Terling

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1921.

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Citation:

, 'Terling', in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west, (London, 1921) pp. 227-230. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol2/pp227-230 [accessed 25 May 2024].

. "Terling", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west, (London, 1921) 227-230. British History Online, accessed May 25, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol2/pp227-230.

. "Terling", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2, Central and South west, (London, 1921). 227-230. British History Online. Web. 25 May 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol2/pp227-230.

In this section

91. TERLING. (G.b.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)xxxiv. S.W. (b)xxxiv. S.E. (c)xliv. N.W. (d)xliv. N.E.)

Terling is a village and parish 3 m. W. of Witham. The Church, Manor House and Ringer's Farm are the principal monuments, and there are many mediaeval houses in the parish.

Ecclesiastical

d(1). Parish Church of All Saints stands on the S.E. side of the village. The walls are of flint-rubble with dressings of limestone and clunch; the tower is mainly of red brick with stone dressings; the chancel walls are rough cast; the roofs are tiled. The Chancel and the E. wall of the West Tower are possibly of early 13th-century date. The S. arcade of the Nave was built in the later part of the 15th century, when the South Aisle and South Porch were added. The W. tower, except the E. wall, was re-built in 1732. The church was restored in the 19th century, when the North Aisle, North Porch, and South-west Vestry were added. The Vault on the N. of the chancel is also modern.

The S. porch is an interesting example of 15th-century woodwork.

The Church, Plan

Architectural Description—The Chancel (34½ ft. by 20 ft.) has an E. window, all modern except some 14th-century stones. In the N. wall are two early 14th-century windows, each of two plain lights in a two-centred head with moulded label; the eastern window has been much restored; further E. is a 13th-century lancet window, now blocked, and only visible externally; between the two 14th-century windows is a modern doorway. In the S. wall are two windows similar to those in the N. wall and much restored; between them is a modern doorway. The chancel-arch is modern.

The Nave (47½ ft. by 24½ ft.) has a modern N. arcade of four bays. The 15th-century S. arcade is of hard, dark stone and of four bays; the two centred arches are of two moulded orders, and the octagonal piers have concave faces and moulded capitals and bases; the responds have attached half columns.

The South Aisle (15½ ft. wide) may be of the 15th century, but it has been entirely refaced and all the details are modern.

The West Tower (17½ ft. by 16½ ft.) is entirely of 1732 except the E. wall, which is possibly of the 13th century. In the ground stage of the E. wall is a doorway of c. 1340, re-set, it has jambs and two-centred arch of three moulded orders; above the doorway on the W. side is a pointed recess. The second stage has in the E. wall a pointed opening into the nave roof. The belfry has in the E. wall a window with a two-centred head and label, possibly of the 13th century, and now blocked.

The South Porch (Plate p. 38) is of the 15th century and of timber on a modern stone base; the S. end has a four-centred outer archway with traceried spandrels, flanked by two openings with cinque-foiled heads; above the archway is an embattled cornice and a trefoil-headed niche or panel; the barge-boards are cinque-foiled and sub-cusped. The E. and W. sides have each two bays with six cinque-foiled lights.

The Roof of the chancel is of the trussed-rafter type and probably of the 17th century. The 15th-century roof of the S. porch has two king-post trusses, a moulded central purlin and trussed rafters.

Fittings—Bells: five and sanctus; 3rd by Miles Graye, 1623; sanctus inaccessible. Brasses and Indents. Brasses: In S. aisle—on E. wall, (1) of William Rochester, 1558, and Elizabeth, his wife, 1556, with kneeling figures of man in civil dress, wife, six sons and four daughters, two shields of arms, all set in tablet of Purbeck marble, with two round arches in the head; (2) of John Rochester, 1584, with kneeling figures of man in civil dress, two wives, four sons and eight daughters, three shields of arms, all set in tablet of Purbeck marble. Another brass is said to be now under the organ. Indents: In tower—(1) of man and inscription plate; (2) of man, woman and inscription plate, probably early 15th-century; (3) of inscription plate; (4) of two demi-figures and inscription plate, early 15th-century; (5) of man and scroll, 15th-century; (6) of cross and marginal inscription, late 14th-century. Communion Table: In chancel—with heavy turned legs and moulded rails, top rail carved with arabesques, late 16th-century. Communion Rails: with moulded rail and sill and turned and twisted balusters, c. 1700. Door: In E. doorway to tower, with strap-hinges and drop handle, probably 15th-century, restored. Font: octagonal bowl of Purbeck marble, each face with two sunk and pointed panels, early 13th-century, stem and shafts modern. Inscriptions and Scratchings: In nave—on stones of S. arcade, various masons' marks, 15th-century. On jambs of doorway to W. tower, two scratched shields—ermine on a bend, three pierced molets and a cheveron with illegible black-letter inscriptions, 15th-century. Monuments, see Brasses. Miscellanea: In tower—worked stone, possibly part of base of font, circular piercing or drain in middle, early 15th-century.

