Loughton

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1921.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

'Loughton', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west, (London, 1921) pp. 165-166. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol2/pp165-166 [accessed 24 April 2024]

In this section

59. LOUGHTON. (B.d.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)lvii. S.E. (b)lviii. S.W.)

Loughton is a parish and suburb of London, on the E. side of and including part of Epping Forest.

Pre-historic

a(1). Loughton Camp stands at the end of a spur of the 300 ft. contour line in Epping Forest, about 1 m. N.N.W. of St. Mary's Church.

The area forms a rough oval, defended by a single rampart and ditch, the latter being partly obliterated on the W. by a road. Beyond this road the ground drops steeply into a ravine. A stream issuing from the work at the S.W. angle has caused a considerable gap in the defences, now occupied by marshy ground, but possibly originally closed by a dam. A similar feature is found at Ambresbury Banks. There are several gaps in the defences, but the position of the original entrance is doubtful. The area enclosed is about 6½ acres. At the best preserved section the ditch is 45 ft. wide and 8 ft. below the rampart.

The work is not shown upon the O.S. maps.

Condition—Fairly good.

Ecclesiastical

b(2). Church of St. Nicholas was entirely re-built in 1877, but retains from the old church the following

Fittings—Brasses: In chancel—(1) of [Abel Guilliams, 1637] with figures of man and wife kneeling at a desk, six sons and four daughters, inscription and shield lost; (2) of William Nodes, 1594, and Elizabeth (Wollsey) his wife, figure of man and eight sons with their names, figures of wife and daughters missing; (3) of [George Stonard, 1558], plate with figures of man in armour and wife, each in round-headed niches, inscription lost; (4) of John Stonnard, 1541, and Joan and Katheryn, his wives, with figures of man and two women. Cupboard: In chancel—in N. wall, with elaborately carved double doors of small size, flanked by columns and strapwork and surmounted by entablature; on panel below doors, painting of the Annunciation, late 16th-century. Glass: In N. and S. windows—two kneeling figures with coloured nimbi, early 16th-century.

At the W. end of the church are remains of a 16th-century churchyard wall. The foundations of the old church, E. of the present building, have recently been traced and indicated a chancel and nave (about 56 ft. by 15 ft.), with a N. aisle (16 ft. wide), and a S. porch. There are said to be floor-slabs to Thomas Tuson, 1702, and Jeffery Lee, 1670, now covered by grass.

Condition—Good, re-built.

Secular

a(3). Alderton Hall, 1,000 yards W.S.W. of St. Nicholas Church, is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed and weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled. The main block and the E. cross-wing, were built early in the 17th century; the W. cross-wing was re-built probably early in the 18th century. The panelled entrance door is original and inside the building are two other original doors; a staircase has turned balusters and moulded handrail of late 17th-century date.

Condition—Good.

a(4). Rose Farm, cottage, on N. side of Trap's Hill, ¼ m. N.W. of (3), is of two storeys, timber-framed and weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 17th century.

Condition—Good.

a(5). North Farm, house (Plate p. 128), on E. side of main road, about ¾ m. S.S.W. of St. Mary's Church, is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built c. 1600 and two chimney-stacks have original diagonal shafts. Some windows on the N. side have original frames. Inside the building are some original wall-posts with moulded heads and four early 17th-century doors. The staircase has a central newel.

Condition—Good.

a(6). Willow Cottage, 550 yards N.E. of (5), is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed and weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 17th century and has an original chimney-stack at the back with offsets.

Condition—Good.

a(7). House and shop, in York Hill (No. 25), 120 yards N.W. of the main road, is of two storeys, timber-framed and weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 17th century and has an original chimney-stack with four grouped shafts, set diagonally.

Condition—Poor.