Stebbing

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 1, North West. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1916.

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Citation:

, 'Stebbing', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 1, North West, (London, 1916) pp. 280-288. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol1/pp280-288 [accessed 25 May 2024].

. "Stebbing", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 1, North West, (London, 1916) 280-288. British History Online, accessed May 25, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol1/pp280-288.

. "Stebbing", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 1, North West, (London, 1916). 280-288. British History Online. Web. 25 May 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol1/pp280-288.

In this section

69. STEBBING. (D.d.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)xxiv. N.W. (b)xxiv. N.E. (c)xxiv. S.W. (d)xxiv. S.E.)

Stebbing is a large parish and village about 3 m. E.N.E. of Great Dunmow. The Church, the Friends' Meeting-house, and the Church Farm are the principal monuments.

Ecclesiastical

c (1). Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin stands at the S. end of the village. The walls are of flint rubble covered with plaster; the dressings are of shelly oolite and clunch; the roofs are covered with lead, tiles and slate. The whole church, consisting of Chancel, North Vestry, Nave, North and South Aisles, West Tower and South Porch, was built c. 1360. Late in the 19th century it was partly restored.

The church is a fine example of 14th-century work; the stone chancel-screen is noteworthy, and should be compared with that at Great Bardfield.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (47 ft. by 24½ ft.) is of the 14th century and has a chamfered external string course, and a moulded internal string-course at the level of the window sills. The E. window is of five cinquefoiled lights with 15th-century tracery under a two-centred head; the jambs. head, labels and rear arch are moulded, and the internal splays have each two attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases. In the N. wall are two windows; the eastern is of two plain lights under a pointed head; the various parts are all moulded and there is an internal label; the western window is of two pointed lights and formerly opened into the vestry, but is now blocked. Further W. is a doorway with chamfered jambs, two-centred arch and moulded label. In the S. wall are three windows; the easternmost is of two cinquefoiled lights with flowing tracery in a two-centred head; the various parts and both labels are moulded, and the internal splays have shafts with moulded bases and moulded and embattled capitals; the second window is similar to the easternmost, but the splays are not shafted and the tracery is different; the westernmost window is of similar detail to the second, but of two trefoiled lights with leaf tracery; the lights are carried down below a transom. Between the second and third windows is a doorway with jambs and two-centred head of two moulded orders; the internal splays and label are moulded, and the rear arch is hollow-chamfered. The two-centred chancel-arch is of two moulded orders, with shafted responds which have moulded bases and capitals; the arch is filled with a stone screen of three bays divided by clustered shafts which have moulded bases and capitals and are continued up to form three pointed sub-arches which are trefoiled and sub-cusped, and enriched with crockets, ball-flower, etc. above the sub-arch in the middle bay is a transom with pedestals for the rood and its flanking images; the head of the main arch is filled with elaborately enriched tracery; recently the screen has been extensively restored.

The North Vestry, now divided into two parts by a modern wall, has, in the E. wall, a window with a square head and a moulded segmental rear arch; the mullions and tracery have been destroyed. In the N. wall are two windows, the eastern, now blocked, is of two trefoiled lights with tracery under a square head; the western window was formerly of two lights, but has been much altered, one light is blocked, and the head of the other is now square. Between the windows is a much-altered doorway; the lower part of the jambs is of chamfered stone; the upper part is of brick, with a flat lintel.

The Nave (66 ft. by 24 ft.) has N. and S. arcades, each of five bays with two-centred arches of two moulded orders and moulded labels with headstops, many of which are modern; the columns have each four semi-octagonal shafts, divided by small rolls and with moulded capitals and bases; the responds have attached half-columns. The clearstorey has, on the N. and S. sides, five windows, each of three cinquefoiled lights under a four-centred head, with a moulded label and maskstops; all are much restored. Below the windows is a moulded internal string-course, mitreing with the labels of the arches.