Condition—Good, much restored.

d (2). Congregational Chapel on the N.W. side of Terling Green, is of red brick; the roofs are tiled. It was built probably soon after 1688, and formerly had a gallery. The N. vestry and S. porch are modern. The roof is hipped and has a plastered eaves-cornice. The windows are in two ranges and have solid frames, mullion and transom. At the back are two round-headed windows extending through both ranges, but partly blocked.

Fittings—Candelabra: of brass with twelve branches and bird on top, ornamented iron chain, late 17th-century. Pulpit: hexagonal with raised and moulded panels, late 17th-century, stem missing.

Condition—Good.

Secular

b(3). Homestead Moat, at Great Loys, about ¾ m. N. of the church.

c(4). Scarlett's Farm, house and moat, 1¾ m. W. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built probably early in the 17th century, and has an original central chimney-stack with six octagonal shafts on a rectangular base. Inside the building is a late 17th-century staircase with turned balusters and square newels with turned caps.

The Moat surrounds the house.

Condition—Of house, good.

d(5). The Manor House (Plate p. 229), house and outbuilding, 50 yards N. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and partly plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built in the 15th century with a central Hall and cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. Probably late in the 16th century the Hall was divided into two storeys and in the 17th century a staircase wing was added on the N. side. The S. front has exposed timber-framing, and the upper storey projects at the ends of the cross-wings, but in the E. wing this has been under-built. At the end of the W. wing is a 16th-century bay-window of five transomed lights with moulded frame and mullions; the brick base has a moulded plinth. The Hall block has a late 16th-century chimney-stack with three octagonal shafts. On the W. side of the house is a similar chimney-stack with two shafts, and on the E. side an early 17th-century stack with two diagonal shafts. At the back the staircase-wing has a 17th-century window of five lights; the main block has two dormer windows, one with 16th-century moulded mullions, and the other of the 17th-century. Inside the building, the ground floor of the Hall block has a heavy chamfered ceiling beam and some 17th-century panelling; the upper floor has the original king-post truss of the former Hall, which was of two bays and probably had the ' screens ' at the E. end. In the W. wing a room on the ground floor has late 16th-century panelling with fluted pilasters, and an overmantel with arched panels and fluted pilasters. In the S. wall are two small original windows, now blocked. The room above has in the N. wall an original doorway with a four-centred head, brought from elsewhere.

The Outbuilding, N.W. of the house, is of two storeys and was built probably in the 15th century. The roof is of four bays, with original trusses.

Condition—Of house, good.

c(6). Ringer's Farm, house, now two tenements, about 11/8 m. S.W. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built late in the 14th or early in the 15th century with a central Hall and cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. The Hall was divided into two storeys, probably late in the 16th century.

The upper storey projects at the end of the W. wing on the S, front, and at the E. end of the main block is the original doorway (Plate, p. 80) to the 'screens.' It is of oak with moulded jambs, two-centred arch and quartrefoiled spandrels; the door is modern, but has the original scutcheon plate with four pierced quatrefoils. At the back is an early 17th-century projecting chimney-stack with two diagonal shafts. Inside the building, the original segmental rear-arch of the doorway at the N. end of the ' screens ' remains. On the upper floor the original cambered tie-beams of the roof are visible, and there is a 16th-century arched fireplace of brick. At the top of the E. staircase are some 17th-century flat shaped balusters, re-used.

Condition—Fairly good.

Monuments (7–31).

