour le roi et a ses nobles seignours de cest present parlement supplie Johan Shepeye, prebendere de la prebende de Nassyngton' en l'esglise cathedrale Nostre Dame de Lincoln' qe come en le record et proces, et en le rendre de juggementz de plee qe fuist devant nostre seignour le roi en [...] bank le roi, par brief d'errour, parentre Henry priour de Huntyngdon pleynant, et le dit Johan defendant, errour y ad apertement, as greves damages de dit Johan. To our most redoubtable lord the king and his noble lords of this present parliament, John Sheppey, prebendary of the prebend of Nassington in the cathedral church of Our Lady of Lincoln prays: whereas in the record and process, and in the rendering of the judgments in the plea which was before our lord the king in the King's Bench, by writ of error, between Henry prior of Huntingdon plaintiff, and the said John defendant, error is apparent, to the grievous injury of the said John.
Qe plese a nostre tresredoute seignour le roi et a les seignours avantditz, de faire venir les ditz record et proces, ove toutz choses touchantz et appendantz d'ycelles, en cest present parlement, et corriger l'errour avantdit; et auxint de faire garnir le dit priour par agarde de mesme le parlement, d'estre en cest parlement a certein jour, d'oier l'errour avantdit; et outre de faire droit as ditz parties en la matire avauntdite: et ceo pur Dieu, et en oevre da charite, considerant qe le dit Johan ad perdu par le dit juggement erroyne un annuyte de dyz southe par an, q'estoit parcelle de sa prebende avauntdite. (fn. iii-284-70-1) May it please our most redoubtable lord the king and the lords aforesaid to cause the said record and process, with all things concerning and relevant to the same, to be brought to this present parliament, and to correct the aforesaid error; and also to cause the said prior to be instructed by decision of the same parliament to be in this parliament on a certain day to hear the aforesaid error; and further to do right to the said parties in the aforesaid matter: and this for God and by way of charity, considering that the said John has lost by the said erroneous judgment an annuity of ten shillings a year, which was part of his aforesaid prebend. (fn. iii-284-70-1)
Et dicta petitione in parliamento lecta, consideratum est quod predictus Johannes habeat breve de scire facias, factum et fundatum in suo casu, retornabile in proximo parliamento, ad scire faciendum prefato priori de Huntyngdon' essendi ad dictum proximum parliamentum, in quocumque loco infra regnum Anglie teneri contigerit, ad audiend' errores quos < per > prefatum Johannem in recordo et processu predictis assignari sive allegari contigerit, et ad faciendum ulterius et recipiendum < quod > per legem terre adjudicari contigerit in hac parte. Et quod recordum et processus predicta, cum omnibus ea tangentibus, sint in dicto proximo parliamento, ex causa supradicta. And the said petition having been read in parliament, it was decided that the aforesaid John should have a writ of scire facias made and founded upon his cause, returnable at the next parliament, to instruct the aforementioned prior of Huntingdon to be at the said next parliament at whatsoever place within the kingdom of England it might happen to be held, to hear the errors which may be assigned or alleged by the aforementioned John in the aforesaid record and process, and further to do and accept whatsoever should be adjudged in the matter by the law of the land. And that the aforesaid record and process, with all things touching them, should be in the said next parliament, for the aforesaid reason.
< Le dean et chapitre de Lichefeld. > The dean and chapter of Lichfield.
23. Decanus et capitulum ecclesie Sancti Cedde de Lichefeld exhibuerunt quandam petitionem suam in presenti parliamento, in hec verba: 23. The dean and chapter of the church of St Chad of Lichfield showed a certain petition in the present parliament, worded as follows:
A nostre tresredoute seignour le roi, et a les nobles seignours de cest present parlement, supplient le dean et chapitre del esglise de Seint Cedde de Lichefeld: qe come en le record et processe, et en le rendre de juggement de plee qe fuist devant nostre seignour le roi en bank le roi, par brief d'errour, parentre le priour de Neuport Paynel pleynant, et le nadgairs dean predecessour de dean q'orest et chapitre de mesme l'esglise defendantz, errours ils sont apertement, as greves damages des ditz suppliantz. To our most redoubtable lord the king and the noble lords of this present parliament, the dean and chapter of the church of St Chad of Lichfield pray: whereas in the record and process, and in the rendering of the judgment in the plea which was before our lord the king in the King's Bench, by writ of error, between the prior of Newport Pagnell plaintiff, and the late dean, predecessor of the present dean, and the chapter of the same church, defendants, errors are apparent, to the grievous injury of the said supplicants.
Qe plese a nostre tresredoute seignour le roi et les seignours avauntditz, de faire venir devaunt eux les ditz recorde et processe, ove toutz choses touchantz et appendantz de ycelles, en cest present parlement, et corriger les errours avantditz, et auxint de faire garnir le dit priour par agarde de mesme le parlement, d'estre en cest present parlement au certein jour, d'oier les errours avantditz. Considerantz qe les ditz nadgairs dean et chapitre ount perduz par celle juggement erroyne trescentz et vint marcz, des arrerages d'un annuite de vint marcz par an; et autre de faire droit as ditz parties en la matire avantdite, et ceo pur Dieu, et en oevre de charite.' May it please our most redoubtable lord the king and the aforesaid lords to cause the said record and process to be brought before them, with all things relevant and pertaining to the same, in the present parliament, and to correct the aforesaid errors, and also to instruct the said prior by decision of the same parliament to be in this present parliament on a certain day to hear the aforesaid errors. Considering that the said late dean and chapter have lost by this erroneous judgment three hundred and twenty marks in arrears of an annuity of twenty marks a year; and also to do right to the said parties in the aforesaid matter, and that for God and by way of charity.
Et dicta peticione in parliamento lecta, consideratum est quod predicti decanus et capitulum habeant breve de scire facias, factum et fundatum in casu suo, retornabile in proximo parliamento, [col. b] ad scire faciendum prefato priori de Neuport Paynel essendi ad dictum proximum parliamentum, in quocumque loco infra regnum Anglie teneri contigerit, ad audiendum errores quos per prefatos decanum et capitulum in recordo et processu predictis assignari sive allegari contigerit; et ad faciendum ulterius et recipiendum quod per legem terre adjudicari contigerit in hac parte. Et quod recordum et processus predicta, cum omnibus ea tangentibus, sint in dicto proximo parliamento, ex causa supradicta. And the said petition having been read in parliament, it was decided that the aforesaid dean and chapter should have a writ of scire facias made and based upon their cause, returnable in the next parliament, [col. b] to instruct the aforementioned prior of Newport Pagnell to be at the said next parliament, wheresoever it might happen to be held in the kingdom of England, to hear the errors which would be assigned and alleged in the aforesaid record and process by the aforementioned dean and chapter; and also to do and receive whatsoever might be adjudged in the matter by the law of the land. And that the aforesaid record and process, with all things pertaining to it, be in the said next parliament, for the aforesaid reason.
< Pour Esmond Bassett. > On behalf of Edmund Bassett.
24. Esmond Basset mist avant une peticioun en cest parlement, en les paroles q'ensuent: 24. Edmund Basset submitted a petition in this parliament in the following words:
A nostre tresdoute seignour le roi et as nobles seignours de cest present parlement supplie Esmond Basset: qe come en le record et proces, et rendre du juggement, de la parole qe fuist devant nostre dit seignour le roi en baunk le roi, parentre mesme nostre seignour le roy demandant et le dit Esmond deforceant, de certeines terres et tenementz ove les appurtenantz en Wynflith, Salford, Dondray, Barwe, Bakwell', Hasell', Rochell', et Asshton', en le counte de Somers', et de l'avowesoun de l'esglise de Wynflith' en mesme le counte, par brief de scire facias: sur quelle brief estoit agarde qe les ditz tenementz et avowesoun serroient seisez en meins du roi; par force de quelle agarde, mesmes les tenementz et avowesoun furrent seisez en meins du roi, et le dit Esmond ent oustez, errours y sont appertement, as greves damages de dit Esmond. To our most redoubtable lord the king and the noble lords of the present parliament Edmund Basset prays that whereas in the record and process, and the rendering of the judgment in the plea which was before our said lord the king in the King's Bench, between our same lord the king demandant and the said Edmund deforciant, over certain lands and tenements with appurtenances in Winford, Saltford, Dundry, Barrow, Backwell, Halswell, Rochelle and Ashton in Somerset, and the advowson of the church of Winford in the same county, by writ of scire facias: on which writ it was decided that the said tenements and advowson be taken into the king's hands; by force of which judgment the same tenements and advowson were taken into the king's hands, and the said Edmund was ousted therefrom; errors are apparent, to the grievous injury of the said Edmund.
Qe plese a nostre tresdoute seignour le roi et as nobles seignours avantditz, de faire venir devant eux en cest present parlement les ditz record et proces, ove toutz choses touchantz et appendantz d'ycelles, et corriger les errours avauntditz, come la ley et resoun demandent; et outre de faire droit a dit suppliant, pur Dieu, et en oevre de charite. (fn. iii-284-75b-1) May it please our most redoubtable lord the king and the noble lords aforesaid to cause the said record and process to be brought before them in the present parliament, with all things touching and pertaining to the same, and to correct the aforesaid errors, as the law and reason demand; and further to do right to the said supplicant, for God and by way of charity. (fn. iii-284-75b-1)
La quele peticioun lieu en parlement, agarde feust qe la dite matire soit continue en l'estat q'orest tanq'al proschein parlement. Which petition having been read in parliament, it was decided that the said matter be adjourned in its present state until the next parliament.
< Petition monsire Robert Knolles et autres pour la sustenance d'un pont et [sic: read 'en'] Roucestre. > The petition of Sir Robert Knowles and others for the maintenance of a bridge at Rochester.
25. Monsire Robert Knolles et monsire Johan de Cobeham de Kent, baillerent avant une peticioun en cest parlement, en les paroles q'ensuent: 25. Sir Robert Knowles and Sir John Cobham of Kent submitted a petition in this parliament in the following words:
A treshaut seignour nostre seignour le roi et a son sage conseille en cest present parlement supplient humblement ses lieges, monsire Robert Knolles, et Johan de Cobeham de Kent: qe come certeins persones, villes, lieux, et boundes severalment limitez deinz le counte de Kent, sont tenuz, et ils et lour predecessours, auncestres et terretenauntz deinz les ditz villes, lieux, et boundes, de tout temps ont este tenuz, de faire un pont parentre la citee de Rouchestre et la ville de Strode; dont chescun de les ditz persones, villes, lieux, et boundes sont assises, < et d'antiquite ont > este, a lour porcions ent reparailler et sustenir, come par recorde < en > vostre escheqer, dont la copie d'icelle est a cestes annexe, pluis pleine est contenuz; les queux persones, villes, lieux, et boundes issint severalment chargez, soleient de temps dont memorie ne court eslier de lour mesmes deux hommes, pur surveier et garder la reparacioun et governance de lour portions del dit veille pount d'antiquite assise et ordeigne, la sustenance de quel pount ad este si chargeant, et unqore est, as ditz persones, villes, lieux, et boundes, considerant lour autres annuelles charges q'ils sont bien pres destruitz et anientez. Le quel pount, pur la graunde profundesse del eawe sale en le lieu ou il est assise, et pur l'asperite des undes qe illoeqes moevent en la dite eawe de jour en autre, est bien pres destruitz, sanz espoier ou relevacioun d'icelle, a tresgrandz meschiefs et perils a toutz illoeqes transpassantz. Les ditz suppliantz eiantz pite et consideracioun de les importables meschiefs suisditz, ount de lour almoigne, ove grantz costages, edifiez un novel pount de piere en un lieu outre la dite eawe, bien pres la dite veille pount ajoynant, le quel novel pount par [p. iii-290][col. a] processe de temps enboisinera de reparacioun. To the most exalted lord our lord the king and to his wise council in the present parliament, his lieges Sir Robert Knowles and John Cobham of Kent humbly pray that whereas certain persons, towns, places and bounds severally specified in Kent are obliged, and they and their predecessors, ancestors, and tenants in the said towns, places, and areas have always been obliged, to build a bridge between the city of Rochester and the town of Strood; whereof each of the said persons, towns, and areas are assessed, and have been since antiquity, to repair and maintain their sections thereof, as is more fully contained on record in your exchequer, a copy of which is annexed hereto; the which persons, towns, places, and bounds thus severally charged have been accustomed since time immemorial to elect two men from amongst themselves to inspect and keep the repair and management of their sections of the said old bridge assessed and appointed since ancient times, the maintenance of which bridge has been, and still is, so costly to the said persons, towns, places, and bounds, considering their other annual charges, that they are very close to ruin and destruction. Which bridge, because of the great depth of tidal water in the place where it stands, and because of the strength of the currents in the said water from one day to the next, will be well nigh destroyed if it be not strengthened or rebuilt, to the very great trouble and peril of all those who cross it. The said supplicants having pity and consideration for the unbearable troubles aforesaid, have of their charity, at great expense, built a new bridge of stone over the said water, very close to the old bridge, which new bridge in [p. iii-290][col. a] the course of time will be in need of repair.
