BHO

Tebay

Pages 225-226

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1936.

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In this section

99 TEBAY (E.e.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XXVIII, N.E., (b)XXVIII, S.W., (c)XXVIII, S.E., (d)XXIX, N.W., (e)XXIX, S.W., (f)XXXIV, N.E.)

Tebay is a parish 10 m. W.S.W. of Kirkby Stephen.

Secular

a(1). Castle Howe, motte and bailey castle, on the S. bank of the Lune, 750 yards N.N.W. of the modern church, covers an area of about 1¾ acres. The work occupies a long oval hillock with the motte at the N. end. The motte has probably been partly carried away by the river and is now of irregular form and rises only about 9 ft. above the bailey; there are traces of a rampart on the S. side. There is a ditch between it and the bailey, the E. and S. sides of which have been much damaged.

Condition—Bad.

a(2). Castle Howe, earthwork at Lower Greenhowe nearly 1¼ m. N.W. of the modern church, has been supposed to represent a second castle. All that now remains is a scarp towards the river Lune on the N. and also continued along the W. side of the site. There are no remains of a mound or of any defensive work on the E. and S.

c(3). Lune's Bridge, over the river Lune, near the middle of the parish, is a rubble structure of two spans. The arches are segmental, the smaller arch on the E. being for flood-water. It dates perhaps from the 17th century, the bridge being decayed in 1649.

Condition—Good.

c(4). Low Borrow Bridge, over the Borrow beck, on the S. boundary of the parish, is a rubble structure of one span with a segmental arch. It is perhaps of 17th or early 18th-century date and was in a decayed state in 1712. It may have been widened on the W. side.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (5–22)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys, the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. Some of the buildings have exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good.

f(5). High Carlingill, house on the E. side of the Lune, 1½ m. S. of (3).

c(6). Brockholes, house 350 yards N.E. of (4), was built probably early in the 18th century and has an original fireplace with a corbelled head.

c(7). Low Borrowdale, house nearly 2 m. E.N.E. of (4), contains a two-stage cupboard of the local type, with enriched upper panels, pendants and the initials and date T. and T.M. 1685.

b(8). High Borrowdale, house 700 yards E.N.E. of (7).

c(9). Lune's Bridge Farm, house 120 yards N. of (3), was built probably early in the 18th century.

c(10). House on the S.W. side of the road at Roundthwaite, 700 yards N.W. of (3).

c(11). Townhead, house at Roundthwaite, 200 yards N.W. of (10), retains an original panelled door.

c(12). Tebaygill, house 1,130 yards N.E. of (3), is of late 17th or early 18th-century date.

c(13). Overcluegill, house 500 yards E. of (12), was built early in the 18th century and contains a fireplace of 1731.

c(14). Gelstone, house ¼ m. S. of (13), was built early in the 18th century.

a(15). Town Foot Farm, house at Old Tebay 670 yards N. of the modern church, has a stone staircase in a semi-circular projection at the back.

a(16). Town Head Farm, house 360 yards E.N.E. of (15), was built early in the 18th century. The doorway has a lintel with the initials and date G. and E.P. 1705 and there is a partition of moulded boarding and a panelled door of the same date.

a(17). House, immediately N. of (16), was built probably early in the 18th century and retains a fireplace with a corbelled head and a panelled partition of the same period.

a(18). Low Greenholme, house over 1 m. N.W. of the modern church, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century.

d(19). Gaisgill Row, house nearly 1¼ m. E.N.E. of the modern church, was built probably early in the 18th century and retains some panelled doors.

d(20). Cottage, at Gaisgill, 470 yards E.N.E. of (19), was built early in the 18th century.

d(21). Ellergill, house ¼ m. S.E. of (20) has been re-built but incorporates a mediæval doorway with a shouldered head.

e(22). Waskew Head, house about 1 m. E.N.E. of (3), retains an original cupboard of the local type with enriched upper panels, turned posts and fascia.

Unclassified

a(23). Brandreth Stone, a granite boulder set against a field-wall, 500 yards N.N.W. of the modern church, is about 3¾ ft. by 2½ ft. It has no indications of working except a small rough cross on one corner. There are said to have been, formerly, two crosses and the stone was reputed to have been a boundary-stone, at one time, between the English and Scots.