The North Aisle (11 ft. wide) has grotesque gargoyles at the level of the parapet string-course, and there are external and internal string-courses at the level of the window sills. In the E. wall is a 15th or 16th-century doorway with chamfered jambs and three-centred head. In the N. wall are four windows, the easternmost and the third are uniform, and each of two cinquefoiled lights with flowing tracery in a two-centred head; the jambs, mullion and labels are moulded: the second window is of late 14th-century date, and of similar detail to the easternmost, but of three lights under a four-centred head; the mullions and tracery are modern: the westernmost window is similar in detail and character to the easternmost, but has varied tracery: the internal labels of the windows are continued along the wall as a string-course. Between the third and fourth windows is the blocked N. doorway, with moulded jambs, two-centred arch and labels. In the W. wall is a window uniform with the easternmost window in the N. wall.

Stebbing, the Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin

The South Aisle (10 ft. wide) has grotesque gargoyles to the parapet string-course, and the walls have string-courses corresponding with those in the N. aisle. In the E. wall is a window of three trefoiled lights with net tracery in a two-centred head; the internal splays are shafted; the various parts and the label are moulded. In the S. wall are four windows, the easternmost and the third are each of two cinquefoiled lights with tracery in a two-centred head; the details are similar to those of the window in the E. wall, but without shafts to the splays; the second and the westernmost windows are of similar detail and character to the others, but the tracery is different and the splays are shafted. Between the first and second windows are the upper and lower doorways of the stairs to the rood-loft; they have chamfered jambs and rough three-centred heads of late 15th or early 16th-century date; the staircase is open and the seven lower steps remain. Between the third and fourth windows is the S. doorway with jambs and two-centred arch of two moulded orders, partly defaced; the label and rear arch are moulded. In the W. wall is a window uniform with the easternmost in the S. wall.

The West Tower (12 ft. by 11 ft.) is of three stages with an embattled parapet, grotesque gargoyles and a small timber spire or spike. The S.E. stair-turret is of the 15th century, and rises a little above the first stage. In the angles of the tower and nave above the level of the stair-turret, are ogee shaped corbels, two on the N. and three on the S., of uncertain use. The two-centred tower-arch is of two moulded orders; the responds have semi-octagonal attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases, and a moulded outer order. The W. doorway is modern; the W. window has moulded external reveals and rear arch, but the mullions and tracery are modern. In the W. wall of the second stage are two single-light windows, one above the other; they have trefoiled heads, but are much weathered. In the N. wall is a similar window. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a window of two trefoiled lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head.

The South Porch was altered in the 16th century, when the walls were raised in brick; the weathering of the original roof is visible on the wall of the S. aisle. The two-centred outer archway is con tinuously moulded, and has a moulded label. In the E. wall is a rectangular window filled with tracery, and partly restored with brick; the segmental rear arch is moulded. In the W. wall is a similar window but with a quatrefoil instead of tracery.

The Roof of the chancel is of c. 1500, and of the braced collar-beam type; the timbers are moulded, the purlins and wall-plates have running foliage ornament and the wall-plates are embattled; the long curved braces have traceried spandrels. The roof of the vestry is modern, but fragments of the 14th-century moulded wall-plates remain. The early 16th-century roof of the nave has moulded main timbers; the tie-beams are cambered; at the feet of the intermediate principals are carved angels holding blank shields, and at the intersections of the purlins are foliated bosses.