Plese a vostre hautesse roiale, et de vostre habundant poiar, considerer la duyte del sustenance d'unt pount illoeqes par les ditz persones, villes, lieux, et boundes, et la poverte q'ils ount pur la sustenance suisdite, et de issint ordeigner q'ils eient la charge del sustenance del dit novel pount entierment par porcions apportioner entre eux. Et outre ceo, qe les persones, villes, lieux, et boundes issint severalment chargez, puissent eslier annuellment deux gardeins de lour mesmes, pur survier, garder, et sustenir le dit pount, solonc les porcions issint ent assiz: et affaire, maintener, sustenir, et user, pur la reparacioun, sustenance, et governance del dit novel pount perpetuelment adurer, d'estre estable et ordeigne ore, solonc l'avis et ordeignance des ditz monsire Robert et Johan, ou ascun de eux, affaire et establer en < ycelle > partie. Et qe les ditz gardeyns issint ordeignez et esluz, et lour successours, en sustenance et maintenance del dit novel pount, puissent resceyver par devis du testament, [col. b] des terres, rentz, et tenementz divisables, et par doun terres, rentz, et tenementz, divisables et nient divisables, a la value annuel de .d. marcz, a tenir a eux et a lour successours gardeyns de dit pount, al profit et oeps d'icelle; l'estatut de terres et tenementz a mort mayn nient mettre non obstant. (fn. iii-284-79-1) Et outre ceo, si les ditz gardeyns empledent autres, ou soient empledez par autres, en temps avenir des terres ou des tenementz, rentz, ou services, ou d'autre chose qeconque qe appartient a dit pount, qe toutz maneres des briefs portez par eux, ou encontre eux, soient mayntenuz et sustenuz par nouns des gardeyns: et coment q'ils soient remuez ou oustez de lour office, soient les ditz briefs bones et effectueles par la ley, pur Dieux, et en oevre de charite. (fn. iii-284-79-2) May it please your royal highness and your abundant power to consider the duty of maintaining a bridge there by the said persons, towns, places, and bounds, and the poverty they suffer in the aforesaid maintenance, and therefore to ordain that they shall have the charge of the maintaining the said new bridge wholly apportioned amongst them. And further, that the persons, towns, places, and bounds thus severally charged may elect annually two wardens from amongst themselves to inspect, keep, and maintain the said bridge according to the shares thus assessed: and to do, maintain, sustain, and use for the repair, maintenance, and management of the said new bridge perpetually to endure, to be decreed and ordained now according to the advice and ordinance of the said Sir Robert and John, or either one of them, to act and decree in the matter. And that the said wardens thus ordained and elected, and their successors, for the sustenance and maintenance of the said new bridge, may receive by devise of testament [col. b] from lands, rents, and tenements devisible, and by gift of lands, rents, and tenements, devisible and not devisible, to the annual value of five hundred marks, to hold to them and their successors the wardens of the said bridge, for the profit and use of the same; the statute of lands and tenements not to be given in mortmain notwithstanding. (fn. iii-284-79-1) And also, if the said wardens implead others, or be impleaded by others, in time to come, over lands or tenements, rents, or services, or anything else pertaining to the said bridge, that all manner of writs brought by them or against them shall be maintained and sustained by name of the wardens: and even if they be removed or ousted from their office, let the said writs be good and effectual by law, for God and by way of charity. (fn. iii-284-79-2)
La quele peticioun lieu en plein parlement, le roy del assent de parlement ad grante mesme la peticioun en toutz pointz, horspris tantsoulement la somme de la purchace de cynk centz marcz, de quele somme le roi ad grante trois centz marcz, del assent suisdit. Which petition having been read in full parliament, the king with the assent of parliament granted the same petition in all respects, except only the sum of the purchase of five hundred marks, of which sum the king granted three hundred marks, with the aforesaid assent.
[memb. 4]
A TRESEXCELLENT ET TRESREDOUTE ET TRESPUISSANT PRINCE, ET TRESGRACIOUS SIGNOUR, NOSTRE SEIGNOUR LE ROI, SUPPLIENT VOZ POVRES LIGES, COMMUNES DE VOSTRE ROIALME D'ENGLETERRE, QE PLESE A VOSTRE HAUTESSE ET ROIALE MAGESTE, EN ESE ET SUPPORTACIOUN DE VOZ DITZ COMMUNES, ET EN SUSTENANCE DE VOZ BONES LOYES, GRACIOUSMENT GRANTER LES PETITIONS SOUZESCRIPTZ. TO THE MOST EXCELLENT AND MOST REDOUBTABLE AND MOST POTENT PRINCE, AND MOST GRACIOUS LORD, OUR LORD THE KING, YOUR POOR LIEGES THE COMMONS OF YOUR KINGDOM OF ENGLAND PRAY THAT IT MAY PLEASE YOUR HIGHNESS AND ROYAL MAJESTY, IN EASE AND SUPPORT OF YOUR SAID COMMONS, AND IN SUSTENANCE OF YOUR GOOD LAWS, GRACIOUSLY TO GRANT THE FOLLOWING PETITIONS.
[col. a]
[Confirmation of statutes] [Confirmation of statutes.]
26. < Statutes. > Primerement, qe toutes les bones estatutz et ordeinances avant ces heures faitz, nieint repellez, soient fermement tenuz et gardez, et duement executz en toutz lour pointz. 26. Statutes. Firstly, that all the good statutes and ordinances made in the past and not repealed be firmly upheld and kept, and duly executed in all respects.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi le voet. (fn. iii-284-89-1) The king wills it. (fn. iii-284-89-1)
[Justices of the peace to act against forcible entry and riot.] [Justices of the peace to act against forcible entry and riot.]
27. Item, < pur > bone quiete et tranquillite de la commune deinz vostre roialme d'Engleterre, qe la pees illoeqes soit bien maintenuz et gardez, et qe ceux qe font entrees a fort main a feere de guerre en ascunes terres ou tenementz, et lour teignent einz ove hommes armez et archers en lour compaignie a lour gages, come en terre de guerre, en desturbance de la pees, et en affray du poeple, et ceux qe font insurreccions, ou grantz chivaches, ou routes, en destourbance de la commune ley deinz mesme le roialme, soient puniz solonc les leyes et estatutz ent faitz, siqe autres liges du roialme eient poure et ensample de tieux entrees, riotes, chivaches, et insurreccions faire en temps avenir. 27. Also, for the good peace and quiet of the commons in your kingdom of England, that the peace there may be well maintained and kept, and that those who make forcible entries to wage war in any lands or tenements, and hold them with men-at-arms and archers in their company in their pay, as in a land at war, in disturbance of the peace and the terror of people, and those who make insurrections or great raids or riots, in disturbance of the common law in the same kingdom, shall be punished according to the laws and statutes made thereon, so that other lieges of the kingdom shall have power and example from such entries, riots, raids, and insurrections in time to come.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi le voet: ajoustant a ycelles qe a toutz les foitz qe tielx forcibles entrees soient faitz, et pleinte en viegne as justices de la pees, ou a ascun de eux, qe mesmes les justices, ou justice, preignent, ou preigne, poair sufficeaunt du countee, et voisent, ou voise, al lieu ou tiel force soit fait. Et s'ils trovent, ou troeve, ascuns qe tiegnent tiel lieu forciblement apres tiel entree faite, soient pris et mys en proschein gaole, a y demurer convict par record de mesmes les justices, ou justice, tanq'ils eient fait fyn et ranceoun au roi. Et qe toutz gentz du countee, sibien viscont come autres, soient entendantz as ditz justices, pur aler et enforcier mesmes les justices, pur aresteer tielx malfesours, sur [col. b] peyne d'emprisonement, et de faire fyn au roi. Et en mesme le manere soit fait de ceux qe font tielx forcibles entrees en benefices ou offices de seinte esglise. (fn. iii-284-94-1) The king wills it: adding to this that whensoever such forcible entries are made, and complaint comes to the justices of the peace, or to any of them, that the same justices or justice shall take an adequate force from the county and go to the place where such forcible entry be made. And if they find, or he finds, any who hold such a place by force after such an entry made, let them be taken and sent to the nearest gaol, there to remain convicted by the record of the same justices or justice until they shall have paid a fine and ransom to the king. And that all the people of the county, as well the sheriff as others, shall assist the said justices, accompanying and providing reinforcement for the same justices in arresting such malefactors, on [col. b] pain of imprisonment and paying a fine to the king. And let those who make forcible entries into benefices or offices of holy church be dealt with in a similar manner. (fn. iii-284-94-1)
[Jurisdiction of the constable of Dover castle.] [Jurisdiction of the constable of Dover castle.]
28. < Constable de Dovorr'. > Item, qe l'estaut fait en temps de vostre noble besaiel, c'estassavoir l'an de soun regne .xviij., qe conteigne qe le conestable du chastelle de Dovorr' ne plede desormes a la port de chastelle null plee forein de counte, qe ne touche la garde de chastelle; et auxi qe les bones ordeinances faitz en parlement l'an de vostre aiel .l. me , qe Dieux assoille, tochant le dit chastelle de Dovorr', soient fermement tenuz et gardez en toutz lour pointz. Et qe une peyne soit mys en certein en cest present parlement as countrevenauntz del estatut et ordeignances suisditz. 28. The constable of Dover. Also, that the statute made in the time of your noble great-grandfather, namely in the eighteenth year of his reign, which states that the constable of Dover shall not plead henceforth at the castle gate any plea foreign to the county which does not concern the keeping of the castle; and also that the good ordinances made in the parliament of the fiftieth year of your grandfather, whom God absolve, concerning the said castle of Dover, be firmly upheld and kept in all respects. And that a penalty be appointed in the present parliament for contravenors of the aforesaid statute and ordinance.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Monstrent les grevances en especiale, sibien dehors parlement come en parlement, et le roi ent ferra due remede par avys de soun conseille. Let them explain their grievances in particular, as well outside parliament as within, and the king will grant a remedy thereon by the advice of his council.
[Farm of the shires] [Farm of the shires.]
29. < Hundreds. > Item, prient les communes: qe come certeines wapentakes, hundredes, et ropes, queux feurent grande parcelle del ferme des corps des countees parmy le roialme, sont par vous, et voz progenitours, grauntez et enfranchisez as diverses seignours, et issint severez des corps des countees; et nientcontresteant cella, voz liges viscontz des ditz countees chargez sont sur lour accompt del entiere aunciene ferme devant les tresorer et barons de l'escheqer, a grant desheritesoun des viscontz, et anientisment de lour estat, encontre l'ordeinance et vostre graciouse grant en le darrein parlement, (fn. iii-284-100-1) et en plusours autres voz parlementz a devant. 29. Hundreds. Also, the commons pray that whereas certain wapentakes, hundreds and rapes which were a great part of the farm of the body of the counties throughout the realm have been granted and enfranchised by you and your progenitors to divers lords, and thus severed from the body of the counties; and notwithstanding that, your liege sheriffs of the said counties are charged on their account with the entire ancient farm before the treasurer and barons of the exchequer, to the great disinheritance of the sheriffs and injury of their estate, contrary to the ordinance and your gracious grant in the last parliament, (fn. iii-284-100-1) and in several other of your parliaments previously.
Qe [p. iii-291][col. a] plese, en overe de charite, considerer la anientisment de voz liges par celle cause, et comander a voz chanceller et tresorer, de lour descharger en lour accomptz en l'escheqer de la ferme des ditz countes, come affiert a la forme de les ropes, wapentaches, hundreds, et franchises issint severez, solonc la purport des ordinances es ditz parlementz, ou autrement lour charger par lour serement des issues et profitz provenantz des ditz countes en lour temps, issint qe voz ditz liges ne soient destruitz et desheritez par tieux fermes importables. May [p. iii-291][col. a] it please you, by way of charity, to consider the ruin of your lieges thereby, and order your chancellor and treasurer to discharge them in their accounts in the exchequer from the farm of the said counties, according to the value of the rapes, wapentakes, hundreds and franchises thus severed, according to the purport of the ordinances in the said parliaments, or otherwise charge them upon their oath for the issues and profits arising from the said counties in their time, so that your said lieges may not be destroyed and disinherited by such unbearable farms.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi voet qe son conseille eit poair et auctorite de faire grace a tielx viscontz de temps en temps, solonc lour discrecioun, sanz pursuite faire au roi mesmes, tancome il plerra au roi; eiant consideracioun as hundreds, franchises, et autres chosez donez et grantez en descresse de lour fermes. The king wills that his council have the power and authority to do grace to such sheriffs from time to time at their discretion, without suing to the king himself, as it shall please the king; having consideration for the hundreds, franchises and other things given and granted to the decrease of their farms.
[Courts of admiralty.] [Courts of admiralty.]
30. < Admirall. > Item, prient les communes pur profit du roi et de roialme: qe come les admiralx et lour deputes acrochent a eux diverses jurisdiccions, franchise, et autres profitz, qe appartienent a roi et as autres seignours et citees et burghes, q'ils ne soleient avoir de droit; a grant empoverissement de la commune, et arrerisement des profitz le roi. 30. The admiral. Also, the commons pray for the profit of the king and kingdom that whereas the admirals and their deputies encroach upon various jurisdictions, franchises, and other profits which pertain to the king and other lords and to the cities and boroughs, and which they never used to have by right, to the great impoverishment of the commons, and injury of the king's profits.
Qe plese comander as ditz admiralles, et lour deputes, q'ils mettent avant en cest parlement lour cleym del jurisdiccioun, franchise, et profitz q'ils cleyment d'avoir appendant a lour office, issint qe declaracioun de lour cleym en escript puisse estre fait en cest present parlement; paront la commune y purra savoir dont ele serra entendant au dit admiral, et dont nemye. May it please you to order the said admirals and their deputies to submit before this parliament their claim to the jurisdiction, franchise, and profits which they claim to have attached to their office, so that declaration of their claim in writing might be made in the present parliament; so that the commons may know in what they ought to be intendant upon the said admiral and in what not.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roy voet qe de toutz maneres contractz, plees, et quereles, et toutes autres choses faitz ou sourdantz deinz les corps de countees, sibien par terre come par eawe, et auxint de wrek de meer, la court de l'admiralle eit nulle manere conissance, poair, ne jurisdiccioun; mes soient triez, terminez, discus, et remediez par les loyes de la terre, et nemye devant ne par l'admiralle ne son lieutenant, en nulle manere. Nientmeins, de mort de homme, et de maheym faitz es grosses niefs, esteantz et hoverantz en my le haut fil des grosses rivers tantsoulement, par avale les pontz de mesmes le rivers pluis proscheins al meer, et en nulle autre lieu de mesmes les rivers eit l'admiralle conissance, et auxint d'arest des niefs en les grantz flotes pur grantz viages du roi et de roialme. Sauvant au roi toutz maneres forfaitures et profitz ent provenantz. Et eit ensement jurisdiccioun sur les ditz flotes durantes les dites viages tantsoulement. Sauvant toudis as seignours, cites, et burghs, lour libertes et franchises. (fn. iii-284-110-1) The king wills that of all manner of contracts, pleas and plaints, and all other things done or arising in the body of the counties, both by land and sea, and also wreck of sea, the court of the admiralty shall have no manner of cognisance, power, nor jurisdiction; but let them be tried, determined, discussed, and remedied by the laws of the land, and neither before nor by the admiral or his lieutenant in any way. Nevertheless, of homicide, and of mayhem committed in great ships being or standing in the middle of the main channel of large rivers only, downstream of the bridges of the same rivers closest to the sea, and in no other place on the same rivers, the admiral shall have cognisance, and also to seize ships in the great fleets for major expeditions of the king and kingdom. Saving to the king all manner of forfeitures and profits arising therefrom. And he shall similarly have jurisdiction over the said fleets during the said expeditions only. Saving always to the lords, cities, and boroughs their liberties and franchises. (fn. iii-284-110-1)
[A standard bushel.] [A standard bushel.]
