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Cheshire Quarter Sessions: 1658

Petitions to the Cheshire Quarter Sessions.

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Richard Piddall and 12 other inhabitants of Bramhall. QJF 85/4/123 (1658)

Much honoured gentlemen

It may hereby please you to understand, that the crying noyce of sin (especially in our towneship) is that which at presente enforceth us to cry unto you for justice against it. We have not formerly beene used thus openly to complaine, whilst wickednes kept it selfe within some boundes, but now it rendring our partes more Sodome like then English, through some connivance and [imp...tie?] (peradventure) it hath mett with, ites high time for all (right worshipfull) that would have peace here and glory hereafter to bend their bow against it. But that we may not be further tedious, we make bold to certifye your worships that in our towneship we have an alehowse formerly kept by on Richard Browne, and now by one Richard Fallowes and a kinswoman of the said Brownes, (who as some say are lately marryed but the trueth of this your worships may knowe if it please you further to inquire thereof) this Fallowes is a smith and since his comeing into the towne to worke tabled himselfe at this alehowse, who hath beene much suspected a long time (through many symtoms that were taken notice of) to be too familiar with the sayd Brownes kinswoman, but none could prove it, till God discovered their secret wickednes by her concepcion with child. And the last weeke another yong woman who often did worke at the sayd alehowse was delivered of an obortive birth and (as it is sayd) fathered her child of this Fallowes also by the examinacion of whom and of the women that were with her in her travell, your worships may come to have more knowledge of the trueth and of what sad attempts the yong woman made to have kept secrett their wickednes.

Worthie gentlemen that which we beg from you, is the same which God requires from you to witt that condigne punishment may be inflicted on theis offenders, and that the howse may be suppressed from selling of ale and beere for the future, it being a howse that harboureth drunkardes frequently and other misdeameanours that [depende?] thereupon. Soe having discharged our duties we leave it to your worships to determine praying that God may stir up your heartes and make you instruments of his glory herein, and of peace to [our?] county and in particuler to us who are Your worships servantes to be commanded.

  • Richard [.iddall?]
  • William Thomson
  • Ralph Milener
  • Hugh [illegible]
  • Robert [illegible]
  • Raph Smith
  • William Browne
  • William Adshead
  • Thomas Hoult
  • William Burch
  • John Brentnall
  • Richard [Fallowes?]
  • Richard Thorniley

Margaret Knowlesley, widow. QJF 85/4/124 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace att there generall quarter sessions held for the county of Chester

The humble petition of Margret Knowlesley a poore destressed widdowe

In all humblenes shewethe

That your petitioner and her auncestours tyme out of minde have lived in there severall tymes in Namptwich within the said county and that your petitioner was married to Randle Knowlesley her late husband 46 yeares; he being borne at Wibunbury within the said countye.

That your poore petitioners husband Randle Knowlesley was a souldier in the armye for the defence and safetye of the common wealth of England against the common enemye in the island of Man for the space of five yeares in which service he dyed; leaving your destressed petitioner and her charge in a most deplorable and starving condicion; she havinge noe comfort but her sonne who is now in his highenes service in the army in France

And inasmuch as your petitioner hath been true and faithfull for the common wealths good not onely against the enimye att the seige att Namptwich but ventured her life in her jorney to Wemm to prevent the betrayinge of yt by the Kinges partye and alsoe att Litchfeild and Stafford and other places.

And in regard your poore petitioner is reduced to a pereshinge estate her humble request is that she may have some smale pencion for her preservacion and livelyhood in her sad condicion.

And she shall ever pray etc.

paratext

If proved before 1 pound for her present relefe paid by mee at Nantwich

Edward Speed and Thomas Bradbury, late overseers of the highways in Miccle Trafford. QJF 85/4/126 (1658)

County of Chester

To the worshipfull the justices of peace att the present quarter sessions held att Chester for and within the sayd county

The humble peticion of Edward Speed and Thomas Bradbury late overseers of the way in and for the townshipp Miccle Trafford

Sheweth That whereas your petitioners have fetched severall warrantes from the justice of peace to compell Richard Cottgreave of thaforesayd towne to pay his proporcion towardes the repayre of a roade that is in the sayd townshipp beinge 5 shillings and 11 pence (notwithstanding the rest of the inhabitantes have payd their partes,) and hee hath and doth refuse to pay the same, not alleadging any reason why hee will not and alsoe that your petitioneres have layd downe the money aforesayd for the sayd wayes

May itt therefore please your worshippes the premisses beinge considered to graunt your order that the sayd Richard Cottgreave may pay the moneyes beinge 5 shillings - 11 pence which your petitioneres have already disbursed or else they are like to loose the same

And your petitioneres as in duty bound will ever pray etc

paratext

The next justice to bind him over to shew cause at next sessions

William Barnett. QJF 85/4/128 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace of the county of Chester att the quarter sessions att Chester January 1657

The humble peticion of William Barnett

Sheweth that your peticioner by reason of a wound which hee received in the parliamentes service att the takeing of Shockelach Hall att present is, and for many yeares hath been in great misery and his parentes who formerly kept him being now dead your peticioner is constrayned in necessity to beg your worshipps favour if hee may bee taken into the list of the pencioners pentioners for this county and that hee may have some allowance forth of Malpas parish yearly for the supply of his necessityes in regard there is noe pencioner or maimed souldier within the said parish where your peticioner was borne as may appere by the certificate annexed and your peticioner will pray etc

paratext

1 pound per annum allowed

13 people in support of William Barnet of Hampton. QJF 85/4/129 (1658)

To the honourable Sir William Brereton knight and barronet and the rest of the worshipfull justices of peace

Att the quarter sessions holden att Chester.

Well knowing the sad condition that William Barnet of Hampton now liveth in, by reason of a wound received in the parliament service att the taking of Shocklach Hall, then under the command of Captain Andrew Brereton and being in no wise able to helpe himselfe, his parentes being dead in whose life time he was not burdensome to his parrish; but now through want he being in danger to loose his legge unlesse some present course be taken for his cure which of himselfe he is not in the least able to doe: wee therefore who know it to bee true make bold to intreat that he may bee taken into the list of the pencioneres for this county, there goinge a greate deale of money forth of the Malpas parrish yearly; and in that parrish noe maimed souldieres save only hee: theise our desires wee have presumed to make knowne unto you; and desire your order herin, as being nothing but what is well worthy your consideration, and tested by the certificate of

Your worships most humble servants

  • Andrew Brereton
  • John Brereton
  • Randull Palin
  • Robart Smyth
  • Randull Croxton
paratext

Upon the credible information of the premises wee joyne with our neighbours in this request

  • William Holland
  • George Mainwaring
  • Randull Eddowe
  • Egerton Brette
  • Robert Roe
  • Peter Dod
  • William Brocke
  • William Bostocke

The inhabitants of the hundred of Wyrrall. QJF 85/4/130 (1658)

County of Chester

To the worshipfull the justices of peace att the present quarter sessiones held att Chester for and within the sayd county

The humble peticion of the severall inhabitantes within the hundred of Wyrrall

Sheweth that there is a great roade in the sayd hundred leading betweene Chester and Great Neston which is a sea port towne in the sayd hundred much decayed and out of repayre soe that itt now is scarce passable and alsoe whereas wee the sayd inhabitantes have beene alwaies ready and willing to contribute towardes the repayre of bridges and highwayes in other places within this county

May itt therefore please your worshippes the premisses beinge considered [illegible] and alsoe that the adjacent inhabitantes to the sayd roade are not able to repayre the same to graunt your order that the rest of the county may contribute something towardes the repayring of the sayd roade and your petitioneres as in duty bound will ever pray etc.

paratext

referred to the justices to examine the decay and certifie

John Gouldson. QJF 85/4/132 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace at the generall quarter sessions of the peace to bee houlden for and within the sayd county.

The humble peticion of John Gouldson

Sheweth That your petitioneres father John Gouldson in his life tyme for the space of 3 yeares untill hee was slayne faythfully served the parliament under the commaund of Captayne Rathborne, and upon that consideracion your petitioner was admitted pencioner within the hundred of Wyrrall and received 1 pound - 6 shillings - 8 pence for 4 yeares together untill Master Thomas Robinson was head counstable, whoe denyed to pay the sayd pencion to your petitioner not alleadging any reason for itt.

Wherefore the premisses beinge considered and alsoe that your petitioner is unable to gett his living by reason of a lamenesse which is in his limbes, may itt please your worshippes to allow your peticioner a competent pencion to your petitioner for the future, and alsoe to order your petitioner to receave the pencion formerly allowed him for 3 yeares which is yett behind and unpayd him

And your petitioner as in duty bound will ever pray etc.

paratext

Master Robinson to shew cause

40 shillings and then discharged

The summe paid by my master

Chester January 19th 1657

It is ordered by this court that the head constable of the lower devision within the hundred of Wirrall doe forthwith uppon sight hereof pay unto the peticioner the summe of forty shillings and then his pencion to cease

[H Milton De...?]

Peter Jackson. QJF 85/4/133 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace att Chester

The humble peticion of Peter Jackson

That Ellen Jackson your peticioners daughter did lately beare a bastard child, and in her extremity of labour thereof, shee fathered the same upon Raphe [Ya...is?]. Whereupon your petitioner obteyned a warrant to [illegible] apprehend the said Raph who did and doth soe obscure himselfe that your petitioner cannot serve the said warrant. Though hee bee of a great ability estate

Your petitioner craveth that hee may have an order that the said Raph may keepe the said child

paratext

To take the child or pay 40 shillings

Joyley Wyld, widow. QJF 85/4/134 (1658)

To the honourable his highnes justices of the peace for the countie of Chester

The humble peticion of Joyley Wyld widdowe

Sheweth that your peticioners late husband Joseph Wyld did (in his life time videlicet from March 1642 untill the time of his death, which was about October last past) faithfully serve the parliament under the severall comaundes of Collonell Booth Collonell Duckenfield and Captain Philip Eaton as by some of their certificates hereunto annexed may appeare.

That your peticioners said husband dyed in the said service and hath left your poore peticioner and two small children destitute of all meanes or freindes to releive them, insomuch that your peticioner (though to her power endeavouringe) is not able any longer to provide for them and herselfe without your honours commiseracion herein.

May it therefore please your honoures to admitt your peticioner a competent pension for the yearely releife of her and her said two small children and shee shall ever pray etc.

paratext

Treasurer to allow her 20 shillings to carry her to London

Paid the said summe of 20 shillings according to order

Thomas Wainewrigh of Baddeley. QJF 85/4/136 (1658)

To the worshippfull the justices of the peace etc.

The humble peticion of Thomas Wainewrigh of Baddeley.

Humbly sheweth That whereas your peticioner for severall yeares past haveing lived in the towneshipp of Baddiley without being troublesome to any and now being destitute of an habitacion, being and not able to take any uppon the racke through his present poverty: alsoe haveing a wife and foure children to maintaine and nothing to maintaine them of but what he gettes by his owne industry and laborious endeavoures, he is likely to be exposed to great misery and calamity unlesse by your pious consideracion in time prevented

May it therefore please your worshipps to comiserate your poore peticioners condicion and grant him your order to erect a cottage uppon some part of the wastes in Baddiley aforesaid he haveing already obtayned free leave and consent of the lord of the soyle and the inhabitantes here soe to doe and your peticioner shall ever pray etc

paratext

In the parish of Baddily by consent of the lord

John Hoole, son of Thomas Hoole late of Wibumbury. QJF 85/4/137 (1658)

To the honourable and right worshipful the justices of the peace etc and gentlemen at this present assessions: the submissive request and humble pettition of John Hoole sonne of Thomas Hoole late of Wibumbury in the countie of Chester

Humbly craveth leave to showe unto this honerable bench that your petticioner about 3 yeares agoe, was by the consent of Randull Boughey his father in law putt an apprentice to one John Stringer then of Namptwich to learne the trade and manuell occupation of a joyner for the terme of seven yeares, who had and received from your said pettitioners father in law 7 pounds - 10 shillings with your pettitioner: butt contrary to covenants your pettitioners said master left the country went to London and since to seas and left your pettitioner now two yeares since untaught his trade and to be further burdensom and chargable to his freinds, who have sent many letters to enquire after the returne of the said master butt cannot heere anything theere=of neither are the sure whether hee bee dead or alive: your petticioner being a younger brother borne upon a small estate: and his saide father in law being yett willing to lay forth himselfe further for the preferment of your pettitioner to another master to learne the said trade of a joyner in the which your pettitioner is allready entred

Your pettitioner most humbly prayeth the order of this honerable bench to be freed from his covenantes and ingagementes to his said former master that hee may legally ingage himself to another master

And your petitioner will ever pray etc

paratext

Granted unles cause bee shewed at next sessions

John Lace, a poor inhabitant of Tattenhall. QJF 85/4/138 (1658)

To the honourable his highnes justices of the peace assigned for the county of Chester in their generall sessione, the humble petition of John Lace a poore inhabit=ante: in the towneshippe of Tattenhall within the said county

Sheweth that the petitioner haveing long beene an inhabi tant within the said towneshippe, and mayntayned himselfe his wife and childe by his dayly labour, and being now by sickenes and other afflictions reduced to much penury and wante and destitute of a place of habitation

The premises considered he humbly prayes your honours order to erect a cottage by the consent of the cheife lord and inhabitantes upon the waste of the mannor of [Tattenhall?] aforesaid for the necesary releife of him and his poore famyly.

