Marcle, Much

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1932.

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Citation:

'Marcle, Much', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East, (London, 1932), pp. 127-134. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/heref/vol2/pp127-134 [accessed 18 June 2024].

. "Marcle, Much", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East, (London, 1932) 127-134. British History Online, accessed June 18, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/heref/vol2/pp127-134.

. "Marcle, Much", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2, East, (London, 1932). 127-134. British History Online. Web. 18 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/heref/vol2/pp127-134.

In this section

53 MARCLE, MUCH (D.e.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XLI, N.W., (b)XLI, S.W., (c)XLI, S.E., (d)XLVII, N.W.)

Much Marcle is a large parish 10 m. S.E. of Hereford. The Church, Mortimer's Castle, Homme House, Hellens, Hall Court and the Vicarage are the principal monuments.

Ecclesiastical

b(1). Parish Church of St. Bartholomew (Plate 158) stands near the middle of the parish. The walls are of local sandstone rubble with dressings of the same material; the roofs are covered with stone slates and lead. The position of the tower, between the chancel and nave, is the only indication that there was a 12th-century church on the site, there being no recognisable detail or walling of this date. The Nave with its Aisles was built about the middle of the 13th century and the clearstorey is probably of the same date; it appears to have extended eastwards beyond the limits of the existing tower, which blocks or destroys two openings in the side walls. The Chancel was extended to its present length late in the 13th century; at the end of the century the North Chapel was added. The South Porch was added in the first half of the 14th century. The central Tower was built probably late in the 15th century, the E. walls of both aisles being thickened to support its western buttresses. The church was restored in 1878, and the North Vestry and probably the N. wall of the N. chapel are modern.

Much Marcle, the Parish Church of St Bartholomew

The church is of considerable architectural interest, and among the fittings the effigies are noteworthy.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (41½ ft. by 17¼ ft.) has a late 13th-century E. window of three pointed lights in a two-centred head with a moulded label and head-stops. In the N. wall is an arcade of c. 1300 and of two bays, with two-centred arches of two chamfered orders; the column is cylindrical with a moulded capital and base; the responds are of two chamfered orders with moulded capitals; at the W. end of the wall is a modern doorway. In the S. wall are two windows, the eastern of the 15th century and of three trefoiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head; the external reveals are casementmoulded; the western window is of c. 1300 and of two trefoiled lights with a plain spandrel in a two-centred head; below this window is an early 18th-century doorway with architrave, frieze, cornice and curved pediment, the cornice resting on scrolled brackets.

The North Chapel (20½ ft. by 19 ft.) has an E. window of c. 1300 and of three lights similar to the E. window of the chancel, but with moulded jambs and mullions. In the W. wall is a 15th-century window of two cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a segmental-pointed head.

The Central Tower (15¾ ft. by 17 ft.) is of the second half of the 15th century and of three stages with a moulded plinth and an embattled parapet with gargoyles on the N. and S. faces. The E. and W. arches in the ground stage are two-centred and of two continuous hollow-chamfered orders, stopped above a chamfered plinth. S. of the E. arch are the two doorways to the rood-loft staircase, the lower doorway having a four-centred head. The N. and S. walls have each a window similar to that in the W. wall of the N. chapel; above each is a second window, of two trefoiled lights in a four-centred head; all four windows have moulded labels. The second stage has, in the N. and S. walls, a window of one trefoiled light. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a window of two trefoiled lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head with casementmoulded external reveals; the tracery is perhaps late 14th-century material re-used. The former pinnacles of the tower have been removed.

The Nave (65¾ ft. by 16¾ ft.) has mid 13th-century N. and S. arcades (Plate 159) of four bays with cylindrical columns and half-columns as responds all with moulded bases and capitals; the N.E. respond-capital (Plate 17) is carved with a range of heads with tiny grotesque beasts and foliage; the capital of the third column on the N. is carved with running foliage sprouting from the mouths of four human heads; the S.E. respondcapital (Plate 17) is carved with interlacing foliage sprouting from the mouth of a man's head; the capital of the third column on the S. is carved with upright leaves; the arches are two-centred and of two chamfered orders; to the E. of both arcades are the chamfered angles and parts of the arches of two former openings, blocked or destroyed by the tower. The clearstorey has, on each side, a range of four tall lancet-windows, with segmental-pointed rear-arches, and of the same date as the arcades. In the W. wall is a large 15th-century window of four trefoiled and transomed lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label and defaced head-stops; the lights are trefoiled below the transom; the 13th-century W. doorway has jambs and two-centred arch of two chamfered orders.