31. < Measure de vin. > Item, supplie la commune: qe come ordeine soit par estatut q'un mesure de vin, de ble, et de cervoise soit parmy le roialme, issint qe oept busselles rasez facent un quarter de ble; (fn. iii-284-112-1) nientmeins, a cause qe nulle peyne est ordeine en le dit estatut, plusours de diverses citees du roialme ne voillient prendre n'achatre deinz les dites citees, ne aillours, sinoun noef busselles pur la quarter, et en cas q'il ne conteigne atant ils les arestent pur forfait, a grant damage et oppressioun de tout le commune poeple, et overtement encontre l'estatut avantdit. 31. The measure of wine. Also, the commons pray that whereas it is ordained by statute that there should be but one measure of wine, corn and malt throughout the realm such that eight levelled bushels equal one quarter of corn; (fn. iii-284-112-1) nevertheless, because no penalty was ordained in the said statute, many of the various cities of the realm will not take or purchase in the said cities or elsewhere, unless at nine bushels per quarter, and if they do not contain so much they seize them as forfeit, to the great injury and oppression of all the common people, and openly contrary to the aforesaid statute.
Qe plese ordeiner qe le dit estatut soit tenuz et garde deinz la cite de Londres, come il est par aillours, c'estassavoir, qe nulle vende, n'achate, sinoune oept busselles pur le quarter, sur peine de forfaire le surplusage, sibien a nostre seignour le roi come as seignours de franchise, et ce pur commune profit de roi et de roialme. May it please you to ordain that the said statute be upheld and kept in the city of London, as it is elsewhere, namely that no one sell nor buy unless at eight bushels per quarter, on pain of forfeiting the surplus, as well to our lord the king as to the lords of the franchise, and that for the common profit of the king and kingdom.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi voet, sibien en la cite de Londres come aillours, et sibien par terre come par eawe, sur peine de [col. b] forfaire le ble ou brees issint achatez; nientcontresteant ascun usage a contraire: sauvant la forfaiture a roi, forspris franchises roialx, as queux le roi a cest foitz ad grantez ycelle forfaiture de sa grace. Et qe sibien les mair et viscontz de Londres, come les mairs et baillifs d'autres citees, burghs, villes, et merches, s'ils n'en facent ent pleine et due execucioun, encorgent au tielle peine, sibien a suite de roi come de partie, et d'autre qeconqe < qe vorra > suer pur le roi. (fn. iii-284-116-1) The king wills it, both in the city of London and elsewhere, and as well by land as by sea, on pain of [col. b] of forfeiting the corn or malt thus purchased, notwithstanding any usage to the contrary: saving the forfeiture to the king, except royal franchises, to which the king on this occasion has granted the same forfeiture of his grace. And that as well the mayor and sheriffs of London as the mayors and bailiffs of other cities, boroughs, towns and markets, if they do not perform full and due execution thereof, shall incur such a penalty, as well at the suit of the king as of the party, and of any other whomsoever who wishes to sue for the king. (fn. iii-284-116-1)
[Perpetual uses adjudged in mortmain.] [Perpetual uses adjudged in mortmain.]
32. < Religion. > Item, prient les communes: qe come en l'estatut de religiosis est contenuz qe nulle homme de religioun, n'autre persone qeconqe, ascunes terres ou tenementz achate; ou par colour de doun, ou par autre title qeconqe, de nulle persone receive, ou en ascune < autre > manere, arte vel ingenio, a luy face approprier, sur forfaiture d'icelles, par qoi les ditz terres et tenementz a mort mayn en ascun manere puissent devenir: (fn. iii-284-118-1) issint qe si nulle religious, ou autre persone qeconqe, encontre celle estatut en ascun manere, arte, vel ingenio, contreviegne, q'adonqes bien lise a nostre seignour le roi, et autres seignours mediatz et immediatz, en tieulx terres et tenementz entrer, come par le dit estatut appiert. Et ore de novelle, par subtile ymaginacioun, arte, et ingenio, ascunes religiouses persones, vikers et autres persones espirituels, sont < entrez diverses terres et > tenementz ajoustez a lour esglises, et de celles par suffrance et assent des tenauntz d'icelles ont fait cimiteries, et par bulles del appostoile dedier, [...] sacrer, et sepulture parochiel illoeqes font continuelment, sanz licence nostre seignour le roi, seignours mediatz et immediatz, en fraude < du > dit estatut. 32. Religion. Also, the commons pray: whereas in the statute de religiosis it is stated that no man of religion nor other person whatsoever shall buy any lands or tenements, nor receive them from anyone by colour of gift, or by any title whatsoever, or cause them to be appropriated to himself in any other way, by device or design, on pain of forfeiting the same, by which the said lands and tenements might in anyway fall into mortmain: (fn. iii-284-118-1) so that if any religious, or other person whomsoever, should contravene that statute in any way, by device or ingenuity, that then it shall be lawful for our lord the king and other lords mesne and immediate to enter upon such lands and tenements, as by the statute appears. And now of late, by subtle schemes, plots and devices, some religious persons, vicars and other persons spiritual, have entered upon various lands and tenements added to their churches, and of these with the sufferance and assent of the tenants of the same they have made cemeteries, and dedicate and consecrate them by apostolic bulls, and continually make parish burial grounds there, without licence of our lord the king or lords mesne and immediate, in defraud of the said statute.
Qe plese ordeiner qe toutz tielx terres et tenementz issint par persones espirituels occupiez, sacrez, et dediez, soient forfaitz, en manere come desuis est dit de terres ou tenementz donez ou alienez a mort mayn: issint qe cest estatut tiegne lieu auxibien de temps passe come pur temps avenir. May it please you to ordain that all such lands and tenements thus occupied, consecrated and dedicated by spiritual persons be forfeit, in the manner said above for lands or tenements given or alienated at mortmain: so that this statute holds force for time past as well as for time to come.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi entende qe ce est en cas de l'estatut de religiosis. Et en outre accordez est et assentuz qe toutz ceux qe sont possessionez [...] par feffement ou par autre voie, al oeps de gentz de religioun, ou autres persones espirituelles, des terres, ou tenementz, fees, advoesons, [...] ou autres possessions qeconqes, pur les amortiser, et dont le ditz religiouses et persones espirituels preignent les profitz; qe parentre cy et le fest de Seint Michel proschein venant, ils les facent estre amortisez par licence du roi et des seignours, ou autrement q'ils les vendent et alienent a autre oeps parentre cy et le dit fest, sur peine d'estre forfaitz < au roi et as seignours solonc la fourme de l'estatut de religiosis, come tenementz purchacez par gentz de religion. Et qe de cest temps > enavant nulle tielle purchace se face, issint qe tielx religiouses ou autres persones espiritueles ent preignent les profitz, come desuis, sur la peyne avauntdite. Et qe mesme cest estatut extende et soit tenuz des toutz terres et tenementz, fees, advouesons, et autres possessions, purchacez et a purchacers al oeps des gildes et fraternitees. Et enoutre est assentuz, pur ce qe [...] mairs, baillifs, et communes des citees, burghes, et autres villes, q'ont commune perpetuel, et autres q'ont offices perpetuelles, sont auxi perpetuelles come gentz de religion, qe de cest temps enavant ils ne purchacent a eux et a lour commune, < ou office, > sur la peyne contenue en le dit estatut 'de religiosis'. Et de ce qe autres sont possessionez ou serra purchacez en temps avenir a lour oeps, et ils ent preignent ou prendront les profitz, soit semblablement fait come devant est dit des gentz de religioun. (fn. iii-284-122-1) The king understands that it is so in the statute de religiosis. And further, it is agreed and assented that all those who are in possession by enfeoffment or by other means, to the use of persons of religion, or other persons spiritual, of lands, or tenements, fees, advowsons, or other possessions whatsoever to amortize them, and from which the said religious and spiritual persons take the profit; that between now and Michaelmas next [29 September 1392], they cause them to be amortised by licence of the king and lords, or otherwise that they sell and alienate them to another use between now and the said feast, upon pain of their being forfeited to the king and lords according to the form of the statute de religiosis, as tenements purchased by persons of religion. And that from this time on no such purchase shall be made, so that such religious or other persons spiritual take the profits therefrom, as said above, on pain of the aforesaid penalty. And that the same statute be extended and upheld for all lands and tenements, fees, advowsons, and other possessions purchased and to be purchased for the use of guilds and fraternities. And further, it is agreed and assented, because mayors, bailiffs, and commons of the cities, boroughs, and other towns who have perpetual commonalty, and others who have perpetual offices, are as perpetual as men of religion, that from this time on they shall not purchase for themselves and in common, or office, on pain of the penalty contained in the said statute de religiosis. And as to others which are possessed or may be purchased in time to come to their use, so that they take or will take the profits therefrom, let it be done as was said above concerning men of religion. (fn. iii-284-122-1)
[John Northampton.] [John Northampton.]
33. < Pour Johan Norhampton'. > Item, prient les communes, pur Johan Norrhampton, draper: qe come au parlement tenuz a Westm', l'an du regne nostre seignour le roi q'orest qatorzisme, [p. iii-292][col. a] a la supplicacioun des nobles, communes esteantz en mesme le parlement, nostre seignour le roi de sa grace especiale repella et en tout adnulla, de l'assent de mesme le parlement, toutz les juggementz renduz a Redyng, et a la tour de Londres, devers le dit Johan al suite nostre seignour le roi, de toutz maneres prodicions, felonies, trespasses, mesprisions et autres choses qeconqes; et en outre granta qe les ditz juggementz ne porteroient nulle force pur ascun temps passe ne avenir, al entent qe le dit Johan aueroit restitucioun de toutz ses terres, tenementz et rentz, quels il perdy par force des ditz juggementz: quele restitucioun il n'ad pas a ore, en grant arerissement de luy. (fn. iii-284-124-1) 33. On behalf of John Northampton. Also, the commons pray on behalf of John Northampton, draper: whereas at the parliament held at Westminster in the fourteenth year of the reign of our lord the present king, [p. iii-292][col. a] at the supplication of the nobles, the commons being in the same parliament, our lord the king of his special grace repeals and entirely annuls, with the assent of the same parliament, all the judgments rendered at Reading and at the Tower of London against the said John at the suit of our lord the king, of all manner of treasons, felonies, trespasses, misprisions and other things whatsoever; and furthermore he grants that the said judgments should have no force for any time past or to come, with the intent that the said John should have restitution of all his lands, tenements and rents which he lost by force of the said judgments: which restitution he has not yet had, to his great injury. (fn. iii-284-124-1)
Qe plese granter et ordeiner qe le dit Johan purra estre restitut en cest present parlement, par assent de mesme le parlement, a toutz les terres, tenementz, et rentz avauntditz, quels il perdy par force des ditz juggementz, sanz pluis outre delaye. Considerantz qe le dit Johan ne feust unqes coupable de nulle des pointz pur queux il avoit et porta les ditz juggementz, come notoirement est conuz; les queux pointz lui feurent surmys par grant malice des ses enemys. May it please you to grant and ordain that the said John might be restored in the present parliament, by the assent of the same parliament, to all the aforesaid lands, tenements and rents which he lost by force of the said judgments, without further delay. Considering that the said John was never guilty of any of the matters for which he had and bore the said judgments, as is well known; which matters were alleged against him by the great malice of his enemies.
[memb. 3]
Nostre seignour le roi eiant consideracioun a les grantz damages, perdes, et diseases queux le dit Johan Norhampton' ad eu et suffert a cause des ditz juggementz, et voillant purvoir pur la relevacioun del estat du dit Johan celle partie, de sa grace especiale repelle, et en tout case et adnulle, en plein parlement, del assent de tout le parlement, toutz les ditz juggementz renduz a Redyng, et a la tour de Londres, devers le dit Johan, al suyte nostre dit seignour le roi, de toutes maneres prodicions, felonies, trespasses, mesprisions, et autres choses qeconqes. Et voet et grante, del assent suisdit, qe les ditz juggementz n'eient ne portent null manere force, effect, vertue ne value, pur null temps passe ne a venir. Et enoutre nostre dit seignour le roi, de soun roial poair et de sa roiale dignite, en plein parlement, par assent de tout le parlement, grante al dit Johan toutes les terres, tenementz, rentz, et possessions, queux il perdist par force des ditz juggementz, ou ascun d'icelles, en qi mayns q'ils soient devenuz, a avoir et tenir en mesme le manere come il les avoit et tenoit devant q'il estoit pris ou attachez par la cause suisdite, et sicome il les deust avoir tenuz si nulle juggement sur lui n'eust este renduz; mesqe les tenantz soient garniz par brief de scire facias, issint toutes voies qe nulle proteccioun soit < allowe pur les ditz > tenantz en celle proces. Et ad nostre dit seignour le roi auxint en plein parlement, par assent de tout le parlement, grantez al dit Johan q'il par enchesoun des ditz juggementz ne perde noun, honour, accioun, droit, ne recoverer, ne nulle autre profit < n'avantage, > a demander et faire en toutes choses sicome les ditz juggementz n'eussent estez envers lui renduz: mes voet et grante nostre dit seignour le roi en plein parlement, del assent suisdit, qe le dit Johan soit aussi frank et able en toutes condicions come nulle juggement ne feust unqes renduz sur lui. Sauvant a nostre dit seignour le roi la forfaiture de ses biens et chateux dont il est a present responduz. Our lord the king, considering the great damages, losses and injuries which the said John Northampton underwent and suffered because of the said judgments, and wishing to provide for the relief of the estate of the said John in this matter, of his special grace repeals and entirely quashes and annuls in full parliament, with the assent of the entire parliament, all the said judgments rendered at Reading and at the Tower of London against the said John, at the suit of our said lord the king, of all manner of treasons, felonies, trespasses, misprisions and other things whatsoever. And he wills and grants, with the aforesaid assent, that the said judgments shall neither have nor carry any manner of force, effect, virtue, or value for any time past or to come. And further, our said lord the king, of his royal power and dignity, in full parliament, by the assent of all the parliament, granted to the said John all the lands, tenements, rents and possessions which he lost by force of the said judgments, or any of the same, into whomsoever's hands they have fallen, to have and to hold in the manner in which he had and held them before he was taken and attached for the aforesaid reason, and as he would have held them had no judgment been passed against him; but that the tenants be warned by writ of scire facias, so that no protection be allowed for the said tenants in this process by any means. And our said lord the king also in full parliament, by the assent of all the parliament, grants to the said John that he shall not lose name, honour, action, right, nor recovery by virtue of the said judgments, nor any other profit nor advantage, to demand and act in all things as if the said judgments had never been rendered against him: but our said lord the king wills and grants in full parliament, with the aforesaid assent, that the said John be as free and able in all conditions as if no judgment had ever been rendered against him. Saving to our said lord the king the forfeiture of his goods and chattels for which he at present answers.
