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Cheshire Quarter Sessions: 1638

Petitions to the Cheshire Quarter Sessions.

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John Heye and Thomas Towrould. QJF 66/4/17 (1638)

To the right honourable bench his majesties justices of peace assembled at the quarter sessions for this countye of Chester.

The humble petition of John Heye and Thomas Towrould.

Shewing that whereas one Thomas Heye appearing before your honours at the quarter sessions next after midsomer last past, and their accused by one Jane Leighe to be the father of her childe, which he then denyed, and theiruppon your petitionors entered into recogn=uzaunc with the said Thomas Heye to appeare before your honoures at the last quarter sessions, but before the said day of apparaunc the said Thomas Heye agreed with the said Jane Leighe and tooke the said childe and hath quitt and discharged her of it, by reason whereof your petitionores not doubting anie daunger for default of apparaunc and the said Thomas Heye at the same time being sore sicke and in great daunger of death did not then appeare, but now your petitionores fearing the daunger of the penaltie in default of the said apparaunc lest the same should be imposed uppon them to their utter undoeing

In tender consideracion of the premisses may it their=fore please your honoures to cause your petitioneres to be discharged from the said recognuzaunc soe that the same may may not anie waies be prejudiciall unto them and your petitionors shall be ever bounden to pray for your honours in all health and happines long to contineue.

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[illegible] per ordinem super [s...?] John Hey.

Robert Wooddall. QJF 66/4/18 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace at his present sessions assembled

The humble petition of Robert Wooddall

Sheweth that about thyrteene yeares and an halfe last past one Thomas Dutton of Frodsham being the reputed father of a bastard chyld begotten on the body of one Margrett Wryght of Sale did contract and agree with your petitioner for the educatinge of the sayd bastard till the child should accomplish the age of ten yeares which your sayde peticioner performed and hath ever since the expiration of that tyme maynetayned the sayde chyld without any allowance at all notwithstanding the sayd Thomas Dutton is a man of greate suffycyencye by reason whereof your sayd peticioner is much oppressed, and althoughe he hath dyvers tymes gently required the sayd Thomas Dutton to disburthen him and the parishe of Cheadle of the sayd chyld yet the said Dutton hath refused, as this petitioner conceyves contrary both to lawe and equitye

Maye your worships be therefore pleased the premisses considered for the releyfe of your peticioner to order the sayd Thomas Dutton to take the sayde bastard chyld and thereof discharge the sayde peticioner and the sayd parish of Cheadle and lykewise to allowe him a resonable exhibition for the tyme past, after and above the tyme contracted as in your discretions shall seeme fytt, and your peticioner will ever praye for your good worships health longe to contynewe

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4 pounds for the 3 years and half and to take the chyld or els to be bound to the next sessions and to abide the order of the court or els to bee comitted.

John Cottingham the younger, Richard Heath and Richard Blinston. QJF 66/4/21 (1638)

To the right worshipfull the Kinges majesties justices of peace assembled at this present quarter sessions held for the county of Chester.

The humble peticion and informacion of John Cottingham the younger Richard Heath and Richard Blinston for of Frodsham in this county for and on the behalf of them selves, and others the inhabitantes of the said towne.

Most humbly sheweinge and informinge your worships that there are diverse severall inmates of bad liffe and conversacion inhabittinge and dwellinge in the said towne which are harbored and kept by diverse of the inhabitantes thereof to the great hindrance of us the peticioners, and informars, and contrary to the lawes and statutes of this realme and albeit that the keepers and harborers of the same inmates have ben often tyme presented and fyned at the lords courtes for such there abuses and kepeing yett nevertheles there is noe redresse therein had by reason whereof the peticioners and others the inhabitantes receave great prejudice by such oppression.

May it therefore please your worships soe to comisserate the causes and estates of us the said peticioners and the rest of the said inhabitantes, as to be pleased soe to order at this present sessions, that the said harborers and b may be enjoyed upon a certaine paine to putt out the said inmates by a certaine day, and not hereafter to admitt of any such like persons, and the peticioners will day pray for your worships healthes

The names of the severall persons that kepe theise in inmates videlicet John Hatton of the Bach, Elizabeth Bradley wydow, Richard Hocknull Robert [Wrig...en?], Ellin Smith wydow. Joane Dale wydow, Thomas Werrall Cicely Alverson wydow. Richard Smith, [illegible] Thomas Hall. Thomas Banner Richard Symcock Raffe Picken, and William Hough.

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Referred to Sir my Lord Savage and Master Doctor Byrom

The parishioners of Plemstoe parish. QJF 66/4/22 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices att this present sessions

The humble peticion of the perishioners of Plemstoe parish unto your good worships most humbly sheawinge.

That where as Troughfoord bridge is agreate throughfare and very convenient and commodioues for all the countrey which bridge hath benn far out of repayre, and hath benn repayred by the sayd parishioneres which was greate chardges unto them, now the sayd bridge is far out of repayre againe, and very like to fall downe unlesse present remedy bee had for the repayringe of the same, the chardge will amount to fifty pownds att least which will bee very burthomsom and chardgable unto your peticioners without the ayd and assistantes of the countrey:

The premises considered that it may please your worships to take into consideration and that they may have assistances towardes they repayre of the sayd bridge and and they will pray for all your prosperities.

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Nil

Elizabeth Webster. QJF 66/4/23 (1638)

To the right worippfull Sir Willyam Brereton knight Sir Thomas Smith knight and the rest of his majesties justices for the county pallatine of Chester

The humble petition of Elizabeth Webster a poore distressed woman

Most humbly sheweth to your worshipps that your poore petitioner beinge by the subtill [illegible] wayes meanes promisses inticementes and false alurementes of the divell and one Thomas [Warrys?] of Dodleston in this county, committed the greeveous sinne of fornicacion and by whom your petitioner hath stood is nowe greate with child to your poore petitioners utter overthrowe without some speedy helpe bee with speed extended the said Thomas [Warrys?] as the country well knowes beinge an ill liver and att this tyme doeth keepe a whore in his howse and hitherto hath ledd a most ungratious life in that and all respectes, and nowe under your worshipps good favor doth turne your poore petitioner off in a most pittyfull manner, still maynteyneing his whore att home whereby without speedy releiffe as aforesaid your poore petitioner and her infant are like to perish beinge layd upon the said towne of Dodleston who will not releeve your poore petitioner

May it therefore for Godes cause pleas your worshipps to order that the said Thomas [Warrys?] may releeve your petitioner in this her extremity and may bee ordered to keepe the child and your petitioner wilbee ever bound to pray for your worshipps prosperity.

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A warrant of good behaviour.

John Ellam of Stockton in Appleton, freemason. QJF 66/4/24 (1638)

To the honourable and right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace at this quarter sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of John Ellam of Stockton in Appleton freemason

Sheweth that your poore peticioner, hath hitherunto lived in good creditt and estimacion amoungst his neighbours, and meyneteyned him selfe his wief and three children by his industry and paines takeinge, without beinge burthensome unto any, but beinge destitute of a howse or habitacion, of his owne for him selfe his saide wiefe and children wherein to harbor, and beinge nowe denyed of the former favour hee obteyned from some of his neighbours, who nowe bee gin, to growe wearye of your saide peticioner by reason of his saide charge of wief and children, they are likely therefore to lye with out doares and perish for want of harbor, unless this honourable and worshipfull bench bee pleased in charity to give order for some releefe therein,

Your peticioner therefore humbly praieth the premisses considered yow would bee pleased for charitye sake to give order that your poore peticioner may have a cottage erectted in Apple ton aforesaide in some convenient place uppon the wast for your peticioner his saide wiefe and children to harbor and dwell in, who doubt not, but to obteyne the consent of the cheefe lord and owner of the saide wast for that end wherein your peticioner his saide wiefe and children will ever pray for your health and happines longe to continue of

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[Conceditur?]

William Hesketh. QJF 66/4/25 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace assembled att att this sessions att Chester

Humblie sheweth your poore petitioner William Hesket Hesketh being bound to the peace and to appear att this sessions not knowing that yester daie was the daie neglected to appeere upon his cale

Maie it please your good worships not to deale soe strictly with your poore petitioner being but apoore servant at husbanddrie as to take ani advantage of his suertyes but accept his appa=ranc, this daie the sessions being not ended and to take the matter into consideration being smale and proceeding more of mallis then matter and disscherg your peticioner and his suertyes and this for Godes love and justic sake

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[dd novo?].

Richard Dickenson. QJF 66/4/30 (1638)

To the worshipfull Master Henerye Bunberie justice of peace and justice of coram within the countie of Chester.

The complainte of Richard Dickenson of [Sanchan?] sheweth whereas your worshipp did grante him a warrant to the cunstabels of [Sanchan?] for to take the bodies of Ellis Owin and Jane his wiffe, the counstables did take them but did let them ago againe without any sureties taken of them for to appeare before your worshipps accordinge to your directione. Therefore my request herein is to entreat your worshipp to doe me justice in this behalfe for they have stolne and kild my goodes to my knowledge and I stand in more feare now then I did stand in before and I have towe wittnesses to justifie that they saide they would kill them the witnesses are Robert Bridge and John Cooke

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[Warr?] de bene [ger proces?] Frances Knowles et Richardus Barlowe de [Stughall?] parva cunstables 20: a peece fine:

Richard Sucley. QJF 66/4/32 (1638)

The humble peticion of Richard Sucley To the right honorable and worshipfull justices of the benche.

This peticioner beinge borne in Spurstawe craveth that he may have a place of habitacion theare or els he must be driven from place to place beinge a good workman and and no place to worke in so he wilbe bond to pray for your helths and happines long to continue: beine a soldier twyse out of the land.

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To erect a cottage in Spurstowe by the lycence of the lord.

Cuthbert Carting. QJF 66/4/34 (1638)

To the honorable and right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace and quorum at this present sessions

Lamantablely complaineing Cuthbert Carting to, it pleased the justices att the sessions hou lden, the 7th of Julie 1635 to certefie my pore estate to the lordes of his majesties most honourable privie counsell who being solicited by justis ces, of peace of my one cunterie it seemes by his letter that without the judges certificate my fine will not be remitted:

Now sinc my distresse is not unknown to you and that now I have exceeded my im prissonment and that in regard of your charitie I am a charge unto the county be pleased for Godes love to graunt me your charri table letter to the judg intreating him theire by to joyne with you in your certificate which I hope will put an end to my troble and this for charities sake

Hughe Calveley, gentleman. QJF 67/1/22 (1638)

To the right honourable and right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace of the countye of Chester

The humble peticion of Hughe Calveley gentleman.

Humbly sheweth that whereas your peticioner did about halfe a yeere last past take to wife on Anne Dutton widdowe by force whereof your peticioner was and became possessed of divers goodes monyes cattle and specialtyes of dett and your peticioners said wife liveing since her said marriage at her former house in Handley in this countye where the same goodes and cattle weare and shee happening to dye on Easter eve last, one John Dutton her sonne and one John Batha of the Holt in the countie of Denbighe being a man of bad carriage accompanyed with divers others to your peticoner unknowen did in a riotous manner enter into the said house and rifle and take away the said goods moneys cattle and specialtyes and have caried the same away to places unknowen and detayne the same from your peticioner and not only soe but when your peticioner after the death of his said wife did come to the said house where his wife dyed intending to have her buryed in a decent manner, the said riotous persons resisted your peticioner therein and would not soe much as suffer your peticioner to come into the said house but have and still doe keepe the said house from your peticioner togeather with the said goodes and have of themselves buryed her in an obscure way, some of which persons haveing beene arrested and brought before Master Doctor Snell stande bounde to appeare at this quarter sessiouns where your peticoner hopeth and humbly desireth that such order may bee taken with them as their haynous misdeameanors doe deserve and your peticioner may finde redresse in his said wronges: soe shall your peticioner pray for your lordshipps and worrshipps health and happinesse.

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Referred to the justices of that hundred.

Jane Barton of Wydford, widow. QJF 67/1/23 (1638)

To all and singluer his magistis justises of the pease but more espechally To the right worshipfull Master Hyde of Northbry one of his magistis justes of the pease

The umble petishon of Jane Barton of Wydford widowe humbley sheweth

That whereas the said Jane Barton having a greate portion of goodes left hor by hor late husband Frances Barton and halfe a living lying in Wydford and your petishner Jane out of hor naturall love and afection to wardes hor chilldren called them to gether on a certen tyme after hor husbandes deces and devided all hor said goodes amongst them equally and laft nothing for hor mentinances but onely hor said ground and living and hor elldest son William Barton being disobediant and unnaturall at the intreatie of some for quiatnes sacke her was agried to give hor a certen som of mony for hor ground much lease then it was worth to maintaine hor withall and now the said William denyeth to pay the mony but what hee listeth whereas for lacke of the same your pore petishner is lyke to com to great lacke or want now she is not able to goe stand or ryde if som couerse be not taken presently with the said William for now a new yeare is comen and som couerse should be taken for seting of the said ground and the said William haveing goton poshi posseshion of the same saith that who soever taketh this ground of your petishner hee will make them wery of there parte and giveth out such wordes that your said petishner dare not bargin with aney man for fere of morther therefore your pore petishner umbley prayeth for God sacke that not onely a warant of good behaviour may be granted hor agenst the said William but allso that som couerse may be taken for your petishneres good and quiate for tyme to com that she may set or let hor said ground to whom soever she will with out danger of morthir hor late husband laft one frend in tenant with hor and the said William gives him many rayling spiches and is soe creuell and vement both to your petishner and otheres that no man dare deall with your petishner for fere of greate trobell and she of soden morder therfor she umbleth prayeth you for the Lord his sacke to consider of hor condishon and grife she is in and your petishner is bounden prayes Jeneuarii 5th 1637

Your petishner hath hard this red three tymes over and spiketh more largly agenst the said William then is contained in this information before Richard Pristnall Richard Barton Frances Pristnall Philip Wyatt and others

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This was brought unto [illegible] the sixthe of February 1657

Hamnet Hyde

The churchwardens and overseers of the poor for Nether Peever. QJF 67/1/25 (1638)

The humble peticion of the churchwardens of overseers of the poore of the chapilrye or Nether Peever.

