BHO

Padbury

Pages 231-235

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Buckinghamshire, Volume 2, North. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1913.

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Citation:

In this section

180. PADBURY.

(O.S. 6 in. xviii. N.E.)

Ecclesiastical

(1). Parish Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, at the N.E. end of the village, is built almost entirely of uncoursed stone rubble, partly covered with rough-cast and plaster; the tower is of large rubble with wide joints; the N. wall of the N. aisle is of small coursed rubble; the dressings are of stone, and the parapet of the tower is of dark brown stone. The roofs are covered with lead, except that of the chancel, which is tiled. The Chancel and Nave were built early in the 13th century; a W. tower and a S. aisle were added at the end of the 13th century. The North Aisle, with the N. arcade and the clearstorey over it, was added c. 1330; the South Aisle was re-built, and the nave widened towards the S. probably later in the 14th century. Early in the 16th century the upper part of the chancel was re-built, and the chancel arch was reconstructed, the S. arcade was altered, and new windows were inserted on the S. side of the clearstorey. The West Tower was re-built probably about the middle of the 17th century. The parapet of the tower is said to have been renewed in 1684, and the whole building repaired in 1830. The chancel was restored in 1882, the South Porch re-built in 1897, and the North-West Vestry added in 1908.

The 14th-century windows of the clearstorey (see Plate, p. 246) and the wall-paintings of c. 1330 are noteworthy.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (25 ft. by 14 ft.) has a 15th or 16th-century external string-course, under the E. window, which is of three cinque-foiled lights and tracery in a two-centred head; the jambs and head are of the 14th century and the tracery is of the 15th century; the external label has modern stops. In the N. wall are two windows; the eastern is apparently of c. 1300, and is of two acutely pointed lights under a two-centred head with a plain spandrel and an external label; the western is a small low-side window, possibly of late 13th-century date, and is of one pointed light, about 7 inches wide, with an internal rebate for a shutter. In the S. wall are two windows, the eastern of c. 1330, and of three trefoiled ogee lights and net tracery under a two-centred head with an external label, which has rough stops, probably formerly carved as heads; the western is a low-side window, of one small light, re-used; the jambs and semi-circular rear arch are apparently of early 13th-century date; the roughly cut pointed head is probably of the 16th century and was possibly formerly foliated: between the windows is a 14th-century doorway with chamfered jambs and two-centred head; the jambs have moulded stops at the base. The chancel arch is of early 13th-century date, re-built early in the 16th century, except the lower part of the jambs, which lean outwards and are of two orders with shallow segmental pilasters having plain capitals with moulded abaci; on the E. side there are only traces of the outer order; on the W. side the abaci of the outer order have been cut away, but the chamfered plinth is carried round both orders; the S. jamb has been partly restored with modern cement; the arch is pointed, and somewhat distorted, of two square orders, built of 13th-century voussoirs; the label on the W. side has been cut back, and above it is a rough relieving arch. The Nave (48 ft. by 20 ft.) has N. and S. arcades each of four bays; the N. arcade, of c. 1330, has thin octagonal pillars with moulded bases; the bell-capitals have moulded abaci; the easternmost pillar is modern, the others have been partly restored; the responds have corbel-capitals supporting the inner order of the arches, which are two-centred and of two chamfered orders, with plain labels in the nave and aisle. The S. arcade, of c. 1300, has octagonal pillars with plain bell-capitals; probably the abaci have been re-cut; the bases are moulded and are all modern, except part of one base; the responds have corbels crudely carved as faces, and probably of the 16th century; the two-centred arches are of two chamfered orders with plain labels in the nave and aisle; some of the head-stops are original; the labels over the middle arches are partly cut away by the clearstorey windows. The clearstorey has, on the N. side, three foiled circular windows of c. 1330, with plain circular external labels; on the S. side are four windows, each of three trefoiled lights under a square head with sunk spandrels; the second window from the E. end is of the 16th century, the others have been partly or completely restored; the easternmost window has an old stop-chamfered oak lintel. The North Aisle (9 ft. wide) has, in the E. wall, a 15th-century window of three cinque-foiled lights under a square head with plain spandrels and an external label. In the N. wall are two windows of c. 1330; the eastern is of three trefoiled ogee lights and tracery under a segmental head with a plain external label which has square stops, one of them with traces of carving; the western window is of two trefoiled ogee lights with a quatrefoil under a pointed head and a plain label: between the windows is the N. doorway, which is probably also of c. 1330, but has been restored and apparently re-tooled; the jambs and pointed head are moulded, and the jambs have square stops at the base; the external label has large head-stops of late 14th-century date, somewhat defaced, apparently of a man in a liripipe hood, and a woman in a veil and wimple. In the W. wall is a modern doorway opening into the vestry. The South Aisle (9 ft. wide) has, in the E. wall, an early 15th-century window of three trefoiled lights under a square head with sunk spandrels and a moulded external label which has shield-stops; the S. shield apparently bears a quatrefoil, but is partly broken. In the S. wall are two windows, the eastern of four cinque-foiled lights under a square head, all modern except the jambs, which are probably of the 15th century; the western window is modern: between the windows is the S. doorway, with moulded jambs and pointed head, and a label which has nail-head and pellet ornament, and defaced head-stops; the label is of early 13th-century date, re-used, the rest of the doorway was re-built in the 14th century and has been restored. In the W. wall is a window of two irregularly pointed lights, probably of the 17th century. The West Tower (11 ft. by 12 ft.) is of three diminishing stages, and has a plinth and a plain parapet, with merlons only at the corners. The whole tower is apparently of the 17th century, except the pointed tower arch which is of c. 1300, and of three chamfered orders, the two outer orders dying into the jambs; the inner order springs from corbel-capitals; the S. capital is of c. 1300, with a carved head; the N. capital is probably a 17th-century copy of the other, and is broken; on the E. side the jambs have chamfered edges with broach-stops, on the W. side they are splayed gradually into the N. and S. walls. Against three walls of the tower, inside, is a stone bench. The W. doorway is of late 17th or early 18th-century date, and the W. window is probably of the same date; both of them have semi-circular heads. The N., S. and W. walls of the second stage have each a small single light with a triangular head, and an internal lintel of wood. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a large single light with a triangular head; the S. and E. windows have two-centred chamfered rear arches, the N. and W. windows semi-circular rear arches. The Roof of the chancel is of two bays, and of late 15th or early 16th-century date, apparently restored in the 17th century; the easternmost truss is modern; the other trusses have moulded tie-beams, with curved braces below them, and king-posts with four-way braces above them; the western tie-beam has, carved on the E. side, the initials and date 'T M AN1655DOM T C', the date probably referring to repairs carried out in the 17th century, and attached above the inscription is a small carved figure of a man holding a shield inscribed 'E H. W H'; the middle truss has, on the soffit, a boss carved as a head; the wall-plates are moulded; the rafters, and the collar-beams with their braces, are modern. The N. aisle has a low lean-to roof of four bays with moulded tie-beams, purlins and wall-plates, and plain rafters, all of the 15th or 16th century. The roof of the S. aisle has plain tie-beams, the easternmost being dated 1764. The porch has a few old timbers re-used in the modern roof.