And he will pray for your honours.

We the inhabitantes of Tattenhall whose names are subscribed doe testifie the truth of the petition and desire it may be graunted

  • Peter Dutton.
  • John Rogers
  • paratextChurch wardens
  • George Larden
  • Ralph [Dods?]
  • paratextCounstables
  • Thomas Dod
  • paratextCounstbles
  • Moses Marsh
  • Edward Spede
  • John Bostocke
  • Josias Clarke
  • John Metcalfe
  • George Edge
  • Richard Dod
  • Peter Filkin
  • John Wrighte
  • William Whitfeild
  • Richard Whitfeild
  • Richard Mosely
  • Richard Jeynson
  • Thomas Dutton
  • Peter Tilston
  • John Aldersey
  • [R...?] Lowe
  • [Samuel Bold?]
  • Charles Hurst
  • Eedward Bradfild
  • John Browster
  • Richard Dod
  • John [Bouleton?]
  • John [Dow..s?]
  • John Hunt

Randle Ridgeway and Anne Ridgeway of Over Alderley. QJF 85/4/139 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace of the generall quartre sessions of the peace held at Chester the 19th day of January 1657.

The humble peticion of Randle Ridgeway and Anne Ridgeway both of and within Over Alderley within the sayd county

Humbly sheweth that att the last quarter sessions of the peace held for and within the saide county that honourable bench was pleased upon your peticioners peticion then presented to order them the cottage in the sayde peticion mencioned which is heareunto anexed before which tyme, one John Chantler agent of or baliffe for Master Leycester had pulled downe one halfe of the sayd cottage and carried it away and allsoe tooke possession of some smalle quantity of ground tyme out of memory of man thereunto belonging by which your peticioners are deprived of any theire former lyvelehood and unles your honours favourable order be to them in this theire lamentable condicion extended, for theire peacable injoyment of the said cottage and ground theire unto belonging the are lykely to be turned vagrants, as by the sayd peticion heare unto anexed more at large it doth and may appeare.

May it theirefore pleace this honourable bench to take the premisses into consideracion and to grante to your peticioners the order of this courte that the sayde Chantler may bring the materialls of that building he pulled downe, and caried a way back againe and that they may allsoe enjoy the sayd cottage and ground theire unto belonging without interruption, rendring yearely payment for the same according to the [illegible] rent theire of hearetofore formerly payd

And your peticioners will ever pray

paratext

Former order confirmed and the tymber taken away restored

Randle Ridgeway and Ann Ridgeway of Over Alderley. QJF 85/4/140 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the p peace of the generall quarter sessions of the peace held at Middlewych the 7th of Aprill 1657.

The humble peticion of Randle Ridgeway and Ann Ridgeway both of and within Over Alderley with in the sayd county

Humbly sheweth That your peticioner Randle Ridgeway is a poore necessitous person of an indisposicion and distracted temper and not able to help conteyne and keepe him selfe from ruine, and hath nothing to st sustaine him selfe in his necessitous and sad condicion, but what he receved from some few charitable and well disposed people togeather with his sister Annes industrie care and constant provision, over and for [illegible] without which such charitable actes as he doth most thankfully and humbly receive from others would not in any measure supply and support his necessitous condicion, and your peticion doe humbly shew that the sayd Anne Ridgeway hath not any thing to sustaine or supply her owne and her brothers occasions withall but what shee hardly laboriously and earnestly earnes, by handy laboure of makeing buttons, yett hath neither of your peticioners been in the least chargeably or burthensome to any the inhabitantes or neighbours in Over Alderley, wheire the doe at present inhabitt and your peticioner doe further shew that not onely the but theire parents have lived remayned and continued in the cottage wherein the now are in Over Alderley aforesayd, for and during the whole tearme and tyme of forty yeares and upwards without the least interuption of any person or persones what soever. But now soe it is may it please your honours that the worshipfull Peter Lecester of Tabley within the sayde county esquire did very lately command and require your peticioners to provide for and remove themselves forth of the sayde cottage of or house wheire in the have soe long lived for theire they should not stay nor have any resydence nor upon any parte of his land (though they were borne upon and have continued theire soe long as above sayde) and that he would cause the house wheire in your petitioners have lived and still doe live to and have noe other place to [resort?] unto pulled downe by and [thr...?] [illegible] imperious dealing your petitioners will be turned or rather exposed to vagrancy which they humbly conceive the law in any sence intends not or to be cast upon such places as will nether receive or allow them any house roome or conveniency to live in, or to gett theire livinge which will render the sayde condicion of the above sayd Randle most intollerable to your peticioner Ann.

The premisses tenderly considered may it therefore please your honours to grant to your peticioners the order of this court to confirme uphould and establish them in the poore cottage wheire they now live, and that such course may be taken they may not be turned vagrants, nor that Master Lecester may neither [disquiett?] or molest them in theire injoyments thereof nor pull downe the sayde cottage as he hath protested and threatned to doe. And the rather because of theire long continuance theire, and the extremity or cruell hardship they will unadavoydably be putt unto yf disturbed removed or theire cottage pulled downe in that they know nott who will receive them

And your peticioners will ever as in duty bound pray.

paratext

This is to certify you further that your peticioners house is [abey?] of itt pulled downe and carried away to a place now in controversy beinge parte of Broadheath which is now in varience betwixt Master Lecester and Master Acton now alsoe yor peticioner humbly prayeth that this honerable bench will soe order that hee who carried her building away may restore itt to her againe according as hee found itt and your peticioner will ever pray etc

Shee to bee continued in the old cottage until further order of the court or other course taken by due course of law

John Griffith. QJF 85/4/141 (1658)

To the honourable Collonel Brookes Collonel Croxton, Barron Bruen Collonel Gerrard Collonel Berkenhead, Captaine Whiteworth and Captaine Partington and the rest of the honourable comanders now or in the late warrs for the comonwealth of England within the county of Chester etc

The humble petition of John Griffith

Sheweth that your petitioner was twelve yeares in the service for the said comon wealth in the late warrs in Tarvin garrison and else where and was plundred of all his estate and meanes of livelihood by the occasion of the said warrs, and was an officer for the collecteing and gatheringe in of all kind of provision for the garrison of Tarvin untill the reducement of Chester which was for many yeares.

That your petitioner is now growen aged dim of sight lame of his limbes and not able to doe service as formerly and that hee hath an aged woman to his wife, and att this present both of them remaine in a very sad and deploreable condicion and are like to perish unles your honours releeife in comisseracion and pitty of theire povertie bee extended to them.

Your poore petitioner humbly prayeth your honourable favor and pious consideracion that you would bee pleased to make your poore petitioner one of the pentioners in your honours severall hundredes for his releeife, or otherwise as in your honours pious wisedomes shalbee thought meete.

And your poore petitioner shall pray etc.

Henry Warner, Richard Lamb and Thomas Hesketh. QJF 86/1/114 (1658)

The To the justices of the peace etc.

The humble peticion of Henry Warner of Altrincham Richard Lamb of Timperley and Thomas Hesketh of Dunham in the said county

Sheweth that at the last quarter sessions held at Knutsford your peticioner Henry Warner appeared appon his recognisance for the good abearing the other peticioners being suertyes for him and it was alleadged that your peticioner Warner after his being bound was druncke and theruppon the said recognizance being eighty pound penalty [was?] [illegible] [to be?] estreated although your other peticioners Lamb and Hesketh were then absent.

Now forasmuch as your peticioners are very poore and their whole substance depends uppon the order aforesaid and your peticioners being in great hopes that they can produce sufficient wittnesses who will give full satisfaccion for the reverseing of the aforesaid order

Your peticioners therefore humbly pray that the whole matter may be reheard at the next generall quarter sessions to be holden within this county and that in the meane time the former order for estreating the said recognizance may be suspended and your peticioners as in duty bound shall ever pray etc.

paratext

Respited

John Cooper of Clotton, butcher. QJF 86/1/115 (1658)

To the worrshipfull the justices of peace at this present sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of John Cooper of Clotton butcher

Sheweth that whereas a certaine pencion of foure nobles per annum was heretofore granted unto James Baguley late of Clotton aforesaid being a maimed souldier, who late was lately called into Scotland leaveing one boy behinde him (by name James Baguley) which your peticioner alloweing him the aforesaid pencion of foure nobles to maintaine the same child which said summe is now denied by the treasurers to be paid [unlesse?] since the said James Baguley is not at present within this commonwealth of England whereby the child is likely to be exposed to great penury and want (unlesse in time by your worshipps prevented) [illegible]

May it therefore please your worshipps to grant your order to the treasurers of the county for prisoneres and maimed souldieres to pay the aforesaid summe of foure nobles per annum to your peticioner for the maintenance of the said child and your peticioner shall ever pray etc

paratext

To be till next sessions and [illegible]

Randle Palin, register for the parish of Malpas. QJF 86/1/116 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace for the county pallatine of Chester assembled att the generall sessions houlden for the said county in the shyre hall the 19th and 20th day of January 1657

The humble petition of Randle Palin regester for the parrish of Malpas:

Sheweth that your petitioner being by the full [consent and good approbation?] of the minester [illegible] and major parte of the parrishioners of the said parrish elected regester and sworne to the true and faithfull keeping of the regester booke and of all accompts of mareiges birthes and burialles in the said parrish before Thomas Manwaring and Jonathan Bruen esquires and justices of peace and quorum for this county in the yeare 1653 and ever since that time hath observed and performed the same now whearas their is severall persons whose names are under written in the said parrish have made a breach of the said act and have made clendestine marriages and now live in the grand sin of adultery and that the same act declareth that all marriages both lawfull and unlawfull are reffered to the right worshipfull the justices of peace att their generall quarter sessions I humbly desire this worshippfull bench to take the said act into consideration and to graunt your worshipps order for the convaying the said persones to the common goale or such other punishment as this worshipfull bench shall thinke meete:

Anthony Barlow and Dorothy Lewis John Davies and Ellin Hooper paratextTo appeare and hath a certifficate from a justice and minister Randle Wyan and Anne Manning Edward Price and Anne Phillips Randle Carsley and Elizabeth Gervis Randle Woolley alias Thomas and Elizabeth Dew paratextTo appeare on Saturday [illegible] Randle Mooreton and Anne Price Richard Doynton and Anne Boult paratext[illegible] Robert ap Hugh and Davis and Alze Tumkin

Richard Dollett and Mary Low Thomas Edge and Mary Hopley

William Taylor and Mary Alliatt

paratext

Referred to Master Tanat to examine and certifie

Chester January the 19th 1657

[It?] is referred to Master Tanat who is hereby desired [illegible] the premises and to certifye the same at [illegible] quarter sessions to be held for the said county

[H Milton De...?]

According to order I have sent for all theise parties mencioned in this peticon all which doe acknowledge they were married without publicacion and contrarie to the act by [Master?] Robert Thornton and Master Smyth of Huxley [illegible] [scandalous?] and ejected ministers and doe [illegible] [themselves?] to the order of the bench

Thomas Tanat

Everard Sherman. QJF 86/1/117 (1658)

Middlewich Aprill 29th 1658

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace att this present quarter sessions.

The humble peticion of Everard Sherman

Humbly sheweth that your petitioner uppon the 5th of March last past (being a sheriffes bayliffe) was employed by one Anne Wayne to serve an [execucion?] issued out of the sheriffes countie courte att her suite; uppon the goods of Thomas Broome and of Middlewich, and before hee had levied the same hee was assaulted by the said Thomas Broome Marye his wife Thomas [Amerye?] and John Hodgskinne, and by them beaten [and?] [illegible] with an iron pestell iron fire shovell and iron tongues and other weapons, insomuch that your petitioner was by them cast out of doores for dead, and there left in the open streete wallowing in his blood and hath received such a wound in his left arme that hee is informed by persones of good skill that hee shall never have any considerable use of itt while hee liveth that uppon informacion of the truth of the premisses before Collonell Croxton hee was pleased to committ Broome and his wife to prison for want of sureties and to take sureties for Thomas Amerye his appearance to answer the same att this present sessions, and John Hodgskin hereuppon fledd

Your petitioner therefore humbly prayes that your worshipps wilbee pleased to consider the injurye hee hath received in the due execucion of his lawfull writt [illegible] which may tend to the evill example of others and your petitioner yett not recovered but in danger of his life, and that you wilbee pleased to continue the said Amerye still bound and the said Broome and his wife to finde sufficient sureties such as this court shall thinke fitt to accept or else to remayne in prison till your petitioner bee recovered in his health and as bound hee will ever pray etc.