Sheweth that whereas your peticioners at the last monethes meetinge addressed there complaintes to the justices that one Roberte Moores of Nether Tabley, had received and taken into his possession the goodes and personall estate of Phillip Moores his brother late of Peever aforesaide (deceased) and doth not dispose and imploye the same for the use of the sayd deceadtes children, to whome the same of right belongeth, but doth mispend and endanger the same, soe that the sayde children were likely to fall uppon the parish charge, beinge foure children in number, whereuppon the sayde justi ces thought fitt and did soe order, that the sayde Roberte Moores should give an to accompt to your peticioners; of the sayde deceadtes estate by him received, but deliver over the same unto your peticioners, for the use of the sayde infantes, and discharge of the parish, as the sayde Roberte Moores would answer the contrary at his perill, and further as by the sayd order may apeare.

Nowe for as much as the sayde Moores hath obstinately contemned and neclectted to performe the sayde order; your peticioners may have farther order by this bench, to receive and take such goodes of the sayde deceadtes as are remayneinge in the custodye of the sayde Roberte Moores, and likewise to compell him thereby to make his accomptes of the re maynder of the sayde goodes before the justices of the hundred of Bucklow at there next monethes meetinge, inregard hee doth not performe the trust reposed and pretended; in the behaulfe of the sayde infantes, but will expose them to the parish charge and for releefe herein your peticioners will ever pray etc.

William Vawdrye. QJF 67/1/29 (1638)

Chester.

To the honourable and right worshipfull the Kinges majesties justices of the peace within the said countie at this presente sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of William Vawdrye.

Humblie shewinge that whereas your peticioner William Vawdrie sonne of William Vawdrie late of Holley in Somerford in the said countie deceased havinge lived in good fassion and mayntayned him selfe and his familie in good sorte for divers yeares heretofore and havinge holden a smale tenement under Master Edmund Swetenham of Somerforde upon a deare racke and yearlie rent, which rent he nowe will doth cause and inhaunce insomuch that your peticioner (havinge a poore blynde wyfe and a sonne to mayntaine) is in noe waies able to paie the same rent soe inhaunced and soe beinge thrust forth of the same tenement is altogither destitute and unprovided of anie habitacion or dwellinge to the great greefe and distresse of him your said peticioner and his poore afflicted wyfe.

The premisses tenderlie considered your peticioner humblie praieth that you would to pleased to give waie for his ereccion of a cottage with some appurtences in and upon the commons of Somerford aforesaid where your peticioner was borne and for the most parte hath lived. And your peticioner (as nevertheles) will daylie praie for continuall heathes and happines.

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That this petition is true we whose names are subscribed doe testifie

  • Henry Maynwaringe
  • John Fallowes

[Conceditur?]

Randulph Cartwright. QJF 67/1/30 (1638)

To the right honourable his majesties justices of the peace at the quarter cessions houlden at Knottesford this present daie.

The humble peticion of Randulph Cartwright.

Humbly sheweth unto your honnours that where as your poore peticioner haveinge indited Thomas Wilddigge for a common barreter, and haveinge a good behaviour against him, hath broken the same for he hathe foughte and stroke a woeman in the church yarde at the Nantwiche and furthermore I have the woeman to testifie of the same as a wittnes upon her oathe, and still doth threaten your peticioner and hee and one Robert Collie together, which is his suretie, doth stirre upp suites and striffes against theire neighbours, I desire, your aide and helpe herein that we may all live in quiett

May it there fore please yow to take it into your honnours consideracions that he may have better sufficient sureties, in regard of his breache, and soe to order and decree of the same as yow in in your clemencie and wisdome shall thinke fittinge. And as I have beene ever soe shall I be still bound to pray for your honours longe life happines with lastinge peace.

Richard Coppocke, John Worthington and Edmund Higginson. QJF 67/1/31 (1638)

To the right honourable his majesties justices of the peace at the quarter cessiouns houlden at Neither Knottesford this present daie April 3 1638

The humble peticioner of Richard Coppocke John Worthington and Edmunnd Higginson.

Humbly sheweth unto your honnours that your peticioners with the consente of the towneshippe of Morley within the libertie of Pawnall Fee, that one John Rylance of Morley afore said, houldinge an [intacke?], taken in by his auncestours upon, the said Morley Greene, doth not make a sufficient pave=ment, or causey for the churche and markett waie, which the inhabitantes of the place doe finde much faulte, therein which waie is soe ill in the winter tyme, and soe, straitt, that we cannot passe in the winter tyme therefore, we desire the assistance of this worthie benche herein

May it therefore please your honnours soe to take it into your consideracions to order and decree of the same, as yow in your clemency and wisdome shall thinke fittinge: and we shalbe ever bee bound to pray for your healthe and happines with lastinge peace.

Ellizabeth Morris of Gropenhall, widow. QJF 67/1/33 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace at this quarter sessions assembled at Nether Knutsford the third April etc 1638

The humble peticion of Ellizabeth Morris of Gropenhall wydowe

Sheweth that whereas William Morris gentleman (deceased) her late husband did in his liefetyme, about thirtye yeares last past give libertie to one Jefferye Pillinge (deceased) to erect and sett up a cottage in Gropenhall aforesaide uppon the inhe ritance of the saide William in right of his saide wiefe, onely in charitye for the saide Jefferye Pillinge his wiefe and children to harbor and dwell in; beinge desti tute of abode, the erecttinge of which cottage was afterwardes by the justices in open sestions allowed and appointed to stande untill [al?] the saide Pillinges childr en beinge sixe in number weare able to gett there owne liveinge and for as much as the youngest of the saide children is about the adge of xxiii yeares and all of them of good abillitye to worke for there liveinge, which some of them doe, and are not burthensome to any, but 3 of them (videlicet) Raphe Thomas and Kather who hath borne 2 basterdes, will not remove from the place aforesaide, but there continue and live in idlenes, to the great prejudice of your peticioner, who hath them in suspicioun for the stealeinge of her corne and other goodes in the night tyme liveinge neare unto her; for that one of them was taken in her barne lately, with an intent to steale one pecke of corne thence, as apeared by his owne confession before Sir George Booth knight and barronett, who ordered him to be whipped for the same. And inregard your peticioner hath not onely of her owne but her sonnes corne and mault stowlne from her saide howse divers tymes before, to there great loss and hinderaunce and have noe other in suspicion for the same.

Your peticioner there fore humbly prayeth the premises considered this worshipfull bench would bee pleased to give order for the better releefe of your peticioner herein that the saide cottage bee forthwith pulled downe to the grounde for the reasons aforesaide, and not stand areceptacle for such leawde and dangerous persons, of whome she this informer standes in continuall feare and in soe doinge your peticioner will ever pray etc.

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To be pulled downe

John Venne. QJF 67/1/34 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace at this present sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of John Venne

Sheweth that your peticioner havinge lived in the parish of Willmslowe for the space of twelve yeares last past and uppwardes hee and his wife (a decrepite and lame woman) beeinge of late [destitute?] of harbor was compelled to peticion to his majesties justices of peace of this county [neere resiant?] theereunto who in commiseracion of his and his said wives desolate condicion weere pleased to enjoyne the churchwardens and overseers of the poore of the said parish to provide for them as the lawe requires, [illegible] soe it is may it please your worships that they have hitherto [neglected?] the same by reason [wherof?] your peticioner and his said wife are utterly harborless and in great daunger to bee starved unless this [bench?] bee pleased to administer reliefe herein

May it therefore please your worships to enjoyne the sayd churchwardens and overseeres of the poore under a paine to make provision for your [say?] peticioner and his sayd wife within some short tyme or take some other course such as in your discrecions seemes fitt

And your peticioner will ever pray etc

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ixo January 1637

It is ordered that the churchwardens and overseers of the poore in the parish of Willmslowe shall pay a fyne of xl shillings for theire contempt in not providinge for the poore man; and unles they shall forthwith provide for him accordinge to lawe, the court will then increase theire fyne as shalbe meete.

[John Holand?]

A cottage with consent of the lord and the [fine recalled?].

Roger Wilkinson. QJF 67/1/36 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace at this present sessions of the peace assembled

The humble peticion of Roger Wilkinson

Sheweth to your worships that whereas Ellen Browne nowe prisoner in the howse of correccion beinge a woeman of evill fame and name and hath latelie borne (as your petitioner hath heard) a child begotten in fornicacion and endeavoreth to father the child upon your petitioner who is an aged mann of threescore yeares or more thereaboutes and very poore and weake both in bodie and estate and further your petitioner can proove that the said Ellen Browne hath confessed before credible persons that Thomas Henshall the younger of Plumley was father of her child, and that the said Ellen never fathered her said child uponn your petitioner in tyme of the birth in such manner as the statute prescribeth

Therefore prayeth this honourable bench will take the premisses into there grave consideracion and not to punish examynn the truth of the premisses; whereuponn your petitioner hopeth the court will descharge your petitioner from this her unjust informacion in and order the same as to justice shall apperteyne

William Plassye. QJF 67/1/39 (1638)

I am abused by one Daggatt who cominge into Ledsham a lordship of mine lived as a servant and married and hath children and the inhabitants att my cort presented him for an inmate and those that entertayned him beinge fined by my steward Master Wilson outed him yett there beinge a [coever?] kylne in the towne free for my selfe and my tenantes hee in the night time enters into yt with his wife and familie and there stayeth against my will iff itt please you as to move the bench to remove him forth out of the towne and to appoint some place in the parish out of my lordship and my tenants will joyne with the parish for the maynteynge of his wife and children, and there Master Wilson wilbee alsoe who knoweth the busines and will fully informe you of itt and aswell therein as for Master Wilsons busines I pray your favour and assistance and I shall ever be att your service to command

Pobbingtonn the 2th of Aprill 1638.

William [Plassye?]

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An order for the erecttinge of a cottage in some convenient place uppon wast in the parish, by and with the consent of the cheefe lord and owner thereof for Dagott his wife and children wherein to harbor, and for the forcecible [det...?] of the kill aforesayde to bee vewed by the towe next justices, and to proceede therein accor dinge to the lawe in such case provyded dated at Nether Knutsford the third April etc 1638.

[John Holand?]

William Hesketh. QJF 67/1/40 (1638)

To the honourable and right woorshipfull his majesties justices of peace att Knutsford assembled

Humblie sheweth your poore peticioner William Hesketh apoore servant att husbandrie being envied by on Robert Farall who upon some unjust pretenc hath caused your pe ticioner, bound [illegible] to the peace, and your peticioner hath onc apeered to his greate cost and charge your peticioner humblie prayeth that he maie be now disscharged unlesse hee shew just cause to the conterarie and this for justice sake and the more rather for that your poore peticioner is heereby pre vented of servis to his utter ruen and undoing and this for justic sake

Raphe Battridge, Richard Standbridge, Margeret Owen and Katherine Rowland. QJF 67/1/41 (1638)

To the honorable and right worshipful his majesties justices of the peace and quorum, at ther sessions at Knutsford:

The humble petition of Raphe Battridge [illegible] Richard Standbridge, Margeret Owen widdowe and Katherine Rowland of the parish of Barrowe.

Humblye sheweth unto [illegible] this honourable bench that your poore petitioners have (without any just cause) beene bound to appeare (this day) in this court, to answer some pretended misdemeanours of riottes, and [illegible] reskues that your poore supplicantes, should make upon the under sheriffe and his bailiffes in the parish of Barrowe when hee had served a replevye upon certaine cattell of Master Fittons of Barrow aforesaid: to which pretended misdemeanours your humble [illegible] supplicantes pleades not guiltye, and that ther troble and chardge is meerely vexatious and causeles:

Your humble oratour Standbridge beinge that daye and tyme not out of the dores of his owne house, nor ever in the veiwe, or sight, or companye of any that made any riot, or reskue or ever did knowe of any, or consent to any but was in his owne house, which is almost a quarter of a mile remote from the place wher the pretended reskue was committed: and your humble supplicant Standbridge hath made a tender of witnesses, to testifye upon oath, wher that daye hee was: not being neare unto that pretended reskue and this tender of witnesses hath been to some of his majesties justices, upon this honourable bench: whoe pittied your poore petitioners cause, but could not releeve it:

And your poore and aged petitioners Margaret Owen and Katherine Rowland [illegible] doe shewe to this honourable bench that they are causleslye vexed and trobled whoe did but come to see the the cattell driven awaye (Master Fitton beinge our master, and landlord,) and not offeringe any injurye, or makinge any reskue, wee your poore supplicantes are [illegible], poore, and aged live upon the charitye of our [illegible] neighbours have nothinge wherwith to dischardge any fees

And humbly (therfore praies) to bee dismissed this court, and wee shall ever praye etc.

paratext

Wee whose names are subscribed beinge justices of the peace within the hundered of Edesbury do beleeve the truth of this petition, and therfore desire the bench to take it in to there commisseration.

Tarvin Aprill the 2d 1638

  • Thomas Savage
  • Charles Vavasor
  • [G Byrom?]
  • John Crewe

[Relaxamus?]

Margaret Maddor, on behalf of herself and her children. QJF 67/1/42 (1638)

To the honourable Sir George Booth knight and barronet, and to other his majesties justices of the peace.

The humble peticion of Margaret Maddor of Moberley, in the behalfe of her selfe and her three small children.

