Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions: 1736

Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions, 1620-1799.

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'Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions: 1736', in Petitions to the Westminster Quarter Sessions, 1620-1799, (, ) pp. . British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/petitions/westminster/1736 [accessed 11 April 2024]

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Charles William Stutley. WJ/SP/1736/07/002 (1736). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654060002

To the worshipfull Sir John Gonson knight
and the rest of his majesties justices of the peace at the
general quarter sessions of the peace now held for the
city and liberty of Westminster in the county of Middlesex

The humble petition of Charles William Stutley

Humbly sheweth
that your petitioner by indenture of apprentiship
bearing date the twenty sixth day of November 1733. was bound
apprentice to Jerrom Johnson of the parish of Saint And Martin in the Fields in
the county of Middlesex glas ingraver for the term of seven years from thence
next ensuing to learn the art of glass ingraving. And though your petitioner hath
faithfully served his said master the said Jerrom Johnson ever since, yet his said
master hath not instructed him in the said art, but (as your petitioner verily
believes) to conceal the same from your petitioner put what work of that kind
he has for two years past had to do, to be wrought by another person and
has imployed your petitioner only to scollop glass (an art which his said master did
not follow before nor at the time the petitioner was bound to him as aforesaid)
which has been very prejudicial to your petitioners health whereby your petitioner
has been twice poisoned and is now so weak that he is unable to work
at any business and is afraid he shall never recover his health again.

Your petitioner therefore humbly prays that his said
master may be compelled to teach and instruct him
in the said art of a glass ingraver as by his said indenture
he is obliged to do, or that your petitioner may be discharged
from his said indenture of apprentiship or have such
further and other relief as to your worships shall seem
meet

And your petitioner shall ever pray etc

  • Charles William Stutley

William Thomas. WJ/SP/1736/07/003 (1736). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654060004

To the right worshipful the bench of justices
for the city and liberty of Westminster

The humble petition of William Thomas

Sheweth
that your petitioner was by indenture bound apprentice
to Nicholas Bygrave of the neat houses Saint George Hanover Square gardiner
for seven years from January 1731. By which the said Bygrave was to
find him meat drink washing lodging, and also to pay unto the said
Thomas during the said term, 3 pounds 10 shillings 0 pence per annum as by the said indenture
ready to be produced may more fully appear.

That your petitioner served his said master faithfully till
February last, when his master, for some reasons was obliged to go into
the country leaving your petitioner to the care of his wife, who could not afford
[illegible] necessaries of life, so that he was almost starved
and lay [in?] a room where the water was but about 3 inches from his bed,
which put him to expences to recover his health, and so being intire
destitute of employ and necessaries, his wages being unpaid, your petitioner
was obliged to seek for his bread, which he did and got into business to
support himself till Saturday last, when the said Bygrave came to
Camberwell where your petitioner was at work, took him away from his place
and also took his cloaths from him, which he by his industry had paid for,
and beat him barbarously contrary to the usuage of a covenant servant

Your petitioner therefore most humbly prays this
worshipful bench to take the merits of his case
into your worships consideration and be pleased to grant
him such relief in the premisses by discharging
him from his said servitude, or otherwise as your
wisdoms shall think fit

And as in duty bound he shall ever
pray etc.

the mark of


  • William Thomas

William Boulton, crier of the court of quarter sessions of the peace. WJ/SP/1736/10/007 (1736). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654070004

To the worshipfull his majesties justices of the peace
for the city and liberty of Westminster in their general quarter sessions
assembled

The humble petition of William Boulton
cryer of the said court of quarter sessions of the
peace for the said city and liberty

Sheweth
that upon your petitioner's humble petition to the court
of quarter sessions in April one thousand seven hundred and
thirty five setting forth that your petitioner was (and still is
one of the clerks in the post office and his constant
attendance requiring him to attend to sort and give out the
letters to be sent and given to his majesties subjects of great
importance to the publick.

Your petitioner prayed that your worships would be pleased
to excuse your said petitioner from personal attendance in
the said office of cryer and to admit Thomas Barber to execute
and officiate in the place stead and absence of your said petitioner
which your worships were pleased to order according to your
said petitioner's prayer

And the said Thomas barber is since dead.

Your petitioner humbly prays your worships
that William Thackary may be admitted to
execute and officiate in the place stead and absence of
your said petitioner (who is qualifyed and fitt
to execute the said office of cryer of the said
court of sessions) during the will and pleasure
of the court of quarter sessions of the peace
for the said city and liberty

And your petitioner in duty bound shall ever pray etc.

  • William Boulton

Elizabeth Kennedy of St Leonard's Forster. WJ/SP/1736/10/006 (1736). LondonLives reference: LMWJPS654070010

To the worshipfull bench of justices of the peace
now sitting at Westminster

The humble petition of Elizabeth Kennedy, of
the parish of Saint Leonard's Forster, Saint Martins Le
Grand. Sheweth; by way of appeal to the
worshipfull bench, that she is rated two shillings
per pound towards the maintenance of the poor of
her parish, it being more then she is able to pay
having many children she hopes, the honourable
bench will take it into consideration

Her whole estate, household goods, and money
her depts being paid) will not amount to a groat
of which she is ready to take oath, which sum is
very unproportionable, the richest men in the
parrish paying no more then two shillings per pound
as will [appear?] as follows

Master Thomas Huckell [senior?] [illegible] worth 15 00 0
Master Thomas Huckell [junior?] 15000
Master Robert Shelley 4000
Master James Murfett 12000
Master Southward 15000
Master Broomer 3000
Master Swayn 2000

Besides divers others that pay no more and come
less, and it is humbly hoped the honourable
bench will take my misserable case into
consideration, and your petitioner shall ever pray etc

July 16th. 1736

  • Elizabeth Keannedy