Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions: 1700s

Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions, 1620-1799.

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'Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions: 1700s', in Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions, 1620-1799, (, ) pp. . British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/petitions/westminster/1700s [accessed 24 April 2024]

In this section

James Roberts. WJ/SP/1707/12/008 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990008

To the right honourable Sir William Wythers knight
Lord Mayor of the Citty of London and to Sir
Salathiell Lovell knight recorder of the same, and
to the rest of the honourable bench sitting in the Old
Bayley in London

The humble peticion of James Roberts

Sheweth
that, your honours poor peticioner is comitted upon
suspicion of felloney, and is innocent of the same
and is now in court with friends ready to make the
same appear, hee being a very poor man and is
almost starved in his confinement

Most humbly prays, your honours will bee soe mercy
=fully pleased, as to take his poverty into your
consideration, and lett him bee called into court
this sessions, and dealt withall as in your honours
most prudent wisdom justice and mercy shall
think fitt

And hee as in all duty bound shall ever pray etc:

Thomas English. WJ/SP/1707/12/009 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990010

To the right worshippfull Sir William Withers knight
Lord Mayor for the Citty of London and to the rest of the
honourable bench sitting at the Old Bayly London

The humble peticion of Thomas English

Sheweth
that your petitioner now is and has been for a
considerable while a prisoner in the common side of Newgate
taken up by some malicious persons on account of a riott (and
so committed) but out of reall intent to robb your petitioner as he
is ready to affirm and prove upon the oath of severall creditable
persons if can be heard and that your petitioner is ready to prove
that he is a disabled person lately ordered from her majestys
service to the Saint Bartholomews Hospitable where certificate
was given of his being an uncureable person according to report
of able physitians and that your petitioner lyes upon the bare
boards in a perrishing condition naked almost being robbed
of that small all he had in the world and if not called up
this present sessions will before next be starved to death

Most humbly prays this present sessions of peace he
may be called up before your lordshipp and this honourable bench
in order to be dealt with according to law.

And (as in duty bound) shall ever pray etca

December
10th:
1707}

Ann Knott. WJ/SP/1707/12/010 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990012

To the right worshippfull Sir William Withers knight Lord
Mayor for the Citty of London and to the rest of the
honourable bench sitting at Justice Hall London

The humble peticion of Ann Knott

Sheweth
that your poor petitioner almost eight years agoe was
indicted at Hicks's Hall for a trespass and through neglect and your petitioners poverty
the same indictment passed into the crowne and so proceeded to an out-lawrey and thereupon
your poor petitioner almost three years agoe and through malice of the constable) was
taken up upon the same outlawrey and sent prisoner to the common side of Newgate
where she has lain ever since in a most miserable and unexpressible condition
on the bare boards destitute both of money and friends having had nothing to subsist
on during her confinement but the allowance of the goal which of late is so little that
it will hardly keep life and soul together) insomuch that she is reduced even to deaths
door and that your poor petitioner is almost three score and ten years of age and a reall
object of your worshipps compassion. And that the prosecutor of your petitioner is not
to be found nor any other prosecutor so that your poor petitioner if not relieved by your
lordshipp and this honourable bench must lye here and inevitably perrish.

Therefore
with greatest submission beggs and intreats the compassion
of your lordshipp and this honourable bench and that you would out
of your reall charity order your petitioners discharge in such manner
as shall seem requisite to your lordship and this honourable bench
to prevent the petitioner from lying in that place wherein she
must inevitably perrish.

And she will be oblidged ever to pray etc.

Elizabeth Mansfield, widow. WJ/SP/1707/12/011 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990013

To the right worshipfull her majesties
justices of the peace for the county of
Middlesex

The humble peticion of Elizabeth
Mansfield widow.

