Hutton, New

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1936.

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Citation:

'Hutton, New', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland, (London, 1936), pp. 116-117. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/westm/pp116-117 [accessed 23 June 2024].

. "Hutton, New", in An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland, (London, 1936) 116-117. British History Online, accessed June 23, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/westm/pp116-117.

. "Hutton, New", An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland, (London, 1936). 116-117. British History Online. Web. 23 June 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/westm/pp116-117.

In this section

43 HUTTON, NEW (D.f.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XXXIX, N.W., (b)XXXIX, S.W.)

New Hutton is a parish adjoining that of Kendal on the E. The church is modern and Strawberry Bank is the principal monument.

Secular

b(1). Strawberry Bank, house, 590 yards S.W. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built probably late in the 16th or early in the 17th century on an L-shaped plan. An addition was made in the angle between the wings, probably early in the 18th century. The E. front has a three-storeyed porch and the 17th-century front door is nail-studded and panelled. Inside the building are some moulded ceiling-beams and some early 18th-century panelling. In the N. room, over the fireplace, is an elaborate 17th-century plaster panel (Plate 51) with a repeating design of vine-scrolls and a band of running foliage above and below it; it is fitted to the segmental head of a larger fireplace-opening. The kitchen has an early 18th-century stone fireplace with a corbelled head.

Condition—Fairly good.

Monuments (2–19)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. Some of the buildings have exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

b(2). Great Hawkrigg End, house, 530 yards W. of the church, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and contains a corbelled fireplace of that date.

b(3). Moss Head, house, 650 yards S.S.W. of the church, contains an original panelled partition and an early 18th-century corbelled fireplace.

b(4). The Ashes, house, 270 yards S.S.W. of the church, has been extensively altered.

b(5). Dubside, house, 230 yards S.W. of the church, contains some original panelling and doors.

b(6). House, 35 yards N.W. of the church, was built c. 1700 and extended to the S.W. at a later date.

b(7). House, 20 yards N.E. of (6), was built probably early in the 18th century and contains a spice-cupboard with the initials and date T.W.E. 1709.

b(8). House, 20 yards N.E. of (7), was built c. 1700 and has a later outbuilding on the S. The original front door has an old latch. Inside the building are a corbelled fireplace of the local type and two spicecupboards.

a(9). High Butterbent, house, nearly ¾ m. W.N.W. of the church, has 18th-century and modern additions. The original front doorway of stone has moulded jambs with the moulding carried across the lintel in embattled form. Inside the building is a cupboard of the local type with enriched upper panels, pendants and fascia with the initials and date W.C.B. 1680. There are also two panelled doors of the same period.

a(10). Low Butterbent, house, 110 yards N.W. of (9).

b(11). Hagg, house, 1,420 yards W. of the church, was built c. 1700. It contains an early 18th-century staircase with turned balusters.

b(12). Hollins, cottage, about 1½ m. W.S.W. of the church, was built probably early in the 18th century.

b(13). Hayclose, house, 200 yards S.W. of (12), has a late 16th or early 17th-century E. wing; the rest of the house was added later in the 17th century and a stone with the initials and date I. and K.F. 1713 in the N. wall probably refers to some later alteration. In the same wall is a 17th-century window of seven lights with solid frame and mullions. Inside the building is an early 18th-century panelled cupboard.

a(14). Crag Farm, house, 1½ m. N. of the church, has later additions at both ends. Inside the building is a cupboard of the local type and facing both ways; the upper panels are enriched and both faces bear the initials and date M.T. 1661.

a(15). Low House, 530 yards E. of (14), was built c. 1700 and contains a corbelled fireplace of the local type.

a(16). Ginshop, house, 1,000 yards N. of the church.

a(17). Green Bank, house, 1,030 yards E.N.E. of the church, contains an enriched spice-cupboard with the initials and date R. and I.B. 1671 and an early 18th-century corbelled fireplace. There is also an original two-stage cupboard with pendants and fascia, with the initials and date M.T. 1674.

b(18). Crake Hall, 1,050 yards E. of the church, contains a cupboard dated 1714 and an early 18th-century fireplace with a corbelled head, a leaf or shell-ornament in the middle of the head and a moulded cornice.

b(19). Hall Bank, house, ¼ m. S.E. of (18), was altered early in the 18th century. It contains a corbelled fireplace of this date and a spice-cupboard with the initials and date T.W. 1714.

Condition—Poor.