Fittings—Brasses and Indents. Brasses: In chancel—(1) to Thomas Jerningan, 1608, and Elizabeth (Thompson) his last wife, inscription and shield of arms. In nave—(2) of a widow, c. 1390, with indents of marginal inscription, four roundels, three shields and scroll; (3) to Isaac Bernard, 1609, two inscriptions. Indents: In chancel—(1) of armed figure, marginal inscription with roundels and shield, late 14th-century; (2) probably of priest with inscription plate, 14th or 15th-century, much worn; (3) probably of woman, with inscription and three other plates, scroll and two shields. In nave—(4) of figure possibly holding crosier, scroll and inscription plate, 15th-century. Chair: In chancel—with upholstered seat, cane back, turned legs and simple carving, c. 1700. Communiontable and Rails: Table: with fluted legs and ball feet. Rails: with fluted and twisted balusters, ramped at ends and on each side of middle gate, all early 18th-century. Chests: In vestry—plain, with shaped feet, late 17th-century. In nave— plain, with iron-bound coved lid and three locks, probably 16th-century. Font: octagonal, with plain bowl, moulded at the base, and cusped panelled stem, 15th-century. Glass: In chancel— in E. window, in head of one light, canopy, 14th-century; in S.W. window, ornamental quatrefoil, 14th-century. In N. aisle—in easternmost window of N. wall, fragments of foliage, tabernacle-work, etc. late 14th-century; in second window remains of inscription and tabernacle work; in third window, strawberry-leaf foliage, etc., 14th-century; in fourth window and in window in W. wall, fragments, late 14th-century. In S. aisle— in E. window and in four windows in the S. wall, foliated and architectural fragments, monogram M.R., etc., late 14th-century. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monument: In churchyard S. of chancel, headstone, to Mary ... 1681. Floorslabs: In chancel—(1) to John Smith the elder, 1666; (2) to John Smith the younger, 1671; (3) to John Lane, 1678; (4) to Dorothy (Lane) wife of John Soreil, 1681. In S. aisle—(5) to Francis Enniver, 1710-11, with skull and cross-bones in low relief. Niche: On S. porch—over outer archway, of plastered brick, with four-centred head, 16th-century. Paintings: In chancel, nave and aisles—traces of texts, etc. illegible, late 16th-century; on E. window of S. aisle—traces of elaborate colour decoration, 14th-century, (see also Reredos). Piscinae: In chancel—in range with sedilia, double, with two cinquefoiled heads and a quatrefoil in a two-centred main head, two drains, one square octofoil and one octofoil, shelf at back, 14th-century. In S. aisle—with richly moulded trefoiled head and label, projecting basin broken off, 14th-century. Reredos: In N. aisle—on E. wall, remains of elaborate canopy with vaulted soffit and projecting brackets, all now cut back to face of wall, traces of rich colour-decoration, early 16th-century. Screen: (See Architectural Description, under chancel-arch). Sedilia: In chancel— in range with piscina, three, with moulded cinquefoiled heads resting on double-shafted jambs and piers with three attached shafts, all with moulded capitals and bases, 14th-century. Stoup: In S. porch—in E. wall, with pointed head and broken basin, probably early 16th-century. Miscellanea: In nave—at W. end, coffin stool, mid 17th-century; table with drawers and turned legs, c. 1700; loose in chancel—lately removed from the chancel screen, two large fragments of stone, carved with grotesque figures; in N. wall of chancel—projecting wood block with slotted soffit, for pulley of Lenten veil.

Condition—Fairly good structurally, but some of the stonework is much decayed.

c (2). Friends' Meeting House, 240 yards N.W. of the church. The walls are of brick in Flemish bond, and the roof is tiled. The structure was built in 1674, and is of plain rectangular plan, with an 18th-century portico at the E. end. The walls have a plain plinth and band-course; the roof is hipped. The windows, two in the N. wall and E. wall, and one in the S. wall and W. wall, have segmental heads and wooden frames. In the middle of the N. wall is a doorway with a semi-circular arch which has an impost and key-blocks; the head of the arch is filled in with brickwork. In the E. wall is a doorway with a plain square head, and, above it, a panel with the date 1674.

Fittings, all of late 17th-century date—Doors: In N. doorway—two-fold, panelled; in E. doorway —with moulded panels, also panelled linings. Panelling: On N. and S. walls—dado of panelling, re-used. Screen: dividing building into two parts, panelled, with moveable shutters to upper part, and two-fold door in the middle; the latches and handles are original. Seating: In W. part of building—four deal benches against N., S. and W. walls. In E. part—two benches fixed against N. and S. walls, and twelve moveable benches, six plain, and six with small turned supports to the arms. Table: In W. part— with turned legs, moulded rails and brackets, and one drawer.

Condition—Bad.

Secular

a (3). Stebbing Mount and moat, 750 yards N.W. of the church. The mount is circular, 225 feet in diameter at the base, 51 feet at the summit, and 44 feet high. The wet ditch surrounding it varies in width and is crossed by a narrow causeway on the W. side.