Sheweth,
that Hanna the wife of Shadrack
Grantland of Saint Giles in the Fields in the said
county yeoman stands indicted at this present sessions
of the peace for cheating your peticioner out of
five pounds

That the said Hanna [illegible] was bound over
to appear at this sessions, and has made default

Your peticioner therefore humbly prays
that the recognizance entred into
by the said Hanna [and?] baile may
be forthwith estreated whereby [illegible]
may be awarded against the baile,
and that your peticioner may have
a warrant for the taking and
apprehending of the said Hanna to
answer the premisses, and that for her
contempt as aforesaid, she may be oblidged
to plead to and try the said indictment the
next sessions.

And your petitioner shall ever
pray etc.

Anne Miller. WJ/SP/1707/12/012 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990014

To the right worshipfull her majestys
justices of the peace for the county
of Middlesex

The humble peticion of Anne Miller

Sheweth
that for the fact whereof your petitioner stood indicted
in this honourable court in this present sessions your worshipps
were pleased to fine her 5 pounds and for nonpayment
thereof to committ her to new prison in this county
where she now remaines

That your petitioner is very sorry for the offence and
being very poor is not able to pay the said fine and
hath offered an agreement with her adversary but
he will not comply and humbly submitteing herselfe
to your worshipps goodness and mercy

Your petitioner therefore most
humbly prayes your worshipps [to?]
be pleased to mittigate the said fine
or grant that she may be
admitted to bayle as unto your
worshipp shall seem meet

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc


Per Thomas Nash


Emanuell Fuller. WJ/SP/1707/12/013 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990015

To the right worshippfull her majestys justices of the peace for the county of Middlesex

The humble peticion of Emanuell Fuller

Sheweth
that your petitioner stands indicted last sessions held for this county for an assault upon one
Mary Newton and to which indictment your petitioner pleaded not guilty and thereupon put in
bayle to try his traverse this present sessions and the said Mary Newton being also
then indicted for an assault upon your petitioner and having not appeared as yet and
pleaded not thereunto

Your petitioner therefore humbly prays your worshipps to be pleased to
respite his recognizance untill the next sessions against which
time your petitioner intends to obleige the said Mary Newton by
warrant from this court to appear to his indictment in order
that both indictments may be tryed together

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc.

Toroll Platt. WJ/SP/1707/12/014 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990016

To the right worshipfull her majestys
justices of the peace for the county
of Middlesex

The humble peticion of Toroll
Platt.

Sheweth
that about 29o July 1701 your petitioner became an apprentice
unto James Dunbarr of the parish of Saint Clement Danes in the
said county carpenter for the term of seaven yeares of as
thereby may appear.

That your petitioner served his said master for about five yeares
and a halfe att the end of which time the said Dunbarr by
reason of his circumstances did abscond from his dwelling
that your petitioner was afterwards bound to a freeman and
after turned over to one Maddon and upon his masters
absconding your petitioner applyed himselfe to the said Maddon
before the residue of his time but the said Maddon not having
any occacion for an apprentice your petitioner [..ed?] out the last indenture
and then turned himselfe over to one Edward Hay

That your petitioners first master the said Dunbarr being come
againe to his habitacion troubles your petitioner for the remainder
of his time

Your petitioner therefore most humbly
prayes your worshipps to be
pleased to grant that he may
be discharged from his said first
master.

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

  • Torol Platt

Per Thomas Nash


John Miles. WJ/SP/1707/12/015 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990018

To the right worshipfull her majestys justices
of the peace for the county of Middlesex

The humble peticion of John
Miles.

Sheweth
that for the fact whereof your petitioner stood indicted
in this honourable court this present sessions your worshipps
were pleased to fine him 10 pounds and for nonpayment thereof
to committ him into custody where he now remaines

That your petitioner is very sorry for the said offence and
resolves never to offend againe in the like nature
and forasmuch as the demands of your petitioners
adversary being 25 pounds 10 shillings which your petitioners can by
noe meanes comply with in regard he hath
a large family to mainteyne soe that your petitioner
is not able to pay the said fine and humbly submitting
himself to your worshipps great goodness and
mercy.