Sheweth

That whereas your peticioner, did about fifteene yeares since marrie one Thomas Burges, by whom shee had three small children, which were borne, in the house of one Joane Walton with whom they did cohabit, till the said Joane died, after whose death, this peticioner, was persuaded by one William Burges to keepe the posession, of the house and ground, which she did accordingly, against Master Hough, to whome of right it did belong, untill by reason thereof, she had spent all her estate

Now forasmuch, as the said Margaret Maddor, and her three small children, for want of releife, are like to perish

May it therefore please your good worshipps that the churchwardens and overseers of the poore may make such provision as is by the lawes and statutes of this kingdome provided, and that for charities sake, and your peticioner, shall pray for your worshipps in health and prosperitie long to continue.

Peter Lawrenson. QJF 67/1/44 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace at this present sessions of the peace assembled

The humble peticion of Peter Lawrenson.

Sheweth to your worships that one Thomas Hutchyn of Aston neare Greate Budworth husbandman hath latelie pracktised and combyned him selfe with one Jane Leighe and earnestly sollicited her to come before some justice of peace of this countie, to geve informacion against your peticioner not only to disgrace your peticioner in his good name amongst his neighbours, but likewise to [illegible] bringe your peticioners life in question, by and through her false and malicious informacion, in soe much that your peticioner is nowe bound over to this sessions to answere such matters as shall nowe bee objected, unto which informacion your petitioner is readie to answere and to submitt himself to the judgment of the court yet withall your peticioner humblie prayeth that this honourable bench would take into consideracion the condicion and quallitie of his accusers first the said Hutchyn (as your petitioner dowtes not to proove) hath for a yeare past forborne the receaveing of the holy communion in respect of his malice borne to your petitioner, and hath heretofore questioned his creditt, (and not only soe) but his life likewise, and yet not satisfied but persistes to disquiett your petitioner by [prack...?] with the said Jane Leigh, who is a woeman by her owne confession whome the said Hutchyn in the woods neere to Arly [reared?] to a tree and as she hath confessed (as your petitioner dowtes not to proove) said hee would have his pleasure on her and thereupon threwe downe his staffe and that she (the said Jane cast aside her hatt, and soe went forward etc besides the said Jane Leigh is publiquely reputed to bee an arrant whore, and worse then soe, for that she voluntarily hath offered herself to your petitioner Lawrenson to sweare what hee would have sworne against the said Hutchyn to bee revenged on him, which your petitioner refused expressing his dislike of her offer but although she was rejected by your petitioner, she hath found entert entertaynement with the said Hutchyn (who as your petitioner dowtes not to proove hath geven her rewardes) or at least promised her.

May it therefore please your worships (the premisses considered as also the condicion and quallity of his abusers that the premisses may bee examined by your worships on both sides, and that your petitioner may bee releeved against his accusers as to justice shall appurteyne and your petitioner shall daylie pray etc.

Richard Burrowes, on behalf of himself, wife and children. QJF 67/1/45 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace att this presente sessions of peace assembled

The humble peticion of Richard Burrowes on the behalfe of himself his wyfe and fyve small children.

Shewinge

That he and his wyfe and chilldren were all borne in Runcorne parrish and have lived att Stocken in that parrish allmost 3 yeares (he beinge born in that towne)

That he hath hitherto mayntayned himselfe wyfe and chilldren by his pynefull labour without any charge or burden to the towne or parrish and behaved themselves honestlie amongst there neighbours.

That hee with wyfe and chilldren are att this presente destitute of habitacion, for want whereof they are inforced eyther to become wanderers against the lawe (which they would avoyd) or otherwyse they wilbe enforced to starve.

May it therefore please your good worshipps to be soe gracious and pittifull towardes your poore peticioners as to give order to the overseers of the poor to provyde some competent and convenyent habitacion for them to give them lycense to erect a cottage uppon the waste in regard your peticioner hath obtained license from the lord of the waste whereby they may be able to gett there liveinge as formerlie they have and will (as in duty bound) ever praie for your worshipps.

paratext

[R.. conceditur?]

Richard Daggott. QJF 67/1/46 (1638)

To the honourable right worshipfull and worshipfull his majesties justices of peace att the quarter sessions att Knottesford nowe assembled.

The humble peticion of Richard Daggott.

Sheweth Thatt your poore peticioner, heretofore, inhabittinge with his wife and three small children in the towne of Leadsham, in the hundred of Worrall and parish of Neston within this county; and of late beinge turned forth and wantinge habitacion was upon his complaint and peticion, to his majesties justices of peace of thatt hundred att their moneth meeteinge att Wolliston the 1[illegible]th of February last some whatt releeved and by the said justices the churchwardens and overseers of the poore of the said parish were ordered to provide a habitacion some where within the said parish for your peticioner his wife and children [illegible] till such tymes as they had caused a house built for them.

Now for thatt your peticioner is exceedinge poore and the said churchwardens and overseers very backwardes to provide for your peticioner accordinge to thee said order; and the warrant thereof to them directed

Your peticioners humble request is that you would be pleased to releeve your peticioner further herein and to grauntt an order of this sessions to confirme the other justices former order and thatt your peticioner may be provided for, who otherwise is like to perish for wantt of harbor; and this for Godes sake and your peticioner will ever pray etc.

paratext

[Conceditur?].

William Barton of Norbury, yeoman. QJF 67/1/48 (1638)

To the honourable and right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace att this quarter sessions assembled

The humble peticion of William Barton of Norburye yeoman

Sheweth that your peticioner hath formerly received many injuries and wronges from Richard Barton of Widford cunstable, brother to your peticioner, against whome by his malicious plottes and divises, hee hath procured your peticioner bound to the good abearinge and apearance this day before this bench and the rather your peticioner is perswaded soe to thinke for that after hee was bound accordinglye, and obteyned a [sepersedeas?] from the honourable Sir George Booth, to cirtifye the same, the sayde Richard Barton, knowinge thereof, and thoughe him selfe sworne to preserve and keepe his majesties peace, did contrarily provoke and seeke to cause your peticioner, to strike and make an assault uppon him, and for that end offered your peticioner his staff, and bade him strike him therewith, which your peticioner re fused, beinge bound as aforesayde, for feare of trouble in to which the saide Richard Barton maliciouslye practiseth to bringe your peticioner without any just cause and for further agreevacion, intendeth privilye to prefer some indictment against your peticioner (as hee is informed,

Your peticioner therefore humbly prayeth the premisses considered this honourable and worshipfull bench would bee pleased to give order that the saide Richard Barton may bee bound to the good behaveour, for the reasons aforesaide, and your peticioner released, and that if any bill of indictment bee at this tyme preferred against your peticioner, the same may bee openlye heard, and your peticioner admitted to pleade thereunto in his owne defence, both for the satisfaccion of this bench and clearinge himselfe, of any false suggestions that may bee aledged, wherein your peticioner will ever pray for your health and happines lounge to continue.

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Bartons petition.

William Higham of Adlington, yeoman. QJF 67/1/49 (1638)

To the honourable his majesties justices of the peace at the quarter sessions of the holden at Knottesford in the countie palatine of Chester.

The humble peticion of William Higham of Adlington in the said countie yoman.

Sheweth unto your lordships that whereas your peticioner being indebted was enforced to absent himselfe for divers yeares out of the contrey leaving his tenement to discharge his debtes. But upon his returne home, not doubting but his wief had discharged the same. [illegible] she not onely had neglected the payment of the said debt, but had a bastard by one Richard Barlowe a maried man, which though he cannot deny to be the father of it, yet refuseth to take the child, soe as your peticioner though he receaved too much injurie already by the fact, he is forced to keepe and maintayne the child still

Prayeth. That some order may be taken for redresse hereof either by this bench or otherwise by neighbour justices as in your wisdomes shall seeme meetest to appoint for the relief of your poore peticioner

And your peticioner as in all dutie bounden will duly pray for your much increase of honour in this life and the reward of an immortall crowne of glorie in the life to come.

Thomas Hutchins of Aston, yeoman. QJF 67/1/98 (1638)

To the right worshipfull Thomas Mallorye deane of Chester and Richard Brereton esquier, and the rest of his majesties justices of the peace at this quarter sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of Thomas Hutchins of Aston aforesaide yeoman

Sheweth that whereas formerlye there hath beene severall differences and variences betwixt your peticioner and the saide Lawrenson, which beinge referd to the arbitra ment of freindes, were ended, and thereby your peticioner and the saide Lawreson became good freindes (as your peticioner conceived) but the saide Lawrenson, harboringe malice in his hart against him, as since which tyme it hath apeared, by severall informations taken before Sir George Booth uppon oath nowe in court tendinge to your peticioners utter overthrowe (if his wicked practices and conspiracies had taken effect) and for as much as the saide Lawrenson standes bound to the good abearinge for the same, and apearance before this worshipfull bench this day.

Your peticioner therefore humbly prayeth the premises considered this worshipfull bench would bee pleased not onely to continue the saide Lawrenson to his good behaveor, but likewise to give order that Anne his wiefe may bee bound alsoe together with John Nickson of Marton her father who joyne maliciouslye in practize against your peticioner (as hee doubteth not to prove, for that the saide John Nickson, offered to swere the peace lately against your peticioner, for and in the be haulfe of his saide daughter, wiefe of the sayde Lawrenson who at that tyme was many myles distant, and for ought your peticioner hath heard, desired then noe such thinge, and the same beinge conceived malice was denyde, and the matter referd to rec bublique hereinge before your worships and the rest this day, from whome your peticioner hopeth to have order for the purpose aforesaide for his future peace and quitt, wherein your peticioner will ever pray etc.

paratext

Peticion for Hutchins.

1638

The inhabitants of the parish of Bunbury. QJF 67/2/41 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace of the countie of Chester at this sessions assembled.

The humble petition of diverse of the inhabitantes of the parish of Bunburie in the countie aforesaid.

Humbly sheweth that notwithstanding a statute made in the thirde yeare of the raigne of our late soveraigne lord King James prohibitinge every popish recusant convict, or any other whose wife is or shalbe a popish recusant convict to keepe in his or their howses or lodginges any alter pix beades pictures crucifix or any other popish relique whatsoever which in the opinion of any two justices of the peace shalbe thought unmeete for such recusantes as aforesaid to have or use. Yet nevertheless may it please this honorable bench to understand that so it is, that one Richard Brock of the parish of Bunburie in the countie aforesaid aleseller and Joane his wife a recusant convict do keepe in their alehowse (which is not fully fyve roodes distant from the chancell doore of the parish church of Bunburie) diverse pictures images and other popish reliques and namely one great crucifix of brasse or copper fayrely guilded which the said Brock audaciously and in contempt of the said statute sometymes bringeth forth and openly setteth the same upp before such as come to drinke at his howse; and sometymes usinge these or wordes to the like effect videlicet: now God be thanked all thinges begin to come well on, and in tyme no doubt will come to good end.

The premisses considered and forasmuch as diverse alehowses in Bunburie aforesaid were lately suppressed by Sir John Bridgman knight then chiefe justice of Chester for the great number that then were thought to be in so little a village towne and for the much disorder in those alehowses used; synce when the said Richard Brock to augment the number is crept in to keepe a common alehowse.

May it therefore please this honourable bench to take into consideracion the said act of Parliament the order made by Sir John Bridgman upon the like petition, which order is hereunto fyled under the teste of the courte and the insolent behaviour of the said Brock to breede distraction in people heartes and thereupon to order as in your good discretions shalbe thought fytting and the parishoners shall ever pray to God for your healths and happines longe to contynue.

paratext

Brocke suppressed

A warrant to bind him to the next assizes and to be of the good behaviour in the meane tyme.

The inhabitants and parishioners of Bunbury. QJF 67/2/42 (1638)

To the honourable Sir John Bridgeman knight cheefe justice of Chester.

The humble peticion of divers the inhabitantes and parishioners of Bunbury in the county of Chester

Humbly sheweth unto your lordshippe that the towne of Bunbury being a poore village and no throughfare towne is opressed with seven alehouses videlicet Anne Brocke Randulfe Hitchinson Robert Brocke Richard Farron William Betteley Randulfe [Povore?] and George Massie whereas in truth one or two at the most were sufficient for so poore a towne and none of these keepe lodgeing and victualling but onely Anne Brocke (it being a house of some repute) as also Hitchinson and Farron and the rest keeping disorder harboring bad persons concealing men's children and servantes in the night season whereby much evill riseth and Godes creatures abused and consumed.

May it please your lordshipp to take the premisses into your honours consideracion for the suppresing of so many as your lordshipp shall thinke fitte and the parishioneres shall ever pray for your lordshipp.

paratext

All these alehowses are suppressed saving that kept by Anne Brocke.

Peter Craven for as much John Brydgeman

[illegible] per me Henricum [Cir..ened prov...?] Ces et Flynt

Alice Charley wife of James Charley of Alderley, butcher. QJF 67/2/45 (1638)

To the honourable his majesties justices of the peace in the county of Chester.

The humble peticion of Alice Charley wife of James Charley of Alderley butcher.

Beseechen that whereas your peticioner about the first day of May last past was by vertue of a warrant of good behaviour attached and brought before Sir Thomas Smith knight and Henry Berkened esquier twoe of his majesties justices of peace of this county, before whom her said husband with suerties became bound to his majesty in a recognizance, that shee your peticioner should personally appere before your worshipes at this presente sessions and in the meane time to be of the good abearinge towardes his majesties leige people.

The peticioner her humble request is that in case noe just cause be nowe alledged to the contrary her said husband and his suerties may be discharged from the said recognizance, and shee as in duty shee is bound will pray for your worships prosperities longe to contynue.