Fittings—Chest: In S. aisle—made in 1908 from bolection-moulded panels of oak taken from former pulpit, late 17th-century; incised pattern on panels, modern. Communion Table (see Plate, p. 50): plain framed top, legs carved as columns, with strap ornament, foot rail moulded, top rail carved with the names of the nine donors and, at each corner, with head and wings of angel, on W. side shield with date 1634. Door: In N. aisle—in N. doorway, of oak, studded with nails. Lockers: In chancel—in S. wall, two small recesses, the lower recess with rebated edges and roughly chamfered lintel, the upper recess with rough edges, partly chamfered, date uncertain. In S. aisle, next to piscina, with trefoiled head, rebated jambs, date uncertain. Paintings: In N. aisle—on N. wall, at E. end, remains, much defaced, and partly hidden by organ, two representations of scenes from the life of St. Catherine; a small figure of St. Catherine, preaching to the doctors, and W. of her figure, a large wheel, with symbolical figures representing the Seven Deadly Sins; below wheel, on arch of recess (see below), consecration cross, all probably of c. 1330; on each side of N. doorway, traces of colour, red and black, including scroll, pattern of fleurs de lis, inscription in black-letter. Piscinae: In chancel—with cinque-foiled ogee head, projecting octofoil basin, 14th-century, basin partly restored; old oak shelf at back. In N. aisle—in E. wall, with trefoiled ogee head, half the basin remaining, 14th-century. In S. aisle—with trefoiled head, jambs enriched with dog-tooth ornament, rough workmanship, 13th-century, re-set, perished and broken. Plate: includes small cup, of 1573; cover paten, of same date, inscribed 1574. Pulpit: see Chest. Recess: In N. aisle—in N. wall, at E. end, with two-centred arch of one chamfered order, probably 15th-century. Miscellanea: Chancel—incised on S.E. angle, sundials; on external stones of E. jamb of doorway in S. wall, small crosses (see also Paintings). In tower—small cup-shaped bowl, detached, probably stoup, date uncertain; long stone, apparently shaft of cross. In vestry —box with moulded panelling, incised ornament on panels, early 17th-century.

Condition—Good.

Secular

Monuments (2–20)

These buildings are almost all of the 17th century, and of two storeys; the walls generally are timber-framed with brick filling, and have been much restored; some of them are whitewashed or covered with plaster. Most of the roofs are thatched. In many of the rooms there are wide open fireplaces and exposed ceiling-beams.