William Bayley of Calveley, laborer. QJF 86/1/118 (1658)

To the worshippfull the justices at this present sessions assembled etc

The humble peticion of William Bayley of Calveley laborer

Sheweth that your peticioner haveing lived within the parish towneshipp of Calveley in the parish of Bunbury for the space of twelve yeares dureing which time he hath maintained himselfe and family without being troublesome to any and [haveing?] five child seven seven children (six whereof were borne within the said townshipp of Calveley) and his wife to [maintaine?] [illegible] destitute of an habitacion to live in being [illegible] to take any uppon the racke he is able likely to be exposed to great misery and calamity unlesse by your pious consideracion in time prevented

May it therefore please your worshipps to granth your peticioner liberty to erect a cottage within the townshipp of Calveley aforesaid he haveing already obtained free leave of the lord of the soyle there soe to doe and your peticioner shall ever pray

paratext

Granted

order made

These are to certifye whom it may concerne that I have read over the aforemencioned peticion and considered the premisses contained therein and doe freely consent that the peticioner William Bayley have leave to erect a cottage within the townshipp of Calveley wittnesse my hand and seale this nineteenth day of Aprill 1658

[illegible] Davenport

Anne Moseley and two small children. QJF 86/1/119 (1658)

Middlewich Aprill 29th 1658.

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace att this present quarter sessiones.

The humble peticion of Anne Moseley and two small children.

Humbly sheweth that your petitioners husband William Moseley went souldier under the command of Generall Venables the voyage for Jameca and left your petitioner 3 small children and her selfe and noe maynteynance nor estate but your peticioners owne labour, that your petitioners husband never returned but for ought your petitioner knowes was lost in the said service or otherwise disposed of, soe that your petitioner is deprived of him, and one of her children since dead, and the other two are unable for themselves, and your petitioner since Generall Venables returne hath [had?] [illegible] [allowance?] for a little tyme which hath beene kept from her by the space of 12 twelve months last past and upwards (as may appeare by the certificate of Captayne Whitworth) and your petitioner and her children are all most sterved for want of releife

Her most humble request to your worshippes therefore is that in reference to her lamentable condicion you wilbee pleased to afford her some pencion or releife towards the maynteynance of her selfe and poore children, and the rather for that your petitioners said husband hath beene a souldier in the service of the common wealth all the tyme of the late warres and as in dutye bound etc.

paratext

Overseers of the poore

Daniell Cartwright of Coppenhall, husbandman. QJF 86/1/122 (1658)

To the worshippfull the justices of the peace of the county palatine of Chester

The humble peticion of Daniell Cartwright of Coppenhall husbandman

Humbly sheweth

That whereas your peticioner being bread and borne within the townshipp and parish of Coppenhall and haveing lived within the said townshipp for the space of 48 yeares, alsoe haveing his mother being of the age of 97 yeares (yet liveing) and his wife and five small children to maintaine and nothing to maintayne them on but what he gettes by his owne industry and laboure and now being destitute of an habitacion for himselfe and family to live in for want of which (being not able through his poverty to take any uppon the racke) he doth suffer much hardship and is likely to be exposed to much misery unlesse by your pious consideracion in time prevented

May it therefore please your worshipps to grant your peticioner leave to erect a cottage within the townshipp of Copenhall he haveing free leave and consent already of the lord of the soyle here soe to doe

And your petitioner shall ever pray

paratext

Granted

Dorathie Venables, the relict of Richard Venables. QJF 86/1/123 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace of the county of Chester, at this sessions assembled

The humble petition of Dorathie Venables the relect of Richard Venables

Humbly sheweth that your petitionour Dorathie Venables the relect of Richard Venables lately deceassed, being in possession of one house, and garden, scittuate, and being in Namptwich of the chourch land, the inherritance of Sir Thomas Wilbrahams the which house cost her husbandes father above one hundred poundes buildinge, her husband being borne in the said house and tennantes to itt neere 14 fourescore yeares payinge per anno thirteene shillings foure pence; and your petitionour was married above 13 yeares unto the said Richard and brought two hundred poundes and above to the said house; your petitionour being now aged above three=score and foure yeares, shee is left alone, destitute, and threattened, by the lordes bayliffes to be cast forth and dis=possessed of the said house, Sir Thomas and his lady promised [they?] the would not hinder mee her of itt, but his bayliffe sayth hee hath power to doe what pleaseth him, your petitioner beinge a gentlewo=man, astranger, one of the Grays of Lestershire

Humbly prayeth this honourable bench to take pitty and commiseration, one your petitioneres sade condicion and be pleased to be ameanes, that Sir Thomas and his ladye in her behalfe, that she may have her house, and garden, payinge the [anti...?] rent, or a reasonable fine for her life

And shall ever pray etc.

Elizabeth Kent, late wife of John of Little Hassall. QJF 86/1/124 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace of the county palatine of Chester assembled at the quarter sessions at Middlewich

the humble peticion of Elizabeth Kent late wife of John of Sandbach Little Hassall in the county aforesaid

Sheweth that whereas your peticioner hath lived a miserable life with John Kent aforesaid her husband about three yeares hee entertaining other strange women and so much addicted to them that at last hee left and forsooke your poore peticioner his wife whom shee followed as farre as Bristowe endeavouring to regaine his affection but shee laboured in vaine hee the said John her husband bringing one of his lewd women to lodge together with him and her in the same bedd upon which shee desisted to seek after him and hath for this seaven yeares lived as a widdow having never heard of him nor from him by all that time

May it therefore please your worshipps to grant that your peticioner may bee free in a second choice of another husband if the lawes of the land will permitt and suffer her so to doe you will ingage your peticioner in all humility to pray etc

The inhabitants of Stanthorne, Occleston, Newton, Hutton and adjacent towns. QJF 86/1/125 (1658)

[County?] of Chester

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace now assembled att Midlewich.

The humble peticion of the inhabitantes of Stanthorne Occleston Newton and Hutton and other townes adjacent

Sheweth that whereas some of your peticioners have binn formerly [indicted?] for not repaireinge the highway at the wallench although your peticioners have endeavoured as much as in them lyeth to have the way passable to their great charge and expences but their hopes have binn still frustrated and made ineffectuall by reason of severall floodes and cannot in any wise prevent itt unless a stone cawsey may be erected and made at the side of the water which workmen conceave will cause it to be passable and permennent which charge will be to the valew of 60 pounds or thereabout.

May it therefore please your worships to consider the premisses in regard that severall persons have binn in great danger of their lives and that the way is very usefull upon severall occasions as alsoe to prevent future dangeres and wee shall ever pray etc.

  • Ralph Walley
  • John Pearson
  • Richard Shawe
  • Edward Minshull
  • Robert Jackson
  • Thomas Bouroughes
  • William Hitchen
  • Raph Holland
  • William Higinson
  • William Farrington
  • William Yates
  • William Harrison
  • Mathew Wright
  • William Ravenscroft
  • Thomas Bousier
  • John Dudley
  • William Carter
  • Hughe [Kincy?]
  • Thomas Leigh
paratext

Ordered

Referred to Collonel Croxton Master Walley Master Yates Richard Shaw

Elizabeth Lydiatt of Hatton, spinster. QJF 86/1/126 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace and quorum for the county pallatine of Chester etc

The humble peticion of Elizabeth Lydiatt of Hatton spinster

Sheweth that her brother John Lydiatt and Elizabeth his wife both dyed within a fourtnight about two yeares since, and left behind them two small children Thomas and George thone about nine yeares of age, and thother about foure, which have noe meanes or goodes to maynetayne them, but must eyther have begged or starved had not your poore peticioner taken care of them,

That your petitioneres mother is yet livinge, very old, decrepit, and not able to helpe her selfe, and that she hath a brother who is a meire idiott, and changlinge, and cannot goe from doore to doore to begg his bread, all which are helples to themselves, and have nothinge to releive them withall

May it therefore please your good worshippes to take commiseracion upon the sad and truly to be pittied conditions of your poore peticioneres mother, brother, and nephewes, and to grant your order for some mayntaynance for them accordinge as in your grave wisdomes shall seeme meete

And your petitioner as in all duty bound shall ever pray for your good worshippes

paratext

Referred to Master Marbury and Master Brooke.

Robert Wyld, a maimed and lame soldier. QJF 86/1/127 (1658)

The humble peticion of Robert Wyld a maimed and lame souldier in the state service

Sheweth right worshipfull and worthy honourable bench desyreinge your good favour to take unto your good consideracion your pooer peticioners estate and condicion hearein beinge a bated a third parte of my former pencion beinge very unable to gett any parte of my liveinge as formerly I have done by reason of hard tymes and my charge increased and the badnesse of tradeinge humbly desyreinge your worships thy favours and goodness to grant me your peticioner further order for the continuance of my pencion your poore petitioner wilbe ever bound to pray for your good health and happyness

paratext

Nil

William Houghe of Bradwall. QJF 86/1/128 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace at this quarter sessions

The humble peticion of William Houghe of Bradwall sheweth

That whereas your petitioner, beinge borne in the parish of Sandbach, hath beene ever ready to performe personall service in the warres for the Lord Protector, and this common-wealth and was a souldier in the last battle at Worcester.

And whereas your said petitioner hath a greate charge of wife and children and noe house to live in but the last winter both himselfe and family (haveinge noe habitacion but a poore shelter made of cloddes) were almost destroyed with cold, and wante of other necessaryes.

Wherefore the humble request of your petitioner is, that your worshipps wilbe pleased to grante an order to your petitioner that hee may have some conveniente place appointed him in Bradwell, wherein to erecte a house and your petitioner shall ever pray etc.

  • William [Flecher?]
  • Hugh Lownes
  • John Hope
  • Hugh Hodgkinson
  • John Bowlte
  • William Oldfeild
  • Joseph Menshull
  • John Hogekenson
  • William Sutton
  • Richard Chesworth
  • John Child

Thomas Snelson of Swettenham. QJF 86/1/129 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace at the quarter sessions held at Midlewich in the county of Chester

The humble peticion of Thomas Snelson of Swettenham

Sheweth that your peticioner was borne and hath lived in Swettenham aforesaid for the space of 35 yeares and upwards and that hee was a trained souldier in the parliamentes service from the begining of the late warrs under the comand of Colonell Venables untill Chester was reduced that he hath a wife and fower small children, and the howse wherein hee hath lived for many yeares last past beinge now otherwise disposed of and noe other howse in the said towne to be taken for money he is at present destitute of an habitacion that your peticioner hath obtained the consent of the cheife lord for erecting a cottage upon the wast within the said towneshipp for an habitacion and succour of himselfe his wife and children

The premisses considered your petitioner humbly prayes that he may have the order of this worshipfull bench for the erecting of the said cottage according to lawe

And your peticioner shall ever pray etc.

  • Thomas Snelson.

Elizabeth Bradbury, wife of Hamnet Bradbury of Sutton, labourer. QJF 86/1/130 (1658)

To the right worshippfull the justices of peace for the county palatine of Chester now assembled at Midlewich.

The humble petition of Elizabeth Bradbury wife of Hamnet Bradbury of Sutton labourer.

Sheweth that your poor peticioner with her husband have lived seaven yeares within the townshipp of Sutton and sixteene yeares within the parish of Presbury and have had eight children borne in the said parish whereof one is dumbe and have lived in good creditt and repute amongst their neibours but of late yeares beinge fallen into poverty and havinge soe great a charge of children their neighbours are not willinge they should have any habitacion within the said township for their money

May it therefore please your worshipps to take your peticioners sad condicion into your favourable consideracion and grant that your peticioners husband may erect a cottage upon the wast within the said towneshipp and your peticioner as in dutie bound will ever pray etc

Richard Burroughs. QJF 86/1/131 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace now assembled att Midlewich.

The humble peticion of Richard Burroughs

Sheweth that your peticioner was borne in Wincham in the parish of Great Budworth and since hee was of abillity of body hath binn a painefull and labourious servant where hee hath binn hired and intrusted, but by reason of a long and tedious sicknes [is?] unable to helpe himselfe and that little that hee got is [already?] spent hee by reason of his weaknes and not able [illegible] [...orke?] or helpe himselfe is now constrayned to peticion [illegible] worships order for some releife and sustenance or [illegible] hee is like to famish beinge destitute both of money and freindes

May it therefore please your worships to take these thinges into your serious consideracions that some course may be taken for the releife of your poore peticioner and hee will ever pray etc.

paratext

[illegible] justices at [illegible]

Timothy Adams. QJF 86/2/115 (1658)

To the worshippfull the justices of the peace at this sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of Timothy Adams

Sheweth that whereas there was 5 marke in arreare for the building of Burr bridge wherupon it was ordered that it should be received from Namptwich unlese it was shewed to the contrary at next quarter sessions which they did accordingly.

