East Flegg Hundred: Great Yarmouth, St. Nicholas's church

An Essay Towards A Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: Volume 11. Originally published by W Miller, London, 1810.

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'East Flegg Hundred: Great Yarmouth, St. Nicholas's church', in An Essay Towards A Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: Volume 11, (London, 1810) pp. 364-394. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/topographical-hist-norfolk/vol11/pp364-394 [accessed 1 March 2024]

AN ACCOUNT OF ST. NICHOLAS'S CHURCH, ITS DONATIONS, MONUMENTS, &c.

We have before had occasion to observe, that this church was founded by Herbert bishop of Norwich, about the year 1123.

In 1251 it was dedicated, having been greatly enlarged the preceding year. At present it consists of three isles, which together make a breadth of 108 feet. The middle isle is much smaller than the other two, both in height and breadth, but to the east extends further in length, being 230 feet within the walls. The height of the steeple is 186 feet, and is made of wood, covered with lead.

In the 53d of Henry III. The prior and monks of the Holy Trinity of Norwich, held the church, valued at 100 marks; and in the 14th, of Edward I. the jurors say, that the prior of the Holy Trinity of Norwich holds the church of St. Nicholas, valued at 300 marks per annum, for his own use, &c. and they say that the said prior and his predecessors have holden it from time immemorial, &c.

Pl'ita' de lib de Gern—Pl'ita coron, &c.

The said prior and monks had it given and appropriated to them by the founder, for 60 marks per annum; and at the reformation, the dean and chapter succeeded them, by whom it is now held.

The founder, also, made this church a priory, as a cell subservient to Norwich. Three parish chaplains, and one deacon, usually officiated in it, and it appears that the prior was obliged to provide them; for in the 34th of Henry VI. the town received a fine "of the prior, for want of a parish chaplain and a dean, 20s. and unless they be provided before the feast of St. Michael next ensuing, the aforesaid prior shall incur the penalty of eight marks."

The prior of Yarmouth held a messuage, &c. formerly Robert Thurkeld's, in Thurton, and paid out of it, to the abbot of Langley, the lord there, 2s. 3d. per annum; and was afterwards possessed of other lands and tenements.

Against the wall, in the south isle of the church, hung formerly a chronographical table, containing a short historical and descriptive account of Yarmouth, witten in Latin, but has been taken down and defaced near two centuries ago. It appears to have been written before the reformation, by some ecclesiastics belonging to the church, which from the third article seems pretty evident. In hâc urbe unum est valdè laudabile, quod nunquam in ea vir ecclesiasticus, qui de peccato carnis publicè sit notus. i. e. "In this town is one very laudable thing, that there never was in it an ecclesiastic, who has been publickly detected of the sin of carnality."

Such articles of this table as were thought worthy to be preserved were transcribed, and placed in the Guild Hall.

The communion table stands in the east end of the middle isle, where, before the reformation, stood the high altar, and over it a loft, called the rood-loft, which supported a large crucifix, having a vestry behind.

This rood loft, in the abovementioned table, is stiled opus pretiosum circa magnnum altare, "the costly work about the great altar." It was erected at the sole expense of Roger de Haddesco, prior of St. Olave's, in 1370, and was very curiously ornamented and decorated with devices, &c. It was illuminated with lamps and candles, thence called rood-lights, and exhibited a very solemn and awful splendor to the spectator.

To these lights, placed before altars, images, &c. most people, who left legacies to pious uses, bequeathed something; their support was attended with great care and expence, and they had always a custos or warden to superintend them. This is evident from a memorandum which we find, made in the 26th of Henry VI. by which it appears that John Waston and Thomas Pond had undertaken to find the light for Corpus Christi, in this Church, for the space of two years; and if any deficiency or negligence was proved therein, they were to be fined 5 marks, to the bailiffs, for every default.

Besides frequent legacies, these lights had certain annual rents; tenements, &c. which the wardens collected; and so zealous was the superstition of those times, that there was scarce a will made, but a bequest was bestowed on this species of Popish parade.

The said Roger de Haddesco, also, erected a neat chapel in the east end of the church, which he dedicated to the Lady of Arneburgh. This chapel was still standing in 1545; on the north side was a fine organ, and to the west of that was the choir furnished with eight priests or monks, who composed a choir till the dissolution. They were sent from Norwich, and resided under the prior here, who, as often as he thought proper, replaced them with eight others.

We have accounts of several chapels in this church. Besides the above, called St. Mary de Arneburgh's, we find St. Catherine's, St. Christopher's, St. Laurence's, the Holy Trinity's, St. Olave's, or St. Toley's, our Lady of the Porey's, St. Lewis's, St. Elignis's, St. Thomas the Martyr's, St. George's, King Henry's, St. Margaret's, St. Edmund's, St. Parnel's, St. Michael's, and Jesus's. In the reign of Edward III. they were so very numerous, that, notwithstanding the spaciousness of the church, it was thought necessary to erect an additional isle or chapel at the west end. This was begun, and was called the new-work, but on account of the plague in 1349, which swept off the greatest part of the inhabitants, it was never finished.