Condition—Good.

a (4). Homestead Moat at Holt's Farm, 1½ m. N. of the church, has the E. arm partly filled in.

d (5). Porter's Hall, barn and moat, nearly 1 m. E.S.E. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics; the walls are timber-framed, partly plastered and partly weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled. It was built c. 1600 on an L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N.W. and S.W. The S.E. front has a gable at each end and the back of the N.W. wing has a gable at the N.W. end. Most of the windows were altered late in the 17th century, and have square frames and mullions with moulded angles. In the N.W. wall of the N.W. wing is an original window with moulded mullions. The original central chimney-stack of the N.W. wing has five grouped diagonal shafts. The other chimney-stacks are plain.

Interior—The ground floor of the N.W. wing has heavy moulded ceiling-beams; those in the S.W. wing are chamfered. One room has a late 17th-century panelled dado, and several pieces of original panelling remain in other parts of the house.

The Barn, S.W. of the house, is timber-framed and plastered, and is probably of late 16th-century date. On the N.E. side the upper part projects on four curved brackets. The roof has an original king-post truss.

The Moat is complete.

Condition—Of house, good, much restored.

b (6). Hobby Binns Farm, house and moat, 2 m. N.N.E. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built about the middle of the 17th century, and has 18th-century additions on the N. and W. sides. The original central chimney-stack has a cross-shaped shaft on a square base with a moulded capping. Inside the building two rooms on the ground floor have stop-chamfered ceiling-beams. Two original fireplaces remain, and have chamfered jambs and segmental arches, but one of them is now filled in. On the first floor is an original panelled and moulded door with cock's-head hinges.

The Moat, W. of the house, is very incomplete.

Condition—Of house, fairly good.

a (7). Stebbing Park, house, now two tenements, 820 yards N.W. of the church, is of two storeys with attics and cellar; the walls are timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built c. 1600 on an L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the S.E. and N.E. At the end of the N.E. wing is a modern addition. On part of the N.E. side of the S.E. wing the upper storey projects, and under it is a late 17th-century bay-window of seven lights with a transom, lead glazing, iron casements, and ornamental furniture. The chimney-stacks are old, but modern at the top.

Interior—In the S.E. wing the middle room has two very heavy chamfered ceiling-beams, and a late 17th-century panelled dado. The cellars under the S.E. wing are built of old red bricks, and in the W. wall are two small recesses with four-centred heads. On the upper floors some of the beams and posts of the timber-framing are exposed.

Condition—Good.

c (8). Parsonage Farm, house, outhouse and barn, 160 yards S.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built late in the 16th century on a modified T-shaped plan, with the cross-wing at the E. end. On the N. front the upper storey projects on small shaped brackets, and there is an original dormer window of five lights, with moulded frame, mullions and transom. The E. elevation has two original windows, one of them partially blocked, and in the W. elevation is a third original window, now blocked. At the back there are two original doors of moulded battens. On the upper floors most of the windows are of late 17th-century date. The chimney-stacks are all old, but modern at the top.

Interior—The cellars and most of the rooms on the ground floor have chamfered ceiling-beams. The hall and passage have dados of late 16th-century panelling, re-set. The fireplace in the kitchen has an oak lintel.

The Outhouse, S. of the house, is timber-framed and plastered, and of late 16th-century date. It has one original battened door and remains of another. On the S. side is a wide open fireplace.

The Barn, N.W. of the house, is timber-framed and weather-boarded, and of late 16th-century date.

Condition—Of house, good.

Stebbing, Plan Shewing Positions of Monuments Described

c (9). Church Farm, house, 60 yards S.W. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 16th century on a modified half-H-shaped plan, with the wings projecting towards the N. There is a modern addition on the W. side.

The original entrance doorway and the foliated barge-boards of a dormer window are noteworthy.

On the N. Front the main block has an original doorway with a moulded frame and a four-centred head with foliated spandrels; the door is of double hollow battens, and nail-studded; further E. is a gabled dormer window with original carved and cusped barge-boards. The central chimney-stack is plain and tapering, and has a modern top. On the E. Elevation is a slightly projecting wing; the upper storey projects and has an original carved and moulded bressumer with two brackets springing from shafts with moulded capitals, much decayed. The S. Elevation has, at the W. end, a projecting gable. The W. Elevation has an original wind w of two lights, now blocked, with a moulded frame and mullion; the original chimney-stack has a sunk panel in the base, and two octagonal moulded bases, but the shafts have been destroyed.