George Hayes. QJF 67/2/46 (1638)

To the honourable his majesties justices of the peace in the countie of Chester

The humble peticion of George Hayes

Shewinge that where Margarett Comberbach widowe and Roger Comberbache put to this peticioner a childe of John Comberbache sonne of the said Margaret and brother to the said [illegible] Roger to nurse, and paid him iii pounds x shillings for the laste yeres keepinge and have denyed to paye for the keeping the said childe since the anuncyacion last and endevor to charge this peticioner with the keeping of the same childe.

The peticioners humble request is that your worships would be pleased to take suche course by sendinge the said childe to the father whoe is nowe prisoner in London for debte or els by orderinge the grandmother to keepe the same childe that the peticioner being a verie poore man maye be freed from the keepinge of the same childe.

paratext

Ordered that Roger keepe the child or send it to the father, because hee received it etc

Thomas Beckett. QJF 67/2/47 (1638)

To the honourable his majesties justices of the peace in the countie of Chester.

The humble peticion of Thomas Beckett

Beseechinge your honours that where the peticioner his wyfe and chil dren, beinge borne and brought upp in the parish of Acton in this countie and ever, or for the moste parte lived in the said parish by his dayly labour, and is nowe growne aged, and thereby not able to mentayne him selfe, and his wyfe and children.

The peticioners humble requeste is that your honours would bee pleased to graunte the peticioner licence to erecte a cottage, in some conveniente place, eyther in Faddeley, Burlond, or Brindley for his habitacion

paratext

for his habitation the peticioner procuringe the consente of the lord or lords for that purpose

[Conceditur?]

Thomas Shetwall of Newbold Atburie, yeoman. QJF 67/2/49 (1638)

To the right honourable and right wurshipfull his majesties justices of peace for the countie of Chester att these present sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of Thomas Shetwall of Newbold Atburie in the said countie yoman against one whome formerlie called herselfe by the [man?] of Katherine Starkaye and nowe by the name of Katherin St Fryth a wanderinge person and hath noe certeyne place of aboade or dwellinge.

Humblie shewinge that the said Katherine (upon her owne report) hath had fyve severall bastard children by fyve severall persons one of which was borne in Rushton in the countie of Stafford about 2 yeares since and a halfe for the mayntenance wherof one Thomas Hall of Bidulphe of in the said countie of Chester Stafford as the peticioner hopeth to prove did compound and agree with the said Katherine and gave her a certeyne summe of money for mayntenance of the said chylde. And likewise entred into bond to discharge the towneshipp of Rushton and parishe of Leeke in the said countie of Stafford where the said chyld was borne from the mayntenance of the said bastard, and to free and [discharge?] one John Skelhorne (att whose house the said bastard was borne) from all [damages?] he should susteyne by reason of keepinge the said Katherine and bastard.

That the said Katherine since hath given forth in speeches that the peticioner should be father to the said basterde, and therupon caused the peticioner to be bound over to the said sessions intendinge therby to give her annother composicion for the mayntenance of the said bastard

That for asmuch as the peticioners witnesses are all Staffordshire men and cannot be brought into these sessions to declare the truth in the premisses for the clearinge of the peticioner. The peticioner humblie prayes the examinacion of the premisses [maie?] be referred to the examinacion and endinge of Sir William Bowyer knight and some other [justices?] of peace of the countie of Stafford next adjoyninge to the place wheare the said bastard was borne accordinge to the statute lawes in such cases provyded and the peticioner will daylie praye for the preservacions of your honours and worshipps

paratext

Request to Sir William Bowyer and John Bellot esquire to examine this case and to ende yt yf theye can.

The supervisor for highways and inhabitants of Hartford. QJF 67/2/53 (1638)

[Com?] Cestria

To the honourable bench of his majesties justices of peace assigned for this countie and assembled at this sessions

The humble peticion of the supervisor for the repayre of the heigh wayes, and the rest of thinhabitantes of Hartforde neare Northwich in this countie.

Sheweth that John Partington of Northwich aforesayd was earnest suter to the sayd inhabitantes to grant him libertie to make a marle pitt in the narrowe and straite of the waye in Hartforde above Northwich beinge the great bade way from thence to Chester to marle some land of the sayd Partingtons which the sayd inhabitantes were loth to grant in regard the same would annoy and spoyle the way yet nevertheles to a worke of that nature and uppon the faythfull promise of the sayd Partington, to make good the repayre thereof agayne, that the same should not anoy the waye the sayd inhabitantes consented. But soe it is that the sayd Partington hath not made good his promise, but by the sayd marle pitt the sayd roade waye is soe narrowed and worne out to the claye and quicksandes that the same in the winter is not passable without great danger; for diverse passengers strangers, have fallen into the same to the great hazard and perill of there lyves, had not speedie help bene readie, and likewise diverse laden horses overthrowen and spoyled to the great damage of the owners, and to the annoyance of the whole countrey that travayle that waye in the in the generall. Where=uppon the sayd inhabitantes are threatned to be troubled and indited.

Maye it therefore please this honourable bench to take the premisses into consideracion, and to order the sayd Partington to make good the speedie repayre thereof, and the rather for that your peticioner will be forced to be att the charge of fyve markes for the makinge of a pavement which might have bene saved if the sayd marle [illegible] pitt had not bene. And for that the sayd Partington hath bene amercyed fyned and pened at severall court leetes yet noe performance had (he havinge dispensed and shufled of the fynes and penalties on him imposed) and for that the sayd Partington hath by the marle there gotten bettered and improved his land that was at vi pounds per annum to be worth at least 24 pounds per annum to his great benefitt and profitt and your peticioner will dayelie praye for this honourable bench in health and all happines longe to contynue.

Margerie Walton. QJF 67/2/54 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace assembled at this quarter sessions.

The humble peticion of Margerie Walton

Humbly sheweth unto your good worships that whereas your peticioner hath had the hard fortune to be begotten with child by one Thomas Gibbons late of this towne of Namptwich who is departed farther of this countie and since his departure your said peticioner was brought to bed in this said towne, where she had formerly dweld for the space of sixe years, and ever since her deliverie she hath keept the said child in the parish of Midlewich (without any burthen either to the said parish or this towne) for the space of one yeare) and a quarter to the utter impoverishment of your peticioner, and now not being further or longer able to beare the said burthen herselfe your peticioner humbly intreath your good worships to order John Gibbons grandfather to the said child, who is of sufficient abillity to keepe the said child and to free the said parish from the burthen thereof; soe confident your good worships taking the premisses into your most worthy consideracion and deallinge therein according to law and equitie your peticioner shalbe ever bound for your to pray for your worshipps helth and happines etc.

paratext

The mother to put in sureties to discharge the parish [illegible]

Henry Rydinges of Stockport, husbandman. QJF 67/2/55 (1638)

To the right honourable his majesties justices of peace for the county of Chester, att the quarter sessiones.

The humble peticion of Henry Rydinges of Stockport in the said county husbandman.

Humbly sheweth your honors that about Michelmas last paste your supliant hired on John Hudson to leade him some corne unto his house in Stockport, and beinge come with a cartloade of corne unto your supliantes house dore, one Thomas Chorlton and William his sonne did offer to areaste the said Hudson with a [cap?] from [illegible] manor court beinge spetiall baliffes where uppon the said Hudson run into the house and did take up a hedginge bill in his handes and your supliantes wyfe hearinge a noyes in her house did come in and findinge Hudson standinge with a bill in his handes and knowinge him to be a dangerouse man, and seeinge the said baliffes standinge in the house over against him, cryed out sainge in the name of God John Hudson take heede what thou [doest?] wilt thou be hanged, heare hath bine murder done tow latly where uppon Hudson stept into a roome and shutt the dore uppon him, uppon that the baliffes went awaye; att which tyme your poore [supllant?] was in his barne uppon the backe side of his house and did nothinge att all against them, nether did your supplicantes wyfe anie thinge but as above saide. This Hudson was leadinge corne in the towne all that daye where the might have taken him if the durst, but seeinge they durst not adventure the returned a rescowe, to the ende they might gett theire feesse though the brought troble appon your poore supliantes.

In tender consideracion whereof and for that your poore supliantes are verie poore and have no waye offended the lawe nor done anie thinge against theise [lei...e?] baliffes it may please your honers to comiserate theire wrongfull vexacion and this for Godes sake.

William Bennett of Great Neston. QJF 67/2/56 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace at this sessions assembled

The humble peticion of William Bennett of Great Nestonn.

Whearas your peticioner upon some displeasure conceived against him by William Whitmore of Leighton esquier was bound to his good behaviour and to appeare at Chrismas sessions, and from thence was bound anew till Easter sessions last and from thence till this sessions. All which hath beene to the great charge and hinderance of your poore peticioner.

Your peticoner hath not to his knowledge given any offence to Master Whitmore, nor will not doe hereafter, and for that this is the therd sessions which hee hath been bound over and hath appeared accordingly, humbly prayeth that hee may bee now released, and hee will ever pray for your worshipps health and happines etc.

paratext

[Relaxamus?].

Apud Vicum Malbanum xo Julii 1638

Margaret Coulthurst, widow. QJF 67/2/57 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace for the county of Chester at this sessions assembled

The humble peticion of Margaret Coulthurst widowe

Shewinge that John Hollinshead late of Sandlebridge in this county for his noto=rious misdemenours and abusive cariage to your peticioner and her servantes (as by exa=minacions returned into this court appeareth) was bound by recognizance with 2 suerties aswell for his appearance at this sessions as for his good behaviour in the meane tyme that notwithstandinge the said recognizance he still persisteth in his violent courses and uttereth thretninge speeches against your peticioner in so much that she dare not goe or send her children or servantes to her owne house, nor about her busines there for feare of vyolence to be offred them by the said Hollinshead, and in further prejudice and terror to your said peticioner he giveth out in speeches that he will by force and stronge hand cause the grasse growinge upon your peticioners land to be cutt and will take the same to his owne use though he hath noe right nor colour of tytle therunto. May it therfore please your good worships (the premises considered) and for the safety of your peticioner her children and servantes, to order the said John Hollinshead to continue bound and that he fynd very good suerties for his good behaviour and your peticioner will ever pray etc

The inhabitants of several townships. QJF 67/2/58 (1638)

To the right worshipfull Sir Richard Wilbraham knight and barronet, one of his majesties justices of the peace, within this county of Chester, and, to the rest of his majesties justices of the peace within this county which shalbee att the quarter session of the peace for this county houlden att Namptwich etc.

The humble peticion of the inhabitantes of the severall towneshipps of Stoake, Hurleston, Wordhull Cholmondeston, Pooles, Aston, and Warleston within this county.

That whereas your worshipps sayd peticioners have urgent and lawfull occasions (att all lawfull and convenient times) to travell both on foote and horsebacke and with horses cartes and waynes loaden and unloaden, to the towne of Namptwich and in, to, throughe and from the highe and open streetes within the said towne of Namptwich (beinge a throughe fare) which are reputed and taken to bee his majesties highe wayes for all his majesties subjectes to travell and passe in and throughe as occasion shalbee offred both for his majesties service and carriage (which your worshipps said peticioners verye lately have beene and are like to bee further charged withall to carry to the sayd towne and into and throughe the same more then for many yeares now last past they have beene, and for the carriage of wichwood and other necessary provision for the benefitt of the inhabitantes of the sayd towne of Namptwich and alsoe for theire owne severall occasions both on the markett day and att all other tymes, as aforesaid in manner aforesaid and forasmuch as the sayd streetes within the sayd towne of Namptwich in divers and sundry places the pavement is broken upp and gone to soe greate decay and ruyne that the same are almost unpassable in some parts thereof where in and throughe his majesties subjectes with loaden horses and with loaden cartes and waynes cannot travell and passe without greate danger of overthrowinge theire loades and hazardinge of theire owne lives and theire cattles (the inhabitantes of the said towne of Namptwich beinge very backeward and negligent in amendinge and redressinge the same) which sayd neglecte of the performance of a matter of soe greate consequence hath beene, is, and doth tend to the greate and dangerous annoyance of his majesties subjectes unlesse some speedy course bee taken for the present amendement and new paveinge of all such decayed places within the said severall streetes where such need requires for prevention of future danger

May yt therefore please your worshipps the premisses tenderly considered to take such speedy course and to make such order in the premisses accordinge to his majesties lawes and statutes in such case provided and as your worshipps in your grave wisdomes shall thinke most fitt and convenient and your worshipps sayd peticioners as in dutyfull manner they are bound shall pray for your worshipps prosperities.

Richard Worrall, a head constable of the hundred of Bucklowe. QJF 67/2/60 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices at this sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of Richard Worrall one of the headconstables for the hundred of Bucklowe.

Humblie sheweth unto your good worships that your peticioner coming into the house of Raphe of Lawrenson of Barterton inkeeper by meere accident; found the said Lawrenson striking of his owne wife in such sort as your peticioner did conceive shee was in great perill of her life, whereupon your peticioner endeavoring to preserve life did [illegible] comand him in his majesties name to forbeare, which the said Lawrenson did not only neglect but did likewise assault and strike your peticioner, in such manner as your peticioner did suddenly fall sick by the space of three monthes together, and the said Lawrenson perceiving this did mocion an agreement which your peticioner yealded unto: since which time of agreement the said Lawrenson hath declared unto some of his companions with a piece that he would shoote at your peticioner with a piece.

May it therefore please this worshipfull assembly to take it into consideracion, and to suppresse the said Lawrenson for selling brewing to sell ale or beere, or to keepe victualling being a man verie unfitt for that purpose, because he is a man of verie lewde and rude behaviour both in his owne house, and for himselfe, keeping drinking upon a sabboath day verie often at the time of divine service and himselfe hath strocken the pettie constable of Barterton in the execution of his office, and Richard Robinson of Dutton as alsoe Margarett the wife Thomas Massie of Barterton, all which your peticioner prayeth you in your grave wisdome to t consider of and to yeild grant his request, and in soe doing your peticioner shall have daily to cause to pray for your health and happines.

paratext

Refer to Sir George and Master Brereton

Roger Moores of Northerne. QJF 67/2/61 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace att this present sessions assembled etc.