The North Aisle (9¾ ft. wide) has, in the N. wall, three early 14th-century windows each of two cinque-foiled lights in a two-centred head. In the W. wall is a window of one square-headed light.

The South Aisle (9¼ ft. wide) has, in the S. wall, three windows, the easternmost of the 15th century and of three trefoiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label; the middle window is of late 13th-century date and of three plain pointed lights with intersecting tracery in a two-centred head; the westernmost window is similar to the N. windows in the N. aisle; the 13th-century S. doorway has jambs and two-centred arch of two moulded orders with moulded bases and label. In the W. wall is a lancet-window apparently modern; below it are traces of a former opening.

The South Porch is probably of the 14th century and has an outer archway, with jambs and two-centred arch of two moulded orders. The side walls have each a window of one trefoiled ogee light.

Fittings—Bells: six and a sanctus; 5th by John Finch, 1638; sanctus, dated 1675. Chest: In N. chapel—plain with ornamental straps, drop-handles and moulded edge to lid, three locks, inscribed on front I.S. 1688 and P.E. 1688, later initials I.H. below. Churchyard Cross: S. of chancel—moulded octagonal base with stump of shaft, on three steps, 15th-century. Communion Rails: with turned balusters and four turned posts, moulded upper and lower rail, early 18th-century. Font: round tapering bowl with three slightly projecting bands and plain base, 13th-century. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In chancel— in N. wall, (1) probably of Blanche (Mortimer) wife of Sir Peter Grandison, 1347, altar-tomb, effigy and canopy (Plate 162); altar-tomb with cinquefoil-headed panels on front and W. end, with foliated spandrels and each containing a shield hanging from various carved heads; on each shield remains of the painted arms of Mortimer; moulded cornice to tomb; on tomb, effigy of lady with gown, tight sleeves with buttons, wimple, close-fitting head-dress, long veil partly covering a flowered headband, head on cushion, left hand holding rosary, dog at feet, drapery falling over end of tomb; canopy with moulded jambs and projecting head formed with canted sides, on front of head three trefoiled arches and one similar head in each canted side, all formerly finished with pendants, now missing, above arches five rectangular cusped panels each containing a re-painted shield-of-arms, hanging from a head, arms as follows—(a), (c) and (e), Grandison, (b) and (d), Mortimer; canopy finished with moulded cornice carved with flowers and a wavy cresting with painted shields of Grandison and Mortimer; back of recess with trefoil-headed panelling and soffit of canopy in two coves, ribbed in imitation of vaulting; farther W., (2) of Elizabeth (Cyrill) wife of Stephen Boughton, 1623, stone marbled tablet with incised kneeling figure of woman at desk on slate slab. In N. chapel—in middle, (3) of Sir John Kyrle, Bart., [1650], and Sibyl his wife, altar-tomb (Plate 156) in black marble and alabaster, with moulded base and slab and panelled sides with six cartouches or achievements-of-arms enclosed in wreaths; on tomb, effigies (Plate 157) of man in armour with long hair, sash with fleur-de-lis decoration, feet against hedgehog, and woman with ruff, slashed sleeves, brocaded under-skirt and feet against a paw within a coronet; in N.W. angle of chapel, (4) altar-tomb (Plate 160) with effigies, formerly in N. aisle; altar-tomb with S. side divided into seven panels alternately cusped squares and upright panels with cinque-foiled heads, square panels enclosing angels holding shields and smaller panels with shields hanging from hooks; effigy of man in bascinet and camail, jupon and hip-belt, feet on lion; effigy of woman in long gown with hanging sleeves and high collar, two angels at head and two dogs at feet, late 14th-century. In S. aisle—on sill of S.E. window, (5) oak effigy (Plate 161) of man in civil costume with crossed legs, close-fitting jerkin to knees, buttoned down the front and with buttoned sleeves, tippet with rolled collar, hip-belt with short sword and wallet on right side, feet on beast, mid 14th-century. In churchyard—near S. porch, (6) to William Brook, 1702–3, and Ann his wife, 1730, head-stone. Floor-slabs: In chancel—(1) to John Walwyn (?), 1686; (2) to Sarah (Sherwell), wife successively of Henry Head and Robert Winch, 1675, with achievement-of-arms; (3) to Elizabeth (Bourne) wife of Thomas Smith, 1678, with achievement-of-arms. In vestry—(4) to . . ., 1697. In S. aisle—(5) to Richard Hooper, 1707. Outside S. porch—(6) to Richard Elton, 1697. Piscina: In S. aisle—at E. end of S. wall, recess with head of three pointed arches with sunk spandrels in a square frame, square drain, mid to late 13th-century; farther W., recess with segmental-pointed head of two chamfered orders, broken octagonal drain, probably 14th-century. Plate: includes cup and cover-paten of 1638, given by Ann, wife of Ely Walwy; paten or salver of 1641 and flagon of 1638, both from the same donor; and cover-paten dated 1586. Screen: In arcade of N. chapel—iron railings with heavy strikes and a gate, perhaps 17th-century. Miscellanea: In N. chapel—on S. wall, stone panel with the arms of Kyrle, probably 17th-century. In chancel—stone mortar with four lugs.