(2). House, on the N. side of a road branching from the Buckingham road, about 280 yards S.W. of the church. The plan is L-shaped. The E. wall is of stone with a brick gable, the W. wall is weather-boarded. Part of the shorter wing is of modern brick. Two of the chimney stacks are original, restored at the top.

Condition—Fairly good.

Padbury, Plan Shewing Positions of Monuments.

Main Street, N. side

(3). The Old Vicarage, now two tenements, 300 yards S.W. of the church, was built on a rectangular plan, probably late in the 16th century. In front and at the back some of the brick is original and set in herring-bone pattern. The wall at the W. end is partly of stone. At the back are two small windows with original frames; one of the windows is now blocked. The central chimney stack is original. Interior:—On the ground floor, one room has a stop-chamfered ceiling-beam, and a large fireplace with a moulded lintel which has moulded stops; in another room a ceiling-beam also has moulded stops. The plain oak staircase is old.

Condition—Good.

S. side

(4). House, 250 yards S.S.W. of the church. The walls are partly of stone rubble; the roof is covered with slate. The central chimney stack and another stack at the E. end are original.

Condition—Fairly good.

(5). Cottage, on the S. side of a triangle, about 300 yards S.S.W. of the church. The plan is rectangular, with a projecting wing on the N. side. The walls are partly of stone.

Condition—Fairly good.

(6). House, about 20 yards W. of (5). The walls are of red brick with blue headers, and have plain string-courses between the storeys. At each end is an original chimney stack.

Condition—Good.

(7). House, about 400 yards S.W. of the church, was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. The plan is of the central chimney type with a small projecting wing at the back. Much of the brick filling in the walls is set in herring-bone pattern; the E. wall, except the gable, is of stone rubble. The chimney stack has been re-built above the roof.

Condition—Good.

(8). House, now two tenements, W. of (7), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. The plan is of the central chimney type. Some of the brick filling in the walls is set in herring-bone pattern. The chimney stack has been re-built above the roof.

Condition—Fairly good.

(9). Barn, about 500 yards S.W. of the church. The walls are on stone foundations, and partly weather-boarded.

Condition—Poor.

(10). Cottage, two tenements, about 600 yards S.W. of the church, was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. Some of the brick filling in the walls is original and set in herring-bone pattern. The central chimney stack has been re-built.

Condition—Good.

(11). Cottage, two tenements, W. of (10). The walls are partly of stone rubble.

Condition—Good.

(12). House, 700 yards S.W. of the church, was built late in the 16th century. In front the brick filling is set in herring-bone pattern, and the wall is much covered with ivy. At the back is a small modern addition. The large square chimney stack is of original brick, and has raised panels on each face.

Condition—Good.

(13). House, about 760 yards S.W. of the church. All the filling in the walls is of modern brick.

Condition—Good.

Old End, road forming loop N. of Main Street, at W. end; W. side (inner)

(14). House, now two tenements, at the junction of the loop road with the main street. The central chimney stack is of early 17th-century date, and the chimney at the S. end probably of a later date in the same century. Interior:— In one room the large fireplace is partly blocked, and the chimney corners are enclosed by cupboard doors of early 17th-century panelling with ornamental hinges. The chamfered ceiling-beams have moulded and broach-stops.

Condition—Good.

S. side

(15). Cottage, now two tenements, 750 yards S.W. of the church. The plan is rectangular, with a central chimney stack; adjoining the W. end is an 18th-century tenement.

Condition—Fairly good.

N. side

(16). Cottage, now three tenements, 650 yards S.W. of the church. It was built probably early in the 17th century, on a rectangular plan, and possibly lengthened towards the E. later in the same century; a modern N.E. wing has been added, making the plan L-shaped. In front the E. end of the wall is of late 17th-century red and black bricks; the middle bay is of similar bricks, probably of the 18th century, and the W. end is original; there are straight joints between the three bays. In the W. wall are two windows with old frames. The central chimney stack in the W. half of the building is original, that in the E. half is probably of late 17th-century date.

Condition—Fairly good.

(17). Cottage, 30 yards W. of (16). The plan is rectangular, with a central chimney stack. The walls are partly of modern brick and stone. The chimney stack is of 17th-century brick.

Condition—Fairly good.

(18). House, 100 yards W. of (16). The walls have been almost entirely re-faced with modern brick and some stone. The central chimney stack has one shaft of early 17th-century date, with a late 17th-century shaft built against it.

Condition—Good, much altered.

W. side (outer)

(19). Cottage, at the corner of the Station Road, 900 yards S.W. of the church, at the N. end of a row of modern cottages. All the filling in the walls is of modern brick. The N. chimney stack is of the 17th century.

Condition—Good.

(20). Padbury Mill, about 1 mile S.W. of the church. Late in the 17th century an addition of timber and brick was made at the S.E. end of the early 17th-century building, which was subsequently extended further towards the S.E. and covered with plaster. The roofs are partly tiled. Some of the windows at the back contain quarries of old glass, and one of the chimney stacks is original.

Condition—Fairly good.