The humble petition of Roger Moores of Northerne.

Sheweth unto your good worshipp that whereas one William Tomlynson of Northern within this countye hath, by the abetment and procurement of one Ellyn Tomlinson and John [Shelmerene?] convayed your said petitioners wiffe from him, into another countye and there doth not only abuse him by makinge use of his wiffe, but dailye threaten and menace to kill your said petitioner whensoever either hee or the said Ellyn Tomlinson or John [Shelmerene?] mette with him therefore your petitioner is enforced and compelled to hide his head for feare of murther soe that hee is in great povertye by reason hee is not dare not followe his vocation wherby by his labour hee mayntayned himselfe.

The premises therefore considered your petitioner desireth your good worshippes to be pleased to grant unto him your warrant of good behaviour thereby to apprehend and take the said William Tomlynson John Shelmerdyne Ellen Tomlynson and Jane Moores your petitioners wiffe to thend there may be such order taken with them that hee may peacably and quyetly followe his labours as formerly hee hath done. And your said petitioner (shall accordinge to bounden duty) daily pray etc.

William Poole and Raphe Poole, churchwardens of p. Audlem. QJF 67/2/62 (1638)

To the right worshipfull George Cotton esquire one of the justices of his majesties peace for this countie of Chester.

The humble peticion of William Poole and Raphe Poole churchwardines of the parishe of Audlem for and on the behalfe of the whole parishe

Humbly sheweth that whereas one Anne Barnes of Audlem aforesaid hath heretofore byne delivered of one bastard child within the said parishe and hath in her payne and travell of childbearth confessed to those persones which weare with her at the tyme of child bearth that one Richard Preston of Hadderton in the said countie of Chester was the father of the said bastard child and since she beinge brought before your worship hath upon her oathe deposed that one Lawrence Podmore of Audlem aforesaid beinge a maried man is the right father of the same and that she hath byne hyred and threatened by blowes or otherwayes by the said Lawrence Podmore to father the said child wrongfully upon the said Richard Preston as by her examinacion upon oathe appeareth and hath allsoe procured some wittnesses before your worshipe for that purpose the said parties beinge boath of them able and sufficient as your peticioners conceave to keepe the said child and to dischardge the parishe from the same and from any further trouble about the same

Your peticioners humbly pray that your worshipe will be pleased to consider the estate of the said parishe in regard the said Anne Barnes hath heretofore byne a verie lewde woman and hath had a bastard by an other maried mane and the parishe hath byne chardged with the same child and allsoe with her the said Anne Barnes shee beinge kepte on the almes of the said parishe and nowe she havinge chardged boath the above named persones with the same wee the said parishoners are verie doubtfull for lest the same should fall chardgeable upon us unlesse your worshipe will be pleased to directe some course for the avoydinge of the same and to take order that the right father may take the same and dischardge the parishe and that some condigne punishment may be inflicted upon her the said Anne Barnes to the ensample of others in the lyke case offendinge and your peticioners as ever bound will dayly pray for your worshipes health etc.

Anne Barne of Audlem. QJF 67/2/63 (1638)

To the right worshipfull George Cotton esquire one of his majesties justices of the peace and the rest of his majesties justices of the peace att this worshipfull bench and assessions assembled.

The humble petition of Anne Barnes of Audlem

Shew unto your good worshipps that whereas it was your petitioners hard fortune to have a bastard child by one Lawrence Podmore of Audlem aforesaid within this countye of Chester who hath ever since the byrth of the same child mayntayned it without havinge or receyvinge any releife or maynteynance for it from the said Lawrence Podmore althoughe shee your said petitioner hath often tymes requyred the said Podmore either to take the said child from her or to allowe her maynteynance to keepe it or to take it away from her, by reason shee was a poore woeman and not able of herselfe to doe the same; which the said Podmore hitherto hath denyed to doe.

The premises therefore tenderly considered your poore petitioner humbly craveth your good worshipps to be pleased to contynewe your accustomed goodnes and to call the said Lawrence Podmore before you who is here present and to enjoyne him either to take the child into his owne keepinge or ells to allowe unto your said petitioner sufficyent maynteynance for the same child. And your petitioner shall (accordinge to her bounden duty) daily pray etc.

The churchwardens and overseers for the poor of Nantwich. QJF 67/2/64 (1638)

The petition of the churchwardens and over seeres for the poore of the towne of Namptwich.

Wheareas Elizabeth Alnaston daughter of Mathew Alnaston of this towne was late servant in the towne of Shrosbury and synce with Master Yonge of [illegible] Pimley within the libertie theirof for this xii monethes now last past and haveing had noe aboade at all hear for this foure or five yeares. And beinge now begott with childe is returned to our towne of Namptwich theire to be delivered theirof. Theise theirfore are to entreat this worship=full bench to graunt your worships warrant for sending hir back againe to the place from whence shee came from constable to constable.

paratext

It is agreed by the courte that an order be made for the sendinge of the said Elizabeth from constable to constable to Pymley in the county of Salop where she last dwelled and was there gott with childe for that was heere taken as a wanderer.

William Smith, constable of Minshull Vernon. QJF 67/2/65 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace in the countye of Chester

The humble peticion of William Smith constable of Minshull Vernon. paratext[Jur?]

Shewing That where your peticioner by vertue of a warrant directed to your peticioner for the gathering of a certeine summe of money for his majesties use for shipping your peticioner by vertue thereof did demaund of John Wilson [illegible] husbandman the summe hee was assessed to paye which the said Wilson denyed soe that your peticioner did seise the goodes of the sayd Wilson and thereupon the said Wilson did locke your peticioner in his house and violently with the helpe of his wife John his sonne and Elizabeth his daughter did take the same goodes from your peticioner and still deteyneth the same soe that your peticioner was compelled to paye the sayd money the said Wilson was assessed to paye and his said sonne John then divers tymes moved your peticioner to meete him in the field to fight which your peticioner did refuse.

The peticioners humble request is that your worships would commaund the said Wilson to paye your peticioner the summe of xii pence which your peticioner hath soe disbursed as aforsaid and that yow would bee pleased to graunte a warrant of good abeareing against the said John Wilson and his sonne for theire misdemeanor and your peticioner as hee is bound will dayely praie for your healths and prosperitye longe to continue.

paratext

A warrant de pace.

John Relton and Jane his wife. QJF 67/2/66 (1638)

To the Reverend Doctor Byrom one of the Kinges majesties justice of peace, and to the rest of his fellowe justices of peace.

The humble petition of John Relton and Jane his wiffe

Most humbly shewing unto your good worships that [your?] poore petitioners having lived in Frodshamm parish the tyme and space of xxii yeares, and now growing in age, the said Jane Relton being aged threescore and sixteene yeares and not having a howse to putt their head in and nothing to helpe themselves withall your poore petitioners doe most humbly intreat your favour to admitt them to erect a place for them to lodge in during their lives, Mistris Turner hath given themm an old sheepe coate to make themm a place to be in if it may please your good worships to give consent;

The premisses most tenderly considered your poore petitioners doe humbly intreat and earnestly desire your worships consents that they may have this poore place to lodge in during their lives, in regard of their miserable and lamentable estate, (they which they doubt not but that you will commi=serate, and they will ever, as in duty they are bound pray for your worships health and happinnes long to continue.

paratext

[illegible]

John Bebington, Alice Bebington, Margrett Cappur, Joane Dod, Thomas Stockton and Randle Piggott. QJF 67/2/67 (1638)

To the right worshipfull Sir George Booth knight and barronett Sir Richard Wilbraham knight and barronett George Cotton esquire and the rest of his majesties justices of the peace att this generall sessions.

The humble peticon of John Bebington, Alice Bebington Margrett Cappur, Joane Dod, Thomas Stockton, and Randle Piggott constable of Harthill.

In all humilitie sheweth unto the worshipfull bench. That whereas there hath bynne some difference of late betwixt Alice Bebington one of your peticioners and Joane Dod togeather with the two daughters of Richard Dod of Harthill who not long since att one of our monethly meetings before Sir Thomas Brereton knight Doctor Snell and Hugh Wilbraham esquire examinacions being taken on both sides the afforesaid Dods of Harthill were then bound to their good behaviour.

For which cause and none other as your peticioners verilie beleive Richard Dod hath sworne the peace not only of Alice Bebington their then opposer but also of John Bebington her husband: Thomas Stockton her brother: Margrett Cappur her sister: Joane Dod: and Randle Pigott the then constable who served them with the justices warrant: soe that your peticioners being bound to the peace (who never lived otherwise then peaceably amongst all our neighbours) are for the present altogeather remediles without assistance from this worshipfull bench for our further freedome, and therefore

Humblie prayes in all submissive manner the premises considered that juste cause may bee shewed att this sessions why wee are all bound to the peace, or els that wee may bee discharged: being alltogeather ignorant for what wee are bound, more then the malitious spleene of our prosecutor. This being taken into the grave consideracion of the right worshipfull bench wee hope will gayne our release; and your peticioners shall have great cause to pray not only for the happie successe of all your proceedings but alsoe for your worships prosperitie in all health and happines long to continue

The inhabitants of the township of Wettenall. QJF 67/2/68 (1638)

The humble petition of us the inhabitaunce of the township of Wettenall to this right honarable benche as followeth.

Wheras wee the inhabitaunce of the towneship of Wettenall beinge of late very grevieousely opprested by diverse poore people, who have cast them selves uppon us of late, whereby wee are sore burdened and not any way able to releive there wantes, sum of them who have sould there meanes and willfully spent and made a way there there estate and under the pretence of seekeing for there one wright, have thrust themselves uppon the towne to the greate burdening of us the inhabitauntes and the great discouragment of divers in the towne who have greate famielies of there one to provide for and unable to releive theise poore as will be exspected from them by reason of there one great charg which the of there [illegible] to provide for

And whereas this defect hath growne by reason of many whoe have tennementes and cottages in the towne whoe in there one parson do not inhabbit with in the towne but let and passe over there houses unto poore people wich are unable to releive there one wants but be come burdensum to the town whereby we stand in greate danger to be still further burdened in future time we doe therfore hunbly beseeche this honarble benche that the will be pleased to take in to consideration this case of extemitie where unto wee are now fallen and we doe humbly beseech this honorable benche to releive us as you discetion shall thinke fitt, and shall be bound to pray for your health wealth and prosperytie for ever

Youre humble petitioners

  • Thomas Wilkinson church warden
  • George Lightfoote over seer of the poore
  • John Wilkinson
  • Thomas Falkner
  • John Cappar
  • Randulph Oulton
  • Robbart Oulton
  • Robbart Wilkinsone
  • Richard Tottie
  • Thomas Lanckrocke
paratext

[in...?]

Roberte Barlowe, James Mosse, Henrye Shalcross, Thomas Massey, John Royle and Ellen Ashton. QJF 67/2/69 (1638)

To the right worshipfull Sir George Booth knight and barronett and Richard Brereton esquire

The humble peticion and complaint of Roberte Barlowe James Mosse Henrye Shalcross Thomas Massey John Royle and Ellen Ashton of Sale.

Sheweth that about the xith day of April 1637 one John Moores of Sale thelder charged the aforsaide Roberte Barlowe then cunstable, in his majesties name, to aprehend John Moores the younger, sonne of the saide John, for fellonye, affirminge his saide sonne had broken open his chest, stowlne the lease of his howse, one brass pott and other goodes, and required the saide cunstable likewise to provyde and bringe some able persons to assist him, therein, for the bringinge of his said sonne before a justice of peace to answere the premisses; and thereuppon the sayde Barlowe charged the rest of the peticioners mencioned in his majesties name to assist him; and goinge to the howse of the sayd John Moores the father, they there found John his saide sonne, and makeinge knowne unto him his fathers complaint and charge requiringe him in his majesties name to keepe the peace and obey the sayde cunstable, hee the saide Moores the younger, not onely peremtorily denyed soe to doe, but assaulted and strucke him the saide cunstable, with a stowle, and the same beinge taken from him, tooke up an iron coulter, to strike therewith, and endangered all your peticioners there by, hurt the cunstable and the said John Royle to the loss of his bloode, and soe escaped from them into his owne howse which ocasioned the saide John Moores the father to send for the other cunstable, who came and brought with him more ayde; to assist the rest before named; and at his and there comeinge, the saide John Moores the younger had gott a pykill in his handes, and with many vowes and oathes threatned to kill the said cunstables or any one that should come nere him; who seeinge him soe desperately bent, for feare of there lives left him of; who likewise vowed and threatned revenge against the saide cunstables and all that assisted them for which cause your worships granted a warrant of good behaveour against the saide Moores the younger, who since which tyme accordinge to his exprest malice and threatninge, together with John his said father have joyned and combynde, for the indictinge of all your peticioners, uppon a pretended royett, to there great prejudice injurye and undoinge of some of your petitioners, not dareinge to goe without doares in this busye tyme, for feare of the sheriffes bayliffes, who have warrantes against them; whose bodyes must suffer, there wiefes and children undone (if they bee taken, by reason of there povertye and unabillity to pay moneys.

Your peticioners therefore humbly pray the premisses considered, your worships would bee pleased for equityes sake, well knowinge the wicked conversacion of the sayde Moores the sonne, to move they justices of the peace at the next quarter sessions at Weich Malbanke, ether to free your peticioners from the saide bill of indictment soe wrongfully stowlne or the fynes that may thereuppon bee imposed at the saide sestions, and your peticioners will ever pray for your worships health and happines longe to continue.