Condition—Good generally, but stonework of W. window much decayed.

Secular

b(2). Mortimer's Castle (Plan, p. xxvi), motte, bailey and outworks, 50 yards N. of the church. The motte is round, about 170 ft. in diameter at the base and with a maximum height of 21½ ft. above the bottom of the encircling ditch. The inner bailey lies to the E. of the motte and has been considerably altered by the formation of gardens; it has an outer ditch of semi-circular form. Beyond this ditch, on the N. and E., is an outer enclosure bounded by a rampart or scarp and with a ditch in addition on the N. To the N.E. of this enclosure is a further rectangular enclosure, perhaps of later date and bounded by a scarp.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(3). Moat, at Rushall, about 1¾ m. N.N.W. of the church, is of oval form, but the N.W. part has been obliterated.

d(4). Homme House, 1,050 yards S.S.W. of the church, is partly of two storeys and partly of three; the walls of the older parts are of stone, and those of the later parts of brick with stone dressings; the roofs are covered with slates. The house consists of three parts, a main block to the S., a middle block adjoining it, and a N. block, just connected with the last and consisting of three wings. The N. block (Plate 34) is the earliest and includes a low tower and other walls dating from early in the 16th century; some remains of stonework in the middle block may also be of the same date. The two northern wings of the N. block and the S.W. wing of the middle block are largely re-buildings or additions of mid to late 17th-century date; the chimney-stack at the back of the main block is perhaps of the same period. The main block, as a whole, was re-built in the middle or second half of the 18th century. The S. front of the original N. block has an embattled parapet; the low tower has a bay-window of two stages with canted sides and embattled parapet; the windows are of three lights on the face and one on each return, all with rounded heads and transoms. A bell-cote, over the N. block, contains a bell, said to have come from Kynaston Chapel, at the N. end of the parish. The E. side of the wing has a small original window of one round-headed light, and farther N. a late 17th-century window with a solid frame. The S. face of the middle block is mainly of late 17th-century brick, and has two windows of this date with solid frames. The W. side of the main or S. block is partly of 17th-century brick, but the rest is 18th-century or modern.

Interior—The dining-room in the main block is lined with early 17th-century panelling re-fixed and painted; the panelling is in six heights with a frieze enriched with foliage-ornament and a cornice; the fireplace is flanked by coupled Doric columns supporting an entablature and an overmantel (Plate 64) flanked by coupled Ionic columns supporting the entablature continued round the walls; the panel is filled with strapwork and an achievement-of-arms, probably modern. Above the front entrance is a painted glass cartouche of the arms of Kyrle quartering Knuttesford and the date 1623. The tower, in the N. block, has an old battened door with ornamental strap-hinges; the window in the small annexe on the N. has a lintel ornamented with a scroll-pattern in plaster, of late 16th-century date; the reveals are lined with panelling of about the same date. Other rooms in this block have chamfered ceiling-beams and there is a wide open fireplace with a three-centred arch. The cellar, under the main block, has stone walls, apparently earlier than the superstructure.

