Nazeing

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1921.

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'Nazeing', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west, (London, 1921) pp. 193-195. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol2/pp193-195 [accessed 14 April 2024]

In this section

71. NAZEING. (B.c.)

(O.S. 6 in. xlix. N.E.)

Nazeing is a village and parish 3½ m. N.W. of Epping. The church is interesting.

Ecclesiastical

(1). Parish Church of All Saints (Plate p. 196) stands N. of the village. The walls are of flint-rubble patched with brick and with dressings of clunch; the W. tower is entirely of brick; the roofs are tiled. The Nave was built in the second half of the 12th century, but has probably been lengthened towards the W. at some uncertain date. About the middle of the 15th century the North Aisle was added, and later in the same century the Chancel was re-built. Early in the 16th century the West Tower and South Porch were added. The church was restored in the 19th century, when the North Vestry was added.

The W. Tower is a plain but good example of early 16th-century brickwork.

The Church, Plan

Architectural Description—The Chancel (29 ft. by 14½ ft.) has an E. window modern except for the 15th-century splays and two-centred rear-arch. In the N. wall is a 15th-century window of two cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head; further W. is a modern opening to the N. vestry. In the S. wall are two windows uniform with that in the N. wall but partly restored; between them is a late 15th-centurydoorway with a modern head and plastered externally. The chancel-arch is modern.

The Nave (60 ft. by 19½ ft.) has a mid 15th-century N. arcade of four bays with two-centred arches of two moulded orders; the piers have each four attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases; the responds have attached half columns; the second arch incorporates a stone with cheveron ornament of the 12th century; E. of the arcade is the 15th-century upper doorway to the former rood-loft, with a three-centred head. In the S. wall are four windows: the eastern most is of early 14th-century date and of two trefoiled ogee lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head; the second window is of late 15th or early 16th-century date and of three cinque-foiled lights in a square head with a moulded label; the third window is modern and the westernmost window is also modern except for the splays and semi-circular rear-arch of the 12th century; between the two western windows is the 13th-century S. doorway with jambs and two-centred arch of two chamfered orders.

The North Aisle (12½ ft. wide) has in the E. wall a modern opening to the Vestry, and S. of it is the 15th-century doorway to the rood-loft staircase, with a three-centred head. In the N. wall are two 15th-century windows: the eastern of two cinque-foiled lights with restored tracery in a square head; the western window has been restored except for the moulded jambs, splays and square head; between the windows is the 15th-century N. doorway with moulded jambs, two-centred arch and label.

The West Tower (12½ ft. by 12 ft.) is of early 16th-century date and of red brick with bluebrick diapering. It is of three stages with an embattled parapet and S.E. stair-turret rising above the parapet. The two-centred tower-arch is of three chamfered orders with plain semi-octagonal responds. The W. window is partly restored, and of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head. The second stage has in the N. and W. walls a single light with a four-centred head. The bell-chamber has in each wall a window of two four-centred lights in a square head with a moulded label.

The South Porch is of timber and of early 16th-century date. The outer archway has chamfered posts and three-centred head with panelled spandrels; the gable has much weathered foiled and traceried barge-boards; the side walls have old framing including two moulded mullions not in situ.

The Roof of the chancel has a moulded tie-beam, king-post with four-way struts and moulded wall-plates, all of the 15th century. The 15th-century roof of the nave is of trussed-rafter type with moulded wall-plates and principals. The ridged but formerly pent roof of the N. aisle has mid 15th-century moulded principals with curved struts and later king-posts set upon the principals. The early 16th-century roof of the S. porch is of two bays with moulded wall-plates, tie-beam, purlin and rafters.