Dat 23th Maye 1638

paratext

The inditement to be quashed.

The cunstables peticion of Sale and other.

Robert Sugar, Thomas Sharpe and other inhabitants of the hundred of Worrall. QJF 67/2/70 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justics of the peace at this quarter sessions assembled

The humble petition and complaint of Robert Sugar of Pottington and Thomas Sharpe of Burton and other inhabitants within the saide severall townships in the hundred de Worrall.

Sheweth that at the last quarter sessions houlden att Chester in January last as your peticioners conceive, one Thomas Bennett of Willison a free houlder in the saide hundred, did present or indict the inhabitants of the saide townships for nott amendinge their high wayes, as since which tyme itt hath appeared for that about the 28th of Maye last, foure of the sheriffs bayliffs videlicit, Anthony Harding Richard Fardow Richard Stoobs William Younge who by vertue of the sheriffs warrant as they pretended attached eight or ixen severall persons inhabitants within the saide townships att this sessions to ansheare the premises and afterwardes three of the same bayliffs videlicit, Anthony Hardinge Richard Fardon Richard Stoobs came againe in there drunkennes and by vertue of their former authoritie (as they pretended attached one Richard Meare of Burton afforesaide servant to the afforesaide Thomas Sharpe beinge imployde in his masters occations affirminge they would have him bound over likwise with whom they had nothinge to doe beinge a servant and likwise in there saide distemper of drunkennes meetinge with one Thomas Moores of litle Neston livinge in another parish attached him the saide Moores for the saide occation who perceivinge there error refused to submitt unto them who thereupon sett him att libertie and that afterwardes the saide bayliffs came to the counstables of Pottington and Burton aforesaide and command them by terrifyinge wordes to goe with and direct them where they might finde and attach more of the inhabitants in Pottington etc for the aforesaide occation which greately putt them in feare and causeles trouble and vexation

Your peticioners and complainants therefore humbly pray the premises considered and for that suite which time the wayes in question are and have beene sufficiently repayred and amended although the saide Thomas Bennett peremtorily, refused to obey the order of 3 justics of the peace next adjoyninge who sett downe an order att the meetinge: thereby directinge that foure out of the aforesaide townships and Willison adjoyninge should meete the head cunstables of the saide hundred att a day appoynted and to them declare there severall knowledges howe and by whom the saide wayes have beene and ought to be amended who weare to certifie accordingly and the saide Bennett apposed the same; affirminge hee would spend C pounds before the township of Willison should joyne or contribute towardes the repaire of the saide wayes in regard whereof your peticioners and complainants pray that your worships would nott onely his order for there releefe herein, soe causlesly molested by the said bayliffs and the malice of the saide Bennett butt for the desidinge and endinge of the controversarye for there future peace and quiet wherein they will ever pray for your worships health and happines longe to continue.

John Vernon of Pulford. QJF 67/2/71 (1638)

To the honourable benche of justices of peace assembled at this quarter sessions.

The humble peticion of John Vernon of Pulford.

Humbly sheweth that whereas John Baxter of Pulford was bounde for his appearaunce at the quarter sessions holden at Chester after Christmas in anno 1635 to aunswere his neglect (being then constable of Pulford aforesaid) in servinge of a warraunt to him directed from two of his majesties justice of peace of this county, for which your peticioner became his suertie and forasmuche as the said justices of peace have remitted the faulte and that the said Baxter by reason of sicknes not being then able to travaile did faile in his appearaunce at the said sessions whereby your said peticioner is afraide of proces and trouble to falle upon him.

That this honourable benche wolde bee pleased to free your pore peticioner from the daunger hee is afraied of by withdrawing of the said recognizaunce or anie other waye as to your wisdomes shall seeme meete, and your pore peticioner shall ever pray for your prosperitie healthe and happines.

paratext

Noe farther prosec uppon the recognizance.

Ellen Owen, a poor distressed widow. QJF 67/2/72 (1638)

To his majesties justices of the peace

the most humble petition of Ellen Owen a poore distresed widdow

Showing unto your worships that your poore petitioner being left with a great charge of children and no resting place but forst to flitt from one barne or pore cote to another which hath offten brought her into great weaknesse and [now?] having hir brother in the same parrish of Wibumbury where she and all the rest weare borne and he profereth hir ground which he houlds by leace from Sir Thomas Smyth who is likewise aquainted with it to put up som pore cote according to hir abillitie wheare she may by Gods permition and hir painfull industrie bring up hir charge as hitherto she hath without charging the parrish with them wherefore your petitioner doth most humbly request you even for Godes cause that you wilbe pleased to give your consents to this deede of charitie and she and all hirs shalbe bound to pray for your eternall happinesse

  • Morice [illegible]
  • William Palmer
  • Georg Mainwaringe
  • Lawrence Bressie
paratext

[Conceditur?]

Randull Granwall of Wettenhall. QJF 67/2/74 (1638)

To the right worshipfull Sir Richard Wilbraham knight and baronett his majesties justice of the peace etc.

The humble petition of Randull Granwall of Wettenhall.

Sheweth unto your good worshipp that whereas your said petitioner beinge an auncyent tenante to Richard Bruerton of Wettenhall aforesaid esquire deceased and for many yeares together held and enjoyed to p under him the messuage or tenemente wherin John Granwall and Thomas Whittingham doe nowe inhabitt and dwell untill that by [s.ertyshipp?] and wrongfull suites hee was enforced to make sale of the same, thereby to pay and discharge his tormenting credytours. And to lyve in peace and quyettnes since which sale your said petitioner hath by his great diligence care and industrie and painestakinge releived himselfe wiffe and family without being any wise chargable or burthensome; to any of his neighbours. And although your said petitioner were borne in Wettenhall aforesaid yet the inhabitantes there, denye to give your said petitioner any entertainment or housroome or att any other neighbouring towne cannot get any housroome although hee trouble them not for any releife but mayntaineth him his wiffe and children by his daily labour. Soe that your petitioner is enforced to make a place in a ditch for him his wiffe and children to lye in; where your said petitioner found in the bed where the children lay a great blyndworme betwixt them.

The premises therefore tenderly considered your poore petitioner craveth your good worshipp to be pleased to give way and libertie unto him that hee may sett upp some postes in any parte or place about the towne of Wettenhall for the erectinge of a litle cavin or shelter by cloddes or otherwise, where your said worshipp Master Roger Wilbramm or any of the towne shall appoynt for his better defence from wynd and weather untill hee can procure a better, and your said petitioner promiseth not to be any wise chargable to the said towne but shall dailie pray for your good worshipp in health and happines long to contynewe

And this for Godsake.

John Wilkinson of Wettenhall. QJF 67/2/75 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace att this present sessions assembled etc.

The humble petition of John Wilkinson of Wettenhall.

Sheweth unto your good worshipps that whereas your said petitioner havinge occation to use money for the takinge of a newe lease of the messuage and tenement wherin hee latly inhabited att Wettenhall aforesaid did about vi yeares nowe last past, procure the somme of 40 pounds of one Thomas Capp of Heighcrofte for to take a lease of the right worshipfull Sir Richard Wilbraham knight and baronnett of the same messuage and tenement which was effected and your petitioner beinge willinge to give the said Capp satesfaccion and security for the said 40 pounds disbursed for and towardes the takinge of the said lease did permitt and suffer the said Capp peacably and quyetly to possesse and enjoy the said premises for the terme of foure yeares accordinge to the contracte made betwixt them but the said Capp beinge in possession thereof hath violently enjoyed the same h about the space sixe fyve yeares [illegible] last past under couler of a false writinge which hee made himselfe; without yeildinge or affoordinge any satisfactory meanes to your said petitioner. And your said petitioner beinge a very poore man burthened with a wiffe and fyve small children have byne enforced to travell hither and thither for their lyvinge and maynteynance, but alwaies expulsed and driven thence to their former dwellinge and place of byrth beinge att Wettenhall aforesaid and there cannot be releived neither by the said Capp nor by the inhabitantes soe that your said petitioner his wiffe and children are enforced to lye in the lanes and likely to starve for want of foode and your petitioner is willinge to give and pay backe the said 40 pounds unto the said Capp by 5 pounds per annum that hee might but enter upon his said messuage and enjoy the same peacably which the said Capp refuseth to doe unlese hee might have the said 40 pounds att one payment which your said petitioner cannot performe and doe.

The premisses therefore tenderly considered your petitioner craveth and desireth your good worshipps to be pleased to [compel?] the said Capp to receyve and take his said 40 pounds by 5 pounds per annum and to deliver up possession to your said petitioner, or that the said Capp shall allowe unto your said petitioner maynetaynance forth of the premises towards the releivinge of him his wiffe and family and your petitioner and his wiffe and children shall (accordinge to their bounden dutyes) daily pray for your worships in good health and happines longe to contynewe

And this for Godsake.

Margarett Bennett of Smethwick, spinster. QJF 67/2/76 (1638)

To the right honourable and right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace for the countie of Chester att these presente quarter sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of Margarett Bennett of Smethwicke in the countie of Chester spinster against William Wharmebie of Sutton in the said countie laborer, and Reynold Baxter constable of Sutton aforsaid.

That the said Wharmebie did begett the peticioner with child and promised her marriage before (which child is not yett borne)

That the peticioner about Barnabie daye last the peticioner for her releife and better securitie of the educacion of the child (when ytt should please God to be borne) procured a warrant from Thomas Dodd doctor in dyvynitie and one of his majesties justices of peace for this countie to put in securitie for his apparaunce att this sessions to stand unto your honourable and wurshipfull order to be taken for the peticioners releife in the premisses

That the peticioner accordinge to the directions of the forsaid warrant delivered the same to the said Baxter (who by vertue therof attached the same Wharmebie and afterwardes left him att libertie without the peticioners consent so that the peticioners is likelie to be undone for ever unles ytt please this honorable bench to releeve her.

Humblie prayinge your honours and wurshipps warrant against the said Baxter to shewe cause before yow or some of yow wherfore he inlarged the said Wharmebie and that the said Baxter maie (in respect of his neglect of the said Maste Doddes warrant.) be ordered (if ytt maie stand with justice) to give such releife to the poore peticioner (as in your wise disscreasions shalbe thought fittinge) for her mayntence and child after the birth therof untill he shall bringe in the bodye of the said Wharmebie to stand unto and abyde your order herafter to be taken in the premisses. And the peticioner will daylie praye for your honours and wurshipps.

The churchwardens and inhabitants of the parish of Bartomley. QJF 67/2/77 (1638)

To the honourable his majesties justices of the peace in the countye of Chester

The humble peticion of the churchwardens and other the inhabitantes of the parishe of Bartomley in the countie aforsaid.

Whereas there is lately come from London into our parish of Bartomley a poore yonge girle whoe saith that her name is Elizabeth Tufeneale and that shee was borne in our said parish being (as shee alsoe saith the daughter of William Tufneale and Margarett his wife of London both lately deceased they haveing for the space of ten or eleavon yeares past at the least dwelled within the parish of Saint Gyles by Cripplegate in London.

The peticioners humble request is in regard the said Elizabeth hath bin dwelling in London by the space of twelve yeares past and nowe cometh as a wanderer into the said parishe that your worships would be pleased to graunt your warrant for the sending of the said Elizabeth backe to the place where shee hath soe dwelled.

paratext

To have a passe to goe to Saint Gyles from constable to constable and to bee furnished by the churchwardens etc

Thomas Prophett of Mouldesworth, weaver. QJF 67/2/78 (1638)

To the right worshipfull bench the Kinges majesties justices of the peace and quorum

The humble peticion of Thomas Prophett of Mouldesworth in this countye of Chester weaver.

Humblye shewinge unto your good worshipps, that I your poore peticioner have for the tyme of fifteene years now laste paste, inhabited with one widow Lightfoote of the said Mouldesworth whose daughter I maried and by her now have three children lyvinge, and my said mother in law beinge deceased, your poore peticioner is destitute of harbour the which good Master Hardware cheefe lorde of the said Mouldesworth, seeinge my distresse and pittiynge the same, is pleased in compation towardes us, to graunt his good will, that I your poore peticioner may erecte and sett upp a small cottage in some conveniente place upon the wast landes of the said Mouldesworth (if that it maye stande with your good worshipps lykinges) to give your allowances and consentes there unto: the which I your poore peticioner my wife and children doe moste humblye beseech your good worshipps for Christe Jesus sake to graunte unto, consideringe our miserable estate, and wee all your worshipps peticioners, will daylye upon our knees praye to God to blesse you all with longe lyfe and happie dayes in this world, and eternall felicity in the world to come.

paratext

[Conceditur?] with consent

Richard Williams. QJF 67/2/79 (1638)

To the right worshipfull Sir George Booth knight and to the rest of the justices of peace at the quarter sessions, and to the wholle bench

The humble peticion of Richard Williams

Sheweth that the petitioner is a very poore man, haveing a wife and many smale children, and noe meanes, nor place to sojourne in, and forasmuch as he hath the consent of the charterers, and dwellers in Tilston, to erect a cote in Tilston, as by this annexed certifficate may appere as alsoe the consent of the honourable the Lord Brereton being cheefe lord of the wastes there (as may likewise appere)

He therefore humbly besecheth your worships, and this honourable bench, to license him to erect the said cote accordingly, and he his poore wife and children will dayly pray for your worships prosperity [etc?]

  • Frauncis Fitton
  • Essex Clerke Rector
  • Richard Allporte
  • Randle Tonna.
  • Richard Tayler
paratext

[Conceditur cum licenc?]