May it therefore please your worshipps to grant your order that the petitioner may receive the said summe of 5 marke being in arreare from the hundred of Namptwich and your petitioner shall pray etc

paratext

To bee allowed in [summ publiq?] charge

Frances Morgell. QJF 86/2/116 (1658)

County palatine of West Chester 1658

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace [illegible]

The humble peticion of Frances Morgell of [illegible]

Sheweth and informeth that your said poore peticioner was as yet never suspected or detected for any manner of leaudnes or [mis...?] [illegible] reputed and taken generally to bee a just true and honest woman untill now of late your said [illegible] John Moumford of Adlington aforesaid dish turner for fynding and unjustly detayning [illegible] (as hee alledgeth) by whose clamourous aspercions hee enddeavours not only to deprave [illegible] your said peticioner as her lyfe and porcion wherby your said peticioner is depryved of her for [illegible] hath [illegible] already [not only?] receyved great losse and disgrace by reason of the said [illegible] your peticioner expulse your peticioner her native cuntry to the utter ruine and overthrow [illegible] may receyve apleonary recompence and satisfaccion from the said Moumford not [illegible] have and suffer condigne punishment for his so greevous and palpable offence [illegible] ground of his slander from the mouth of aconjurer or wiszard and the [wiza...?] [illegible] beginninge (as your said peticioner doubteth not to prove) for one William Taylor of [illegible] Mounford to goe alonge with him and did shewe him the said wizardes [habit...?] [illegible] consulted together concerninge this matter and the said Mounford hath alsoe [alre...?] [illegible] at the howse of the said wizard.

Wherefore the premisses most tenderly considered your said [p...?] [illegible] and that for Godes cause and zeale of justice to bee [illegible] and distressed cause of your worshippes said peticioner as [illegible] recompence as shall seeme most fitte in your [illegible] peticioner is poore and not able to wage lawe [illegible] all duty bound dayly praye for your worshippes [healthe?] [illegible]

paratext

[Releasd?]

James Croxton, a poor soldier. QJF 86/2/117 (1658)

To the honourable and right worshipfull the jusices of the peace assembled in sessions att Namptwich.

The humble petition of James Croxton a poore souldyour

Shewinge that the peticioner was borne in Wrenbury Frith in this county and there was brought up untill he was able for service, and then lyved as a paynefull servant in the parish, and carryed himselfe honestly and justly and in good repute and then marryed, and uppon the last Scottish invation the peticioner served as a souldyour in the states service under Captaine Whitney and was att Worcester fight and there adventured his lyfe in that battaile. Butt when he came home againe his wyves weaknes and a charge of children cast the peticioner downe and the peticioners [elder?] brother gott into the howse with his father and soe outed the peticioner and he hath noe place of habytacion butt by sufferance as yett

His suite to this honourable bench is, that aswell in regard of his birth and residensie, as of his service for his contrey he may have order to erect a coate to lyve in upon somme part of the wastes in Wrenbury or Frith the peticioner procuringe the consentes of the lordes and charterers of the said towneship and he will ever pray etc.

paratext

[Absent?]

Granted

I doe beleeve by information the contentes of this peticion to bee true

  • John Starkey
  • John Whittingham
  • John Wilridge
  • Hugh Massie
  • Thomas Caldecote
  • John Caldecott
  • Robert Wollom
  • Hugh Webster
  • Joseph [Ottiwell?] minister
  • John Wilson
  • Jasper Rutter
  • Robert Gryffith
  • William Wilson
  • Henrey Wollrich church warden
  • Richard [Smith?]

Ellenor, wife of Thomas Cotton of Cotton, esquire. QJF 86/2/118 (1658)

To the right honourable the Lord Bradshaw cheife justice of Chester.

The humble peticion of Ellenor the disconsolate wife of Thomas Cotton of Cotton in the county of Chester esquier

Sheweth that your poore peticioner having for divers yeares lived with her sayd husband (in a sad condicion) by reason of severall and sundry extravagancies and intollerable abusing your peticioner (not fitt to bee expressed or mencioned in a peticion) shee beeing inforced for feare and perill of her life to live apart from him yet by his permission and approbacion in promise of competent maintainance which hee unjustly detaynes from her to her utter ruine shee having neither subsistance for food or rayment.

Her most humble suite is that her sayd husband may bee required to appeare before your lordshipp at Chester in the assize weeke that such further course may bee taken herein as may bee most agreeable to justice and your judicious judgment

And shee will ever pray for your lordshipp

paratext

I cannot judicially take notice of this complaint in this way but finding it verie proper for the examinacion of the justices of peace neere the place or at their generall or quarter sessions to them it will be fit for the petitioner to make her addresse for such just reliefe as the law allowes in cases of this nature which cases I wish may be rare or none at all found in that countrey which hath had the prayse for manhood and hath not bene usuallie taynted with offences of this kind. Yet before this course be taken I advyze that some one on the petitioners behalf acquaint the party complaynd of herewith who if he consyder of the matter aright will prevent further scandall and extremity by a wise and Christian complyance which I exhort him to; if otherwise, the law sought unto in a regular way will supplie his defect.

5o April 1658.

John Bradshawe

Margarett, wife of Richard Rutter of Aston. QJF 86/2/120 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace for the county of Chester att their quarter sessions of peace houlden att Namptwich the 13th day of July 1658

The humble peticioun of Margarett wife of Richard Rutter of Aston in the said county

Sheweth that your petitioner have hath heretofore kept an alehouse and therein hath behaved herselfe orderly and civilly as may appeare by a certificate hereto annexed from the most sufficient of the towneship of Astonn afforesaid and alsoe that your petitioners house is conve niently scituated and able to give entertainement to travellers and alsoe a person of [a?] good repute amongest her neighbours:

May it therefore please your worships to admitt your petitioner to brew and sell ale as formerly shee hath donne

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc.

paratext

Done

Edmund Robertes, a poor maimed soldier. QJF 86/2/121 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace att this present sessiones

The humble peticion of Edmund Robertes a poore maymed souldier

Humbly sheweth that your petitioner is a poore weake impotent man, and made altogether unfitt for labour or paines taking by reason of his many wounds received in the late warres in the service of the commonwealth.

That your petitioner hath foure small infants and his wife lately dead and hath noe estate att all to maynteyne them nor any subsistence neyther from for them nor himselfe, but what hee is enforced [illegible] beyond his strength and to the hazard of his life to labour for which your petitioner hath endeavoured soe long to doe that hee is in noe wise able longer to continue itt, but himselfe and his foure small helplesse infantes are unavoidably likely to [sterve?] and perish.

Hee therefore humbly implores your worships wilbee pleased to admitt him a pencioner in this countye and to order him such yearely pencion as shall seeme meete to your grave wisdomes according to his necessitious and [distressed?] condicion and as in duty bound hee will ever pray etc.

paratext

40 shillings a yeare

William Olliver of Werneth, husbandman. QJF 86/2/122 (1658)

Cheshire sessions

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace and quorum for the said county

The humble peticion of William [Olliver?] of Werneth in the said county husbandman

Humbly sheweth that your peticioner together with his wiefe children and family have lived and continewed in the said towne for severall yeares last past menteyneing themselves by and through their handie laboure and great paines takeing without beinge burthensome unto any in the said towne but beinge nowe destitute of a dwelling house to inhabite in as formerly

Your peticioner humbly prayeth your good worshipps according to your accostomed goodnes to take his condicion into consideracion and to grant him order to erect a cottage upon the wast (or some parte thereof) in Werneth aforesaid to thend hee and his famyly may not for the future bee destitute of habitacion there hee first obteyning lycense of the cheife lord of the premisses soe to doe

And your peticioner shall ever pray.

paratext

With consent

Wee whose names are hereunder written inhabitantes of and within the said towneship doe knowe the substance of the above written peticion to bee true and humbly pray that the desire of the peticioner may bee granted

  • Robert Winterbothom
  • William Sydebotham
  • Robert Marsland
  • Thomas Benisonn
  • Charles Sydbothom
  • John Benetson
  • John [Ashton?]
  • Thomas Booth
  • Thomas [Beaves?]
  • Thomas Gee
  • Robert Ashton
  • Thomas Hyde
  • Edmund Higham
  • John Buckley
  • Robert Gee

Thomas Titherington of Titherington, yeoman. QJF 86/2/123 (1658)

To the right honourable the justices of peace and quorum for and within the county of Chester at the generall quarter sessions of the peace held at Namptwiche

The humble peticion of Thomas Titherington of Tithorington within the said county of Chester yeomann

Humbly sheweth that your peticioner beinge duely elected to bee supervisor for the highwayes within the towneship of Titherington within the said county for this present yeare and alsoe sheweth that the causey at thend of Bach bridge is fallen into some decay and that yt hath togeather with the said bridge beene built by a generall charge [illegible] of the whole county and that the said cawsey is now in some decay and if tymely course be not taken and remeady made and had yt may come to be a vast and a greate charge to repaire the same, which said decay hath beene viewed by severall knoweinge persons, and the present charge which wilbee requisit to repaire the same will amount unto the summe of five poundes, as by the certificate hereunto annexed more fully yt doth and may appere.

May yt therefore please your honours to graunt the order of this court, that soe much money may bee laid uppon the county and leavyed and gathered and paid for the repaire thereof to such persons as yow shall instrust and nominate to see the said worke perfected and to give such accompt as yow shall please to order and direct and the rather because if present and speedie remeadie bee not had and made afarr greater summe will not doe the same, it beinge a very greate and common high way.

And your peticioner as in duty bounde will ever pray etc.

paratext

Referred to the 2 next justices to examine whether a county bridg

Thomas Titherington, supervisor of the highways for Titherington. QJF 86/2/125 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace at their monethly meeteinge at Prestbury.

The informacion of Thomas [T...nor?] [illegible] Titherington supervisor of the highwayes for the towneship of Titherington

Humbly sheweth that their is a breach in the cawsey att thend of Bach: bridge which will cost a reasonable summe of money to repare yt which said bridge hath beene erected and built by the whole county and the neighbowrhood not able to repaire the same.

May yt therefore please your worshipps to graunt the order of this court that this informer may with the assistance of some sufficient persons veiw the same and consider, what may repaire yt to prevent a farr greater charge and to thend the next court of sessions may uppon your order graunt such remedie and way to repaire the same as to their judgementes shall seeme most meete.

  • Thomas Titherington overseer
paratext

22o June 58 att Prestbowry

That the substance of this request bee referred to William Rowe alderman of Macclesfeild and John Shrigley of Bollington gentleman to examine what will repaire the said cawsey and report the same to the justices of peace at the next sessions

Thomas Stanley E: Hyde

The supervisors and inhabitants of Acton. QJF 86/2/126 (1658)

To the worshipfull the justices of the peace att this present sessions assembled

The humble peticion of the supervisours and inhabitants of Acton

Sheweth.

That wheras the pavement or cawsey scituate betweene Namptwich and Acton church commonly called Acton pavement beinge a common high road betwixt London and Ireland for carts and carriages to pass that way both to Chester and Ireland and all North Wales is very much out of repaire; and whereas there was heretofore a parcell of land with in the said parrish lyinge in Henhall enclosed which was assigned to re paire the cawsey untill it was taken away by Earle Rivers who is the lord of the waste there; and seeinge that your petitioners have computed with workemen that noe lesse then 100 pounds will sufficiently repaire the same and that the parish wherein the same lyes is noe way able to repaire the said pavement, since the charge thereof will amount unto soe great a summe consideringe the very many waies the [are?] charged with within the said parish and alsoe your petitioners have upon the like oc=casion readily contributed their assistance to other places.

May it therefore please your worshipps to con=sider the premises and to lay the said summe of one 100 pounds upon the whole county or otherwise as your worshipps shall thinke fitt

And your petitioners

Mary Vernon, wife of John Vernon of Newton, yeoman. QJF 86/2/127 (1658)

To the right worshippfull the justices of the peace for the countie pallatine of Chester now assembled at Namptwich.

The humble petition of Mary Vernon wife of John Vernon of Newton yeoman

Sheweth that your poor peticioner hath formerly peticioned and made knowne her greevances and great distresse to the right worshippfull the justices of peace for this countie and they ordered that your peticioners husband should either take your peticioner home to his house and allowe her such sustenance as the rest of his family had and decent apparrell to wear: or els to give your peticioner four pownds yearly to be paid her quarterly: and your peticioners husband did take your peticioner home upon this order but after a certaine season hee beat your peticioner and locked all from her that she could not come by a morsell of bread to sustaine her self but was forced to goe to her frendes for releef and cloathes to put on or els she had famished and starved.

May it therefore please your worshipps to consider of your poor peticioners sad condicion and grant that your peticioners said husband may shall either take your peticioner unto him (which your peticioner most desireth) and allowe her such food as the meanest of his houshould hath: or els to pay her four powndes a year to be paid quarterly or what in your judgments shall think meet towardes her maintenance and your peticioner as in duty bound will ever pray etc

paratext

Referred to the justices at next moneths meeting to examine and order

Anne Clowe, widow. QJF 86/2/128 (1658)

To the right worrshipfull the justices of peace at this sessions assembled

The humble peticion of Anne Clowe the wife widdow.

Sheweth.

That your petitioners late husband being called to Worcester fight gott such a cold there that he fell into a consumpcion through the same, which he never recovered but lay very long weake being uncapable to gett a livelyhood for his wife and five small children untill about Whisontide last, about which tyme he died and left your peticioner and her five children in a very [sad?] miserable and deplorable condicion, as alsoe very great of the sixt whereby she is not able to take any paines for their severall lively hoodes.