These chapels had each its particular image, altar, light, &c. which were principally supported by a society, called a Guild; of these we find the Brown Rood Guild, the Guild of St Crispin and Crispiana, the Guild of St. Christopher, the Guild of St. Erasmus, St. George's Guild, the Guild of our Lord's Ascension, the Guild of Holy Cross, St. John's Guild, the lesser Guild of the Holy Trinity, the Guild of St. John Baptist de Rollesby, St. Margaret's Guild, the Guild of St. Mary de la Pere, the Guild of St. Mary in Ernesburgh, the Guild of our Lady of St. Nicholas's church, the Guild of the Holy Ghost, the Guild of St. Nicholas. These were the principal guilds, though there were probably many more. They had most of them particular possessions of real and personal estates. They had each of them an alderman, who was accountable to two auditors for their respective transactions, which were therefore regularly registered; and their several members were permitted to make public processions, through the town, on particular occasions.

In two old church books, mention is made of several organs and vestries in the 14th and 15th centuries. There also appears to have been some pantomimical machinery, in order to represent the star, as appears from these articles:

In 1465, Paid for leading the star, 3d. on the twelfth day.

Making a new star.

In 1506, — For hanging and scouring the star.

A new balk line to the star, and rysing the star, 8d.

In 1512, — For a nine thread line to lead the star, &c.

In 1465, also, there appear to have been several sums disbursed on account of the sepulchre, for setting it up, mending of angels, tending the light, &c.

Several other memorandums of the 14th and 15th centuries, also occur; amongst which are disbursements for covering images in Lent, hanging up the veil; for bells and bell-ropes; for making a ship, to hang in the church; for setting up and taking down the pascal, painting it, a new fore-lock to it, &c. in 1485, a new pair of censers, containing 81 oz. workmanship and guilding 14d. per oz.

Inventory of the church goods in the new vestry, in 1502.

A principal vestment of cloth of gold; i. e. a chesapyll and a cope of one suit; eleven toneclys (tunicles) of the gift of Sir John Fastolf, Knight.

A book for the prior (Thomas Hoo) with a cushion of velvet, and a cloth of silk.

A temple, silver and gilded, containing 168 oz.

A [cross] with Mary and John, silver and gilded, containing 86 oz.

Eight chalices, the best gilded, and weighs 46 oz.

A relick of the oil of St. Nicholas, the gift of Dawn John Hoo, prior.

— of St. Margaret.

— of St. George, in gold.

— of the Holy Thorn, in silver.

— of St. Maurick, in copper.

Before the reformation it was a custom for the prior and monks, and afterwards for the dean and chapter, or their farmer of this parsonage, to provide a breakfast for the inhabitants of this town, every year, on Christmas day; which custom continued till the 21st of Elizabeth, when, on account of a grievous plague, which carried off two thousand of the inhabitants in one year, and on consideration of the ruinous condition of the parsonage house, it was agreed that Thomas Osborne, who was then farmer of the parsonage, should pay five pounds a year to the church wardens, for the use of the town, in lieu of the said breakfast.

After the plague had ceased, the breakfast was resumed and continued, as usual, till the reign of James I. when William Gostlynge, then farmer, absolutely refused to provide it, or to pay any equivalent composition. Upon which the town preferred a complaint to the dean and chapter, who promised not to countenance him in such a nonconformity to the terms of the lease by which he held of them.

Mr. Gostlynge's allegations, on this occasion, were specious enough, but it is to be imagined that his motives were less moral than interested, notwithstanding the plausibility of his reasons. He says,

"First. In regard of the danger of gathering together of at least a thousand people, the most part of them being of the rudest and basest sort, all which meeting, there hath been oftentimes danger of murther, by quarrelling and fighting amongst themselves, and also breaking of windows, tables, stools, pots, glasses, and many other disorders, which by no means can be prevented.

"Secondly. By the profaning of the birth-day of Christ, at which time, by the law of our church, the communion ought to be administered, which by this disordered meeting is always put by, and the greatest part of them being drinking and swaggering until eleven of the clock, going neither to service nor sermon.

"Thirdly. It is beneficial to none; the better sort, for the most part, contemning it, and the poorest of men, especially upon that day, are invited by their neighbours, and so no need of charity in giving a piece of bread and cold meat in the morning, going to another place to dinner.

"Fourthly. The town hath much injured both the church and the farmer, in detaining of a house these nineteen years, worth four pounds per annum, which hath always belonged to the parsonage, to the damage of the farmer, fifty-four pounds, at least.