At the end of the garden, N.W. of the house, is an octagonal building of rubble with a pyramidal roof and lantern; it was built probably as a pigeon-house, but was subsequently converted into a summer-house, and has an octagonal staircase projecting on the S. side. It was either erected in the 16th century and reconstructed later, or is an 18th-century building re-using old material. The doorway has a four-centred head and a horizontal label. The fireplace, in the W. wall, has a four-centred head.

Condition—Good.

b(5). Hellens (Plate 21), house, 700 yards N.E. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of red brick with stone plinths and the roofs are covered with slates. The house is now of T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the N. end. The lower part of the W. end of the cross-wing is part of a late 15th or early 16th-century house, but the rest of the building was reconstructed probably late in the 16th century and formed part of a larger house which extended farther both to the S. and W. It was reduced in size probably in 1641 and again late in the 18th century. It was formerly the seat of the Walwyn family.

The House is a good example of late 16th-century brickwork and the pigeon-house is interesting.

The elevations, generally, are of red brick with occasional black brick headers, stone plinth and string-course between the storeys and plaster quoins. The E. front has two ranges of mullioned and transomed windows, with plaster or cement quoins, and some of them modern; the doorway has moulded jambs, four-centred arch and label, all rendered in cement and perhaps modern. The N. front has three projecting chimney-stacks, modern or destroyed at the top; between the two eastern stacks is a dormer-window with a curvilinear gable, partly destroyed. Some o the original windows remain and some have been replaced by late 17th-century windows with solid frames, mullions and transoms. The western part of this front is of one storey and an attic only, and the gable-end of the higher part has exposed timber-framing. The S. face of the W. arm of the cross-wing has a semi-octagonal stair-turret near the junction, and on its W. face are remains of the toothing of the former wall continuing to the W.; the existing wall, at this point, sets back and represents an alteration or rebuilding. E. of the stair-turret is a late 16th-century window of three lights. The W. side of the main block has a late 16th-century projecting chimney-stack and several mullioned and transomed windows of the same date.

Hellens, Much Marcle

Interior—The entrance-hall, in the main block, has a high dado of refixed early 17th-century panelling with an enriched top rail; the modern fireplace, which occupies the site of a former doorway, has a re-set overmantel of the same date as the panelling; it is of two bays divided and flanked by terminal figures; the bays have each an enriched arch with a richly carved panel within it. The staircase appears to have been remodelled; it is of dog-legged type with short heavy turned balusters, grip hand-rail and square newels; the strings are moulded or carved with running foliage; on the first landing is re-set a fascia (Plate 67) carved with two pairs of griffons and foliage. The Hall, to the S., has a late 16th-century fireplace with moulded jambs and four-centred arch. The E. room in the cross-wing is lined with re-set late 16th or early 17th-century panelling, now painted; the overmantel is of similar date and of two elaborately panelled bays; the fireplace is similar to that in the Hall. The passage to the W. has a doorway with a late 16th-century moulded frame. The W. room in the cross-wing, now divided up, was probably the hall of the late 15th or early 16th-century house, and was perhaps originally a timber-framed building. The ceiling is divided into square panels by moulded beams, there being nine panels in the length and four in the width; the anglepanels on the N. are sub-divided by diagonal beams The room perhaps has been curtailed on the S. by the width of one panel, but this is uncertain. The spiral staircase, to the S., has an old oak newel finished with a moulded ball-terminal at the top and a balustrade with turned balusters. The first-floor rooms in the main block have fireplaces with moulded jambs and four-centred heads. The E. room of the cross-wing has a fireplace with a 17th-century overmantel; the fireplace is flanked by coupled Ionic columns supporting an entablature; the overmantel (Plate 64) is flanked by coupled Corinthian columns supporting a bracketed entablature and pierced cresting with a shield of the arms of Walwyn; the main panel has an oval centrepiece surrounded by bold scroll-work in relief. In the fireplace is an iron fire-back (Plate 77) with the date 1615, and achievement-of-arms and the initials T.C., probably for T. Chamberlayne; flanking the fireplace are dadoes of late 16th or early 17th-century panelling. The middle room in the cross-wing is lined with late 16th or early 17th-century panelling. The E. room has a fireplace with moulded jambs and flat four-centred arch. There is a similar fireplace in an attic over the main block.

