Netteswell

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1921.

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'Netteswell', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west, (London, 1921) pp. 195-197. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol2/pp195-197 [accessed 19 April 2024]

In this section

72. NETTESWELL. (C.b.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)xli. N.W. (b)xli. S.W.)

Netteswell is a small parish 4½ m. N. of Epping.

Ecclesiastical

b(1). Parish Church of St. Andrew stands about the middle of the parish. The walls are of flint-rubble partly coursed and with dressings of limestone and clunch; the roofs are tiled and the bell-turret and spire are shingled. The Chancel and Nave were built early in the 13th century. In the 15th century the bell-turret was added, and a S. porch built. The church was restored in the 19th century, when the North Vestry and the South Porch were re-built.

The Church, Plan

Architectural Description—The Chancel (24½ ft. by 17 ft.) has a 15th-century E. window much restored and of three cinque-foiled lights under a three-centred head with a moulded label; on each side are the outer jambs and springers of two 13th-century lancet windows, now destroyed, and the original arrangement probably included a third lancet in the middle. In the N. wall are two 13th-century lancet windows, partly restored and with hooks for former shutters. In the S. wall are two lancet windows, and between them a doorway with chamfered jambs and two-centred arch, all of the 13th century, partly restored. There is no chancel-arch.

The Nave (41 ft. by 16½ ft.) has in the N. wall two windows; the eastern is of the 15th century and of two cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a square head; the western window is a 13th-century lancet; further W. is the N. doorway, all modern except the semi-circular rear-arch, which may be of the 13th century. In the S. wall are two windows uniform with those in the N. wall; further W. is the 13th-century S. doorway with chamfered jambs, partly restored, and a two-centred arch; further W. is a sunk panel in brick with a moulded label and enclosing a double rose with supporters perhaps for Gervaise Rose, abbot of Waltham (1497–1500), below a crozier (?) a rose-sprig and a rabbit. In the W. wall is a 15th-century window, partly restored, and of three cinque-foiled lights in a segmental-pointed head; the jambs are moulded. The bell-turret at the W. end of the nave stands on chamfered posts and a tie-beam with curved braces, all probably of the 15th century.

The Roof of the nave is modern, but incorporates some 15th-century ribs with foliated bosses. The modern roof of the S. porch incorporates two 15th-century moulded wall-plates.

Fittings—Bells: three; 1st uninscribed; 2nd and 3rd by William Dawe, c. 1400, and inscribed "Sum Rosa pulsata mundi Katerina vocata" and "Gallus vocor ego solus super omnia sono." Brasses: In chancel—(1) of John Bannister, 1607, with figures of man and wife in civil costume, three sons and a swaddled infant. In nave—(2) of Thomas Laurence, 1522, and Alys, his wife, with figures in civil dress, two sons and five daughters. Font: plain octagonal bowl with moulded lower edge, plain stem and base, probably 13th-century. Glass: In chancel—in S.E. window, roundels with fragments of foliage, borders, badges of a feather piercing a scroll, etc., 13th to 15th-century. In nave—in N.E. window, symbols of the four evangelists, 15th-century; in S.E. window, figures (Plate p. xxxv.) of (1) St. Mary Cleophas with two children and name in black letter; (2) St. Mary Salome with four children and name in black letter, 15th-century; in W. window, figure of the Virgin, feather and scroll badges, fragments and quarries with leaf ornament, 13th to 15th-century. Niche: In nave—on jamb of N.E. window, with cinque-foiled head and vertical tracery, 15th-century. Piscina: In chancel—double, with Purbeck marble lintel and shaft with moulded capital and base, 13th-century, heads and drains modern. Plate: includes cup and paten of 1641 and alms-dish of 1656 with lozenge of arms; wooden case covered with tooled leather inscribed, "Netteswell Essex Arms, 1700." Pulpit: incorporating vine pattern frieze, dated 1618, and late 16th-century panelling; other carved panels now incorporated in cupboard in vestry. Seating: In nave—two benches with plain popeys, probably 15th-century. In vestry—stool with turned legs and carved rail, 17th-century. Sundials: Scratched on each jamb of S. doorway.

Condition—Good.

Secular

b(2). Mill Ponds or fish-ponds, N. of the church, separated from each other by large banks in which small gaps mark the positions of former sluices.

Condition—Good.

d(3). Barn, at Netteswellbury, W. of the church, is of weather-boarded timber-framing; the roofs are tiled. It was built probably in the 16th century, and is of six bays divided by massive trusses.

Condition—Good.

b(4). Cottage, at N.E. end of Tye Green, ½ m. S. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of plastered timber-framing, and the roofs are tiled. It was built probably in the 16th century, but has a modern addition at the back. On the E. elevation the timber-framing is exposed; the original chimney-stack has grouped diagonal shafts on an irregular base with a moulded coping. Inside the building are exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Fairly good.

(5). Panelling, in modern house in Netteswell Plantation, 700 yards W.N.W. of the church; four rooms lined mostly with late 16th-century panelling, with some bolection-moulded panels of late 17th-century date; possibly brought from Netteswellbury.

a(6). Cottage, S. of cross-roads at Netteswell Cross, 1 m. N.N.W. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of plastered timber-framing, and the roofs are tiled. It was built probably early in the 17th century, but has a modern addition at the back. The original central chimney-stack has grouped diagonal shafts. Inside the building are exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

a(7). Cottages, five tenements, on S. side of road, 100 yards W. of (5) and of similar construction. They were built probably as a row of tenements late in the 17th or early in the 18th century on a half H-shaped plan with small wings projecting towards the S.E.; at the back are modern additions. Inside the building are exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(8). Tye Green Farm, house about ½ m. S. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed and weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 17th century and has exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

b(9). Crawley's, house, barn and moat 350 yards W. of (8). The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered.; the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 17th century and has exposed ceiling-beams and timber-framing.

The Barn, S.E. of the house, is probably of the 17th century and has a projecting wing on the E. side.

The Moat is fragmentary.

Condition—Of house, good.

b(10). Jackson's Farm, house 60 yards S. of (9), is of two storeys, timber-framed and weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 17th century and has an original chimney-stack with grouped diagonal shafts. Inside the building is an original door.

Condition—Good.