Interior—On the ground floor two rooms have each a moulded ceiling-beam, and another room has a chamfered ceiling-beam. The cellar at the E. end has in the E. wall two openings with four-centred heads, and in the N. wall two smaller arches. On the first floor one room has some late 16th-century panelling, and there are two doors of the same date and detail. In the N.W. bedroom is an original fireplace with a chamfered and four-centred arch of stone.

Condition—Good.

c (10). House, E. of the churchyard, and said to have been the Church House, is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built at the end of the 15th century, and has small modern additions at the back. On the S. front, and at the W. end the upper storey projects and has shaped brackets. The S.W. angle-post has a moulded capital and a heavy curved bracket. Inside the building, some rooms have chamfered and exposed ceiling-beams. The roof has an original truss in the middle, with a chamfered and cambered tie-beam, chamfered wall-posts, curved braces, and a central purlin.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (11–71).

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled or thatched. Some of the buildings have original chimney-stacks, wide fireplaces and exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

c (11). Cottage, S. of churchyard, is of two storeys with attics, and has a modern addition at the W. end. Inside the building are two cambered tie-beams to the roof, one of them with curved braces.

c (12). Cottage, two tenements, 60 yards E. of the church, is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the E. and S. Inside the building is an original ledged door of moulded battens, with an oak latch.

c (13). The Red Lion Inn, S. W. of (12), was built, probably late in the 16th century, on an H-shaped plan, with the cross-wings at the N.E. and S.W. ends. Both wings were extended towards the S.E. in the 17th or 18th century. Under the main block is a cellar with brick walls. Inside the building is an old ledged door of moulded battens. The upper floor has an original roof-truss, of which the heavy cambered tie-beam and the wall-posts are visible; the braces have been destroyed.

c (14). Cottage, two tenements, S. of (13).

c (15). Cottage, now two tenements, W. of (14) with a modern addition on the S. Inside the building, in the E. room, two shaped wall-posts are exposed.

Main Street, W. side

c (16). House, two tenements, 160 yards N.W. of the church, is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the S. and W.

c (17). House, now four tenements, N.W. of (16), was built probably late in the 15th century, but except the S.E. part, the house was rebuilt in the 17th century, and there are 18th-century and modern additions on the S.W. side. On the N.E. front the upper storey of the original part projects on plain brackets, and is gabled. The 17th-century central chimney-stack has a panelled base and a square shaft with diagonal pilasters. Inside the building, in the N.W. wall of the original part, is a 15th-century doorway with chamfered jambs and four-centred head; it now opens into a passage in which there are two panelled doors of the 17th century. In the 15th-century roof are two tiebeams with curved braces.

c (18). House, now three tenements, 230 yards N.W. of (17), was built probably c. 1600 on an L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N.W. and N.E. The addition on the S.W. side is modern. Inside the building, on the ground floor, the middle tenement has two moulded ceiling-beams.

a (19). House, two tenements, 90 yards N.W. of 18), was built early in the 18th century.

E. side

a (20). Cottage, 520 yards N.W. of the church, with weather-boarded walls.

a (21). Cottage, S.E. of (20), was built c. 1600; and has some modern additions.

c (22). House, four tenements, S.E. of (21), is of two storeys with attics. The walls are partly weather-boarded.

c (23). House with shop, S.E. of (22), is of Lshaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N. and E. Both wings were lengthened in the 18th or 19th century. Inside the building, on the ground floor, the middle room has two original doors, one panelled and one of moulded battens.

c (24). House, now four tenements, 40 yards S.E. of (23), was built in the second half of the 16th century, and is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N.W. and N.E. Late in the 17th century a small addition was made on the N.E. side of the N.W. wing, and there are two small additions of later date. On the S.W. front the upper storey projects, and below it is a modern cart-entrance.

c (25). Town Farm, house, 60 yards S.E. of (24), is of two storeys with attics. It was built early in the 16th century, but the back was probably altered in the 17th century, and the plan is now square. On the S.W. front the upper storey projects on small shaped brackets. Inside the building, a room on the ground floor has moulded ceiling-beams and a dado of linen-fold panelling.