Your petitioner therefore most
humbly prayes your worshipps
to be pleased to mittigate the
said fine as unto your worshipps
shall seem meet.

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

  • John Miles his marke

Per Thomas Nash


John Walter. WJ/SP/1707/12/016 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990019

To the right worshipful her majestys justices
of the peace for the county of Middlesex

The humble peticion of John
Walter

That as of yesterday upon a hearing in this honourable
court betweene your petitioner and one John Miles
touching an assault your worshipps were pleased
to fine the said John Miles 10 pounds and to order that
he should agree the matter in difference

That your petitioners demands were noe more then
8 pounds which the said Miles absolutly refuses to pay
but alledges that before your petitioner shalbe paid
two pence he will pay the said fine and threatens
your petitioner with more actions att law.

Your petitioner therefore most humbly
beggs such releife in the
premises as unto your worshipps
shall seem meet

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc.

  • John Walter

Per Thomas Nash


Sarah Marcy, wife of Samuel Mercy of Mile End New Town. WJ/SP/1707/12/017 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990020

To the right worshipfull her majesties
justices of the peace

The humble petition of Sarah Marcy
wife of Samuel Mercy of the hamblet of
Mile End New Towne in the parish of Stepney Middlesex

Sheweth
that your petitioners husband being a bricklayer
and going about his lawfull imployment, was prest
by the constables of Saint Giles and carried to the
Savoy. And your petitioner having [illegible] four small
children and nothing to maintain them with all
but her husbands labour, they are likely to perish
unless your worships will be so pleased as to have
him set at liberty

Your petitioner humbly prayeth that her
said husband may be set at liberty whereby
to maintain his said wife and her four children

And she shall ever pray etc.

In testimony whereof we the churchwarden and overseer of the
poor have set our hands this 9th day of December 1707


  • John Poter overseer
  • William Lloyd church warden

John Still. WJ/SP/1707/12/018 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990021

To the right worshipful her majestys justices of the peace for the county of Middlesex

The humble peticion of John Still.

Sheweth
that your petitioner was lately imployed in the service of one Daniell
Stacy of Hackney in the said county brewer as a day labourer
and that Jeremiah Hatchet one of the headboroughs of the said
parish did lately take him by force to the Savoy in order to compell
him into her majestys service without bringing him before three of
her majestys justices of the peace for the said county as the law directs.
That your petitioner is a housekeeper and pays all parish dutys and
hath a wife and six children to maintaine and is of an honest
life and conversacion which he is ready to make appeare to this
honourable court.

Your petitioner therefore humbly prays your worships to
be pleased to grant that he may be discharged
from his said imprisonment.

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc.

Per L Westley


William Macgill, on behalf of his son in law Eggles Green. WJ/SP/1707/12/019 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990023

To the right worshipfull her majesties
justices of the peace for the county of
Middlesex

The humble peticion of William
Macgill on the behalfe of his sonn in law Eggles Green

Sheweth
that your peticioner the 16th March 1703 bound his said son apprentice
to one John Bainbridge of Fisher Street neere Red Lyon Square in the parish of Saint
Andrew Holborne in this county perukemaker for 7 years to learne the said
trade

That your peticioners son has served 3 years and 7 months of his apprenticehood
dureing which time he hath undergone great hardships in lyeing in uncleane and fowle
bedding and been often imoderately beaten and bruised by his said master and his wife
without any provocacion and that the said master has used his utmost endeavour
to put the said apprentice off to any person that would give the most [mony?]
for him by haggleing with him to severall persons unknowne to your petitioner and
the said master hath not instructed the said apprentice in the said trade and hath
likewise endeavoured to put your petitioners son off to some comander in the Affrican
Company or to waite upon any gentleman and has declared he hath not business for
your petitioners son