May it therefore please your worshipps to grant your peticioner an annuall stipend for the maintenance of her selfe and children and your peticioner shall ever praye

paratext

40 shillings from treasurers and 6 pence a weeke from parish

We whose names are subscribed some of us know and the rest doe beleeve the contentes to be true and desire the poore widdowes case may be considered by this honourable bench.

  • Richard Jackson minester
  • of Namptwich
  • Thomas Mainwaringe
  • Thomas Malbon church wardens
  • James Smith
  • [.ab?] Church
  • John Brocke
  • John Tench constables
  • Robert [Curroughe?]
  • Thomas Wright
  • Roger Wilbram
  • Roberte Wright

Thomas Pierson of Butley. QJF 86/2/129 (1658)

Countie of Chester

To the right worshippfull justices of the peace for this countie of Chester at there quarter session held at Namptwich the 13th day of Junly now asembled for the said countie

The humble peticion of Thomas Pierson of Butley in the parishe of Prestbury

Humly sheweth that whereas your peticioner was borne within the towneshepp of Butly Butley and parishe of Prestbury and hath there lived ever seince and now is married and hath a charg of children and hath not anie house to live in but of taking uppon the racke and the inhabitence of the said towneshepp doe refuse to sett your peticioner anie house room whereby hee your peticioner his wife and children are like to perrishe and your peticioner for want of house room was forced to put up a peticion to the right worsheppfull Sir William Brereton Master Stanley and Edward Hid at there monthly meetting at Prestbury ther held the 11th day of May 1658 where there worshepps were pleased to grant that your peticioner should to be referred to the oversiers of the poore in the towneshepp of Butley to doe there duty according to law or untill further order bee given or the order of quarter sessiones for the erecting of a cottage

Your petitioner therefor humley prayes that your worshepps will be pleased to take the premisses in to your grave and serious consideracion and to grant your order that your petitioner may have a cottage erected and sett up in some conveniant place within the said towneshepp of Butley and your petinor as in duty bound will ever praye

paratext

With consent of lord

Mary Holland of Over, widow. QJF 86/2/130 (1658)

To the right worshipful the justices of peace att this sessions assembled

The humble peticion of Mary Holland of Over widdow

Most humbly sheweth that your poore very poore petitioner haveing had first leave of Master Major of Over about the third of May last, (that being the fare time there) brewed soe much ale onely as that John Armston an excise man, gaged the said brewing to bee halfe a barrell, and noe more, for the which your petitioner offered to pay to the said excise man soe much as by act the said halfe barrell did amount unto the truth [whereof?] may appeare by a schedule hereunto annexed upon oath before the said Master Major of Over but the said Armston and his companion re=fusing to take your petitioners money soe tendered as aforesaid came with force and armes, and without constable or commission from the said Master Major and broke your petitioners house, tooke all her waring apparell that she had (save that on her back) much affrighted and astonished your poore petitioner and her, to the undoeing in deed of your poore petitioner and her poore children, who although of good parentage (being daughter to Henry Starkey of Darley esquire) yet hath noe other income or subsistance, but such or what shee getteth by her needle to mainetaine her selfe and her pore fatherless children

May your worships therefore be gratiously pleased to correct the sad abuses of these men, such high oppressours of the poore and fatherless, and to grant your honours order to the constables of Over for the receiving of her said apparrell againe which as yett lye detained att Dorothy Ellams's widdow in Over aforesaid, and your poore petitioner as for ever bound shall for ever pray etc

paratext

Referred to Master Mainwaring and Collonel Croxton to heare and determine on the 5 August

Randle Turner, an infant. QJF 86/2/132 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace att this present sessions.

The humble peticion of Randle Turner an infant

Humbly sheweth that your petitioners father and mother who lived in Congleton dyed about 7 yeares since and left your petitioner and two small children more an estate to the value of 37 pounds presently after whose decease one of the said children allsoe dyed, and your petitioner and one other being then onely left one William Peever of Bradwall uncle to your father petitioner by the fathers side did importune one your petitioners uncle by the mother to suffer him to take your petitioner and his meytye of the said estate into his custodye to educate and did promise to condisend that your petitioner and other uncle should by his free consent have the other child and the other moytye of the said estate, and that hee would maynteyne your petitioner according to his quallitye and employ his estate for his best advantage, hee haveing gott the said estate and your petitioner into his custodye hee doth employ his estate to his owne use and [...es?] your petitioner a begging.

Your petitioner therefore most humbly prayes the assistance of this honourable courte for his releife herein who is otherwise likely to perish or bee chargeable to the parish where hee was borne or else perish without releife, and as in duty bound etc

paratext

Nil

John Hussey the elder, parish clerk and sexton of p. Nantwich. QJF 86/2/133 (1658)

To the right worshippful the justices of the peace at this sessions assembled

The humble peticion of John Hussey thelder parish clerke and sexton of the parish of Namptwich

Sheweth.

That your peticioner beinge imployed in the offices aforesayd and in and for the said parish hath for wages due to him by the said offices foure pence from every househoulder within the said towne and parish and forasmuch as William Browne Richard Jacson Randle Gibbons Raphe Jackson John Yardley and John Read junior all of Nampt=wich aforesayd with divers other inhabitants of the sayd towne are behind and unpayd to your peticioner the said wages due to him as aforesayd although the same hath bin demended seaverell times from them by your peticioner, yet neverthelesse they denye to pay the same to your peticioner except your worshipps warrante for the collectinge of the same although the same hath accordinge to the custome of the sayd parish bin payd by the inhabitants thereof to your peticioner or to his predecessours time out of minde

May it therefore please your worshipps that your peticioner may have releefe accordinge to the ordinance for payinge of church dutyes and that yow will bee pleased to grant your petitioner warrant to gather the said wages due to your peticioner by distresse accordinge to the said ordinance and that the warrant for the gatheringe of church dutyes due to the church wardens of the parish aforesaid and for your petitioner may be joyned togather in one warrante

And your petitioner shall pray etc

paratext

At Namptwich 18. [1654?] granted

Referred to Master [Manne?] and Collonel Massey

Anne Hardy. QJF 86/2/134 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace of the county pallatine of Chester assembled at this their present quarter sessions of the peace houlden att Midlewich Namptwich the 14th of Aprill July 1658

The humble peticion of Anne Hardy a poore cripple

Sheweth that upon the peticion of your poore peticioner presented unto your worships at the quarter sessions held at Namptwich July the 15th 1651 itt was ordered that in respect that your peticioner was borne in Wimbaldesley within the parish of Midlewich, but yett had lived for a longe space within the parishe of Minshull, and beinge not able to gett her liveinge or to goe abroad for releefe, that the church wardens both of the aforesayd parish of Midlewich and Minshull should from the sayd 15th day of July 1651 pay unto the said Anne Hardy the summe of sixe pence [illegible] weekely for and towardes her releefe and menteynance which was by the sayd churchwardens of the sayd parishe of Midlewich for the most parte unperformed, insomuch as your peticioners applyinge her self unto your worships at the quarter sessions held at Midlewich Aprill the eleaventh 1654 procured a further order for payment of all arreares of the sayd vi pence a weeke and for continuance of the sayd payment, and yett the sayd churchwardens of the sayd parishe of Midlewich have not payd unto your peticioner but xxxix shillings ii pence, and now refuse to pay any more without a further speciall order for that purpose, and forasmuch as your peticioner for want of payment is forced to live on the charrity of her frendes

Therfore humbly prayes that some strict and speedy course may taken that the churchwardens of the parishe of Midlewich may both pay her the arreares now due unto her, and alsoe continue their paymentes (accordinge to your former orders

And your peticioner shall ever pray [etc?]

paratext

Referred to Collonel Croxton [illegible] Master Attorney

[Absent?]

Jeane Barlow of Lower Peour. QJF 86/2/135 (1658)

[Com?] Cestria

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace, within this county assembled at theire quarter sessions at Namptwich the 13 day of this instant July 1658 the humble peticion of Jeane Barlow of Lower Peour sheweth.

That whereas one Thomas Darlington of Brooke=howses, within the parrish of Whitegate, in this county: hath beegotten one bastard child, on the body of one Ellen Barlow, daughter to your petitioner, who did lawfully father the same uppon the same Darlington in the tyme of her greattest anguish in her travell (the gettinge of which child hee doth not deny) but notwithstandinge doth not come in, to take course, and order for the same accordinge to law, albeeyt there have beene all probable meanes used to bringe him thereunto, to the great trouble, and chardge, of your petitioner with whome the child is, who is soe poore, that more then she gettes with her hand labour she hath not to maintaine her selfe fower poore children of her owne, and this infant of her daughters, and if ether death, or sicknesse, seize upon her, they are all like to bee cast upon the parrish where she and all her poore children are but at pleasure, in a poore cote upon the wast which she feareth the neighbourhood will pull downe, except, the father of the bastard bee by your good worshipps ordered to free the towne of the same, and brought in, to performe, what more, you in your wisdomes shall appoint

The premisses tenderly considered, the man beinge soe aversse both to authority, and the ministers who are ymployd to execute the same, have beene remysse in theire offices, whereby justice is retarded and some of your worships warrantes neclected, humbly [praeth?] your further assistance herein accordinge as you in your grave wisdomes shall thinke meete, and the law [provides?]

paratext

Warrants to [issue?] to take Thomas Darlington the reputed father to take the child

Isabell Clarke of Ranow, widow. QJF 86/2/136 (1658)

To the honourable bench at the generall sessions of the peace

The humble petition of Isabell Clarke of Ranow widow

Humbly sheweth that whereas your petitioner hath committed afoule and scandalous offence for which she suffereth condigne punishment and humbly confesseth that she hath justly deserved what is inflicted upon her

And also whereas the end of the law inflicted upon offenders is to bring them to the sight of their offences and to humiliation and reformation of life and your petitioner is truly penitent for her foule offence and is in hope that this punishment inflicted upon her (through the blessing of God) will soe worke upon her heart to prevent all foule miscarriages for time to come

May it therefore please this honourable bench to take your petitioners condicion into your pious and charitable consideration, and to thinke the punishment already inflicted upon her to be sufficient and to release her to goe to her poore children which doe also suffer in her absence. And the rather your petitioner humbly beggs this favour, because the towshipp of Ranow is and wilbee burthened with her poore children soe long as she is in this condicion which (upon your serious consideracion) if you would be pleased to order that the father of this bastard child now with your petitioner may take it from her to mainteyne it, and to [g...?] being an able man to doe it and to graunt her liberty to goe home to her children to keep them to worke, and by Gods assistance she shall and will with all diligence imply her self and her children in worke that none of them shalbee burthensome to the said townshipp, and this infliction of punishment upon your petitioner shalbee awarning to her all her dayes

The premisses considered if this honourable bench wilbee pleased to graunt your petitioners humble request she and her poore children shalbee obliged to pray etc

paratext

We whose names are subscribed, inhabitantes of the township of Ranow, being sensible of the petitioners condicion doe pitty her, and desire she may be taken into consideracion, before the petitioner was sent thither she suffered much with the child haveing noe reliefe from the father, insomuch that they might both have sterved if they had not beene relieved by the neighborhood

  • Thomas Jacksonn
  • John Lowe de Hordren
  • John Howley
  • Lawrance Pott
  • John Lowe
  • William Clarke
  • Thomas Clarke
  • Raph Jackson
  • Thomas Haigh
  • Anthony Wattson
  • Nicolas Cuttler
  • William Andrewe
  • Francis Hough
  • James Hough
  • John Barton
  • Edward Oakes
  • William Broome
  • William Cutler
  • Raphe [Bruser?]
  • Robert Broadhead
  • John Ollerenshaw
  • Thomas Stoxton
  • Laurance Johnson
  • John Bower
  • Richard Worthington
  • Laurance Pott

The churchwardens and overseers of the poor for p. Wibunbury. QJF 86/2/137 (1658)

To the right worshipful justice Thomas Manwareing and justice Jonathan Bryan esquire

The humble request and petition of the churchwardens and overseers of the poore for the parish of Wibunbury

Most humbly sheweth unto your worship that a poore child of of one William Tompsones of Hough in our saide parish lately deceased of whom with his wife allsoe deceased, your pettitioners have been att greate coast and charge in the time of theire sicknese and buriall, have left behind one child which as yett is mainteined and kept at the charge of the saide parish.

May it therefore please your worships, (if to justice it appertaine) to grant your order that the grand=father of the saide child one Randull Tumpson of Swettenham may be ordered to take the saide child and keepe it, if your worships shall soe thinke meete and accord ing to law

And your pettitioners will ever pray etc

paratext

At Namptwich 10 June 1658.

It is this day ordered by us that seeing wee are credibly informed that there are severall goodes of William Tompson deceased in the handes of Thomas Rockett of Hough, that therefore the churchwardens of Wibunbury parish doe forthwith secure the said goodes for the use of the said child otherwise the said child is likely to become burthensome to the said parish

  • Thomas Mainwaringe
  • Thomas Croxton

Raphe Dod of Bonebury. QJF 86/2/138 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace at the quarter sessions for the cownty palatyne of Chester etc.

The humble peticion of Raphe Dod of Bonebury a poore blynde man aged fowerscore yeares or thereabouts.