[Richard Norbury.] [Richard Norbury.]
34. < Pour Richard Norbury, mercer. > Item, supplient les communes pur Richard Norbury, mercer: qe come Johan Norhampton', draper, jadys estoit mair de Londres, < et > son purpos et entier entent y fuist pur droiture et loialte sustenir en la dite citee, et injuries et autres malvestees usez en ycelle reprover et punir a son poair; a quel Johan le dit Richard fuist eidant, en ce q'il purroit en son loialtee avantdite. Et pur ce ascuns grantz du dite citee et autres y deviendrent mortelx enemys au dit Richard, issint q'ils lui empescherent a nostre tresredoute seignour le roi de diverses tresons et mesprisions q'il deust avoir a lui fait, dont il ne feust unqes coupable, come notoirement est conuz. Et enapres le dit Richard feust areignez des tresons et mesprisions suisditz, a quel temps ses adversairs [col. b] suisditz feurent de si grant poair devers lui, et la presentz pur avoir passe < encontre > le dit Richard pur lui avoir fait d'estre ajugge a vile mort et heynouse, en cas q'il eust dit adonqes q'il ne feust coupable de ycelles. Paront le dit Richard veiant outrement le grant peril et destruccion de lui purpensez par ses ditz adversairs, pur sa mort esloigner se mist ent en la grace le roi: sur quoy il feust ajuggez a mort, et ses terres et tenementz, biens et chateux, forfaitz. 34. On behalf of Richard Norbury, mercer. Also, the commons pray on behalf of Richard Norbury, mercer: that whereas John Northampton, draper, was once mayor of London, and his whole purpose and intent was to sustain right and loyalty in the said city and reprove and punish injuries and other evils practised in the same to the best of his ability; to which John the said Richard lent assistance, as far as he could in his aforesaid loyalty. And some great men of the said city and others there became mortal enemies of the said Richard therefor, so that they accused him before our most redoubtable lord the king of divers treasons and offences he was supposed to have committed, and of which he had never been guilty, as is well known. And later, the said Richard was arraigned for the aforesaid treasons and offences, at which time his adversaries [col. b] aforesaid wielded such great power against him that they contrived that the said Richard would be adjudged to a vile and heinous death, if he should then say that he was not guilty of the same. In consequence whereof the said Richard clearly perceiving the great peril and destruction plotted against him by his said adversaries, submitted to the king's grace to avoid death: whereupon he was adjudged to death, and his lands and tenements, goods, and chattels were forfeited.
Qe plese d'accepter, declarer et tenir en cest present parlement, par assent de mesme le parlement, le dit Richard de rien coupable de toutz les pointz suisditz, et de reserver, repeller, et en tout adnuller, en cest dit parlement, par mesme l'assent, toutz les juggementz renduz a Westm', et al toure de Londres, vers le dit Richard, al suite nostre seignour le roi, de toutz maneres prodicions, felonies, trespasses, et autres choses qeconqes; et granter qe les ditz juggementz ne portent nulle force pur ascun temps passe ne avenir. Et enoutre ce, granter et ordeiner par mesme l'assent qe le dit Richard et ses heirs eient restitucioun et soient restitutz en cest present parlement de toutz ses terres et tenementz et rentz, quels il perdy par force des ditz juggementz, sanz pluz outre delay; et qe mesmes les juggementz, pur temps passe ou avenir, ne soient barre ou forclos par allegeance de nulli devers le dit Richard ne ses heirs, d'avoir restitucioun, come desuis est dit, mes voidez et adnullez, et sanz force de tout temps passe et avenir, si pleinement come si les ditz juggementz n'eussent unqes estez renduz ou donez: nonobstant doun ou grant devant ces heures fait a nully par nostre dit seignour le roi des terres, tenementz, et rentz avauntditz. May it please you to accept, declare and maintain in this present parliament, by the assent of the same parliament, the said Richard to be guilty of nothing in any of the aforesaid points, and to reserve, repeal, and entirely annul in this said parliament, by the same assent, all the judgments rendered at Westminster and at the Tower of London against the said Richard, at the suit of our lord the king, of all manner of treasons, felonies, trespasses, and other things whatsoever; and to grant that the said judgments carry no force for any time past or to come. And further, to grant and ordain by the same assent that the said Richard and his heirs have restitution and be restored in this present parliament of all lands and tenements and rents which he lost by force of the said judgments, without further delay; and that the same judgments, for time past or to come, be not barred or foreclosed by the allegations of anyone against the said Richard or his heirs, to have restitution, as said above, but be voided and annulled and without force for all time to come, as fully as if the said judgments had never been rendered or given: notwithstanding any gift or grant made before this time to anyone by our lord the king of the aforesaid lands, tenements, and rents.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Nostre seignour le roi eiant consideracioun a les grantz damages, perdes, et diseases queux le dit Richard ad eu et suffert a cause des ditz juggementz, et voillant purvoir pur relevacioun de l'estat du dit Richard celle partie, de sa grace especiale repelle, et en tout casse et adnulle, en plein parlement, del assent de tout le parlement, toutz les ditz juggementz renduz a Westm', et a le toure de Londres, devers le dit Richard, al suite nostre dit seignour le roi, de toutes maneres prodiciouns, felonies, trespasses, mesprisions, et autres choses qeconqes. Et voet et graunte, del assent suisdit, qe les ditz juggementz ne eient ne portent nulle manere force, effect, vertue, ne value, pur nulle temps passe ne avenir. Et enoutre nostre < dit seignour le roi, de son roial poair et de sa roiale dignite, > < en > plein parlement, par assent de tout le parlement, grante al dit Richard toutes les terres, tenementz, rentz, et possessions, queux il perdist par force du ditz juggementz ou d'ascun d'icelles, en qi mains q'ils soient devenuz, a avoir et tenir en mesme le manere come il les avoit et tenoit devant q'il estoit pris et attachez par la cause suisdite, et sicome il les deust avoir tenuz si nulle juggement sur lui n'eust este renduz: mes qe les tenantz soient garniz par brief de scire facias, issint toutes voies qe nulle proteccioun soit allowe pur les ditz tenantz en celle proces. Et ad nostre dit seignour le roi auxint en plein parlement, par assent de tout le parlement, grantez al dit Richard q'il par enchesoun des ditz juggementz ne perde noun, honour, accioun, droit, ne recoverer, ne nulle autre profit n'avantage a demander et faire en toutes choses, sicome les ditz juggementz n'eussent este envers lui renduz. Mes voet et grante nostre dit seignour le roi en plein parlement, del assent suisdit, qe le dit Richard soit auxi frank et able en toutes condicions come nulle juggement ne feust unqes renduz sur lui. Sauvant a nostre dit seignour le roi la forfaiture de ses biens et chateux, dont il est a present responduz. Our lord the king considering the great damages, losses, and injuries which the said Richard had and suffered because of the said judgments, and wishing to provide for the relief of the estate of the said Richard in this matter, of his special grace repeals, and entirely quashes and annuls, in full parliament, with the assent of all the parliament, all the said judgments rendered at Westminster, and at the Tower of London, against the said Richard, at the suit of our said lord the king, of all manner of treasons, felonies, trespasses, offences, and other things whatsoever. And he wills and grants, with the aforesaid assent, that the said judgments shall neither have nor carry any manner of force, effect, virtue, nor value for any time past or to come. And further, our said lord the king, of his royal power and of his royal dignity, in full parliament, by the assent of all the parliament, granted to the said Richard all the lands, tenements, rents, and possessions which he lost by force of the said judgments or any one of the same, into whomsoever's hands they have fallen, to have and to hold in the same manner as he had and held them before he was taken and attached for the aforesaid reason, and as he would have held them had the judgment against him never been passed: but that the tenants be warned by writ of scire facias, so that no protection be allowed for the said tenants in the same process by any means. And our said lord the king also in full parliament, by the assent of all the parliament, granted to the said Richard that he should not lose name, honour, action, right, nor recovery, nor any other profit or advantage by virtue of the said judgments, to demand and act in all things as if the said judgments had never been rendered against him. But our said lord the king wills and grants in full parliament, with the aforesaid assent, that the said Richard be as free and able in all conditions as if no judgment had ever been rendered against him. Saving to our said lord the king the forfeiture of his goods and chattels, for which he at present answers.
[John More.] [John More.]
35. < Pour Johan More, mercer. > Item, supplient les communes pur Johan More, mercer: qe come Johan Norhampton', draper, jadys estoit mair de Londres, et son purpos et entiere entent [p. iii-293][col. a] y fuist pur droiture et loialte sustenir en la dite citee, et injuries et autres malvestes usez en ycelle reprover et punir a son poair: a quel Johan Norhampton' le dit Johan More fuist eidant, en ceo q'il purroit en son loialte avantdite, et pur ceo ascuns grantz du dite citee y deviendrent mortelx enemys au dit Johan More, issint q'ils lui empescherent a nostre tresredoute seignour le roi, de diverses tresons et mesprisions q'il deust avoir a lui fait, dont il ne feust unqes coupable come notoirement est conuz. Et enapres le dit Johan More feust areignez des tresons et mesprisions suisditz, a quel temps ses adversairs suisditz feurent de si grant poair devers lui, et la presentz pur avoir passe encontre le dit Johan More pur lui avoir fait d'estre ajugge a vile mort et heynous, en cas q'il eust dit adonqes q'il ne feust coupable de ycelles. Paront le dit Johan More veiant outrement le grant peril et destruccioun de lui purpensez par ses ditz adversaries, pur sa morte esloigner se myst ent en la grace le roi: sur qi il feust ajuggez a mort, et ses terres et tenementz, biens, et chateux forfaitz. 35. On behalf of John More, mercer. Also, the commons pray on behalf of John More, mercer: whereas John Northampton, draper, was once mayor of London, and his whole purpose and intent [p. iii-293][col. a] was to sustain right and loyalty in the said city and reprove and punish as best he could injuries and other evils practised in the same: to which John Northampton the said John More lent assistance as far as he could in his aforesaid loyalty, and some great men of the said city became mortal enemies of the said John More therefor, so that they accused him before our most redoubtable lord the king of various treasons and offences which he was supposed to have committed, and of which he was not guilty at all as is well known. Later, the said John More was arraigned for the aforesaid treasons and offences, at which time his aforesaid adversaries had such great power against him that they contrived that the said John More be adjudged to a vile and heinous death should he then say that he was not guilty of the same. In consequence of which the said John More, clearly perceiving the great peril and destruction plotted against him by his said adversaries, submitted to the king's grace to avoid death: whereupon he was adjudged to death, and his lands, tenements, goods, and chattels were forfeited.
Qe plese d'accepter, declarer, et tenir en cest present parlement, par assent de mesme le parlement, le dit Johan More de rien coupable de toutz les pointz suisditz, et de reserver, repeller, et en tout adnuller, en cest dit parlement, par mesme l'assent, toutz les juggementz renduz a Westm', et al toure de Londres, vers le dit Johan More, al suite nostre seignour le roi, de toutz maneres proditions, felonies, trespasses, et autres choses qeconqes; et granter qe les ditz juggementz ne portent nulle force pur ascun temps passe ne avenir. Et enoutre ceo, graunter et ordeiner par mesme l'asent qe le dit Johan More et ses heirs eient restitucioun et soient restitutz en cest present parlement de toutz ses terres, tenementz, et rentz, quels il perdy par force des ditz juggementz, sanz pluis outre delay; et qe mesmes les juggementz, pur temps passe ou avenir, ne soient barre ou forclos par allegeance de nully devers le dit Johan More ne ses heirs, d'avoir restitucioun, come desuis est dit, mes voides et adnullez, et sanz force de tout temps passe et avenir, si pleinement come si les ditz juggementz n'eussent unqes estez renduz ou donez: nonobstant doune ou grant devant ces heures fait a nully par nostre dit seignour le roi des terres, tenementz, et rentz avantditz. May it please you to accept, declare, and maintain in this present parliament, by the assent of the same parliament, the said John More to be guilty of nothing in all the aforesaid points, and to reserve, repeal, and completely annul in this said parliament, by the same assent, all the judgments rendered at Westminster and at the Tower of London against the said John More, at the suit of our lord the king, of all manner of treasons, felonies, trespasses, and other things whatsoever; and to grant that the said judgments carry no force for any time past or to come. And moreover, to grant and ordain by the same assent that the said John More and his heirs have restitution and be restored in this present parliament with all his lands, tenements, and rents which he lost by force of the said judgments, without further delay; and that the same judgments, for time past or to come, be not barred or foreclosed by the allegation of anyone against the said John More or his heirs, to have restitution, as said above, but be cancelled and annulled, and without force for all time past and to come, as fully as if the said judgments had never been rendered or given: notwithstanding any gift or grant made before this time to anyone by our said lord the king of the aforesaid lands, tenements and rents.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Nostre seignour le roi eiant consideracioun a les grantz damages, perdes, et diseases, queux le dit Johan More ad eu et suffert a cause des ditz juggementz, et voillant purvoir pur la relevacioun del estat du dit Johan More celle partie, de sa grace especiale repelle, et en tout casse et adnulle en plein parlement, del assent de tout le parlement, toutz les ditz juggementz renduz a Westm', et a la toure de Londres, devers le dit Johan More, al suite nostre dit seignour le roi, de toutes maneres prodicions, felonies, trespasses, mesprisions, et autres choses qeconqes. Et voet et graunte, del assent suisdit, qe les ditz juggementz n'eient ne portent nulle manere force, effect, vertue ne value, pur nulle temps passe ne avenir. Our lord the king, considering the great damages, losses and injuries which the said John More sustained and suffered because of the said judgments, and wishing to provide for the relief of the estate of the said John More in this matter, of his special grace repeals and completely cancels and annuls in full parliament, with the assent of all the parliament, all the judgments rendered at Westminster and at the Tower of London against the said John More, at the suit of our said lord the king, of all manner of treasons, felonies, trespasses, offences, and other things whatsoever. And he wills and grants, with the aforesaid assent, that the said judgments should neither have nor carry any manner of force, effect, virtue, or value for any time past or to come.