[Com?] Cestria

Upon thearnest request and supplicacion of this bearer Richard Williams of Tilston, unto us, whose names are hereunder written (being charterers or inhabitantes in Tilston aforesaid) to give way for him to set up a smale cote in Tilston aforesaid, in a ditch upon the wast where he his wife and children now lie, which suite of his wee have taken into consideracion, and knowing him to be a very poore man, haveing a wife and many smale children borne in the parish of Tilston aforesaid, where they have lived theis many yeres last past, and now destitute of a habitacion wee doe therefore hereby give our consentes that he may erect a cote in the said ditch where he nowe lies, or some other convenient place upon the said waste as witnes our handes the first of July 1638.

The inhabitants of Twemlowe. QJF 67/2/80 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace assembled at the quarter sessions.

The humble peticion of the inhabitantes of Twemlowe

Informeth your worshipes your said supplyantes that some of the inhabitantes of Blackden and Goostry have threatned to preferre a bill of indictment at this present sessions against some of the said inhabitantes of Twemlowe for not repayring of a platt suggested by the said inhabitantes of Blackden and Goostry to bee in Twemlowe.

That your said peticioners doe conceave and are verie credibly informed that the place where the said platt ought to bee made is within Blackden onely, and not within Twemlowe.

Maie it therefore please your good worships (the premises considered) to favour your peticioners soe farre as that the said bill of indictment (if anie such shalbe preferred by the said inhabitantes) maie be heard openly and the evidence on both sydes to be produced before your worships; and your said peticioners thereuppon are and wilbee verie willing to submitt themselves to bee ordered by your worships as yow in your grave and judicious consideracions shall thinke meete etc.

Frauncis Haukinson of Audlem. QJF 67/2/82 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace att this present sessions assembled etc.

The humble petition of Frauncis Haukinson of Audlem.

Sheweth unto your good worshipps that whereas your petitioner beinge in company with some of his acquaintances att one of his neighbours house, there came into their company one Thomas Poole of Houghe who without any just cause of quarrell or offence assaulted your said petitioner and ymedyatly drewe his sword and offered to strike your said petitioner with the same, but that hee was by the company then present prevented and estopped, soe that your said petitioner willingly for feare of harme and hurt that should be offered unto him avoyded the roome and att his cominge forth of the same roome the said Thomas Poole violently (with his sword drawne) thrust att your petitioner; pursuynge him with severall thrustes but still prevented by the said company; who takinge the sword from the said Poole and hidinge the same from him thereby to appease his fury, yet notwithstandinge the said Poole seeinge hee was debarred from his sword hee forthwith drewe his knife and came with it drawne in his hand into another roome where your petitioner was, which your petitioner espyinge shunned him and went his way home. And cominge upp the towne aforsaid leadinge a gent horse in his handes not dreaminge of the said Poole, the said Poole afresh assaulted the said Haukinson your worshipps petitioner with his sword drawne came in the open streete broke his sword upon the body of your petitioner yet notwithstandinge after the said Haukinson was againe gone out of sight the said Poole enquyred upp and downe the towne where the your said petitioner dwelled protestinge and ventinge out most greivous oathes hee would kill and slaughter your worshipps said petitioner before he went out of the towne.

The premises therefore tenderly considered your petitioner humbly craveth this worshipfull bench to be pleased to grant unto your petitioner your worshipps warrant of good behaviour thereby to take order with the said Poole least hee further molest and trouble your said petitioner who is in great feare and perill least the said Poole shall hereafter offer violence against him. And your petitioner shall (accordinge to his bounden duty) dayly pray etc.

John Kent of Sandbach, glover. QJF 67/2/83 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace assembled at the quarter sessions.

The humble peticion of John Kent of Sandbach glover.

Humbly informeth your worshipes your said supplyant that uppon the last daie of Aprill nowe past your said peticioner being in Sandbach aforsaid in the Kinges majesties highe waie, and standing theire in Godes peace and the Kinges was presently assaulted with theise persons following videlicet Henry Smethley, Rychard Parratt, John Twys, William Boult, John Gylford, John Baylie and William Late all which did violently lay handes uppon your said orator and carryed him to the stockes where hee sate with both his leggs in for the space of a quarter of an houre, all the said parties goeing about the stockes and laughing your said supplyant to scorne; albeit your said orator gave noe occation of offense unto them or anie of them.

That your peticioner is a man of good carriage and conversacion which for your worships better satisfaccion, hee hath procured a certificate under the handes of divers of his neighbours of good quality within the said parish of Sandbach and Myddlewyche, and hereunto anexed

The premises considered; maie it please your good worships to inflict such condigne punnishment uppon the said offendours as your worships in your grave and judicious consideracions shall thinke most meete. And your peticioner (as in dutie bound) will ever praie etc.

paratext

[Relaxamus?]

[illegible] Wright constable

[Relaxamus?]

The inhabitants of the parish of Sandbach in support of John Kent. QJF 67/2/84 (1638)

To the Kinges majesties justices of peace in the county of Chester.

Wee whose names are subscrived, beinge inhabitantes within the parish of Sandbach in the saide countie, doe, hereby certifey your worships; that one John Kent of Sandbach aforesaide gloover, was borne in the parish of Midlewich in the saide county which is the next parish to the saide parish of Sandbach; and to our knowledge he is come of good parantage and freindes, and hath lived and dwelled in the said parish of Sandbach for the space of twelve yeares last paste, or thereaboutes, and he is one of good carriadge behaviour and conversacion, and a verie painfull and laborious man in the trade he now useth, which is a glover. And thus much wee make boulde to certifie your worships; and will ever reste your worships humble servauntes.

June xxiiith 1638.

  • John Oldfeld
  • John Mosse
  • William Yorke
  • Thomas Royle
  • William Stoiner
  • Thomas Minshall
  • John Wright
  • William Whitticars
  • William Rathbon
  • John Bostocke John Bostocke
  • [Huon Minshall?]
  • Ralph Hulse
  • Robert Carter
  • William Whittingham
  • John Whittingham
  • William Yates
  • Thomas Shawe
  • Charles Mainwaring
  • John [Thorne?]

Margarett Colthirste, widow. QJF 67/2/85 (1638)

To the honourable and righte worshipfull his majesties justices of peace assembled att this presente sessions.

The humble peticion of Margarett Colthirste vidua.

That whereas one John Hollinshead of Sandle Bridge gentleman beinge a man of a lewde and dissolute carriage and behavyour and one whose handes hathe byn ymbrewed in blood and nowe att this instant standeth bounden to his good abearinge, for his greate abuses and wronges offred towardes your peticyoner and her servantes and to appeare att this presente sessions.

The petycyoner humblie prayeth that your woorships wilbe pleased (in regard that shee and hir servantes (whome hee daylie threatneth) stand in danger of theire lyves) that the same Hollinshead maye bee bound over agayne to his good abearinge and not released [illegible] and your peticyoner accordinge to hir bounden duetie will praye etc.

Elizabeth Greaves, wife of Edward Greaves of Pointon, husbandman. QJF 67/2/86 (1638)

To the right honourable and the rest of his majesties justices of the peace, at the quarter sessions holden at Namptwich in the countie of Chester the xth day of July 1638.

The humble peticion of Elizabeth Greaves, wife of Edward Greaves of Pointon in the said countie husbandman.

Sheweth that one Raphe Lea the constable of Pointon aforesaid came to this informers husbandes howse upon the 30 day of Aprill last, and being accompanied and assisted with others like himselfe, by force and armes carryed away divers goodes, and rent and tore in peeces other goodes, and not onely spoyled such victualls as were then provided for the sustenance of that poore familie, but also violently broke into the inner roomes of the howse, and offered to carry away a chest wherein was the lease of the howse and other wrytinges, which chest, (in stryving to resist them) was broken and a bonnd of vii pounds was lost or taken away at that tyme; and the said Lea hath done many other great injuries to your peticioner, without shewing any warrant or cause for it, which she conceaveth to proceede from him, because that when he was constable in Pointon formerly he solicited your peticioner divers tymes to be naught with him, and offered her xl shillings if she would consent to him, which (by) reason of his importunitie she was enforced to declare unto her husband for which he then threatned that he would be revenged on her. And the said Lea is a common drunkerd, and a great stirrer of debate generally amongest his neighbours

Prayeth that he may be bound to the good behaviour, and that he may be further punished according to his due demerittes, as it shall be made apparent by divers other credible persons at this present sessions.

And your poore peticioner (as elshow in all dutie bounden) will pray for your much increase of honour in this life and eternall glorie in the life to come.

The churchwardens of the parish of Prestburie. QJF 67/2/93 (1638)

To the honourable and right worshipfull his majesties justices assembled in there quarter sessions at Wick=Malbanke

The humble peticion of the churchwardens of the parish of Prestburie

Sheweth that whereas there was a child lately borne in the borrough of Macclesfield within the aforesaid parish, the mother of which child being a wanderer and afterwards travelling throug Bollington (another towne of the aforesaid parish) died there. By reason whereof the towne of Bollington being then burthened with the said child procured order from this honourable court that your peticioners under the penaltie of v pounds should provide for the mayntenance of the child untill it were further determined what particular towne should be charged therewith. Which order your petitioners have obeyed, and now humbly crave to be freed from the same, and that speciall order may be directed to the particular overseers for the poore of the said borrough and towne aforesaid, to one or both as in your wisdomes you shall thinke most meete. Which request your peticioners conceave to be just for that the parishioners of Prestburie with a generall consent doe agree, that the auncient custome of the said parish hath beene for every towne to keepe there owne poore, which custome by order from this honourable court hath beene confirmed, together with another order that in every particular towne there should be named an overseer for the poore both which orders are put in execution, and unto which we humbly pray that you would have respect in any order you now shall make

And your peticioners shall ever pray for your health and happines.

paratext

Wee know the particulars of this peticion to be true and doe desire that in our absence nothing be done to prejudice the setled orders formerly made for the releife of the poore.

  • William Brereton
  • Thomas Stanley

Sir Edward Fitton Sir William Brereton Master Humfrey Davenport and Master Standley to attend my lord chiefe baron and his opinion had to order in it as they thinke fitt.

Peter Maynwaring. QJF 67/3/12 (1638)

Right worshipfull

at the quarter sessions holden at Wich Malbank in Julie last your self with the rest of the justices then their present (or the most of them) sett your handes unto this order touchinge the makinge of a bridge in Smalwood neare to the house of one Widow Deane as by this order herein closed maie further expresse, and now for that the inhabitantes of Smalwood aforesaid hath not performed the said order in makinge the said bridge, and my self who formerly moved for the makinge of the said bridge hath such occasions that I cannot attend at this sessions [illegible] lest that the [said?] inhabitantes should informe that the said bridge shoult be made by one Widow Deane, one of the tenantes of William Lord Brereton, my humble suite unto you is that if there be any such opposicion, the matter then maie be referrd to your self and [illegible] for the examyning of witnesses in respect they are some of them verie old, for the determyning of the same, and soe my service ever remembred I rest

Yours ever to be comanded

  • Peter Maynwaring

Smalwood the xxviiith of September 1638

Thomas Tasker, constable of Stublach. QJF 67/3/13 (1638)

To the right worshipfull the Kinges majesties justices of the peace I assembled at this quarter sessions.

The humble peticion of Thomas Tasker constable of Stublach

Sheweth that Master Wy Paule Wynnington high constable for the halfe hundred of Northwich made out his precept for a mise and a half to bee collected towar within the towneship of Stublach towardes the erecting of a howse of correccion.

And whereas the it appeares by the mise book that the assessement the assessment for the said towne shipp for a whole mise amounteth but unto 5 shillings 2 pence th and by the precept from M the said Master Wynnington this peticioner was commanded to levy vi shillings ii pence which hee conceives then did accordingly and paid the same to the said Master Wynnington but neverthelesse tould the said Master Wynnington that it was more then was due to bee paid and demaunded the overplus, which he the said Wynington refused to restore him.

Now forasmuch as the petitioner conceives this to bee a great wrong to the said towneship and may proove verie prejudiciall to them hereafter and for that hee beleives manie other towneshippes are lik have suffered in the same nature

Hee humbly beseecheth the worshipful bench to referre the examinacion of the premisses to some of the his majesties justices within this division to examine the mise booke and to redresse the peticioner herein and other of his neighbours herein [illegible]

paratext

The bench intreats the justices of Northwich hundred to call the petty constables before them and to examine Master Wyningtons dealing with the cuntrey and to certefie it at the next sessions.

To be sent to the baron.

William Barnes and Thomas Shenton, yeomen. QJF 67/3/15 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace assembled at the quarter sessions

The humble peticion of William Barnes and Thomas Shenton yeomen.

Humbly sheweth unto your worships your said supplyantes that whereas your said peticioners were joyntly and severallie taken bound by recognizance in ten powndes a peice by the right worshipfull Sir Richard Wilbraham knight and barronet for the personall apperance of one Alan Cotton chirurgion and practitioner of phisick before the right reverend father in God John lord bushop of this diocesse, to shewe what licence hee the said Alan Cotton had for the practising of phisick etc as alsoe further to answeare all such matters as shalbee objected against him by Mistress Margaret Wodenoth widow and Arthur Wodenoth gentleman.

That your said oratours (not dreading anie danger) at the instance and importunity of the said Cotton were bount with him as aforesaid, conceaveing that the said Cotton would have honestly discharged himself and your said supplyantes from theire ingagementes.

That your said Cotton verie dishonestly is runne awaie, and exposed your said peticioners to forfeyte theire recognizance, (except your worships bee favorably pleased) to geve unto your said oratours some convenient tyme (as to your worships shalbee thought meete) for the bringing in of the said Cotton; or otherwyse to yeald unto your said oratours such further releif (as in your grave and juditious consideracion) shalbe thought most meete. And your peticioners (as in dutie bound) will praie etc.

paratext

The estreating of the recognizance respited till the next sessions [illegible]

The peticioners to doe theire best to [illegible] bring in the said Cotton and in the interim the recognizance not to be estreated till further order given

The inhabitants of the township of Bollington. QJF 67/3/17 (1638)

Secundo die Octobris 1638.