c (26). The King's Head Inn, 30 yards S.E. of 25), with a modern addition at the back. On the S.W. front the upper storey projects, and one bracket remains.

c (27). Cottage, S.E. of (26), is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the S.E. and N.E. Inside the building is a cupboard door of 17th-century panelling.

c (28). House, S.E. of (27), was built probably early in the 18th century. The eaves of the S.W. front have a moulded wooden cornice; the front door and three windows are probably original, and above the doorway is a moulded wooden pediment.

c (29). House, two tenements, 50 yards S.E. of (28), is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N.W. and N.E.

a (30). House, two tenements, S.E. of (29), was built in the 16th century, and is of irregular plan. The S. tenement was added probably in the 17th century, and there are additions of later date. On the S.W. front the upper storey of the original part of the house projects. Inside the building, on the ground floor, the original tenement has moulded ceiling-beams.

a (31). House, two tenements, S.E. of (30), and 120 yards N.W. of the church. On the S.W. side is an 18th-century addition which makes the plan L-shaped. A shed on the S.E. side was added at the same time. Inside the building, the N. room has a 16th-century moulded ceiling-beam, re-used.

Mill Lane

c (32). Cottage, on the S.E. side of the road, 400 yards W.N.W. of the church.

c (33). Cottage, two tenements, S.E. of (32).

c (34). Cottage, four tenements, S.W. of (33), with an 18th-century addition on the N.W. side.

c (35). Tan Office Farm, house, on the N.W. side of the road, 420 yards W.N.W. of the church, was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. It is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N.W. and N.E. Late in the 17th century sheds were built on the S.E. side. On the S.W. side there is a small porch with original turned balusters on each side; the upper storey projects. The original central chimney-stack has diagonal pilasters and a rectangular base with a moulded capping. On the N.E. side of the N.W. wing is another original chimney-stack with a moulded capping and two octagonal shafts. On the same side is an original window of eight lights, with a moulded frame, partly blocked.

Interior—The middle room of the N.W. wing has moulded ceiling-beams. In the N.E. wing a small room has a fragment of early 17th-century carved ornament. Opening on to the staircase is a cupboard with a carved and panelled door of early 17th-century date. On the first floor, a passage in the N.W. wing has an original doorway with a four-centred head.

a (36). Cottage, on the W. side of the road, 800 yards N.W. of the church.

a (37). Downs Farm, house, now two tenements, 200 yards N. of (36), has weather-boarded walls. Inside the building, the two S. rooms each have a moulded ceiling-beam.

a (38). House, four tenements, N. of (37), was built early in the 17th century, and extended towards the W. late in the same century. At the E. end the upper storey projects on shaped brackets.

Bran End

a (39). Cottage, on the S.W. side of the road, about 1 m. N.N.W. of the church, with a modern addition. The original building probably formed part of a larger house.

a (40). Cottage, two tenements, 40 yards N.W. of (39), was built probably early in the 18th century.

a (41). The Green Man Inn, N.W. of (40), has 18th-century or modern additions on the S.E. side, which make the plan L-shaped. At the N.E. end of the original building is a gable with moulded oak barge-boards. Inside the building, a room on the ground floor has a moulded ceiling-beam. On the first floor are two cambered tie-beams, one of them with curved braces, and a cupboard is made up of original panelling.

a (42). Martin's Hall, 130 yards S.W. of (41), is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S.E. and S.W. The end of the S.E. wing has two gables. Inside the building are two original ledged and battened doors.

a (43). Cottage, 60 yards S. of (42), with a modern addition at the S.W. end. Inside the building are three tie-beams with some of the curved braces remaining.

a (44). Tanner's Farm, house, 200 yards N.W. of (43), was built in the 16th century; the small addition on the S. is modern. On the N. front the upper storey projects on shaped brackets, and is gabled at the W. end.