Et enoutre, nostre dit seignour le roi, de soun roiale poair et de roiale dignite, en plein parlement, par assent de tout le parlement, grante al dit Johan More toutes les terres, tenementz, rentz, et possessiouns, queux il perdist par force des ditz juggementz, ou d'ascun d'icelles, en qi mains q'ils soient devenuz, a avoir et tenir en mesme le manere come il les avoit et tenoit devant q'il estoit pris ou attachez par la cause suisdit, et sicome il les deust avoir tenuz si nulle juggement sur lui n'eust este renduz: mesqe les tenantz soient garniz par brief de scire facias, issint toutes voies qe nulle proteccioun soit allowe pur les ditz tenantz en celle proces. Et ad nostre dit seignour le roi auxint en plein parlement, par assent de tout le parlement, grantez al dit Johan More q'il par enchesoun des ditz juggementz ne perde noune, honour, action, droit, ne recoverir, ne null autre profit, n'avantage [col. b] a demander et faire en toutz choses, sicome les ditz juggementz n'eussent este envers lui renduz. Mes voet et grante nostre dit seignour le roi en plein parlement, del assent suisdit, qe le dit Johan More soit auxi frank et able en toutes condicions come nulle juggement ne feust unqes renduz sur lui. Sauvant a nostre dit seignour le roi la forfaiture de ses biens et chateux, dont il est a present responduz. And further, our said lord the king, of his royal power and dignity, in full parliament, by the assent of all the parliament, grants to the said John More all the lands, rents, tenements and possessions which he lost by force of the said judgments, or any of the same, into whomsoever's hands they have fallen, to have and to hold as he had and held them before he was taken and attached for the aforesaid reason, and as he would have held them had no judgment been rendered against him: but that the tenants be warned by writ of scire facias, so that no protection be allowed for the said tenants in this process by any means. And our said lord the king also in full parliament, by the assent of all the parliament, grants to the said John More that he shall not lose name, honour, action, right, nor recovery, nor any other profit or advantage by virtue of the said judgments [col. b] to demand and act in all things, as if the said judgments had never been rendered against him. But our said lord the king wills and grants in full parliament, with the aforesaid assent, that the said John More shall be as free and able in all conditions as if no judgment had ever been rendered against him. Saving to our said lord the king the forfeiture of his goods and chattels, for which he is at present answered.
[Constable of Brest.] [Constable of Brest.]
36. < Castle en Brest. > Item, supplient les communes: qe come depuis qe Johan de Roches, vostre bachiler, feust ouste dedeins ses termes du chastelle de Brest, et qe en temps q'il fuist ensegie et bastise il lui covensist de tenir pluis de soudoiers qe en autre temps; et pur ce qe le dit Johan parfist une bastie a ses grantz coustages, le quel il lui covensist de tenir en savacioun du dit lieu de Brest, en le quel il avoit plusours souldeours; qe plese de vostre grace especiale ottroier qe le dit Johan de Roches de les charges suisditz, et autres duetes, soit allowe sur son accompt et paiement, ou assignement sur ce a lui fait: et qe a cause q'il fuist ouste dedeins ses termes, qe tiel regard lui soit fait come il semblera a vostre tresgrant noblesce, siqe il ne soit outrement destruit. 36. Castle in Brest. Also, the commons pray: whereas since John de Roches, your bachelor, was ousted during his term from the castle of Brest, and that when it was besieged and assaulted it befitted him to keep more soldiers than in other times; and because the said John built a fortification at his great expense, which he contrived to hold for the rescue of the said place of Brest, in which he had many soldiers; may it please your special grace to grant that the said John de Roches be given allowance on his account and payment for the aforesaid charges and other duties, or that assignment be made him thereon: and that because he was ousted during his term, that such regard be given him as your most great nobility sees fit, so that he be not entirely ruined.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi l'ad commis a son conseille. The king has committed it to his council.
[memb. 2]
[Knights of the shire.] [Knights of the shire.]
37. < Gages de chivalers. > Item, prie la commune: qe come les gages des chivalers venantz al parlement pur countees, soleient estre levez des fees de chivaler parmy countees sibien deinz franchises come dehors, et ore certeines fees queux sont en les mayns des diverses tenantz des seignours des franchises, queux seignours veignent au parlement par somonce, ne paient riens as ditz expenses, en grant oppression du poeple. 37. Knights' wages. Also, the commons pray: whereas the wages of knights coming to parliament for the shires used to be levied from knights' fees throughout the counties, both within franchises and without, yet now certain fees which are in the hands of various tenants of lords of franchises, which lords come to parliament by summons, pay nothing towards the said expenses, to the great oppression of the people.
Qe plese ordeiner, desicome les ditz chivalers sont a chescun parlement pur tout la commune des countees, et les seignours des ditz franchises soulement pur lour mesmes, qe les ditz gages soient desormes levez de toutz les fees des chivalers avauntditz, sibien dedeinz franchise come dehors, au fyn qe chescun tenaunt de fee de chivaler purra monstrer sa charge des ditz gages solonc les journes qe les ditz chevalers serront a chescun parlement en temps avenir. May it please you to ordain, since the said knights are at each parliament for all the commons of the counties, and the lords of the said franchises only for themselves, that the said wages be henceforth levied from all the aforesaid knights' fees, both within franchise and without, so that every tenant of a knight's fee may show his share of the said wages according to the number of days for which the said knights will be at each parliament in time to come.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soit use come ad este use devaunt ces heures: et si ascun se sent grevez, monstre al chanceller sa grevance en especial, et droit lui serra fait. Let it be done as it has been done in the past: and if anyone should feel injured, let him explain his particular grievance to the chancellor, and right will be done him.
[Appropriations to provide for vicars and for the poor.] [Appropriations to provide for vicars and for the poor.]
38. < Benefices de seint esglise. > Item, priont les communes: qe come conuz soit solonc la ley divine, ley canoune, et ley humaigne, benefices de seinte esglise eiantz cure del almes primes < estoient > institutz et estables al honour de Dieu, saintee et remedie de foundours, governaile et relevement des parochiens d'icelles, et promocioun et avancement del clergie: nientmeyns les spiritels patrons des ditz benefices, et nomement les religious, par diverses colours et cautels puis et encontre l'estatut de provisours, par perdurable provisioun nostre tresseint pere le pape, et d'autres ordinaries, par tout le roialme les ditz benefices meschivousement appropriont, et les maisons et edifices d'icelles dolorousement a terre abatont, et trestout emportent, et divine service, hospitalite, et autres < oeveres > de charite, queux soleient estre faitz en les ditz benefices a les poveres et meschenons cruelment subtrahont et destruont, et le clergie de promocioun excludont et pur toutz jours forbarrent, et le tresor de roialme en grantz sommes grevousement emportont, et al court de Rome privement envoient, en offense de Dieu, confusion de lour almes, grevouse desolacioun de tout la paiis et des parochiens, final destruccioun del clergie, graunt empoverissement del roialme, et irrecuperable [p. iii-294][col. a] ruine de seinte esglise d'Engleterre. Qe plese en cest present parlement purvoir et ordeigner ent due remedie. 38. Benefices of holy church. Also, the commons pray that whereas it is known according to divine law, canon law and civil law that benefices of holy church having cure of souls were originally instituted and established to the honour of God, the sanctity and remedy of the founders, governance and relief of the parishioners of the same, and the promotion and advancement of the clergy: nevertheless the spiritual patrons of the said benefices, and especially the religious, by various tricks and ruses against the statute of provisors, by the everlasting provision of our most holy father the pope and of other ordinaries, mischievously appropriate the said benefices throughout the entire realm, and lamentably cast the houses and buildings of the same to the ground, and carry all away, and cruelly withdraw and destroy divine service, hospitality and other works of charity, which used to be performed in the said benefices for the poor and the unfortunate, and they exclude and forever forbar the clergy from promotion, and grievously carry off the treasure of the realm in great quantities, which they secretly send to the court of Rome, to the offence of God, tribulation of their souls, grievous desolation of the entire land and of the parishioners, final destruction of the clergy, great impoverishment of the realm, and irrecoverable [p. iii-294][col. a] ruin of the holy church of England. May it please you in this present parliament to provide and ordain a suitable remedy therefor.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi voet q'en chescune licence desore affaire en la chancellarie d'appropriacioun d'ascune esglise parochielle, soit expressement contenuz et compris, qe le diocesan del lieu en l'appropriacioun de tielx esglises ordeine, solonc la value de tielx esglises, une covenable somme d'argent d'estre paiez et distributz annuelement des fructz et profitz des mesmes l'esglises par ceux qe aueront les dites esglises en propres oeps, et par lour successours, as povres parochiens des ditz esglises, en eide de lour vivre et sustenance a toutz jours. Et qe le viker soit auxint bien et covenablement dowez. (fn. iii-284-155-1) The king wills that in every licence henceforth to be made in the chancery for the appropriation of any parochial church, it be expressed, contained, and stated that the diocesan of the place in the appropriation of such churches ordain, according to the value of such churches, a suitable sum of money to be paid and distributed annually from the fruits and profits of the same churches by those who shall have the said churches in their use, and by their successors, to the poor parishioners of the said churches, to assist their livelihood and sustenance forever. And that the vicar be also well and suitably endowed. (fn. iii-284-155-1)
[Tenants in villeinage.] [Tenants in villeinage.]
39. < Religiouses homes. > Item, priont les communes: qe plese ordeiner qe nulle neif ou vileyn du ercevesqe, evesqe, abbe, priour, ou d'autre religiouse qeconqe deinz vostre roialme d'Engleterre, de cy enavaunt purchace terres ou tenementz en fee, sur peyne de forfaire a nostre seignour le roi toutz tielx purchaces: et ceo a cause qe a toutz jours est trove, qe ycelles purchaces deveignont hors du mayns des temporaltees en les mayns des espiritualtees, le quele est grant destruccioun de lay fee du roialme. Et auxi de ordeiner et comander qe nulle neif ou vileyn mette ses enfantz de cy enavant a escoles pur eux avancer par clergie, et ce en maintenance et salvacioun del honour de toutz frankes du roialme. 39. Religious men. Also, the commons pray: that it may please you to ordain that no bondman or villein of an archbishop, bishop, abbot, prior or other religious within your kingdom of England in future purchase lands or tenements in fee, on pain of forfeiture to our lord the king of all such purchases: and that because it has always been found that these purchases fall out of the hands of temporality into the hands of spirituality, which is to the great destruction of the lay fee of the kingdom. And also to ordain and command that no bondman or villein put his children in schools from now on to advance them by clerisy, and this for the maintenance and salvation of the honour of all free men of the kingdom.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi s'avisera. The king will consider it further.
[Fraudulent sales of Guildford cloths.] [Fraudulent sales of Guildford cloths.]
40. < Draps de Gillford. > Item, les comminaltees de la ville de Guldeford, et d'aillours en les contees de Surr', Sussex', et Suthampton': qe come par auncien temps hors de memorie estoient faitz draps en les ditz ville et contees, les queux draps estoient appellez draps de Gildeford, et feurent de mesure et de bone fesure et de bone value, et portoient graunt noune. Et ore, pur cause qe fullers et autres de mesmes les paiis depuis ont usez d'achatre les draps des ditz paiis venantz hors de les lomes nient fullez ne parfaitz, et en lour oeverance de fullure treignent draps plus long et pluis larges par grant mesure qe ils soloient estre, a grant feblesce, et tresgrant empeirement de soun bone et naturelle fesure, et a tresgrant disceit du commune poeple, pur lour covytise d'avoir pluis grant mesure outre la commune assise qe jadys estoit usee. Issint le bon noune des draps du dite paiis, et la marchandise d'icelle, est bien pres tout perduz et destruitz, a grant damage de roi, et arrerissement des gentz du paiis. 40. Cloths of Guildford. Also, the commons of the town of Guildford, and elsewhere in Surrey, Sussex and Hampshire, pray that whereas from time immemorial cloths had been made in the said town and counties, which cloths were called cloths of Guildford, and were of good measure, well made and of good value, and had a good reputation. Yet now, because fullers and others of the same region are used to buying the cloths of the said land straight from the looms neither fulled nor finished, and in their work of fulling they draw the cloths far longer and larger than they used to be, greatly weakening and impairing their good and natural texture, and to the great deceit of the common people, because of their greed for a larger measure than the common size once used; therefore, the good name of the cloths of the said region, and the merchandise of the same, are likely to be entirely lost and destroyed, to the great injury of the king and ruin of the people of the region.
Qe plese ordeigner et establer pur commune profit qe nulle fuller, ne nulle autre, n'achate nulle tiel drape devant qe le drap soit pleinement parfait en sa nature, et enseale desouz le seal pur ceo ordeigne, sur peine de forfaiture d'icelle. May it please you to ordain and decree for the common profit that no fuller, nor any other, buy any such cloth before the cloth be fully finished in its production and sealed under the seal ordained for this, on pain of forfeiting the same.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi le voet. (fn. iii-284-166-1) The king wills it. (fn. iii-284-166-1)
[Trade with Berwick.] [Trade with Berwick.]
41. < Berwik. > Item, monstrent voz povres communes, le mair et burgeys de vostre ville de Berwyk sur Twede, les queux soloient avoir lour vivre de marchandie, sicome des leyns et autres marchandises, queux ils soloient avoir hors de la paiis et viscontes de Roxburgh' et de Berewyk, queux paiis et les enhabitantz, exceptz ceux qe sont en la dite ville et chastelx illoeqes, sont tournez a l'enemytes, et ont deguerpez vostre ligeance. 41. Berwick. Also, your poor commons show: that the mayor and burgess of your town of Berwick upon Tweed, who used to gain their livelihood from merchandise, such as wool and other merchandise, which they used to have from the lands and sheriffdoms of Roxburgh and Berwick, which regions and their inhabitants, except those who are in the said town and castle there, have gone over to the enemy, and have thrown off your allegiance.