Humbly sheweth unto this honourable bench

That whereas your poore peticioner did heretofore by his owne honest labors and indeavors mayntayne himselfe and famely with creddit and comfort, and releived the poore according to his abilitye, untill aboutes ten yeares agon, that his sight fayled him which to his great charge he used all meanes to recover but could not procure any helpe for yt, and by reason thereof hath byn forced to live upon the charetye of his good neighbors and parrisioners who having many others more in the parrishe to bee releived your poore peticioner being altogether to help himselfe unhable and is like to suffer much by reason of his wantes if some speedy course be not taken in his behalfe.

May it therefore please your worships to take the lamentable condicion of your poore peticioner into your serious consideracion what way of mayntenance and what allowance your worships shall think meete for your poore peticioner during the little remayning tyme of his life and your peticioner shall dayly pray etc.

paratext

The contents of this petition are true and worthy of your consideration

  • Francis Mosley pastour of Bunbury
  • John: Wallworke [assistant minister?]
  • Josuah Willson
  • Samuell Garrett [churchwardens?]

Rose Snelson of Swettenham, widow. QJF 86/2/139 (1658)

County of Chester.

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace and quorum assembled at the bench at quartersessions at Namptwich.

The humble peticion of Rose Snelson of Swettenham wydowe.

Sheweth and informeth.

That wheras your worshippes poore peticioner beinge a very poore woman having a great charge of smale children is unjustly interrupted of her just right tytle and possession of apart of howsinge by Thomas Snelson of Swettenham aforesaid weaver who pretendes atitle from her late husband deceased for aterme which is already longe since expyred, and intendeth to hould and possesse the same so longe and untill the said Snelson have built himselfe a cottage upon Swettenham [heath?] (yf hee can have and obtayne so much favour.) And in the interim your peticioner [illegible] destitute of any habitacion whatsoever to her great greefe and undoinge. And the said Snelson [illegible] therein by forcible possession and letten down the buildinges therof contrary to lawe [illegible] good conscience your poore peticioner being a very poore woman and farr unable to [illegible] for righting of her just complayning cause therein.

Wherefore the premisses (most tenderly considered) your said poore peticioner [illegible] [humbly?] [illegible] this honourable bench and that for Godes cause zeale to justice and tender pitty [illegible] to your peticioner and children as to take such speedy course and order [illegible] as shall seeme most just in your worshippes wisdome so as the said buildinges therunto belonginge maye bee reedifyed before winter and your peticioner will as duty bound dayly pray for your healthes and happines heare and hereafter.

paratext

Nil

I know the contentes of this petition to bee truth

John Davenport.

Dorothy Calley. QJF 86/2/140 (1658)

County of Chester

To the worshipfull the justices of peace for the county of Chester in their quarter sessions

The humble peticion of Dorothy Calley

Humbly sheweth that your peticioner haveinge lived some yeers last past within the township of Tattenhale within the said county and demeaned her self amongst her neighbours [sc..ely?] and peaceably not beinge burthensome to any have=inge maintayned her selfe by teachinge younge children to reade and sowe but nowe groweinge in to yeeres and wantinge a place of abode to live in.

The premises considered her humble desire is your worshipps would be pleased out of your goodnesse and charity to graunte your order with consent of the said lords of the said manner that shee may have liberty to erecte some small place upon the comons or waste of Tattenhall for her to live in and shee as in duty bound shall ever pray for your worshipps health and happynesse.

The inhabitants of Tattenhall in support of Dorothy Calley. QJF 86/2/141 (1658)

To the worshipfull the justices of peace for the the county of Chester in their quarter sessions held for the said county.

Wee whose names are hereunder subscribed inhabitance of the towneshipp of Tattenhall doe humbly certify that Dorothy Calley of our said towne hath lived amongst us for some yeeres last past and hath demeaned her selfe amongst us [sc...ely?] and peaceably and maintayned herselfe by teachinge yonge children to reade and sowe our humble desire is your worshipps will be pleased to graunt your worships order with the consente of the lords of the manner for the erectinge of acoate upon the wast of Tattenhall for her to inhabitt in and the rather because shee is very usefull for the educateinge of yonge children wee haveing none that teacheth schoole neere us thus wee thought good to certify and remaine

Your worshipps servants

  • John [Wrenshaw?]
  • Hugh Dod
  • George Edge
  • Peter Dutton
  • Robert Edge the marke of
  • Peeter [Falkn?]
  • Peter Tilston
  • Raph Lowe the marke of
  • John Bruce
  • George Lorden

John Bromley of Wichmalbank, innholder. QJF 86/2/142 (1658)

Namptwich July the 13 58

To the right worshipful, the justices of peace att this sessions assembled

The humble peticion of John Bromley of Wichmalbank comitatu Cestria inholder

Most humbly sheweth, that your petitioner was and is ever forward, since the first, to act, and pay any thing (according to reason and his power) advantagious to this state and cause; offered Master Lewellin and the rest of the excise men, to pay by barrell, or thirty-shillings with bond per quarter (their utmost demand being thyrty two) yet did they distraine your petitioners horses, demanding 40 shillings for the distraine and fifty shillinges per quarter for brewing ale or beere, to sell for the future, threatning also to fetch a second, and a third distraine, thereby to seize upon all that estate your petitioner had for him, and his to subsiste upon in the world, and that if your petitioner shold give bond, hee that said Master Lewellin would upon the least default, give up your petitioners bond into the exchequer to receive the forfeiture, on purpose, through apparant malice, to keep your petitioner from brew=ing ale, or beere, to sell as formerly, although hee keep, and long hath kept a common, and ancient inne for that purpose; whereby your petitioner (liveing formerly in good creditt and repute amongst his neighboures, and never sued for any debt of his owne) is now, since thiese excize mens late showne cruelties, sued, and dayly cald upon for monney both which, had never happened to your petitioner had hee but injoyed his former freedome of brewing to sell, the which, since the proclamation of this same sessions, your petitioner hath divers, and severall times sought for to obtaine, by goeing downe to the office, there to give bond and security, but could never find any person or persons there, unto whom your petitioner might once tender the same, through which none composition with them, (though upon like and equall tearmes much sought for by your petitioner) hee your said petitioner, is not onely debarred of his brewing, but of buying his beere of the common brewer to retaile it, who refuses soe to sell it him, through thiese excize mens sollicitations, warneinge, and importunities, and by them brought thereunto.

May your worships therefore be gratiously pleased, to putt your [illegible] [illegible] power into practise, for the righting of such wrongs, [conferd?] upon you; that soe your petitioner like others in the like case, may ether pay propor=tionably by barrell, or give equall bond, which may not be challenged but upon just and good grounds (if any such shall happen) according to the act in the case made and provided; and that your petitioner relying, and casting himselfe wholly, upon your worships, may not be thus exposed, and lye open to thiese [illegible] apparant malice and fury, tending, to his, and his childrens overthrow, but that by some meanes, as your worships in your graver judgements shall judge just [illegible] act provides, your petitioner may be relieved, the ruin of him and his prevented, and your petitioner, as for ever bound, shall for ever pray etc.

paratext

Done

Randle Sharman, late surveyor of the highways in Buglawton. QJF 86/2/143 (1658)

To the worrshipfull the justices etc.

The humble peticion of Randle Sharman late surveyor of the highwayes within the towneshipp of Buglawton

Sheweth

That whereas a summe of nine pounds and upwards was imposed uppon the Buglawton aforesaid towards the repar of the highwayes within and about the said towneshipp as alsoe towards the building of Danehenshawe bridge betwixt Lawton Lowe and Congleton, yet nothwithstanding there are severall who doe neglect to pay the severall summes imposed uppon them towards reparacion of the said highwayes and making of the saide bridge (towitt) John Hollinshead of Buglawton yeoman William Gibson of Biddle in comitatu Stafford husbandman John Portor of same husbandman.

May it therefore please your worshipps to grant your order to levey and gather by distresse or otherwise the severall summes imposed uppon the severall persons above named who neglect to contribute towards the said high wayes and making of the said bridge

And your petitioner shall pray etc

paratext

Nil

Elizabeth Clarke of Macclesfield, widow. QJF 86/2/144 (1658)

To the honourable bench at the generall sessions

The humble petition of Elizabeth Clarke of Macclesfield widow

Humbly sheweth that your petitioners late husband Christopher Clarke was a souldier in the late warr under the commaund of Captain John Leadbeater and was slaine at Hoult, and your petitioner (being a desolate widow with a poore diseased child upon her hand) had a yearely pension of fortie shillings allowed her which was paid her quarterly for some few yeares after but the order whereby it was graunted was afterwards lost at another sessions where it was shewed to the bench and she could not gett it againe

Since which tyme tenne shillings of your petitioners yearely pension hath beene kept backe, with a promise from the bench, that if need required it should be added againe which never yet was done

May it therefore please this honourable bench to take your poore petitioners case into your pyous and charitable consideracion your petitioner herself growing into yeares is very dimme of sight and can gett very smale towards a livelyhood and her poore childes disease (being the evill) doth soe farre grow upon her that she is not able to worke insomuch that your petitioner hath beene constrained to sell those smale necessaryes in her house to relieve her poore child in her necessity

The premisses considered your petitioner humbly prayes that this honourable bench will be pleased to order your petitioner her whole pension in regard of her childs great weaknes

And she shalbee engaged to pray etc

Richard Eldershaw. QJF 86/2/145 (1658)

Cheshire [sessions?]

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace for the county aforesaid at the quarter sessions houlden at Namptwich.

The humble peticion of Richard Eldershaw.

Humbly sheweth unto your worshipps that your peticioner hath soe many yeares last past by vertue of a power from the worshipfull the justices of the peace to him by their severall licenses brewed and sold ale and beare in the towne of Auldlem in this county dureinge all which tyme your peticioner hath kept a civill and orderly house notwithstandinge some persons (not loveinge your peticioner) endeavour to prevent your peticioner from beinge bound

May it therefore please your good worshipps to take the premisses into your consideracion and grant your peticioner a license to sell ale and beare unless cause can be shewed to the contrary and your peticioner shall ever pray etc.

paratext

Granted

William Francis of Acton, laborer. QJF 86/2/146 (1658)

To the worshippfull the justices of the peace this present sessions assembled.

The humble peticion of William Francis of Acton laborer

Sheweth that whereas your peticioner haveing lived within the parish of Acton within the county of Chester for the space of twelve yeares and now being very poore and about 60 yeares of age and haveing a wife and two children to maintaine and nothing to maintaine them of but what he getts by his owne industry and labour and now being very destitute of an habitacion and not able through his present poverty to take any uppon the racke

May it therefore please your worshipps to grant your peticioner an order to erect a cottage uppon some part of the wastes within the parish of Acton aforesaid he first obtayneing free leave of the lord of the soyle there soe to doe.

And your peticioner shall ever pray etc.

  • Edward Burghull
  • Edmund Mainwaringe
  • Richard Prachatt
  • Randle [illegible]

Henrye Beighton of Bartomley. QJF 86/2/147 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace att thies present sessions

The humble peticion of Henrye Beighton of Bartomley

Humbly sheweth that your petitioner being a tallow chaundler by trade and fully stockt and well to [live?], and having att least fifftye pounds in stocke of candles and tallow, and being uppon the fiffteenth day of December last abroad making his marketts itt pleased God that by a violent fire happening in the night tyme, all your petitioners whole estate together with his dwelling house, was burnt and cleerely destroyed to the utter ruine destruccion and overthrow of your poore petitioner his wife foure small children and a poore ould woman his mother in law insomuch that they are now reduced to the charitye of theire freinds for a livelihood and subsistence and your petitioner and his charge aforesaid like to begg theire bread from doore to doore unles your [illegible] worshipps ayd extended

His humble peticion therefore is that your honours wilbee graciously pleased to afford your petitioner your letters of request to procure him the charitable benevolence of well disposed people in the severall parishes within this countye to the end your petitioner if God see itt good may gaine something towards his releife by your worshippes gracious assistance your petitioner being very desirous to labore for his living for the maynteynance of his wife and family if bee [illegible] any stocke wherewithall and as in duty [bound?] hee will ever pray etc.

paratext

Granted by permission

Inhabitants of the hundred of Worrall. QJF 86/2/148 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justice of peace now in sessions at Namptwich

Humbly sheweth

That wheare as your poore peticiones of the hundred of Worrall, hath beene alwayes readie to contribute to the repaire of many bridges, in the body of this countie and now haveinge occasion to desire the assistance of the countie towards the repaire of Neston and Shotwick bridge to make them passable for cartes to goe on soe that the cartars for Chester may goe (as usually they have) the shore way to the shipinge with there ladinge for Chester that thereby they may not goe the land roode to the distroyinge and [cutinge?] out the causey to the great damage of our hundred which said land roode hath cost lately fiftie or sistie pounds to repaire.