To the N. of the house is an octagonal brick pigeonhouse (Plate 36), with two string-courses, plastered quoins and a pyramidal roof, finished with a lantern. On one side are the initials and date 1641, F. and M.W. The doorway has a chamfered four-centred head, and this and other faces have square or diamond-shaped decorations in the brickwork.

Condition—Good.

b(6). Hall Court, house and outbuildings, 1¾ m. N.N.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics; the walls are timber-framed with plastered infilling and the roofs are tiled. The house was in course of erection in 1608 by John Coke (afterwards Sir John Coke) and is of half H-shaped plan with the cross-wings extending towards the W. The difference in timbering between the lower and upper storeys may indicate that the materials of an earlier building were in part re-used.

The House is a good and complete example of a timber-framed building of its period.

The E. front (Plate 164) has a close-timbered lower storey and a much lighter timbered upper storey, the main beams, however, are continuous and divide the front into five unequal bays. The windows are all modern. The porch is original and has carved and enriched barge-boards with a pendant apex-post; the uprights, flanking the entrance, have attached posts with moulded bases and carved capitals, supporting scrolled brackets; the inner entrance has double nail-studded doors with strap-hinges. The N. end is similar in general character to the E. front, and is of three bays; the chimney-stack, on this side, has three square shafts, two of which are set diagonally. The S. end is entirely of open timber-framing and the chimney-stack on this side has three detached diagonal shafts. The W. front has close framing to the lower storey of the wings and open framing above; the lower part of the main block is covered by a later addition; the chimney-stack is of rubble with three diagonal shafts of brick.

Interior—The dining-room, at the S. end, is lined with original panelling (Plate 165) in five heights with an entablature carried round the room and has a frieze carved with vine-ornament; the walls are divided into bays by fluted Ionic columns with a blank shield above each. The fireplace has chamfered jambs and flat four-centred arch, above which is an oak fascia carved with a swan and sea-monsters; the shelf above is gadrooned; the overmantel, now imperfect, is of three bays, divided and flanked by terminal pilasters; the middle bay has an enriched arch with side-pilasters; the arches in the side bays are missing and have been replaced by carved rosettes. The ceiling has chamfered beams with plaster mouldings against them. The adjoining passage has exposed timber-framing with carpenters' assembly marks. The middle room, formerly the Hall, has two modern partitions; the ceiling-beams are chamfered and there is some exposed framing in the walls; the original fireplace has a later brick arch. The timber-framing is also exposed in the kitchen, in the N. wing, and elsewhere. The backroom in the S. wing has an original fireplace with a three-centred arch. The main staircase retains an original newel with a moulded terminal. The back room in the N. wing has an original fireplace, and in the S. partition is a three-light window with moulded mullions. In the cellar, below the S. wing, are two re-used 15th-century moulded beams; other re-used beams, of the same date, are to be seen in the first floor and attics. On the first floor the S. room is lined with panelling, similar to that in the room below; over the fireplace is a fluted frieze. Over the main block is an original fireplace with a surround carved with strapwork and fluting. The roof incorporates some re-used timbers, perhaps of the 15th century.

The Barn, W.S.W. of the house, is timber-framed and of six bays, with a tiled roof. The Long Granary, or stables, N.W. of the house, is of two storeys, timber-framed with red brick filling. The ground floor has chamfered ceiling-beams. The small building N. of the house is timber-framed, and adjoining it are pigstyes and other buildings, partly of stone and partly timber-framed. All these outbuildings are of the same date as the house.

Condition—Good.

b(7). Chandos, house and barn, 1½ m. N.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys, partly timber-framed and partly of stone; the roofs are covered with stone slates. It was built in the 15th century with a cross-wing at the W. end. About 1600 the house was much altered and a floor inserted in the hall. Late in the 18th century the E. porch was re-faced with stone, the S.W. wing added, and the original W. wing extended towards the N. The original close-set timber-framing is exposed on the E. and W. sides of the house. The framing is also exposed at the W. end, and in the E. gable. Inside the building the former Hall has heavy stop-chamfered ceiling-beams; in the S.E. angle is a moulded oak corbel. Other rooms have exposed framing and ceiling-beams. The doorways to the corridor between the hall and kitchen have segmental-headed frames. The roof-trusses are probably of the 17th century.