Et par tant vous supplient q'ils puissent avoir les leyns d'une partie de Northumbr', c'estassavoir de coket vers la northe, paiant pur la sak quatre nobles, sicome ils avoient en le temps le noble roi Edward [I], qe Dieux assoille; considerantz qe les leyns sont de cy petit value, [col. b] q'eles sont cariez al enemyte en larcyn, a vostre grant damage. And for this reason they ask of you that they might have the wool from a part of Northumberland, namely from the River Cocket towards the north, paying four nobles per sack, as they had in the time of King Edward [I], whom God absolve; considering that the wool is of such small value [col. b] that it is taken to the enemy surreptitiously, to your great injury.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi s'advisera, et ent ferra ce qe lui meultz semblera, par advys de son conseill. The king will consider it further, and do as he thinks best by the advice of his council.
[Trade with Berwick.] [Trade with Berwick.]
42. < Draps. > Item, la ou par un estatut fait de certeine peine qe nulli doit carier drap n'autre marchandise hors de roialme d'Engleterre, si sont plusours citezeins et autres burgeys d'Everwyk, Neofchastell' sur Tyne, et aillours, empeschez, de ce q'ils ont amesnez drape et autre marchandise a vostre ville de Berewyk, et a voz liges enhabitantz en ycelle. (fn. iii-284-173-1) 42. Cloths. Also, whereas by a statute made on a certain pain that no one should carry cloth or any other merchandise out of the kingdom of England, many citizens and other burgesses of York, Newcastle upon Tyne, and elsewhere have been impeached for taking cloth and other merchandise to your town of Berwick and to your lieges inhabiting the same. (fn. iii-284-173-1)
Par quoy suppliont voz ditz liges qe celle estatut poet tielment estre declare qe peine encourge soulement de ce q'est amesne al enemyte hors de vostre roialme, ou hors de vostre dite ville, as autres queux ne sont de vostre ligeance. Wherefore your said lieges pray that this statute be defined in such a way that a penalty be incurred only for that which is taken to the enemy outside your kingdom, or outside your said town, to others who are not of your allegiance.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi voet q'ils le purront bien amesner a Berewyk, a cause q'il est la ville du roi et de sa ligeance, sanz empeschement du dit estatut et sanz paier subside ou custume. Et qe ceux qe sont pur l'amesner de draps, vitailles et autres marchandises a la dite [ville] de Berewyk empeschez en l'escheqer, soient ent outrement quitz et deschargez, et le proces contre eux ent fait illoeqes tout outrement cessez, cassez et adnullez. Purveux toutes voies qe ceux qe amesnent ascuns draps, vitailles ou autres marchandises hors de Berewyk as ascunes parties esteantz del amiste du roi, paient les subsides, custumes et autres devoirs ent dues, et s'ils l'amesnent as ascunes parties del enemiste du roi, encourgent la peine del dit estatut. (fn. iii-284-177-1) The king wills that they may indeed be brought to Berwick, because it is the king's town and of his allegiance, without impeachment of the said statute and without paying subsidy or custom. And that those who have been impeached in the said exchequer for taking cloths, victuals and other merchandise to the said town of Berwick be entirely quit and discharged thereof, and the process brought against them there altogether ended, cancelled and annulled. Provided always that those who take cloth, victuals, or other merchandise out of Berwick to any parts being in friendship with the king pay the subsidies, customs and dues owed thereon, and if they take them to any parts hostile to the king, let them incur the penalty of the said statute. (fn. iii-284-177-1)
[Export of kerseys.] [Export of kerseys.]
43. < Marcaunts d'Engleterre. > Item, prient les marchantz d'Engleterre: qe come a le parlement tenuz a Westm' l'an de vostre regne treszisme, estoit ordeinez qe les ditz marchantz purroient amesner un manere de marchandise appellez kerseys as parties de dela tanqe al proschein parlement < alors > proschein ensuiant, sanz custume ent prendre a vostre oeps, sicome auncienement soleit estre de tout temps passe. (fn. iii-284-179-1) 43. Merchants of England. Also, the merchants of England pray: whereas at the parliament held at Westminster in the thirteenth year of your reign it was ordained that the said merchants could take a kind of merchandise called kerseys to parts beyond the sea until the next parliament then following, without any custom being taken for your use, as was always done in the past. (fn. iii-284-179-1)
Et sur ce les ditz marchantz prierent a vostre hautesse, a le darrein parlement tenuz a Westm', c'estassavoir l'an de vostre regne qatorzisme, q'il plerroit a vostre dit hautesse et a la discrecioun de vostre tressage conseille ordeiner, et pleinement declarer voz pleiseirs et gracious assent et avys touchant l'envoie des ditz kerseys, et de faire restorer et deliverer as ditz marchantz, et a chescun de eux, toutz les obligacions et autres seurtes prises par qeconqes coillours des custumes, et autres voz ministres, pur la cause avantdite, pur qeconqes kerseys eskippez devant vostre dit parlement l'an de vostre regne suisdit treszisme, issint qe par cause des ditz obligacions et seurtes ils ne serroient en nulle manere molestez, grevez, n'empeschez, einz tout outrement quites et deschargez. (fn. iii-284-180-1) And then the said merchants prayed of your highness at the last parliament held at Westminster, namely in the fourteenth year of your reign, that it might please your said highness at the discretion of your most wise council to ordain and fully declare your pleasure and gracious assent and advice touching the export of the said kerseys, and to cause to be restored and delivered to the said merchants, and to each of them, all the obligations and other sureties taken by any collectors of customs and other ministers of yours, for the aforesaid reason, for any kerseys shipped before your said parliament in the thirteenth year of your reign, so that they will not be harassed, grieved nor impeached in any way by reason of the said obligations and sureties, but will be wholly quit and discharged. (fn. iii-284-180-1)
Au quelle supplicacioun estoit responduz a vostre darrein parlement, l'an de vostre dit regne qatorzisme, qe celuy qe se sente < estre > grevez sue en especial au conseille, et droit lui serroit fait. Et combien qe diverses des ditz marchantz ont pursuez pur la cause suisdite au dit conseille apres le dit darrein parlement tanqe encea, nientmeins unqore ne purront avoir lour dites obligacions et seurtes a eux deliverez, n'ent a l'escheqer estre deschargez, a grant arerissement de l'estat des ditz suppliantz. To which supplication it was replied at your last parliament, in the fourteenth year of your reign, that whosoever felt aggrieved should sue individually to the council, and right would be done to him. Yet although various of the said merchants have sued for the aforesaid reason to the said council from the time of the last parliament until now, nevertheless they still cannot have their said obligations and sureties delivered to them, nor gain discharge therefrom at the exchequer, to the great injury of the estate of the said supplicants.
Plese ore par advys de vostre tressage conseille ordeiner qe toutz maneres des obligacions et seurtes faitz pur les ditz kerseys devant vostre dit darrein parlement soient restorez et deliverez a voz ditz marchantz, issint q'ils ne soient par cause des ditz obligacions et seurtes en nulle manere molestez, grevez, n'empeschez, einz tout outrement quitz et deschargez, come resoun demande. May it please you now by the advice of your most wise council to ordain that all manner of obligations and sureties made for the said kerseys before your said last parliament be restored and delivered to your said merchants, so that they are neither harassed, grieved nor impeached in any way because of the said obligations and sureties, but are thoroughly quit and discharged, as reason demands.
[p. iii-295]
[col. a]
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Purce qe le roi est enheritez par descent apres la mort de ses progenitours de custume de toutz maneres des draps faitz de leyne en Engleterre, et passantz hors du roialme, le roi voet qe toutz ceux qe vorront passer ascuns draps, soient ils kerseys ou autres, paient ent la custume, solonc les ordeinances et estatutz en faitz. Because the king has the heritable right by descent after the death of his progenitors to custom on all manner of cloths made of wool in England and exported from the realm, the king wills that those who wish to export any cloths, be they kerseys or others, pay the appropriate custom, in accordance with the ordinances and statutes made thereon.
[Coppice wood.] [Coppice wood.]
44. < Disme de bois. > Item, supplient les communes: qe come en plusours parties parmy tout le roialme plusours gentz sont pursuez, travaillez, et mys a grantes coustages, et ascuns escomengez en court Cristiene, pur dismes sibien des grosses arbres come de boys seisonable, sur colour de cest parole, silva cedua. 44. Tithe of woods. Also, the commons pray that whereas in many parts throughout the kingdom numerous people have been sued, harassed and put to great expense, and some excommunicated in the court Christian, for tithes both on large trees and young woods, by colour of the phrase coppice wood.
Qe plese a nostre seignour le roi et les tressages seignours de cest parlement, qe ceste parole [...] de silva cedua soit declare, et l'age de boys dismable mys en certein, en cest present parlement, en ese del commune, considerantz qe diverses billes sur ceste matir ont este mys en la peticioun del commune en diverses parlementz devant ces heures, et nulle remedie est ordeigne. May it please our lord the king and the most wise lords of this parliament to clarify this phrase coppice wood, and specify the age of titheable wood, in this present parliament, to the ease of the commons, considering that various bills on the matter have been submitted as common petitions in various parliaments in the past, and no remedy has been ordained.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soit use come ad este use devant ces heures. Let there be done what has been done in the past.
[Poverty of the northern counties.] [Poverty of the northern counties.]
45. < Les communes de Northumbr' et Westmerland, etc. > A tresexcellent et tresredoute seignour nostre seignour le roi supplient voz liges des countes de Northumbr', Cumbr' et Westmerl': qe come vous, l'an de vostre regne .ix. me , de vostre grace especiale, pardonastez et relessastez a voz ditz liges toutz deniers en queux ils adonqes feurent tenuz a vous, des dettes, fines, issues, et amercimentz appellez vert cere, et des dismes et .xv. mez et autres taxes et subsides a vous devant le dit an .ix. me grauntez. (fn. iii-284-193-1) Et puis au parlement tenuz a Westm' l'an de vostre dit regne treszisme, au supplicacioun des communes de vostre dit regne, de vostre grace especiale, et de assent de vostre conseille en mesme le parlement, pardonastez et relessastez as hommes des ditz countees, et a chescun de eux, toutes fines, issues et amercimentz, et arrerages des fermes, et auxint accomptes des dismes sibien de clergie come des cites et burghs, et des .xv. mes des biens et chateux a vous par eux, ou ascun d'eux, devant le primer jour de Marche, le dit an .xiij. me , duez. (fn. iii-284-193-2) Et auxint < al > parlement tenuz illoeqes l'an de vostre dit regne .xiiij. me , al supplicacioun de comminalte de vostre dit regne, pardonastez et relessastez as hommes des ditz countes, et a chescun de eux, toutz maneres des sommes de pecuniez a vous d'eux, ou d'ascun d'eux, par noun de plusours dettes en vostre escheqer, exactions, demandes, et toutz releves a vous par eux ou d'ascun d'eux devant le dit primer jour de Marche duez. (fn. iii-284-193-3) Et vous nient voillantz qe eux, ou ascun de eux, ou viscont ou eschetour des ditz countes, ou coillour des dismes sibien de clergie come des cites et burghes, et des .xv. mes suisditz, pur tielx fines, issues, amercimentz, arrerages, accomptes, dismes et .xv. mes a vous a paier, ou arendre al dit escheqer en temps avenir, soit ou soient empeschez, destreintz, molestez, ou en ascun manere grevez; mes qe ent de vostre grace especiale soient quitez et deschargez pur toutz jours: si font les barons de vostre escheqer destreindre plusours hommes des ditz countes pur diverses dettes et accomptz, et pur arrerages et remenantz des accomptz sibien des coillours des .x. mes et .xv. mes come de l'eschetours des ditz countez, et des voz autres ministres illoeqes, a vous devant le dit primer jour de Marche duez. 45. The commons of Northumberland and Westmorland, etc. To the most excellent and most redoubtable lord our lord the king, your lieges of Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmorland pray: whereas you, in the ninth year of your reign, of your special grace, pardoned and released to your said lieges all the moneys for which they were then indebted to you, from debts, fines, issues and amercements called green wax, and from tenths and fifteenths and other taxes and subsidies granted to you before the said ninth year. (fn. iii-284-193-1) And then at the parliament held at Westminster in the thirteenth year of your said reign, at the request of the commons of your said kingdom, of your special grace, and with the assent of your council in the same parliament, you pardoned and released to the men of the said counties, and to each of them, all fines, issues and amercements and arrears of farms, and also accounts of tenths as well from the clergy as from the cities and boroughs, and the fifteenth on goods and chattels owed to you by them before 1 March in the said thirteenth year [1390]. (fn. iii-284-193-2) And also, at the parliament held there in the fourteenth year of your said reign, at the supplication of the commons of your said kingdom, you pardoned and released to the men of the said counties, and to each of them, all manner of sums of money owed to you by them, or by any of them, in the form of numerous debts in your exchequer, exactions, demands and all reliefs owed to you by them or any one of them before the said 1 March [1390]. (fn. iii-284-193-3) And you, not wishing that they, or any one of them, or any sheriff or escheator of the said counties, or collector of the tenths as well from the clergy as from the cities and boroughs, and of the aforesaid fifteenths, should be impeached, distrained, harassed or in any way damaged by such fines, issues, amercements, arrears, accounts, tenths and fifteenths to be paid to you, or rendered at the said exchequer in time to come; but that of your special grace they should be quit and discharged forever: yet the barons of your exchequer cause many men of the said counties to be distrained for various debts and accounts, and for arrears and remainders of accounts both from collectors of tenths and fifteenths and from the escheators of the said counties, as well as from your other ministers there, owed to you before the said 1 March [1390].
Qe plese a vostre tresredoute et tresexcellent seignourie, de pardoner et relesser as hommes des ditz countes, et a chescun d'eux, toutz maneres des dettes et accomptz, et les arrerages et remenantz des dettes et accomptz qeconqes, a vous devant le dit primer jour de Marche duez, pur Dieu, et en oevre de charite, considerant, tresexcellent seignour, [col. b] la graunde destructioun et oppressioun de voz enemys d'Escoce et de France. May it please your most redoubtable and most excellent lordship to pardon and release to the men of the said counties, and to each of them, all manner of debts and accounts, and the arrears and remainders of debts and accounts whatsoever, owed to you before the said 1 March [1390], for God and by way of charity; considering, most excellent lord, [col. b] the great destruction and oppression of your enemies of Scotland and France.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi voet q'ils eient allowance auxi pleinement come soun pardoun demande. The king wills that they shall have allowance as fully as the pardon demands.
[memb. 1]
[Cheminage in the forest.] [Cheminage in the forest.]