Thereffore humby pray your worships that yu would afford your assistance for soe necessarie worke and allow that the sume of thirtie pounds may bee raised out of the whole countie to wards the make inge and fittinge the said fore said bridges, soe that cartes may pas that way and the other unusuall rode [repared?] and wee shall be readie and continue willinge to contribute to others, as yu in your wisdoms shall thinke fit:

And in dutie pray:

paratext

30 pounds allowed and [illegible] order of [Master?] Tymothy Adams to bee [illegible] 5 [markes?] sent out

Neston and Shotwicke bridges - 30 pounds - 0 - 0

Bach bridg cawsey - 05 - 0 - 0

joyning both - 35 - 0 - 0

Charged thus videlicet

Edishbury - 3 - 13 - 0

Broxton - 5 - 7 - 0

Wirral - 4 - 13 - 0

Northwich - 4 - 9 - 0

Bucklow - 5 - 0 - 0

Namptwich - 5 - 18 - 0

Macclesfield - 6 - 0 - 0

In all - 35 - 0 - 0

The inhabitants of Ranowe. QJF 86/2/149 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace for the countye of Chester at the generall quarter sessions of the peace houlden at Namptwiech.

The humble peticion of the inhabitants of Ranowe within the said county

Sheweth that about the last of March 1657 one Reignald Pickeford came into Ranowe, and there procured worke at a coale myne, who in May after tooke a house from one Richard Shawe, whereunto he brought his wief and children to inhabite, from a place called Luddworth in the countye of Derbie the place of their last settled aboad, that shortly after the said Shawe beinge presented at a monthely meetinge for enterteyninge the said Pickford and his family cast them forth of his said house, and the said Pickeford his wief and children beinge cast forth in the frost and snowe, and he beinge a workeman at the coale pittes of one John Swindells of Ranow aforesaid, the said John did receive them into some of his out houseinge to save them from perishinge, untill the next month ly meetinge after held at Presbury, whither the said John did repaire to know the justices pleasures concerninge the the said persons, who at that tyme commended the said charitable act of the said Swindells, and desired the him to suffer them there to continue untill further order, now soe it is that the said Reignald himselfe, shortely after went forth of the said townshipp, and doeth now inhabitte in Staffordshire, but hath left his said wief and children in Ranowe, who without the helpe and relief of this honourable bench for their removall are likely to be burdensome and chargeable to the said township

The premisses [considered may?] it please this honourable bench, to [illegible] [...der?] either for the removeall [illegible] the said Pickefordes wief and [illegible] [her?] said husband; or unto [illegible] [...ir?] last setled aboad, that [illegible] be freed from soe [illegible]

And your petitioners will [illegible]

paratext

The woman and children to bee sent to the husband

The inhabitants of the township of Kingsley. QJF 86/2/150 (1658)

To the honorable the justices of peace within the county of Chester assembled at Nampwich this present quarter sessions held for the said county.

The humble petition of the inhabitants of the towne shipp of Kingsley

Sheweth that there is a lane and common highway leading from Torperley to Frodsham bridge commonly called Barkers Lane in regard it adjoyneth to certaine lands within the towneshipp of Neuton herunto belonging to one Henry Barker of Neuton aforesaid

That the middle of the said lane is the meete and bound betwixt the said townshipp of Kingley and Neuton and the inhabitants of either towne have time out of mind constantly repaired the said lane as the highway lay; the inhabitants of Kingsley where the highway and roade lay on Kingley side and the inhabitants of Neuton where the highway and roade lay upon Neuton side

That the 9th of Aprill in the fourth of King Charles the said inhabitants of Newton did peticion the then justices who ordred that the inhabitants of Kingley should make the one half of the said highway unlesse they cold shew cause to the contrary att the then next quarter sessions

That the inhabitants then of Kingley did then shew for cause that the highway and pavement did pavement did for the greatest part ly upon Neuton side and that Kingsley had many other highwaies to repaire within ther theire owne townshipp and that the said towne of Neuton had not any other high way but onely the said lane within theire townshipp wherupon it was by the said then next quarter sessions referred by Master John Savage and Doctor Byrome then tow of the justices of the said county to view the said lane and certifie or compose the difference betwixt the said [two?] townes wherupon the said referries mett and by the consent of the said inhabitants of both the said townes it was then agreed that in regard the said lane was in greate decay [illegible] [therefore?] the said inhabitantes of Kingsley should for that present [illegible] therof and for the reasons aforesaid they the said [inhabitants?] [illegible] [should?] for ever after wards bee freed from all repaire [illegible] [...id?] highway

That the said inhabitants of Kingley [illegible] [a great par...?] therof on Neuton side and have [illegible] repaire thereof.

That neither the said agreement nor the [illegible] being knowne to the jury att a [quart...?] [illegible] for this county both the said the inhabitants [illegible] of the said highway and the said inhabitants of [illegible] standing the they well know the premises to be [illegible] the inhabitants of Kingley to repaire the decayes now growing in the lane and highway on Newton side

May it therfore please your honour to order that the said inhabitants of Neuton may for the present repaire the decayes in the said high way espesially those which are fallen on Neuton side and that the truth of the premises may be referred and fully examined and certified att the next sessions by such as your honours shall think fitt in the meane while to intrust therwith that therupon such finall order may bee made therin by your honors at the next sessions as to justice doth appertaine.

And your petitions will ever pray for your soules

paratext

To bee repard according to said order

Anne Moseley, widow of William Moseley, a soldier. QJF 86/2/151 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace for the county pallatine of Chester now sitting at quarter sessions in Namptwich.

The humble peticion of Anne Moseley the distressed widow of William Moseley late of Kinarton a soldier deceased.

Sheweth, that your petitioners said late husband faithfully served the common=wealth as a soldier from the beginning of the late warres, and went over with Generall Venables as a soldier to Jamaica, and never since returned, leaving your poore petitioner and two poore children in a very meane condicion, having no subsistence to releeve them but with your petitioners hard labour, till such time as it pleased Captain Whitworth to commiserate her condicion, and by his importunity to the committee appointed for Jamaica procured her some small allowance, but within a short time it was debarred her and hath beene kept from her above 15 or 16 moneths past, soe that your petitioner, and orphanes are in a very languishing condicion, and ready to perish for want unlesse some other timely provision be made for their reliefe, as by the certificate annexed fully appears.

That your petitioner of late is credibly informed that the said committee have perfect intelligence of the death of your petitioners husband, and that if she had but meanes to beare her charges to the said committee, and in the interim to mainteyne her said orphanes, she doubteth not, but they will take her condicion into their charitable consideracions, and releeve her as others in the same case.

The premisses considered your poore petitioner humbly imploreth your worships clemency to be extended towards her, and to order her such reliefe as will carry her and her orphanes on her said intended journey [illegible] [illegible], as to your worships charitable wisedomes shall seeme meet.

And your petitioner etc.

paratext

1 pound from treasurer and referred to the maior of Chester

Thomas Williams of Broxton, labourer. QJF 86/2/153 (1658)

To the worshipfull the justices of the peace in theire quarter sessions held at Middlewich the 7th day of Aprill 1657.

The humble peticion of Thomas Williams of Broxton in in the county of Chester labourer humbly sheweth that your peticioner haveinge lived within the said towneshipp in good creditt and as a poore and honest man for the space of tenn yeeres last past but soe it is may it please your worshipps have in a wife and six small children borne in the said towne and little withall to main tayne them and unwillinge to cast them upon the parish for releife (he never beinge chargeable to the parish former ly, his humble request and desire is that you would be pleased out of your goodnesse to [graunt?] your worships order to the inhabitance of the said towneshippe that a habitacion or some place of abode may be provided for your peticioner as your worshipps and the towne [shill?] thinke that he his wife and six small children may not be cast oute and lost for wante of a place to live and abide in and your peticioner his wife and children will ever pray for your worshipps health and happinesse.

paratext

Hand and seale

At Middlewich 7 April 1657.

Ordered that if the peticioner can procure the hand and seale of the lord or lords of the soyle there to a consent hereunto then the clearke of peace is to draw upp an order for the peticioner to erect a cottage accordingly H Milton [De...?]

I am contented that this petitioner doe erect a cottage upon the wasts of Broxton

Brereton

William Wright. QJF 86/2/155 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace assigned for the county of Chester the humble petition of William Wright.

Sheweth that wheras your petitioner upon his humble petition dyrected to the justices for this county in their generall sessions was by their order dated at Middlewich the 29th day of Aprill 1658 thereby dyrected to have a place of habitation provided for him and his family in the parish of Handley where the petitioner hath beene an inhabitant for foure yeares last past

Yet so it is if it may please your worships that after notice given of the said order some of the inhabitants refuse to give your petitioner any releife at all, so that your petitioner and his family remayne unprovided of any place of habitation which the petitioner prayes may be taken into consideration, and he releived according to justice

For which he shall pray.

paratext

Former order confirmed

John Johnson of Gawseworth, husbandman. QJF 86/3/134 (1658)

[County?] of Chester

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace at Middlewiche assembled

The humble peticion of John Johnson of Gawseworth within the said county husbandman

[Humbly?] sheweth That your peticioner was a foote souldier in the late parliamentes service under the command of Captain John Leadbeater and was wounded in the arme att Farnedon [whi?] in the said service, by reason whereof hee is unable to gett his owne liveinge and that this court was pleased heretofore to admitt him as a pencioner and had allowed him thereby twenty shillinges by the yeare but since hath beene reduced to thirteene shillinges fower pence by the yeare, which will not by much in any smalle manner support or uphould his necessitous condicion

May yt therefore please your worships to increase your peticcioners pencion and allowe him the summ of forty shillinges by the yeare, or such other summe yearely as may seeme most meete to your judgmentes and to support your peticioner in his want and necessity and the rather because the [illegible] truith of the premisses does now fully appere by the certificate hereunto annexed.

And your peticioner as in duty bound will ever pray etc.

paratext

Nil

The inhabitants of Gowseworth in support of John Johnson. QJF 86/3/135 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace at Middlewych assembled the first of September 1658

The humble certificate of the inhabitantes of Gowseworth whose names are subscribed

Sheweth unto your worshipps that whereas John Johnson of our townshipp was formerly wounded in the arme at Farndon, under the command of Captain John Leadbeater by which wound he became lame and unable to gett his maintetenance and thereuppon had twentie shillinges formerly allowed him towardes his mainetenance and of late but 13 shillings 4 pence yearly which is a very small pension towardes the mainetaineinge of himself and family he beinge utterly lame and unable (as uppon the veiwe of his arme will appeare) to doe little towardes his livelyhood, and in regard wee paye yearly forth of our townshipp towardes the relief of maymed souldiers (and have noe more pensioners amongst us) the some of 3 pounds - 6 shillings - 8 pence therefore wee intreat your worshipps to consider the sayd deplorable condicion of your sayd pensioner and afford him yearly fourtie shillinges forth of the sayd 3 pounds 6 shillings 8 pence which wee submitt to your worshippes consideration and subscribe ourselves

Your worshippes most humble servantes.

  • Edward Fitton
  • William Brownell
  • Richard Lowe
  • William Harden
  • Edeward [Kelsaw?]
  • George Stubes
  • Edeward Geskell
  • Thomas Jackson
  • John Brankraft
  • Rondell Brewerton
  • Edward [Giee?]
  • Richard Lisle
  • Edward Gardnor
  • Nathaniell [Pas?]
  • John Chorle
  • Thomas Swaine
  • John Swaine
  • Thomas Redditch clearke.
  • Edward Reddich
  • Roger Henshall
  • Edward Moreton
  • George [Low?]
  • John Johnson
  • Edward Bradhurst
  • Edward Sharman senior
  • Edward Sharman junior
  • Richard Posson
  • John Plant
  • Peeter Sidbotham
  • William [Savaige?]
  • William Hammond
  • Roberte Hammond
  • Edward Lowe
  • John Gee
  • John Johnson
  • Edward [.elso?]
paratext

Wee think it right proper and charitable that the peticioner being one of our parish should receyve his payment of our [illegible]

  • John [Bollard?]
  • John [Hiar?]
  • John Hollines
  • Edward [...ldon?]
  • John [Pag?]
  • Edward Gandy

The inhabitants of Newton near Kingsley. QJF 86/3/136 (1658)

To the honourable the justices to conserve the peace assigned to heare and determine diverse trespasses and other misdemeanours within the county of Chester att the generall sessions of the publique peace held att Knotsford in the saide county the 16th day of November in the yeare of our Lord God 1658.

The humble peticion of the inhabitantes of the towne of Newton neare Kingsley in the parish of Frodsham in the saide county of Chester

Humbly shew that whereas there hath binn difference betwixt your petitioners and the inhabitantes of the township of Kingsley concerning repaire of the highwaies betwixt the saide towneships and that upon debate and hearing of the differences betweene severall of the inhabitantes of both the saide townships touching the repaires of the saide waies att the last generall sessions held att Namptwich it was ordered, that the saide waies in both townships in reference to the present and future tyme should bee repaired according to the manner and way prescribed and appoynted by an order then produced in the saide courte formerly made by the honourable Thomas Lord Viscount Savage and Sir John Doane knight deceassed

Now forasmuch as that in obedience to the saide orders your peticioners have repaired the saide way as much as belonges to the saide township of Newton as may appeare by the certificate of severall sufficient inhabitants in the saide parish of Frodsham hereunto annexed

Your peticioners humbly pray that in consideracion it is by the neglect of the township of Kingsley the saide waies are still unrepaired that your peticioners may bee discharged of any damage may happen against them being that both townes stand presented for the same and that the inhabitants of the saide towne of Kingsley for theire neglect as formerly in the like case they have binn, may bee ordered to dischardge the fees due upon the saide presentment or pay such fines as shall bee imposed upon the saide townships for theire neglect of making the saide way or otherwise as in justice to your honours may seeme most meete

And your peticioners will dayly pray etc

paratext

To grant out a warrant

  • William Key
  • Richard Weston

The petitioners in Mottram parish. QJF 86/3/137 (1658)

To the right worshippfull the justices of the peace for the county Chester

The humble petition of the petitioners in Mottram parish humbly sheweth that the pentioners are all liveinge videllicet: Widow Booth Widow Heape Widow Kindor Widow Wagstaffe Widow Bradley Widow Wolley Thomas Bredburie Ellice Collyor Gerrard Collyor.

