Little Waltham

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1921.

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'Little Waltham', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west, (London, 1921) pp. 162-165. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol2/pp162-165 [accessed 21 April 2024]

In this section

58. LITTLE WALTHAM. (F.b.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)xliii. N.E. (b)xliii. S.E. (c)xliv. N.W. (d)xliv. S.W.)

Little Waltham is a parish and scattered village on the River Chelmer, 4 m. N. of Chelmsford.

Ecclesiastical

a(1). Parish Church of St. Martin stands to the E. of the village. The walls are of flint and pebble-rubble mixed with free stone, with limestone dressings; the tower has been repaired with red brick; the roofs are tiled. The Nave was built early in the 12th century, and the Chancel was probably re-built in the 14th or 15th century. The West Tower was added or re-built in the first half of the 15th century, but its S.W. angle appears to have collapsed in the 16th or early in the 17th century, when it was re-built and buttresses added. A S. Porch was added probably early in the 16th century. The church was extensively restored in the 19th century, when the South Porch was re-built and the North Aisle and Organ Chamber added.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (27 ft. by 17½ ft.) has a modern E. window. In the N. wall is a modern arch to the Organ Chamber. In the S. wall are two windows, the eastern is apparently entirely modern; the western has some old stones re-used in the splays; between these windows is a modern doorway.

The Church, Plan

The Organ Chamber is modern, but has in the N. wall a single light window with a 15th-century square head with sunk spandrels, re-set.

The Nave (41 ft. by 20 ft.) has a modern N. arcade of three bays. In the S. wall are two windows, the eastern all modern, except some stones re-set in the splays; the western has a single light of the 12th century set high in the wall; it has a round head and rear-arch; further W. is the early 12th-century S. doorway, much restored; it is of two orders, the outer moulded and resting on side shafts with cushion capitals and defaced bases; the inner order is square and continuous.

The West Tower (11 ft. square) is of three stages with an embattled parapet, two square late 16th or early 17th-century buttresses at the S.W. angle and a diagonal 18th-century buttress at the N.W. angle. The 15th-century tower-arch is two-centred and of two continuous chamfered orders, partly restored. The W. window is modern, except for the internal splays and segmental-pointed rear-arch, which are probably of the 15th century. The second stage has in the W. wall a modern window. The bell chamber has in the E. wall a 15th-century window of one cinque-foiled light. The N., S. and W. walls have each a 16th or early 17th-century window of brick and of two lights under a square head with a moulded label. Above the windows in the E. and W. walls are 17th-century loops of brick, now blocked.

The South Porch is modern and of timber, but incorporates 20 cinque-foiled heads with carved squandrels of early 16th-century date, and a moulded beam at the base of the gable.

The Roof of the nave is modern, but has one old stop-chamfered tie-beam. The roof of the S. Porch has early 16th-century moulded and embattled cornices and tie-beams.