46. < Chartre de forest. > Item, prie la commune: qe come contenu soit en la chartre de forest qe null forster qe ne soit forster de fee, rendant au roi ferme pur sa baillie, preigne chyminage en null manere en sa baillie, n'en autres lieux ou ne soleit estre pris d'auncien temps, ne de nully demurant deinz la forest, ne de nulle autre demurant dehors qe face cariage hors de forest pur soun oeps demesne a despendre en sa maisoun; mes soulement de eux qe font cariage hors de forest, come de busshe, maerisme, cortes, carbons et autres choses pur les vendre aillours, et ent faire lour profit, c'estassavoir pur le charet pur demi an .ij. d., et pur autre demi an .ij. d., et pur chival qe port summage pur demi an obole, et pur autre demi an obole. Et ore est ensi qe diverses foresters qe ne sont mye forsters de fee, et auxi autres diverses persones deinz forest et aillours, en diverses lieux parmy le roialme, parnent chiminage sibien de ceux deinz forest come d'autres cariantz pur lour oeps demesne. Et auxi des cariantz pur vendre parnent tiel chiminage a tant de foitz, et si sovent come ils ensi carient, et ce en diverses lieux ou tiel chiminage ne doit, ne soleit estre pris, ne paie d'auncien temps, en tresgrant damage et oppressioun du poeple, et contre la forme de l'estatut avantdit. 46. Charter of the forest. Also, the commons pray: whereas it is contained in the charter of the forest that no forester who is not a forester at fee, paying the king a farm for his office, should take cheminage in any manner in the area under his bailiwick, nor in other places where it was never to be taken ancient times, nor from anyone dwelling within the forest, nor from any other dwelling outside who should take things from the forest for his own use to be used in his house; but only from those who should carry out of the forest such things as logs, timber, bark, charcoal, and other things to sell elsewhere, to make their profit of them, namely 2d. per cart for half a year, and for another half year 2d. and a halfpenny per horse which carries a load, for half a year, and for another half a year, a halfpenny. Yet now it happens that various foresters who are not foresters at fee, and also various other persons within the forest and elsewhere, in various places throughout the realm, take cheminage from those in the forest and from others carrying things for their own use. And also, from those carrying to sell they take cheminage as often as they thus carry, and that in various places where such cheminage ought not to be and never was taken nor paid of old, to the very great injury and oppression of the people and contrary to the form of the aforesaid statute.
Qe plese qe l'estatut de forest soit duement tenuz et execut deinz la forest de Shirwode, et en toutz autres forestes et lieux deinz le roialme. May it please you to ordain that the statute of the forest be duly upheld and executed in the forest of Sherwood and in all other forests and places in the realm.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soient la chartre de la forestre, et la declaracioun d'icelle, fermement tenuz et gardez: et si ascun soi sente greve en especiale, sue, et plein droit lui serra fait. Let the charter of the forest and the declaration of the same be firmly upheld and kept: and if anyone should feel especially damaged, let him sue, and full right will be done him.
[Arrests in Cheshire and the march.] [Arrests in Cheshire and the march.]
47. < Marcaunts. > Item, monstrent la commune: qe les liges du roi ont sentuz longement un grant damage et grevance, de ce qe diverses marchantz et autres q'ont passez parmy le conte de Cestre, et autres seignouries en Gales, ont estez sovent arestuz ove lour biens et marchandises, pur dette d'autres qe sont ou furent des cites, burghs, villes, ou paiis dont tielx arestuz sont ou furent, et de quelle dette tielx arestuz ne soit ne feurent dettours, ne plegge, encontre droit et resoun et bone foy. 47. Merchants. Also, the commons show: that the king's lieges have long felt great injury and grievance, for that various merchants and others who have passed through Cheshire and other lordships of Wales have often been arrested with their goods and merchandise for the debts of others who are or were from the cities, boroughs, towns or country from which those arrested are or were, and for which debts those arrested are not nor were the debtors nor pledges, against right, reason and good faith.
Qe plese le bone establissement fait par le noble roi Edward fitz a roi Henry, progenitour nostre seignour le roi, en son primer parlement tenuz a Westm' apres soun coronement, granter et ordeigner qe nulle homme, marchant, n'autre, du roialme d'Engleterre, soit arestuz, attache, ou distreint nulle part deinz le dit counte de Cestre, ou deinz le seignourie de Gales, pur dette dont il n'est dettour ou plegge, et qe tiel arest, attachement, ou distresse, soit deliverez par les ministres de lieu tantost sanz delaye, ensemblement ove damages a treble, a paier par ceux a qi suite tiel arest, attachement, ou destresse soit; (fn. iii-284-206-1) parensi qe toutz ceux q'ont mestier ou aueront a pursuir pur ascuns tielx causes, puissent savement venir et demurer en le paiis et marches avantditz, et de illoeqes savement retourner a faire lour pursuites, sanz estre greve, destourbe ou damage de nully, sanz proteccioun le roi et seignours des franchises et lieux avantditz. May it please you, following the good ordinance made by the noble king Edward [I], son of King Henry, progenitor of our lord the king, in his first parliament held at Westminster after his coronation, to grant and ordain that no man, merchant or other, of the kingdom of England, be arrested, attached or distrained anywhere within the said Cheshire or within the lordship of Wales for a debt for which he is not the debtor or pledge, and that from such arrest, attachment or distress they should be released by the ministers of the place at once and without delay, with triple damages to be paid by those at whose suit such an arrest, attachment or distress was made; (fn. iii-284-206-1) so that all those who have or shall have business to pursue there for any such purpose may safely come and go in the aforesaid lands and marches, and from there safely return to carry out their business, without being harmed, disturbed or injured by anyone, without the protection of the king and lords of the aforesaid franchises and places.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi s'advisera. The king will consider it further.
[The staple for tin.] [The staple for tin.]
48. < Cornewayll. > Item, prie la commune: qe come en le conte de Cornewaille crest un grant commodite du roialme d'Engleterre, ceo est esteim, le quelle est grantement anientise par l'estatut et ordeinances faitz en darrein parlement tenuz a Westm', c'estassavoir qe l'estaple [p. iii-296][col. a] d'icelle esteime serroit a Dertemuth', a quelle lieu les marchantz ne voillent lour gree venir pur achater le dit esteime: (fn. iii-284-211-1) et aussi, qe les marchantz Engleys ne autres ne poient amesner ne encarier le dit esteime dela la meer, ne a nulle autre parte, devant q'ils eient amesnez le dit esteime a Dertemuth suisdit, a grantz coustages et anientissement des ditz liges, et a grant damage et abatement del coignage nostre seignour le roi. 48. Cornwall. Also, the commons pray that whereas in Cornwall there accrues a great commodity of the kingdom of England, that is tin, which has been greatly damaged by the statute and ordinances made in the last parliament held at Westminster, namely that the staple [p. iii-296][col. a] of the same tin should be at Dartmouth, to which place it does not please the merchants to come to buy the said tin: (fn. iii-284-211-1) and also, that neither the English merchants nor others can take nor transport the said tin overseas, nor to any other part, until they have brought the said tin to the aforesaid Dartmouth, to the great cost and ruin of the said lieges, and to the great injury and debasement of the coinage of our lord the king.
Qe plese ordeigner qe les avauntditz ordeinances et estatut soient anullez, et les ditz liges, et toutz autres marchantz repairantz en le dit roialme, soient enlargez pur amesner le dit esteime en quelle part q'ils vorront, auxibien dela la meer come par decea, paiantz les custumes ent duez. Et qe l'estaple du dit esteime soit a Lostwithiel en le counte suisdit. May it please you to ordain that the aforesaid ordinances and statute be annulled, and that the said lieges, and all other merchants repairing to the said realm, be permitted to take the said tin wherever they will, as well overseas as on this side of the sea, paying the customs due thereon. And that the staple of the said tin be at Lostwithiel in the aforesaid county.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi voet qe les ditz ordeinances et estatut soient adnullez: et qe parentre cy et le fest de Seint Johan Baptistre proschein venant, toutz marchantz, denzeins et aliens, soient a large de charger estein en niefs et autres vesselx pur amesner hors de roialme en quelle port q'ils vorront eslire deinz le roialme, et a quelle part q'ils vorront. Et apres le dit fest repeirent a Caleys, pur le temps qe la repaire des leyns y serra, paiantz toutdys les devoirs, custumes et subsides ent duez avant la passage del esteime avantdit. (fn. iii-284-215-1) The king wills that the said ordinances and statute be annulled: and that between now and the feast of St John the Baptist next [24 June 1392] denizens and aliens be free to load tin into ships and other vessels to be taken out of the kingdom from whatsoever port they choose in the kingdom, and to wheresoever they will. And after the said feast they shall repair to Calais, for the time when the return of wool shall be there, paying always the dues, customs and subsidies owed thereon before the passage of the aforesaid tin. (fn. iii-284-215-1)
[Girdlers: use of white metal.] [Girdlers: use of white metal.]
49. < Ceinturers. > Item, priont les communes pur commune profit du roialme: qe toutz ceinturers en le roialme d'Engleterre qe oeverent ceintures garnisez de blank metal, purront oeverer, user, et continuer, lour dit mestier; c'estassavoir de garniser les ceintures de blank metal come auncienement soleient, nientcontresteant acune chartre as ascuns ceinturers pur lour singuler profit fait a contraire, considerantz qe homme purra avoir de tielx ceintures issint garnisez .iiij. ceintures pur .i. d., .iij. ceintures pur .i. d., .ij. ceintures pur .i. d., et .i. ceinture pur .i. d.; et autres ceintures d'autre pris come sont de value. 49. Girdlers. Also, the commons pray for the common profit of the realm that all girdlers in the kingdom of England who make belts decorated with white metal might work, practise, and continue their said craft; that is to say, to decorate the belts with white metal as they used of old, notwithstanding any charter granted to the contrary to any makers for their singular profit, considering that one can have such belts thus decorated at four belts for 1d., three belts for 1d., two belts for 1d., and one belt for 1d.; and other belts at another price according to their value.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi le voet; et si ascunes chartres ou patentes soient faitz a contraire, soient voides et de nulle force ou virtue. (fn. iii-284-220-1) The king wills it; and if any charters or patents be made to the contrary, let them be void and of no force or virtue. (fn. iii-284-220-1)
[Preference to be given to English ships.] [Preference to be given to English ships.]
50. < Navye d'Engleterre. > Item, priont les communes: qe pur ceo qe la < navye > d'Engleterre est tresgrantement amenuse et [col. b] empeire, qe plese a voz treshautes seignouries grauntier qe nulle marchant Engleys n'affrette nulle biens ne marchandises en nulle nief ne vesseaux des estraungers, en nulle lieux ou ils puissent affretter lour biens et marchandises en nief et vesseaux Engleys; sur peyne de forfaiture de tielx biens et marchandises issint eskippez en nief ou vesseaux estraungers, en oevre de charite, et en meyntenance et encres de la naveye d'Engleterre. 50. The navy of England. Also, the commons pray: whereas the navy of England has been greatly reduced and [col. b] weakened, it may please your most high lordships to grant that no English merchant shall transport any goods or merchandise in any foreign ship or vessel, to any place whither they might transport their goods and merchandise in an English ship or vessel; on pain of forfeiting such goods and chattels thus shipped in the foreign ship or vessel, by way of charity, and to maintain and enlarge the navy of England.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Soient les estatutz ent faitz tenuz et gardez. Let the statutes made thereon be upheld and kept.
[Villeins settled in enfranchised towns.] [Villeins settled in enfranchised towns.]
51. < Chivalers de countes. > A tresexcellent et tresredoute seignour nostre seignour le roi et seignours de parlement monstrent les chivalers des countees en ycest < present > parlement: qe come les seignours parmy le roialme d'Engleterre eient plusours vileins queux s'enfeuont de lour seignours et de lour terres en diversees citees et burghes enfranchisez, de jour en autre, et la demuront tout lour vies; par cause des queux franchises les ditz seignours ne pount aprocher a lour ditz vileins. Et si les ditz seignours, ou ascun de lour ministres, viegnent dedeinz [...] les ditz citees et burghes issint enfranchises, pur seiser ou prendre les ditz vileins pur eux justicer solonc la ley et custume de la terre, les gentz des citees et burghes < ne les voillent > suffrer, einz les distourbount forciblement. Et si ascuns des ditz vileins soient ensi seisez par lour dit seignours ou lour ministres, les ditz gentz les preignent de eux par cause de lour ditz fraunchises, et ne les soeffrent point amesner hors des ditz citees ou burghes, as damages importables et desheritesons des ditz seignours. 51. Knights of the shires. To the most excellent and most redoubtable lord our lord the king and the lords of parliament, the knights of the shires in this present parliament do show that whereas the lords throughout the kingdom of England have many villeins who have fled from their lords and from their lands to divers enfranchised cities and boroughs, from one day to another, and who remain there all their lives; by reason of which franchises the said lords cannot approach their said villeins. And if the said lords or any of their ministers enter the said cities and boroughs thus enfranchised to seize or take the said villeins and to do justice to them according to the law and custom of the land, the people of the cities and boroughs will not allow it, but forcibly impede them. And if any of the said villeins are thus seized by their said lords or their ministers, the said people take them from them because of their said franchises, and do not allow them to be taken out of the said cities or boroughs, to the unbearable injury and disinheritance of the said lords.
Par quey suppliont les ditz chivalers qe plese a lour tresredoute seignour le roi d'ordeigner en cest present parlement qe les ditz seignours ou lour ministres puissent entrer les ditz citees et burghes, et seiser et amesner lour ditz vileins hors des ditz citees et burghes et franchises des seignours peisiblement, sanz destourbance de nully: non obstant ascuns tielx franchises, custumes, ou usages en ycelles devaunt ces heures usez a contraire, pur Dieu, et en oevre de charite. For which reason the said knights pray that it please their most redoubtable lord the king to ordain in this present parliament that the said lords or their ministers may enter the said cities and boroughs and seize and take their said villeins out of the said cities and borough and franchises of the lords,peaceably and without hindrance from anyone: notwithstanding any such franchises, customs, or usages of the same to the contrary, practised in the past; for God and by way of charity.
[editorial note: Responsio.] [editorial note: Answer.]
Le roi s'advisera. The king will consider it further.
52. Cest parlement finist samady le second jour de Decembre. 52. This parliament ended on Saturday 2 December [1390].