The Outbuilding, N. of the house, is of late 18th or early 19th-century date, but incorporates much old timber-work. The Barn, S.W. of the house, is timber-framed and weather-boarded; it was built in the 17th century and is of three bays.

Condition—Of house, good.

b(8). The Vicarage (Plate 163), 130 yards E. of the church, is of two storeys with cellars and attics; the walls are of brick with some stone dressings and the roofs are tiled; the cellar-walls are of stone. It was built in 1703 and there are late 18th-century or modern additions on the N. and S. The E. front is symmetrically designed with a stone plinth, a band between the storeys and rusticated angles and a wooden modillioned eaves-cornice. The central doorway (Plate 38) has a stone architrave enriched frieze, cornice and broken segmental pediment. The windows have plain key-blocks, except the middle window on the first floor, which has the initials and date D.P. 1703. The roof has three dormers. The W. front is similar in general arrangement, but the doorway has a curved and scrolled pediment and most of the windows have solid frames with mullion and transom. The side elevations are mostly concealed by later additions. The chimney-stacks are original and have sunk panels on the outward face. Inside the building the Hall has a fireplace with a moulded surround and shelf and two bolection-moulded panels above, finished with a cornice which is continued round the room; the rest of the walls is lined with panelling, partly 17th-century work re-used and partly modern. The staircase (Plate 75) has twisted balusters, moulded strings and rails and newels formed with four balusters; the upper part of the staircase has turned balusters and newels. On the first floor one room is lined with re-used 17th-century panelling, and this and a second room have moulded stone or marble surrounds to the fireplace; there are several panelled or battened doors.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (9–40)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are covered with tiles or slates. Many of the buildings have old chimney-stacks and exposed ceiling-beams and timber-framing.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

b(9). Cottage, 35 yards E. of the church, was built c. 1700.

b(10). Cottage (Plate 32), on the W. side of the road, 130 yards S.E. of the church, has a thatched roof. It was practically re-built in the 18th century, but incorporates part of a much earlier building with a crutch-truss.

b(11). House, on the E. side of the road, 250 yards S. of (10), has been partly re-faced with stone and brick.

Condition—Poor.

b(12). Cottage, 130 yards S. of (11), is of late 17th or early 18th-century date and has a thatched roof.

d(13). Cottage, on the W. side of the road, 280 yards S. of (12), was built in the 15th century and has a crutch-truss at the W. end; the roof is thatched.

Condition—Poor.

d(14). Cottage, 100 yards S. of (13), was built c. 1700. It has a corrugated iron roof.

d(15). Cottage, 60 yards S. of (14), has an 18th-century extension on the N.

b(16). Cottage, on the S. side of the road, 230 yards E.S.E. of the church, has a thatched roof.

b(17). Cottage, 330 yards E.S.E. of (16), has been partly heightened, probably in the 18th century. The S. side has been re-faced in brick.

b(18). Great Moorcourt Farm, house and barn, 700 yards E. of the church. The House was built c. 1700 and is of two storeys with cellars and attics.

The Barn, W. of the house, is in two divisions, weather-boarded. Both divisions are of three bays, but the northernmost bay is modern.

c(19). Green Farm, house, 1¼ m. E.N.E. of the church, has been considerably altered and the roof raised on the E. side.

b(20). Cottage, on the W. side of the road, nearly 400 yards N. of the church, was built early in the 18th century and has a thatched roof.

Condition—Bad.

b(21). Cottage, immediately N.W. of (20).

b(22). Cottage, on the E. side of the road, 100 yards N. of (21), was built early in the 18th century.

b(23). Cottage, 20 yards N. of (22).

b(24). Walwyn Arms Inn, at the cross-roads, 550 yards N. of the church, has a low wing on the N.W. of 17th-century date.

b(25). Barn, on the E. side of the road, 1,050 yards N.N.E. of the church, has been largely re-built.

b(26). Upper Redding End, house and barn, 1 m. N.N.E. of the church. The House has an addition at the N. end, and the S. end has been either added or re-built in the 18th century.