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace at this present sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of the inhabitantes of the townshippe of Bollington in the parish of Prestburie

Shew unto your worships that one Jane Livesley a wanderer comeinge into our township in Februarie last to a house wherein one Twellin for a short tyme did dwell (she beinge in extremitie of sicknes) his wyffe gave her lodginge from Sundaie till Wednesday, which daie she dyed and lefte a yonge child behind her, which child was borne within the towne of Macclesfeild, and whereas there was agreement made by the parishioners of the said parishe of Prestburie in August 1636 and confirmed by order at the sessions next after holden at Middlewich that everie township within the said parishe should mayntayne their owne poore, (which agreement and order all of us are most willinge to performe) we your peticioners (conceyvinge and perswadinge our selves, that this child ought not to be made one of our poore, by reason not anie one of us knoweth or can learne that ever the said Jane lodged in our township before that tyme of her decease) peticioned the bench at the sessions holden at Knottesford in Aprill last, and their it was ordered that the churchwardens and overseers of the poore for the whole parish, should provyde for the child untill it were further orderedd, since which tyme at the sessions holden at Namptwich upon the peticion of the churchwardens of the said parish, the bench (as appeareth by their order) much desyringe to be resolved of the lawfullnes of the custome of the said parish, did therefore intreate Sir Edward Fitton and Sir William Brereton baronettes and Thomas Stanley and Humfray Davenport esquires to attend my lord cheife baron for his opinion in this case, and theirupon to order as in their discretions they should thinke meete, and in the meane tyme the child to be kept at the charge of our township which order we have sithence obeyed

Your peticioners humble request theirfore is, that your worships would take the premisses into your consideracions, and give such order theirin, as in your wisdomes shall seeme meete, and your peticioners (as in all dutie bounden) will ever pray for your worships etc.

  • Richard Normansell
  • Thomas Pott
  • John Pownall
  • John Ecckles
  • Thomas Mottershed
  • William Jackson
  • John [Calrawl?]
  • Francis [Daly?]
  • Lawrence Clarke
  • Robert Brodhurst
  • John Simcock
  • Jesper Shatwall
  • Richard Allen
  • William Tealey
  • George Dowsone
  • John Brondrith
paratext

Because the woman was a wanderer in Bollington, and harboured in Macclesfield and the child borne there, Macclesfield to keepe it and Bollington discharged, till cause shewed to the contrary

Richard Cane of Darnall, labourer. QJF 67/3/19 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace assembled at the quarter sessions

The humble peticion of Richard [Cane?] of Darnall laborer

Humbly informeth your worships your said poore supplyant that hee was borne and brought up in Darnall aforsaid where hee your said peticioner hath lived from the daie of his nativitie untill this present tyme with his mother in a backhowse, where hee cannot now anie longer resyde.

That your said orator hath a wyfe and sixe small children which hee hath (by his industrie and paynes taking) mainteyned hitherto, without anie charge or burden to the parish [illegible] of Whytegate or inhabitantes of Darnall where your said peticioner his said wyfe and children doe live

That your worships would bee pleased (the premiss considered) to permit your said poore supplyant to erect some lyttle howse uppon the common in Darnall aforsaid for the releif of him, his said poore wyfe and children; and hee your said peticioner (as in dutie bound) shall neverthelesse praie for your good worships in health and happines long to continewe.

paratext

[Conceditur?]

Anne Birkett. QJF 67/3/20 (1638)

To the honourable and right worshipfull his majesties justices assembled in their quarter sessions at Middlewich

The humble petition of Anne Birkett

Humbly sheweth That your peticioners late father William Brickett of Upton within the parish of Prestburie died about Michaelmas the last yeare, and left behind him, besides other children an infant of two yeares old from which tyme till about midsommer last your peticioner did maintaine the said infant with some small revercion that was left after the payment of her fathers debtes, and with what shee got by her owne labour and industrie, and when shee was not able any longer to releive it with needfull maintaineance shee repaired to the justices of that division in their monethly meeting and obtained warrant from Sir William Brereton barronet and Thomas Standley esquier directed to John Barlowe overseer for the poore for the said towne of Upton to provide for the said child which hee hath neglected, and the child is still unreleived

Your peticioner therefore humble prayeth that some course may be taken for the main=tainance of the poore child such as in your wisdomes you shall thinke most meet and your peticioner shall ever pray for your and happines

Raphe Reade and Anne his wife. QJF 67/3/21 (1638)

To the honourable and right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace at this quarter sessions assembled

The humble peticion of Raphe Reade and Anne his wiefe.

Sheweth that your poore peticioners weare borne and brought up in the parish of Peever, and have last lived in Allostocke within the same for the tyme of three years, together with there three children lately (deceased) and for as much as your poore peticioners have not any certeyne place of habitacion of there owne, more then what formerly they have obteyne ed for there money gotten by there industry and labour, which beinge nowe decayed and debard of by the inhabitantes are likely to lye without doares and by reason of the approchinge season there starve and perish unlesse some speedye course bee taken in charitye for there releefe

Your poore peticioners therefore humbly pray the premisses considered this honourable and worshipful bench would bee pleased to give order, that a cottage may bee erectted uppon the wast in some conve nient place for your peticioners to lodge in who hope to gett the consent of the cheefe lordes and owners of the wast for that end, wherein your petitioners will ever pray etc.

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[Conceditur?]

William Platt of the parishe of Whitegate. QJF 67/3/22 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace att this present sessions assembled

The humble petition of William Platt of the parishe of Whitegate

Sheweth unto your worships that whereas your sayd poore petitioner and his wife haveinge lived in the sayd parish for the space of eighteene yeres haveinge lived by our theire hand labour and bringinge upp our theire children without any the cost or charge to the sayd parishe and growinge ould and somwhat impotent are still desireous to spend the rest of our theire tyme in the sayd parishe if soe bee that wee they could have houseinge for our theire money as for merly and hitherto wee they have had which by some in the parish is greatly stood against and the persons of whom wee they have taken houseinge (throw the malice of some persons in the said parish) are alreadye fyned and the rest threatned that would sett your sayd petitioner any houseinge soe that your sayd poore petitioner and his wife by the reason afforesayd are lyke to starve for wante of harbour this next ensueinge winter if some other course by your good worships bee not herein taken for his better releife

May it therfore please your good worships the premisses considered to give order that your poore petitioner may eyther have houseinge within the sayd parishe for his money without the further vexation or trouble of any whom hee shall take it of, or else that your worships would bee pleased to give order that your poore petitioner may erect up some little harbour in some convenient place of the sayd parish for his futur re leife in this their ould age and impotencie and your sayd petitioner and his wife (as theire bounden duetye) shall dayly pray for your good worships ever felicities

Raphe Prince of Spurstowe, laborer. QJF 67/3/23 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace assembled at the quarter sessions.

The humble peticion of Raphe Prince of Spurstowe laborer.

Humbly informeth your worships your said poore supplyant that one Thomas Prince your said orators sonne came about a three weekes before Whitsontyde last past unto your said peticioners howse, and there fell sick and dyed about 8 weekes since

That, ymediately after [illegible] the said Prince fell sick Margaret Prince wyfe unto the deceast and daughter in lawe unto your said oratour came unto your said supplyantes howse and left 2 of hir children theire with your said peticioner being grandfather unto them; and an aged ould man not able to releive himself. The premises considered; maie it please your good worships to commiserate your said poore supplyantes cause; soe as the said poore children maie have releif out of the parish of Bunbury and towneship of Spurstowe aforsaid, wherein they were borne, and nowe live, and your said poore orator (as in dutie bound) will praie etc.

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[illegible] William Betteley to take the youngest and the peticioner to keepe the other

Elizabeth Stretch, spinster. QJF 67/3/25 (1638)

To the right worshipfull Peeter Venables esquire baron of Kynderton and the rest of his majesties justices assembled at the quarter sessions.

The humble peticion of Elizabeth Stretch spinster

Humbly informeth your worships, your said poore oratrix, that shea was bred and borne in the parish of Lower Peever where shea continewed amoungst hir freindes for the space of almost 60tie yeres.

That your said peticioner about sixe yeres agone (at the intreatie of one William Yarwood late of Sproston deceassed) came to live with him and his wyfe being cozen germans to your said supplyant, with whome shea lived for the space of sixe yeares (now past) in Sproston aforsaid, without anie charge or burden to the parishes of Peever or Myddlewyche or either of them.

That your said William Yarwood and his said wief being both dead, and your said peticioner (throughe Godes visitacion fallen lame and decrepit) is whereby shea is disinabled to get hir living as formerly; is altogeither destitute of a place for habitacion, as alsoe for livelyhood; in either the the said parishes.

Maie it please your good worships (the premises considered) to commiserate the distressed estate of your said poore supplyant soe as she maie have releif out of either of the said parishes as your good worships in your grave consideracions shall thinke most meete. And your said peticioner (as in dutie bound) will neverthelesse praie etc.

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The petitioner to deliver all to the over seers for the poore and they to provide for her during her life and to allowe her xx shillings per annum

John Cotton, tailor. QJF 67/3/26 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace assembled at the quarter sessions.

The humble peticion of John Cotton taylour.

Humbly informeth your worships, that your said supplyant, [illegible] was borne and brought up from his infancy in the towneship of Cotton within the parish of Sandbach where your said oratour, his wyfe and fower small children did lately inhabit, as subtenauntes to one John Broome of Cranage. That the said Broome is fyned in 18 pounds for enterteyning your said peticioner and his said wyfe and children into the said howse in Cotton aforsaid to live theire as inmates for the space of 3 yeres last past, your said oratour not houlding 4 acres of land belonging to the said cottage, as the statute (in such case provideth.)

That your said poore peticioner his said wyfe and children have not bene aniewyse burdensome to the said parish of Sandbache or inhabitantes of Cotton aforsaid, but hath lived and mainteyned himself and his said family by his industry and labor in his said trade and calling.

Maie it therefore please your good worships (the premises considered) to admitt your said supplyant to erect a cottage uppon the waste within Cotton aforesaid for the releif of your said oratour and his said family; and your said peticioner (as in duty bound) shall neverthelesse praie for your good worships in health and happines long to continewe.

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[Conceditur?]

Elizabeth Bradshawe, spinster. QJF 67/3/28 (1638)

To the right worrshipfull his majesties justices at this quarter sessions

The humble peticion of Elizabeth Bradshawe spinster

Sheweth whereas one Raphe Barrowe (beinge the reputed father of a bastard chylde begotten upon the bodie of your petitioner and yet unborne) is bound over to this quarter sessions and your petitioner beinge within a weecke or ten dayes of the tyme of her deliverance and verie poore and freindles in these partes, and the said Barrowe of good meanes, and freindes

Maye it therefore please your worships the premisses consider=ed, so to order that [illegible] the said Raphe Barrowe may alowe unto your poore petitioner some presente meanes towardes her presente relieffe and further to order for takinge of the said childe so soone as it shalbee borne as your worships in your discrecions shall thinke meete and your poore petitioner shalbe ever bounden to praye for your healthes and happines longe to enduer

Richard Litler. QJF 67/3/29 (1638)

To his majesties justices assembled at the quarter sessions holden at Midlewich the second of October anno domini 1638.

The humble peticion of Richard Litler.

Humbly shewing unto this honourable bench that whereas your petitioner was bound to the peace for a batterye against one Richarde Grandfield, and by his recognisance was to appeare at the next generall sessions of the peace then next followinge which should have bene the sessions holden at Chester in January was twelve month, but being released before Doctor Byrom (who tooke your petitioner bound) with the full consent of the prosecutor, before the said sessions came, and by some necligence or oversight was not discharged in the clarke of the peace his booke.

May it therefore please this honourable bench to give order that your petitioner may be discharged of the said recognisans and your petitioner shall ever pray etc.

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[illegible] and not to be estreated

Johan Duckworth of the parish of Davenham. QJF 67/3/30 (1638)

To the right worshipfull his majesties justices of peace att this present sessions assembled

The humble petition of Johan Duckworth of the parish of Davenham

Most humbly sheweth unto your worships that wheras your sayd poore petitioner beinge borne in the said parish and haveinge longe tyme continued there with out any housing but what she hath taken from yere to yere, but now by reason of your poore peticioners age and impotencie and the greatnes of the yerely rentes to bee paid as alsoe the scarcitye of housinge to bee taken your poore peticioner your is lyke utterly to sterve and perishe for want of harbour the next ensuinge winter unles your worships most gracious favour bee further herein to her extended.

May it therefore please your good worships the premisses consider=ed to commisserate the poore estate of your poore petitioner and to give order that your poore petitioner may erect up some little cottage or harbour in some convenient place of the parish of Davenham for her [illegible] her releife future releife in this her ould age and impotencie and your said petitioner (as duetye ever byndes her) will dayly pray for your good worships ever felicities:

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Wee whose names are subscribed doe (in the behalfe of this petitioner) [illegible] desire your worships favourable consideration herein

  • George Bradforde
  • Richard Dutton
  • Joane Holford
  • Samuel Carington curat
  • Robart Venables ibidem
  • George [Walley?]
  • Richard [Patti...e?]
  • John Ryld

[Conceditur?]

2: Octobris 1638.

The benche requireth that the churchwardens and overseers for the poore in the said parish will provide harbboure for the poore woman and reliefe allso as the lawe requireth, and that forthwith [illegible] uppon payne of 40 shillings

[John ...lend?]