Fittings—Chest: (Plate p. xxxiii). In tower— heavily iron bound with large lock plate, possibly 14th-century. Coffin-lids: In S. porch—two tapering slabs, date uncertain. Doors: In S. doorway— (1) of oak battens with plain strap-hinges and oak lock, possibly 17th-century. In door of rood-loft staircase, (2) of nailed studded battens, 15th-century. In doorway of turret staircase of tower, (3) of nail-studded battens with strap-hinges, early 16th-century. Font: octagonal bowl with quatre-foiled panels enclosing blank shields, 15th-century, circular stem, probably earlier. Monument: In churchyard—S. of nave, to Ambrose Chandler, 1707, headstone. Piscina: In chancel—with chamfered jambs, segmental-pointed head and circular drain, probably 15th-century, much worn. Screen: In chancel—moulded rail, close lower panels and two bench-ends with popeys carved each with two faces, early 16th-century, re-used as screen; on wall above chancel arch, sawn-off ends of former rood-beam, fragment on S. at higher level, with remains of moulded cornice, 15th-century. Seating: In nave—bench with moulded rail and carved popeys, 15th-century.

Condition—Good, but external stonework much weathered.

Secular

(2). Homestead Moat at Nazeingbury, 15/8 m. W.S.W. of the church.

(3). House, now Post Office, and moat, at road junction 700 yards S.S.E. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled; it was built probably late in the 15th or early in the 16th century on a rectangular plan with a gable at each end of the W. and E. elevations; at the back is a modern addition. On the W. elevation the upper storey projects under the S. gable and formerly projected under the N. gable but has been under-built.

The Moat surrounds the house and included a secondary enclosure on the S.

Condition—Of house, fairly good.

Monuments (4–16).

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century, and of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled or thatched. Many of the buildings have original chimney-stacks, wide fireplaces, and exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good, or fairly good, unless noted.

(4). Cottage, at E. angle of Nazeing Park, 300 yards S.E. of (3), has an original central chimney-stack with grouped diagonal shafts.

(5). Cottage, at S. angle of Nazeing Park, 800 yards S.S.W. of (4), has an original central chimney-stack with grouped diagonal shafts.

(6). Cottage, 250 yards N.N.W. of (5), has an original central chimney-stack with grouped diagonal shafts.

(7). Jack's Hatch, cottage, 1¼ m. E.S.E. of the church, was built probably late in the 16th century.

Condition—Poor.

(8). Newmans, cottage, 1¾ m. S.W. of the church, was built on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and S.

(9). Darmers, house, 2,000 yards S.W. of the church, was built probably in the 16th century on a rectangular plan with a gable at each end of the S. and N. elevations, and a small gable over the staircase on the N. elevation. Inside the building are an original doorway with a roughly four-centred head and an original window, now blocked, with square mullions set diagonally.

Condition—Poor.

(10). Ninnings, house, ¼ m. W.N.W. of (9), was built probably late in the 15th or early in the 16th century on a half H-shaped plan with the wings projecting towards the N.; at the back is a modern addition, and part of the main block has been heightened. On the N. front the E. wing retains an original barge-board with traces of cusps, much defaced; the 16th or early 17th-century central chimney-stack has grouped diagonal shafts now covered with cement. Inside the building are panelling and a fireplace of the same date; the fireplace has an oak frame and overmantel with enriched lintel and side-panels carved with arabesque ornament, all now painted.

(11). House, 700 yards N. of (10), was built probably in the 16th century, but has a modern addition at the back. Inside the building, on the first floor, is an original plastered fireplace with four-centred head, and cambered tie-beams with rough curved braces, are exposed.

(12). Camps, cottage, N.N.E. of (11), has an original chimney-stack with grouped diagonal shafts.

(13). Cottage, 150 yards N.E. of (12).

(14). Greenleaves, house (Plate p. 110), 50 yards S.E. of (12), was built probably early in the 16th century on an H-shaped plan with the cross-wings at the N.E. and S.W. ends; at the back of the main block is a modern addition. On the N.W. front the upper storeys of the wings project. The central chimney-stack is of cruciform plan and probably of 16th or early 17th-century date. Inside the building, the central room on the ground floor has 16th-century panelling with fluted pilasters and an original doorway with a four-centred head. In the roof is an original king-post truss.

(15). Cutlands, cottage, 900 yards W. of (10).

(16). Marshgate, cottage, 750 yards N.W. of (15), was built probably in the second half of the 16th century on a half H-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S., but the W. wing has been destroyed; at the back is a modern addition. The original chimney-stack is of cruciform plan. Inside the building is an original moulded ceiling-beam.

Condition—Poor.