The Barn and cider-house, N.E. of the house, is partly of two storeys and partly one; the barn is of three bays.

b(27). Huntley's Farm, house, 500 yards N.W. of (26), is of two storeys with cellars and attics. It is of modified half H-shaped plan with the wings projecting to the N. On the N. front the stone porch is probably an 18th-century addition; in the E. wing is an original window of four lights with moulded frame and mullions. The subsidiary wing at the W. end of the house has projecting upper storeys with moulded bressummers and carved and scrolled brackets resting on a moulded string; on the first floor is a four-light transomed window with a moulded frame and mullions, perhaps re-set. The S. elevation has a central gable with a moulded bressummer. Inside the building the original staircase is built round a well with continuous newels, enclosed to form a cupboard; the lowest flight has a turned newel and balusters, moulded hand-rail and string. The closet beneath the stairs has a doorway with a moulded frame and a battened door with strap-hinges. The hall and westernmost room has original moulded ceiling-beams. In a modern window, on the S. side, is a painted glass sundial with the date 1647 and the motto "Aspice ut aspiciar."

b(28). Cottage, 400 yards S.S.W. of (27), was built early in the 18th century and has a thatched roof.

Condition—Poor.

b(29). Caerswell Farm, house, nearly 1¼ m. W.N.W. of the church, has been re-faced with modern brick and stone; it is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the E. and S. Inside the building the N.W. room has moulded ceiling-beams and the room in the S. wing has plaster mouldings against the beams. On the first floor is some 17th-century panelling.

b(30). Cottage, on the E. side of the road, nearly 1¼ m. N.W. of the church, was built early in the 18th century.

Condition—Poor.

b(31). Cottage, standing back on the W. side of the road, 400 yards N.W. of (7), has been re-faced with stone on the S. side.

b(32). Cottage, on the S. side of the road at Rushall, 500 yards S.W. of (6), has a corrugated iron roof.

a(33). Cottage, on the W. side of the road, 420 yards N. of (6), has a thatched roof.

a(34). Cottage, 160 yards N.W. of (33), was built c. 1700, but incorporates some 16th-century material.

a(35). Cottage, 120 yards N. of (34), has a later extension on the W.

Oldbury Camp (Much Marcle.)

a(36). Cottage, 200 yards N.N.W. of (35), was built c. 1700.

d(37). Oldbury, house, two tenements, 1½ m. W.S.W. of the church, was built early in the 18th century. At a later date the E. half was raised to two storeys instead of one storey with attics; the roofs are partly covered with corrugated iron.

d(38). Gamage Farm, house, 1¼ m. S.S.W. of the church, is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and N. Late in the 18th century the house was altered and partly re-faced with stone.

d(39). Oatley's Barn, nearly 1¾ m. S. of the church, is weather-boarded and of four bays. The trusses are of queen-post type.

d(40). Whittocks End, house and barn, 1¾ m. S. of the church. The House was built in the 15th or 16th century, but was entirely remodelled in the 17th century. A large part of the external walling has been re-built in brick and stone in modern times. The lower part of the W. wall retains its original close-set timber-framing. The house is now of half H-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S.

The Barn, N. of the house, is weather-boarded and of three bays.

Unclassified

b(41). Oldbury Camp occupies the top of Ridge Hill, about 1½ m. W. of the church. It is a roughly oval enclosure approximately 17½ acres in extent, including the defences. The ridge has a steep slope on the W. and slight slopes on the E. and S., the ground rises slightly to the N. The W. face of the camp has a scarp and berm. On the N. there are traces of a scarp, an inner rampart and faint traces of a ditch in the western half. On the other sides the defences have been ploughed down, but a scarp remains to show the outline of the earthwork.

Condition—Bad.

b(42). Earthwork, on the W. side of the road to Rushall, ½ m. N.W. of the church, consists of a roughly rectangular enclosure, 45 yards by 10 yards, with a scarp at each end and a bank along each side; there is a third and parallel bank to the N., and to the W. and N.W. extend a system of ditches. To the S.E. of the enclosure is a small rectangular terrace.

Condition—Good.