Condition—Bad, partly ruinous.

a (45). Cottage, 190 yards S.W. of (43), with a mall modern addition at the W. corner.

a (46). William's Farm, house, about 1 m. N.W. of the church, with large modern additions on the N. side; they surround a small gabled projection, probably the original porch.

a (47). Hill Farm, house, 1¾ m. N.N.W. of the church, with 18th-century or modern additions on the N.W. and N.E. sides. Inside the building, a room on the ground floor has moulded ceilingbeams.

a (48). Pratt's Farm, house, 2 m. N. of the church, with a late 17th-century addition at the E. end.

b (49). Cottage, S. of Hobby Binns (6), and 2 m N.N.E. of the church, was possibly part of a larger house. Inside the building, the S. room has a moulded ceiling-beam resting on a wall-post with a shaped head.

b (50). Tollesbury Farm, house, nearly 2 m. N.N.E. of the church, is of irregular form; the roofs are of H-shaped plan, with the cross-wings on the E. and W.

b (51). Cottage, 140 yards W.N.W. of (50), is of late 17th or early 18th-century date.

b (52). Stone's Farm, house, about 1½ m. N.W. of the church, with a modern addition at the W. end.

b (53). Whitehouse Farm, house, 1¼ m. N.E. of the church, was built in the 16th century, with a main block, and side-wings on the E. and W. The E. wing has been pulled down, and there are modern additions on the N. side. At the W. end of the S. front the upper storey projects and is gabled. Inside the building, a room at the back has moulded ceiling-beams and joists.

b (54). Gatehouse Farm, house, 1 m. N.E. of the church, is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N. and W. Inside the building, one wide fireplace is fitted with an old iron crane and hook.

b (55). Badcock's Farm, house, about 1 m. E.N.E. of the church, was built early in the 16th century, but was extended towards the E. in the 17th century. In the E. gable is a small 17th-century window of two lights. Inside the building, the two W. rooms on the ground floor have original moulded ceiling-beams, probably not in situ.

b (56). Boreham's Farm, house, 1½ m. E.N.E. of the church, with an 18th-century or modern extension at the E. end.

b (57). Cottage, formerly two tenements, 70 yards N.E. of (56).

d (58). Bacon Farm, house, nearly 1½ m. E. of the church. The W. end was probably rebuilt in the 18th century. Inside the building, on the first floor, a tie-beam with one curved brace is exposed.

Stebbing Green, N.E. side

d (59). Tilehouse Farm, house, now two tenements, about 1½ m. S.E. of the church, was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. The S. tenement is possibly of later date. At the N. end of the W. front the upper storey projects and is gabled.

d (60). Cottage, two tenements, 620 yards N.W. of (59), with small modern additions at the back.

S.W. side

d (61). Cottage, opposite (59), was built probably in the 16th century, and the S. end is of that date; the rest of the house was rebuilt in the 17th century, and there is an 18th-century addition at the back. Inside the building, in the S. room, is an original doorway with a pointed arch, now blocked; the N. jamb has been removed; one ceiling-beam has curved brackets.

d (62). Cottage, two tenements, N.W. of Old Ryes Farm, and 300 yards W. of (61), with a modern addition at the back.

d (63). Stebbing Green Farm, house, 1 m. S.E. of the church, with an 18th-century addition on the N. side.

d (64). Canfield Farm, house, 100 yards W.N.W. of (63), was built c. 1616, and is of T-shaped plan, with the cross-wing at the S. end. The gable at the E. end of the cross-wing has the date 1616 in plaster. At the N. end of the E. front the upper storey projects and is gabled. The original central chimney-stack has a single hexagonal shaft with rounded broaches at the base. Inside the building are two original panelled doors, and in a corridor at the back is a doorway with a four-centred head.

d (65). Collops Farm, house, ¾ m. S.E. of the church, was originally of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the S. and E. There are modern additions on the E. side of the S. wing. The moulded and panelled front door is original.

d (66). Cottage, two tenements, on the N. side of the Stane Street, 1 m. S.S.E. of the church.

d (67). Warehouse Farm, house, now two tenements, about 700 yards S.E. of the church.

d (68). Cottage, 180 yards N.W. of (67), with a modern addition at the N. end.

c (69). House, two tenements, 400 yards E.N.E. of the church, was built early in the 18th century, but the brewhouse at the N.W. end has been rebuilt.

c (70). Cottage, two tenements, on the N. side of the road, 160 yards W. of (69), with a modern addition at the W. end.

c (71). Cottage, opposite (70).