That your petitioner gave the said master 5 pounds and engaged himselfe to finde his said son in all
apparell and necessaryes dureing his apprenticehood and has hitherto performed the same and that
the said master did confess he could not charge your petitioners son with any misdemeanour
whatsoever but on Saturday last (unknowne to your petitioner) he caused your petitioners said son to be
apprehended and caried before Ralph Bucknall esquire one of her majesties justices of the peace
for this county and there in your petitioners absence complained against the said apprentice upon
oath for assaulting his said masters wife and being a stubborne and disorderly [servant?] and for
runing away from his said service whereupon your petitioners son was comitted to new prison
at Clerkenwell in this county where he now remaines

Your peticioner humbly prayes that the said matter may
be heard and examined by this court and that your worships will
be pleased to order that the said John Bainbridge may be [ordered?]
to attend this court to shew cause why your petitioners said son should not
be discharged from his said indenture of apprenticehood and your petitioner
may be releived herein as to your worships shall seem meet

And your petitioner as in duty bound shall ever
pray etc

E Stanhope

William Macgill, on behalf of his son in law Eglas Green. WJ/SP/1707/12/020 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990026

To the right worshipful her majesties justices
of the peace for the county of Middlesex

The humble peticion of William Macgill on the
behalfe of his son in law Eglas Green

Sheweth
that your petitioner the 16 March 1703 bound his said son apprentice
to one John Bainbridge of Fisher Street nere Red Lyon Square of the parish
of Saint Andrews Holborne in this county perukemaker for 7 years to learne
the said trade

That your petitioners son has served 3 years and 7 months of his apprenticeshood dueing
which time he hath undergon great hardships in lyeing in uncleane and
fowle bedding and been often imoderately beaten and bruised by his said master
and his wife without any provocacion and that the said master has used his utmost
endeavour to put the said apprentice off to any person that would give
the most money for him by haggleing with him to severall persons unknown
to your petition and the said master hath not instructed the said apprentice in his said
trade and hath likewise endeavoured to put your petitioners son of to some comander
in the Affrican Company or to waite upon any gentleman and has declared he hath
not buisiness for your petitioners son

That your petitioner gave the said master 5 pounds and engaged himselfe to finde his said son in [all?]
apparell and necessaries dueing his apprenticehood and has hitherto performed the same
and that the said master did confess he would not charge your petitioners son with any misdemenor
whatsoever but on Saterday last unknown to your petitioner he caused your
petitioners said son to be apprehended and carryed before Ralph Bucknall esquire
one of her majesties justices of the peace for this county and there in your
petitioners absence complained against the said apprentice upon oath for
assaulting his said master wife and being a stubbourne and disorderly
servant and for running away from his said service whereupon your petitioners
son was comitted to new prison att Clarkenwell in this county where he now
remaines

Your petitioner humbly prayes that the said matter may be heard
and examined by this courte and that your worships will be
pleased to order that the said John Bainbridge may be
ordered to attend this courte to shew cause why your petitioners
said son should not be discharged from his said
indenture of apprenticehood and your petitioner may be relieved
herein as to your worships shall seem meet

And your petitioner as in duty bound shall
ever pray

E Stanton

Prudence Curtis, widow, on behalf of John Curtis her son. WJ/SP/1707/12/021 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990028

To the right worshipfull her majesties justices of the peace
for the county of Middlesex

The humble peticion of Prudence Curtis widow on the
behalfe of John Curtis her son

Sheweth
that on the third day of January in the year 1704 your petitioners son was
putt an apprentice to Philip Bollard of the parish of Saint Giles in the
Fields in the said county joyner for the terme of seven years to learn
the said art

That the said Philip Bollard was to find and provide for the
said apprentice meat drinke washing and lodging during
the said term and your petitioner to find apparell of all sorts

That the said Philip Bollard hath often given the said
apprentice imoderate correction and hath not allowed him
wholesome and sufficient food fitting for an apprentice
for which complaint hath been made to the worshipfull Richard
Dyott esquire one of her majesties justices of the peace for this county who
hath bound the said master to answer the same in this
court this present sessions

Your peticioner humbly prays (the premises considered)
that the master with the apprentice may be
ordered to attend this court someday this sessions
and that the master shew cause why the said
apprentice should not be discharged from him and
placed with some other person useing the same
trade to serve the residue of the said term

And your petitioner (as in duty bound) shall ever pray etc

Per [J Fyton?]


