BHO

Staveley, Upper

Pages 219-220

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1936.

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In this section

94 STAVELEY, OVER (C.e.)

(O.S. 6 in. XXXIII, N.W.)

Over Staveley is a parish and small village 5 m. N.W. of Kendal.

Ecclesiatical

(1). Old Chapel of St. Margaret stood on the E. side of the main road in the village. It is said to have been first built as a chapel of Kendal in 1388, but was demolished, with the exception of the West Tower, in 1865.

Architectural Description—The West Tower (10 ft. square) is probably of late 14th-century date and is of rubble, of two stories with a parapet and low modern gables towards the E. and W. The two-centred tower-arch has been blocked by a modern wall in which is set a late 14th-century window of two trefoiled lights in a square head. The W. doorway has moulded jambs and round arch with a moulded label and defaced head-stops; the W. window is of three trefoiled lights in a square head with a moulded label and head stops; flanking it are two niches with round heads. The bell-chamber has in each wall a two-light window; that on the W. appears to be a widening of an original window of one round-headed light, the jambs and two sides of the head being re-set; the other three windows are of later date and have rough square heads.

Fittings—Font: octagonal bowl with hollow-chamfered under edge, mediæval. Weather-vane: of copper with ball and spike, probably 17th-century. Miscellanea: Preserved loose in tower, two trefoiled window-heads and parts of mullions. In modern church—Chest: with panelled front and carved top-rail with the initials and date N.W.M. 1672. Glass: In chancel—in N.W. window, shield of arms, the dexter side a jumble of fragments including two lozenges each with three stags' heads and a man's head, the sinister side, sable fretty argent; also half-figure of a man, 15th-century. Monument: In nave—on S. wall, to George Jopson, 1696–7, plain slab.

Condition—Good.

Secular

(2). Barley Bridge over the river Kent, 150 yards N.E. of the modern church, is of rubble and of two spans. It is probably a 17th-century structure but has little evidence of date. The arches are segmental and the central pier has cutwaters both up and down stream; there is a refuge over the N. cutwater.

Condition—Good.

(3). Staveley Park, house 650 yards S.E. of the old church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. There is a two-storeyed porch on the S. side. It was built probably in the 17th century, and on the first floor inside the house is an ornamental plaster panel with the initials and date G. and S.M. 1661. There is some plaster decoration in the lower W. room, now papered over. In the E. room is a recess with an original panelled and carved door.

Condition—Good.

(4). High Scroggs, house 800 yards N. of the old church, is of two storeys, rubble-built and with slate-covered roofs. It was built in the 17th century and subsequently enlarged. Inside the building is a small cupboard the door of which is carved with the initials and date I. and M.B. 1677. Another small cupboard in an outbuilding has the same initials and date. Over the fireplace in one room is a 17th-century cornice probably of plaster.

Condition—Good.

(5). Low Scroggs, house 220 yards W. of (4), is of two storeys, rubble-built and with slate-covered roofs. It was built probably in the 17th century and is said to have been the house of George Jopson, died 1696. Inside the building is a door made up of early 17th-century panelling and batten and plain partitions of the local type.

Condition—Fairly good.

(6). Low Fold, house about 1 m. N. of the old church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs slate-covered. It was built in the 17th century. Inside the building is a partition of the local type and a small cupboard-door with the initials and date W M E S. 1700.

Condition—Good.