Fittings— Bells: five; 1st by Miles Graye, 1632; 2nd by John Hodson, 1657; 4th by Miles Graye, 1634. Brasses and Indent. Brasses: In chancel—(1) to Richard Waltham, 1426, inscription only; (2) of John Maltun, 1447, figure of man in armour of period, with taces of rather unusual form, feet on dog, inscription plate and indents of four shields. Indent: In tower—partly covered by font-step, of man with marginal inscription, date uncertain. Chests: In nave—(1) dug-out chest (Plate p. xxxiii) of sycamore heavily bound with iron straps, ring handle at each end, lock and two staples, 13th or 14th-century. In tower—(2) framed of oak, arched lid covered with leather with initials in nail heads, G.W., L., A.B., 16th or 17th-century. Door: In S. doorway—studded and feather-battened with strap-hinges, key plate and scutcheon, late 15th or early 16th-century. Glass: In E. window—fragments including part of a garter, mixed with modern glass, 14th and 15th-century. Monuments and Floor-slab. Monuments: In chancel—on N. wall, (1) to John Aleyne, 1663, of Gray's Inn, and his parents, Giles Aleyne, rector of the parish and Elizabeth his wife, alabaster and black marble tablet with broken pediment. In churchyard—headstones, (2) to John Goodeve, 1698; (3) to Sarah (Goodeve), wife of Michael Hinde, 1713. Floor-slab: In chancel—to Lady Elizabeth (Pynchon), second wife of Sir William Luckyn, Bart., 1657, with lozenge of arms. Piscinæ: In chancel—modern recess with remains of sill and sex-foiled basin, 14th or 15th-century. In nave—in S. wall, with trefoiled ogee head, part restored and quatre-foiled drain, probably 14th-century. Plate: Includes cup with Elizabethan stem and later bowl of 1619 (Plate p. xxxix) and stand-paten of 1712. Stoup: In nave—E. of S. doorway, with chamfered, two-centred head and modern sill, date uncertain. Weather-vane: On cupola of tower—arrow shaped with pennon, dated 1679. Miscellanea: In chest— part of boy's leather coat, for bound apprentice under the Aleyne bequest, probably 17th-century.

Condition—Fairly good, some cracks in tower walls.

Secular

c(2). Homestead Moat, at Long's Farm, nearly 1½ m. N.N.E. of the church.

a(3). The Rectory, W. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of modern brick and the roof is tiled. The house was built in the early 17th century on an L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the W. and S., it has been much altered and has modern additions on the N.E. and W. sides. Inside the building a room on the S. side has original stop-chamfered ceiling beams.

Condition—Good, much altered.

a(4). Pratt's Farm, house, ½ m. S.S.E. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. The house was built probably early in the 16th century on a rectangular plan, but has been much altered and has a modern addition on the N.E. The 17th-century central chimney-stack has three square and attached shafts set diagonally on a rectangular base. Inside the building there are some chamfered ceiling beams with moulded stops and chamfered wall-posts. On the first floor is a doorway with an original four-centred head.

Condition—Good, much altered.

d(5). Belstead's Farm, house (Plate p. 128), about 1 m. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with attics and cellar; the walls are timber-framed and plastered and the roofs are tiled. The house was built late in the 15th century on a modified H-shaped plan with the cross wings at the N. and S. ends; c. 1678 the house was largely re-built and a wing added on the E. side. The central chimney-stack is of L-shaped plan, with pilaster strips with moulded bases resting on flat-shaped corbels; near the top is a heart-shaped panel with the initials and date, I. P., 1678. Inside the building there are some chamfered beams and wall-plates, and one wall-post has a moulded head. The late 17th-century staircase in the S. wing has moulded strings and rails and turned balusters. In the roof of the N. wing is an original king-post with two-way struts and a central purlin.

Condition—Good.

a(6). Stonage Farm, house and barn, 1¼ m. N.N.E. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics and cellar; the walls are of plastered timber-framing and the roofs are tiled. The house was built probably in the 15th century on a half H-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S.E. and a central hall. Late in the 16th century an upper floor was inserted in the hall and the S.W. wing was subsequently removed. There are modern additions on the N.E. and S.W. On the N.W. front the upper storey projects at the N.E. end and is gabled. The 17th-century central chimney-stack is of cross-shaped plan. Inside the building there are some chamfered ceiling beams and wall-plates, and in the central part of the ground floor is a moulded beam. On the first floor, in the N.E. wing, is an original tie-beam with a brace, and there is said to be a moulded king-post in the roof. A partition is formed of late 16th-century panelling, not in situ.

The Barn, W. of the house, is timber-framed and weather-boarded; the roof is thatched. It was built late in the 16th century and is of five bays with a N. porch.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (7–25).

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys, timber-framed and covered with plaster or weather-boarding. The roofs are tiled or thatched. Some of the buildings have exposed ceiling beams, wide fire-places and original chimney-stacks.