Appendix November 1391

3 November 1391

Westminster

1

There is in the Public Record Office a memorandum concerning the settlement during this parliament of the dispute between Richard Lescrope, lord of Bolton, and Sir Robert Grosvenor, concerning the right to bear the arms azur, a bend or . The two men were eventually reconciled in full parliament on 16 November.

Source : PRO , C 49/12/6, transcribed in full in CCR 1389-92 , 517-9.

2

Petition to the king and lords of parliament from the abbot and convent of Abingdon (Oxon), who from time immemorial have held the right of burying the dead from their surrounding lordships in the cemetery of the abbey, complaining that the vicar of the church of St Helen in Abingdon, through an apostolic bull, but without royal licence, has now consecrated a cemetery and begun to bury the dead in a piece of land around his church belonging to the abbey, to the disinheritance of the abbey's rights. Following their complaint, the king's escheator has seized the land in question into the king's hands. The abbey and convent request that the escheator be brought into parliament and justice be done to them.

Endorsed : Let the petition be sent into the chancery, and the chancellor, by the authority of parliament, be instructed to do justice to the parties.

Source : Printed in full in RP , III.297.

3

Petition to the king and lords of parliament from Alice de la Maire, one of three daughters and co-heiresses of John Mary and his wife Eleanor, complaining that after the death of her father, her mother's second husband, John Lovet, forced his wife to sell 'the manor of East Mersea called La Esthall' (Essex) in fee simple to Humphrey Weston and others, to the use and profit of Sir Robert Swynburn. Following Eleanor's death, one John Sumpter offered to act as Alice's attorney to recover the manor, and at a judicial hearing in Colchester it was agreed that Swynburn would pay 360 marks to Alice by way of compensation, in return for which she released her right in the manor. However, Alice has not received more than fifty marks of this sum, while John Sumpter has also received fifty marks which he has kept for himself; he will neither pay this sum to Alice nor pursue the remainder of the debt, for which she begs remedy.

Endorsed : Let the petition be sent into the chancery, and the chancellor, by the authority of parliament, be instructed to do justice to the parties.

Source : Printed in full in RP , III.297-8.

4

Petition to the king and council in parliament from Sir John Pavely the elder complaining that he is still charged an annual rent of thirty shillings and six pence at the exchequer for forty-five acres and one rood of land attached to his manor of Pury (Northamptonshire), which he used to be charged when it was a part of the forest of Whittlewood, but which he should no longer be charged since the disaforestation of his manor and his tenements, as was found by a commission held by Sir Geoffrey Lescrope and other justices, the record of which remains in the exchequer. He begs finally to be discharged of this rent.

Endorsed : Let the petition be sent into the chancery, and the chancellor, by the authority of parliament, be instructed to do justice to the parties.

Source : Printed in full in RP , III.298.

5

Petition to the king and lords in parliament from Sir Richard de Byron and Joanna his wife, complaining that he has from time immemorial had a mill and fishing-weir worth forty marks annually attached to his manor of Colwick (Nottinghamshire), through which a lade runs from the River Trent. However, the mayor and bailiffs of Nottingham, acting on a commission obtained at the suggestion of various persons hostile to Sir Richard, without warning came and broke down his weir. This commission was contrary to the law of the land, for which he begs remedy.

Endorsed : When this petition and the commission had been read in parliament and examined by the justices, it was awarded in parliament that, since the commission had not been made in accordance with the law, the petitioners should be free to rebuild their weir without hindrance from the mayor, bailiffs and commonalty of Nottingham or from any other persons, and that a new commission be issued to enquire into the matter and report in chancery.

Source : Printed in full in RP , III.298.

6

Petition to the king and lords in parliament from Walter Sibill, complaining of having been ruined by the long delay in deciding the suit between him, on the one hand, and William Coggeshall and Sir Nicholas Twyford on the other hand. Thomas Mortimer was appointed at the last parliament to arbitrate in this dispute, and he took sureties of one thousand pounds from each side on the understanding that he would announce his award by Michaelmas (29 September) 1391, but he has not yet done so. Walter Sibill requests that Lord Richard Lescrope be appointed to examine Mortimer on his failure to make an award, and to pronounce a final accord, for he has suffered long imprisonment and other inconveniences as a result of this suit.

Endorsed This petition was read in parliament, and it was agreed by the lords, with the assent of William Coggeshall and Walter Sibill, both of whom were present in parliament, that the bishops of London and Ely and Lord Richard Lescrope, or any two or one of them, should act as arbitrators in this dispute.

Source : Printed in full in RP , III.298.

7

Petition to the king from Robert, prior of Upholland in Lancashire (as in Item 16 on the roll).

Endorsed 'Let a commission be made to a sergeant-at-arms to arrest the aforesaid malefactors and bring them into parliament, there to answer for the horrible trespasses described above'. (see Item 16 for the award subsequently decreed in parliament)

Source : Printed in full in RP , III.298-9.

8

Licence, with the assent of the council in the present parliament, for John Prata, clerk, to sue at the Roman court for execution of his provision to the church of St John Zachary, London, and a prebend in the cathedral church of St Asaph. By king and petition in parliament. Dated 1 December 1391.

Source : CPR 1391-96 , 3.

9

Grant, with the assent of the council in the present parliaments, to the merchants of the Hanse, who have petitioned parliament that they may be exempt from certain duties on goods imported to various towns and cities in England, that they be exempted from such imposts for two years. By petition in parliament. Dated 1 December 1391.

Source : CPR 1391-96 , 4.

10

Order to the mayor and sheriffs of London to implement, by Ash Wednesday next, the ordinance made with the assent of this present parliament confirming the statute of 35 Edward III concerning the slaughtering of animals and dumping of offal and carcasses at least one league outside the city, because of the defilement of the air and danger to health caused by such behaviour. By petition of parliament. Dated 6 December 1391.

Source : CCR 1389-92 , 409 (and see p. 521, where the order is repeated but the date for implementation is extended to Whitsuntide 1392).

11

Grant to Robert Markeley, sergeant-at-arms of the king, of twelve pence daily for life from 14 December 1391, 'at the instance of the commons in the last parliament'. Dated 26 March 1392.

Source : CCR 1389-92 , 452.

12

Order to the constable of the Tower of London to bring Percival Pensax and his son William, imprisoned in the Tower, before the king and council in parliament. Dated 20 November 1391.

Order to the constable of the Tower to release Percival Pensax and his son William. Dated 28 November 1391.

Source : CCR 1389-92 , 409.

13

Order to the warden of the Fleet prison, following a petition to the king and council in parliament which was forwarded to the chancellor for judgment, to release William Bast of Dartmouth, imprisoned for seizing a French ship in time of truce, since the French merchant whose goods were seized has acknowledged payment of the fine by Bast. Dated 29 November 1391.

Source : CCR 1389-92 , 410.

14

Writ of supersedeas to the treasurer and barons of the exchequer to cease their demands against the abbot of Tintern, collector of clerical subsidies in the diocese of Llandaff, for arrears from the clerical tenths granted between 1384 and 1388. By petition in parliament. Dated 12 November 1391.

Source : CCR 1389-92 , 507.

15

Order to the mayor and bailiffs of Cambridge, following a petition from the chancellor and scholars of the university to the king and council in parliament, not to release clerks of the university imprisoned by the chancellor and scholars. Dated 30 January 1392.

Source : CCR 1389-92 , 428.

16

Pardon, at the request of the archbishop of Canterbury, to Robert Couene, esquire of Kent, who was impeached at the previous parliament [of November 1391] for attempting to kill his wife by throwing her down an old well at Croydon during the time of the parliament. Dated 16 January 1393.

Source : CPR 1391-96 , 209. See also CCR 1389-92 , 456, 556, CCR 1392-96 , 122-3.

17

Appointment of a commission to investigate a complaint made by petition in the last parliament from Thomas Manston of Dorset, esquire, that John Lovell, knight, forcibly expelled him from his manor of Manston (Dorset) and threatened the jurors empanelled at an assize to hear the case so that they did not dare to appear. Lovell has denied these charges. Dated 6 December 1391.

Source : CPR 1391-96 , 79, 238.

18

Appointment of a commission, following a petition from the abbot of Chertsey (Surrey) to the king and council in the last parliament, to investigate the question of whether the abbot was bound to repair 'Egham causeway', which he claimed to have done in the past only out of charity and not as an obligation. By petition of parliament. Dated 1 July 1392.

Source : CPR 1391-96 , 165.

19

Order to the sheriff of Buckingham to give to Thomas Bekerynge, knight, and Elizabeth his wife, Philip Skydemore and Alice his wife, and Richard Lyle and Margaret his wife, livery of two thirds of the manors of Huntercombe and Eton, as it has been shown, following a petition submitted by Elizabeth, Alice and Margaret to this parliament ('the parliament last holden at Westminster'), that they are the daughters and co-heiresses of John Huntercombe and should by right inherit the manors, from which they have been forcibly expelled by Giles Frenssh and his associates. Because cognisance in this case belongs to an ecclesiastical court (since it involved the question of whether another alleged heiress, Maud, was a nun), the bishop of Lincoln was ordered to decide it, and he has decreed that it be restored as above. Dated 16 June 1393.

Source : CCR 1392-96 , 70-71.

20

Petition from the dean and chapter of Lichfield cathedral concerning a dispute with the prior of Newport Pagnell.

Source : Printed in full in the roll of the Parliament of 1393, Item 17.

21

Petition from John Shepeye, clerk, prebendary of the prebend of Nassington in Lincoln cathedral, concerning a dispute with Henry, prior of Huntingdon.

Source : Printed in full in the roll of the Parliament of 1393, Item 18.

22

Petition from Edmund Basset concerning certain lands in Somerset seized into the king's hands.

Source : Printed in full in the roll of the Parliament of 1393, Item 19.