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century, and of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered or weather-boarded; the roofs are tiled or thatched. Many of the buildings have original chimney-stacks, wide fireplaces and exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

d(7). House, now two tenements, 50 yards S.W. of (2). The original central chimney-stack has attached diagonal pilasters.

d(8). House, now three tenements, 10 yards N.E. of (2), was built probably in the 15th century with a central Hall and cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. The Hall was divided into two storeys c. 1613. On the S. front the upper storey projects at the ends of the cross-wing. The central chimney-stack has the date and initials 1613 R.T. Inside the building an original tie-beam remains in the Hall-block.

d(9). House (Plate p. 228), now two tenements, at the street corner, 110 yards N. of the church, was built possibly in the 15th century with crosswings at the N. and S. ends. The two early 17th-century chimney-stacks have grouped diagonal shafts on a rectangular base with moulded cappings, Inside the building, parts of the roof-truss of the former Hall are visible.

d(10). House, N. of (9).

d(11). House, now three tenements, N. of (10), was built probably late in the 16th century. One chimney-stack has flat pilasters. Inside the building one room is lined with original panelling.

d(12). House (Plate p. 228), now shop and two tenements, at the fork of the road 140 yards N. of the church, was built in the 15th century with a central Hall and cross-wings at the N.E. and S.W. ends. The Hall was divided into two storeys, probably in the 17th century. On the S.E. front the upper storey projects at the ends of the crosswings, and also on the S.W. side of the S.W. wing. Inside the building the Hall-block has an original roof-truss with moulded tie-beam, curved braces and wall plates; the rebated king-post has curved struts. The S.W. wing has also an original king-post truss.

d(13). House, on the E. side of the road, 50 yards S.S.E. of (12).

d(14). House, known as the Old Vicarage, 430 yards N.W. of the church. At the N. end the upper storey projects.

b(15). House, 50 yards N.W. of (14), has an original central chimney-stack with grouped diagonal shafts on a square base with a moulded capping. The upper storey projects and is gabled at the W. end of the N. front.

b(16). Cottage, on the N. side of the road, N. of (15). Inside the building is an original panelled door.

a(17). Cottage, three tenements, on the S. side of the road, 120 yards N.W. of (15), was built in the 16th century on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N. and E. One chimney-stack has rebated angles and another has two shafts, one square and one set diagonally. Inside the building is an original doorway with a four-centred head.

Condition—Poor.

a(18). Cottage, N.W. of (17), has some exposed timber-framing on the N.W. side.

c(19). House, opposite the Vicarage and 750 yards W. of the church, was built probably in the 16th century.

c(20). House, now three tenements, 100 yards W. of (19). is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the E. and S.

c(21). Cottage, two tenements, ¼ m. W. of (20).

Condition—Poor.

c(22). Eyart's Farm, house (Plate p. 129), now two tenements, at Flack's Green, about 1,000 yards S.W. of the church. The upper storey projects at the E. end and has a carved grotesque figure (Plate p. 80) in a crouching attitude. The original central chimney-stack has three octagonal shafts with moulded bases.

c(23). House, now two tenements, at Norrells Hill, ½ m. S.W. of the church, was built probably late in the 15th or early in the 16th century, and has a cross-wing at the N.W. end. The Hall was divided into two storeys, probably late in the 16th century. On the N.E. front the upper storey projects at the end of the cross-wing. The 17th-century chimney-stack has a moulded capping and modern shafts. Inside the building is an original tie-beam with curved braces.

a(24). Wasse's Farm, house, nearly 1 m. N.W. of the church, has an original central chimney-stack with grouped diagonal shafts.

a(25). Cottage, opposite (24), has exposed timber-framing.

a(26). Three Ashes, house, ¼ m. N.W. of (25), is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and S. Inside the building are two blocked windows with diamond-shaped mullions.

c(27). Sparrow's Farm, house (Plate p. 129), 1¼ m. W.S.W. of the church, has an original central chimney-stack, with four shafts with varied, vertical flutings, etc., standing on a square base with a moulded capping. Inside the building is an original moulded ceiling-beam and a door of heavy moulded battens.

c(28). Cottage, opposite (27).

c(29). Porridgepot Hall, about 1¼ S.S.W. of the church, was built probably early in the 18th century.

d (30). Terling Hall (Plate p. 96), nearly 1 m. S. of the church, was built originally in the 15th century, but the W. part has been pulled down. The upper storey projects and is gabled at the E. end of the N. side. The 17th-century central chimney-stack has flat pilasters. On the N. side are the moulded head and sill of an original projecting window. Inside the building is an original arched doorway, probably in the former ' screens,' but now blocked. There are also some flat shaped balusters of the 17th century and some turned balusters of the same date.

d(31). Great Farsley Farm, house, now three tenements, ¾ m. E.S.E. of the church, was built in the 16th century with a cross-wing at the N. end. The original central chimney-stack has grouped diagonal shafts.