Wee humbly intreate your good worshippes that these poore pentioners may have theire allawance as formerly whereas there is in areare behinde due to us one halfe yeares pay in Master Standleys time wee therefore have petitioned for this small portion three or four severall times and he hath promissed and never performed and wee have had orders granted out upon severall petitions that we should have the money paid us and yet we are without it the pentioners are in great neede and necessity full of imperfections as lame and blinde

Therefore we humbly beseech and desire your good worshipps to take this into serious concideration that we may have those areares which are due to us which Master Standley and Thomas [Deine?] have severall times promissed to us but yet have not full filled theire promisse alsoe wee expect that we should have our charges made up which we have beene at in makeinge [petitions?] and in travellinge and wee your poore petitioners shall ever pray

The church wardens doe certifie the truth of this petition

  • Thomas Kenorley
  • John [Collier?]
paratext

That this petition is true soe far as it intimates the necessity and distresse of the said pencioners is affirmed by mee 15th November 1658 Robert Dukenfeild

Let the accompts bee examined by Master [Baret?] and Master Coxon

Edward Barber, Robert Bradford, Richard Turner, Edward Dawson and John Bischinhaugh. QJF 86/3/138 (1658)

The humble peticion of Edward Barber Robert Bradford Richard Turner and Edward Dawson and John Bischinhaugh

To the honourable the justices of peace and quorum for the county of Chester

Humblie sheweth that whereas six hundred pownds is charged uppon the county for the building of Otterspoole bridge theis peticioners humblie pray that they may have the benefit of building the said bridge they being inhabitantes in this county and giveing security to doe the worke reasonably and sufficiently and they will pray etc.

John Wrench of Shurlach. QJF 86/3/139 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace assembled at the quarter sessiones at Knuttesford the humble peticion of John Wrench of Shurlach in the county of Chester

Sheweth that whereas your peticioner at the last great leet held for the hundred of Northwich was presented by Raphe Briscoe constable of the towneship of Shurlach aforesaid for not repayring the lane lyeing next to the landes of the said John Wrench which hee in no waies was ever lyable to repaire nor maynteyne and by sufficient evidence at the court aforesaid did fully proove the same upon his traverse to the said presentment notwithstanding one Richard Chantlor of Shurlach aforesaid Shipbrook devising and maliciously intending to vexe and trouble your poore peticioner hath ende threatned and your peticioner verily beleeves to hath indicted him heere againe for the same offe supposed offence and on purpose to impoverish him

May it therefore please your worships to supersede and stay his proceedings heere and that the verdict in the court aforesaid may end and determine this matter and that your peticioner may not against law bee twice vexed for one feyned crime you would ingage your peticioner in all humility to praie etc

paratext

Nil

William Phillipps of Hale. QJF 86/3/140 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of peace att the generall sessions of the publique peace holden at Knottesford

The humble peticion of William Phillipps of Hale

Sheweth that your petitioner with his wife haveinge inhabited in Hale by the space of about 14 yeares past, and haveinge mainteyned themselves and theire children (beinge now five in number) upon their owne labours, without beinge burthensome to any, are now fallen into poverty, and disenabled (in some measure) to gett theire liveliehoodes as formerly, and are altogeather destitute of a habitacion.

And forasmuch as your peticioners neighbours in Hale are willinge that your peticioner shall have a cottage erected upon some part of Shadowe Mosse in Hale aforesaid, and your peticioner hath great hopes to obteyne the consent of the lord or lords of that wast for the same,

Your petitioner therefore humblie praieth that hee may have the order of this court for ereccion of a cottage as aforesaid and hee will apply himselfe speedily to obteyne the consent of the lord or lords of the wast thereunto,

And as in duety bound will ever praye etc

Wee whose names are subscribed inhabitantes and howseholders in Hale aforesaid doe hereby (what in us lyeth, and as farre as wee are concerned) freely consent, that the petitioner may have a cottage erected, accordinge to his peticion, wee beinge sensible of his poore estate, and great want of a habitacion,

  • Thomas Hesketh
  • Richard Grantham
  • Henery Hesketh
  • William [Barrett?]
  • Lawrence Hardey
  • Thomas [Pirrin?]
  • John Goolden
  • Thomas Newton
  • John Lambe
  • Robert Hollinhurst
  • William Wallton
  • Hugh Coppocke
  • William [Ecles?]
  • [illegible] Partinton
  • Robert [Persson?]
  • William Partington
  • Marie [Arstingshall?]
  • Richard Janney
  • William Coppocke
  • Humfrey Worthington
  • Richard Rylands
  • Thomas Sanderson
  • Edmund Newton
  • William Hobson
  • Robert Letherbarrow his marke
  • John Warburton
  • John Borgis
  • Richard Lether
  • Henry Warburton
  • Isaac Rylands
  • Henry Warburton
  • Thomas [.older?]
  • George Bury
  • William Barrett [juniore?]
paratext

Lord consent first before order

James Tittell and Elizabeth Houlbrooke, wife of John Houlbrooke. QJF 86/3/141 (1658)

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace for the county palatine of Cheshire sittinge att the quarter sessions houlden in the county aforesaide

The humble peticion of James Tittell and Elizabeth Houlbrooke wife to John Houlbrooke of Alurnley yeoman

Humblely sheweth unto your worships that whereas one Thomas Leech of the foresaid towne and county beinge aman that is both bound to his good behaviour as all soe to keepe the peace to all the leige people under the command of the Lord Protector hath most voilently and uncively abbused the wife of the foresaid James Tittell and John Houlbrooke callinge them whores and nominatinge them whose whores the weare with diveres orther candolouse reprochfull speeches to our wifes greate disgrace and wee theire husbantes discreditt, our request and peticion his in this behalfe unto your worships that your worships wilbe pleased to keepe the said Leech unto his behaviour and the abearinge of the peace towarde us and all other his highnesse the Lord Protectors true subjects and till wee may take some legall course in the law to right our selves and prove our wifes weomen of an other carrage

And wee as in dutye bound shall ever pray

paratext

[Absent?]

Elen Urmeston of Meyre, widow. QJF 86/3/142 (1658)

County of Chester

To the right worshipfull the justices of the peace holden at Knuttesford for the county aforesaid at their quarter sessions there houlden.

The humble peticion of Elen Urmeston of Meyre widdow

Sheweth that shee hath lived in the mannor and lordship of Meire aforesaid for seaventeene yeares and upwardes last past, and for eleaven yeares therof and more was marryed to Roger Urmiston deceased and for soe longe both did with her sayd husband live (till about Candlemas last) by whom shee had and hath four children the yongest wherof was but a quarter old at the fathers death; that since the death of her said husband shee hath with her sole care and handlabour maintayned herselfe and them (save what hath beene charitably bestowed on her and them for their releife) now forasmuch as shee is thus weake in estate, and overburdened by soe many yonge children, and hath beene beholden to others as aforesaid, and hath noe habitacion for herselfe or children but at will of others,

Shee humbly prayes that shee may have liberty to erect a cottage within the said lordship and mannor of Meyre for her selfe and children wherin to reside, and shee doubts not but the inhabitants here will humbly in her behalfe [re...f?] her consent and approbacion of the lord of the said mannor herein,

paratext

Ordered a cottage for 10 yeares if shee live unmarried

Anne Smith. QJF 86/3/143 (1658)

[Com?] Cestria

To the honourable bench at the generall sessions of the peace

The humble petition of Anne Smith

Humbly sheweth that your petitioner is now growing into yeares and weake in body through many infirmities and diseases, and want a place of abode to reside in, and in regard it was my hard fortune to have a child, which hath occasioned me to suffer much misery and distresse, and have undergone the penalty of the law for my offence. But in regard of the charge of my child, I cannot have intertainement in any place to settle for the present

That your petitioner was borne in Hanley in the parish of Prestbury, and brought up in Disley in the parish of Stockport, and soe soone as your petitioner was growne up she lived in service and mainteyned herself sufficiently untill she had that misfortune, for which she is truly penitent, and although your petitioner hath brought this charge and trouble upon her self yet if she had aplace of abode to reside in she would not be burthensome to any place further, then for some smale habitation to dwell in for her life

And in regard your petitioner was brought up in Disley within the parish of Stockport it is her humble request that she might have some place of abode there provyded for her to be a succour in her ould age, and by Gods assistance she will not be any further troublesome or burthensome to any person whatsoever

May it therefore please this honourable bench, to take the case of your petitioner into your pyous and charitable consideracion, and to give order that some provision may be made for an habitacion for your petitioner in or about Disley in the said parish of Stockport to be arefuge for your petitioner in her ould age wherein your petitioner humbly submitts her self to the wise consideracion of this honourable bench to make such provision for her as in their wisdome they shall thinke fitt and convenient

And herein you highly engage your petitioner to pray etc

paratext

[Absent?]

The gentlemen and inhabitants of Nantwich in support of Margaret Woodward. QJF 86/3/144 (1658)

November 13 58

To the right worshipful the justices of peace att this sessions assembled

Wee the gentlemen and inhabitants of Namptwich whose names are subscribed doe hereby certifie that Margarett Woodward wife of Thomas Woodward of Namptwich aforesaid is, and ever hath bene, nothing to the contrary to us knowne a woman of an honest, decent and civill deportment, very laborious and painefull to mainetaine her self and children haveing foure all unable for themselves, and soe dependant upon the said Margarett and her sick husband, never well since this most malitious scandall raised upon the said Margarett (to the great disgrace of her and her posterity) by one Catherine Prince, for the stealeing of one yard of cloath; which the said Catherine Prince by her invocation of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, and turneing of the riddle wold find out the said Margarett to have taken the said cloath right worshipful the said Margarett, is a neighbour well knowne unto us all, and hath very much used many of our houses in labouring and takeing paines amongst us, wee never knew her to be faultie that way in the least, and conceive this grand aspersion, to be a most malitious scandall, which makes us all to become your worships supplicants that the said Margarett and Thomas her husband being by the said Catherine bound to the peace, may be now released, it being to their ruin to continue bound, the said Thomas be=ing exceeding weake, their charge great, and nothing to mainetaine them all but what the said Margarett acquires by her labour aforesaid; as also that the said scandall tending to the overthrow and disgrace of them and theires, may be looked upon, and we as bound shall pray etc

  • James Smith
  • John Brocks
  • Thomas [Tench?]
  • John Mainwaring
  • Richard Venables
paratext

If the honourable justices of the peace find noe further ocasion to continue the said partees bound we desire their releasment

  • Richard Jackson minister at Namptwich
  • Thomas Mainwaring
  • Thomas Malbon churche wardens

Nil

The inhabitants of Dutton, Leigh and Barterton in support of Robert Shingler. QJF 86/3/145 (1658)

To the worshipfull the justices at this present bench assembled.

Wee the inhabitants of the severall towneshipps of Dutton, Leigh and Barterton, beinge at this instant present at the court heere held for the towneshipps aforesaid and not knowinge how to have that accomodation at this instant nor any other tyme for our selves nor travellers as formerly wee have had heere by reason that the bearer hereof Robert Shingler is supprest from brewinge or sellinge ale or beere: wee therefore whose names are hereunto subscribed are bold to make knowne unto your worships the want of soe convenient a place both for our selves and others, and that wee knowe not any one man more fittinge to undertake the same then this bearer, nor noe place person soe able and fittinge to give entertainement to people of all sorts as hee is: neither have wee ever heard that hee hath any way misdemeand himselfe duringe the tyme that hee did formerly brewe and sell ale. Our humble request therefore is that your worships will bee pleased to graunt him your lycense once more soe to doe againe that soe both wee and others may finde accommodation, which now is wantinge. And for soe doinge you will oblige both him and us to bee your humble servantes

Barterton 12th July 1657

  • Thomas Nedham
  • [Ceycester?] Ran: Egerton
  • Philip Prichard
  • Ralphe Starkey
  • Ralph Morhall [illegible]
  • William Harcourt
  • Thomas Blackburne
  • John Turpin
  • Peter Bromfeild
  • John Hulton
  • William Martin
  • Joseph Rowcrofts marke
  • Josseph Basartt
  • John Barker
  • John Broadhursts marke
  • Richard Bancrofte
  • John Worrall
  • Abraham Darlington