Mary Viccors of St Paul Shadwell, widow. WJ/SP/1707/12/022 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990030

To the right worshipful her majestys
justices of the peace for the county of
Middlesex

The humble peticion of Mary
Viccors of the parish of Saint
Paul Shadwell in the said
county widow

Sheweth
that your petitioner stand indicted in this honourable
court this present sessions for keeping a disorderly
house in the said parish

That the same is a malicious prosecution contrived
against your petitioner in order to gett her out of her
house in which she hath lived for fourty years past
and allways demeaned and behaved her selfe very civilly
and honestly as severall of her neighbours now present
in this honourable court can justify

And forasmuch as your petitioner being a very poor woman and
having been lame for these twelve years past

Your petitioner therefore most
humbly prays your worshipps to be
pleased to grant that she may
be discharged from the said indictment
And your petition shall ever pray etc

Per Thomas Nash


Anne Adams. WJ/SP/1707/12/023 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990031

To the right worshipful her majestys justices of
the peace for the county of Middlesex

The humble peticion of Anne
Adams

Sheweth
that for the fact whereof your petitioner stood indicted
in this honourable court this present sessions your worshipps
were pleased to fine her 10 pounds and for nonpayment
thereof to committ her to new prison in this county
that your petitioner is very sorry for the said offence and
resolves never to offend againe in the like nature
but immediately to leave her house and for as much
as your petitioner being very poor and her landlord
haveing lately [illegible] seized on her goods for nonpayment
of rent and she haveing one child and her
husband being in her majesties service soe that she
is noe waies able to pay the said fine and humbly
submmitteing herselfe to your worshipps great goodness
and mercy.

Your petitioner therefore most
humbly prayes your worshipps to
be pleased to mittigate the said
fine as unto your worshipps shall
seem meet

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

Per Thomas Nash


William Baguley, clerk to the honourable bench of justices at Hick's Hall. WJ/SP/1707/12/024 (1707). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654990032

The humble petition of William Baguley clerk
to the honourable bench of justices at Hick's Hall [Middlesex?]

Sheweth
that wheras your most humble petitioner [having?]
(as in the case) agreed, and contracted with Richard [Chilto...?]
junior for an house, and yard in Great Queen Street Saint Giles
in the Fields for forty one years, building a chappel there
did also actually buy the freehold of that, and another house
and yard adjoyning, haveing by sufficient witnesses payed [illegible]
[teen?] pounds in part of the nine hundred and ten contracted
for both: and being for some time in quiet possession till sup
planted, and forceably turned out by a barbarous coachmak
=er, and others named in the case, and haveing lately [illegible] quiet pos-
sesion [illegible] again, leaveing his wife and daughter to keep [pos?]
session: but these named in the case not suffering any except
one, or two of your honourable bench to give her, or the
child so much as a crust of bread, or a cup of cold water
endeavouring to starve them there; nay they are so malici-
-ously bent as to indite two honest neighbouring women for
attempting to cary victuals to the distressed. It is hoped therfore
that this honourable bench will discharge the innocent
neighbours; and pitty the case, and condition of your petitio-
-ners wife, and child, possitively ordering these neighbours
or some other friend without interuption to cary them neces
saries till the case is fairly decided by law: if this canot be
granted: your petitioner must (as he is advised) address himself
to the throne, and Grand British Councell both for justice
and mercy: so not doubting but that this honourable bench
will consider so as in justice to discharge the innocent
and cause that the distressed be taken care of for which
as in duty bound your petitioner will ever
pray


December 12th [illegible]
Master Lindon
I desire you to gett William
Martin discharged of his
recognizance he haveing
given satisfaction to the [illegible]
Yours

  • John Arden