Condition—Good or fairly good.

a(7). Sheepcotes Farm, house, 1,100 yards N.E. of the church, has modern additions on the E. and S. The central chimney-stack is of cross-shaped plan.

a(8). Cottage, on the S. side of the road, 700 yards E. of the church, has modern additions on the S. and W.

c(9). Shuttleworth's Farm, house, 1,100 yards E. by N. of the church, was built probably early in the 16th century and is of Z-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S. and N. The upper storey overhangs at the S. end of the S. wing. The central chimney-stack has two square 17th-century shafts set diagonally on a rectangular base.

c(10). Scott's Farm, house, 100 yards E. of (9), was built in the 15th century on an H-shaped plan with the cross-wings at the N.E. and S.W. ends. It has been much altered and the S.W. wing has been destroyed. Inside the building in the main block and in the N.E. wing are remains of original king-post trusses. The staircase has some late 17th-century turned balusters.

c(11). Cottage, now two tenements, 450 yards N.E. of (10), has modern additions on the N. side.

c(12). Power's Farm, house, now two tenements, 200 yards S.E. of (10).

c(13). Cottage, two tenements, 400 yards E. by S. of (12).

c(14). Cottage, 150 yards S. of (13), was built in the 16th century.

c(15). Cottage, S. of (14).

c(16). Peverel's Farm, house and barn, 100 yards S. of (15). The House is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N. and E. The original central chimney-stack has grouped diagonal shafts on a rectangular base. The Barn, S. of the house, is of five bays with a N. porch.

b(17). Cottage, two tenements, at Croxton's Mill, nearly ¾ m. S. of the church, is of two storeys with attics. It was built c. 1600. A gabled dormer on the S. side has an original moulded barge-board. The original central chimney-stack has grouped shafts, set diagonally on a rectangular base with a moulded and dentilled capping. On the first floor is an original window, with diamond-shaped mullions, now blocked.

Blastford Hill, E. side

a(18). Thurley's Farm, house, now two tenements, 1,200 yards S.S.W. of the church, was built probably in the 15th century on a half H-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the W. The N. wing has been destroyed and a floor inserted in the hall or main block in the 17th century. The W. half of the S. wing was re-built and lengthened late in the 16th century. The central chimney-stack of the S. wing has attached diagonal pilasters and a square base with a moulded capping of c. 1600. Inside the building the main block has an original king-post truss.

a(19). Farmhouse, now two tenements, 50 yards N. of (18), was built in the 15th century on an H-shaped plan, with the crosswings at the N. and S. ends. The S. wing has been destroyed and a floor was inserted in the hall or main block in the 17th century. On the W. front the upper storey projects at the end of the N. or Solar wing. Inside the building the main block has some original moulded beams, re-used as wall-plates. In the roof of the Solar wing is an original king-post truss.

W. side

a(20). Cottage, three tenements, 60 yards S.W. of (18), is of L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N. and E.

a(21). Malthouse, three tenements, 60 yards N. of (20), was built late in the 16th century on an L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards N. and E. There are modern additions at the back. Inside the building there is an early 17th-century panelled door.

Main Street, E. side

a(22). Cottage, 650 yards W. of the church.

a(23). House, three tenements, 150 yards N.N.E. of Winckford Bridge, was built early in the 16th century on an L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N. and E. The central chimney-stack is cross-shaped on plan and has a 17th-century addition on one side. Inside the building there is some 16th-century panelling in the E. wing.

Loughton Camp

a(24). Cottage, 100 yards N.N.E. of (23).

W. side

a(25). House (Plate p. 96), now two tenements, 50 yards S.W. of Winchford Bridge, was built probably in the 15th century on a rectangular plan, including cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. In front, the upper storey of the cross-wings projects, but has been under-built at the W. end. The eaves are continuous and over the central block; they rest on a heavy beam with curved braces springing from the cross-wings. Inside the building, the cambered tie-beams of the roof are visible.