"Fifthly. Whereas other farmers that kept this breakfast, gave towards the maintenance of the preacher and minister, not above thirty pounds per annum, the rest of their maintenance being paid out of the town stock. The now farmer, being desirous for the settling of a sufficient ministry there, and for peace sake, of his own good will, doth give one hundred marks, and above, per annum, and so the town is thereby much eased, and the farmer overcharged. In respect whereof, he thinketh it reasonable not to be charged with this unnecessary and unprofitable charge of the breakfast."

These allegations, however, did not appear sufficient to exculpate Mr. Gostlynge, to the lords of the privy council, before whom the matter was brought; for they obliged him to sign an agreement, whereby he engaged to pay yearly to the town in lieu of the breakfast, ten pounds, which was distributed to poor fishermen, &c. and five pounds for his default, in before refusing to provide the breakfast. This continued till the making of a new agreement, between the corporation and Mr Gostlynge, of a grant of nomination and appointment of preachers and ministers in the town, since which it seems that both breakfast and composition shared the fate of all human institutions, and sunk into oblivion.

After the death of the said William Gostlynge, Charles, his brother and executor, confirmed, in 1624, an agreement formerly made by his said brother William, with the corporation, on a complaint made by the latter to the dean and chapter of Norwich, "that the impropriate rectory of Yarmouth was not supplied with able and sufficient pastors or ministers;" the purport of which agreement was, that the corporation should nominate and elect their own ministers, for the remainder of his lease.

At the time of the above confirmation, Mr. Wilkinson was minister of the church, who having preferment elsewhere, imagined the town would with-hold from him, on account of his non-residence, their annual stipend of twenty-five pounds, in lieu of his offerings, and therefore, without ceremony, demanded them of his communicants, whom he threatened with exclusion from the holy communion, in case of a refusal; but upon an after conference with the town, finding they did not intend to deprive him of the composition, a reconciliation took place, and he returned the money he had already received of the people, intimating at the same time his desire of living upon good terms with them, so long as he should hold the living.

Mr. Wilkinson, however, left his cure soon after, and put a period to this formal friendship. At which time a vacancy ensued, on account of the dean and chapter's opposing the town's nomination and appointment of a minister, agreeable to the terms of their agreement with Mr. Gostlynge; and accordingly the lord bishop of Norwich, by letter to the bailiffs, appointed Mr. Gammon to officiate as minister, in the said vacancy.

The receipt of this letter was also accompanied with an instrument of installation, which Mr. Gammon then produced; a peremptory and sudden mode of proceeding highly displeasing to the town, but which they thought proper to submit to, on account of Wilkinson's sudden departure, for a few days, and not longer.

A short time after, therefore, it was resolved to write to the Bishop, asserting their right, and assuring him of their resolution to maintain their privilege of nomination and election; accordingly, about three months after, in April 1625, a letter of attorney was given to Mr. Edmund Grosse and others, to present John Brinsleye, clerk, to be curate of St. Nicholas's church. At the same time the case was laid before Sir John Suckling, comptroller of the King's household, and one of the privy council, who wrote to the Bishop of Norwich, requesting him to cease his in erposition, in an affair which appeared to him to be in favour of the corporation.

This had not the desired effect; for the dean and chapter soon after exhibited a bill in Chancery against the corporation, concerning the nomination and appointment of preachers and ministers to serve in the cure of Yarmouth; their principal allegations against the town being, concerning the separatists, a dissenting sect; neglect of the lord chief justice's warrant; detaining the church books; holding assemblies in the church; a disrespect of King James's mandate, dated 30th December, 1524; disturbances in the church, &c. &c.

Mr. Brinsleye was also convened before the High commission Court of Lambeth, to be questioned upon matters not then known; who therefore obtained a certificate from the corporation, under their common seal, of his proper demeanor, official qualifications, &c. and afterwards the town voluntarily presented him with another certificate, in his behalf, containing additional clauses of recommendation.

But all was insufficient. A decree in Chancery was given against the town, on a certificate made by Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, on a refereuce made to him by the court, That the nomination of curates or ministers for Yarmouth, belongs to the dean and chapter of Norwich, and not to their farmers of that rectory.

Mr. Brinsteye was accordingly dismissed, at Midiummer 1627, having served the cure two years, and was succeeded by Mr. Barker.

This controversy had irritated the Bishop of Norwich against the town to such a degree, that every little frivolous thing was made the foundation of as many litigious and vexatious suits. But upon the petition of the late bailiffs, with Mr. Brinsleye, to the King, concerning several matters urged against them by the Bishop, the affair was referred by the King, to the Lord Bishop of London, Justice Crook, Justice Yelverton, the dean of St. Paul's, and Sir Henry Martin; who accordingly directed their letters to the Bishop, to appear at the house of the Earl of Manchester, lord president of the privy council, in order to hear the cause.

In the mean time, the Bishop having had some intelligence concerning the petition, thought proper to address the bailiffs in a very friendly manner, expressing his wishes that they would recommend to him a fit person for a second preacher, which was accepted by the town, and seems to have been the first step towards a reconciliation.

Mr. Brinsleye, after his dismission from St. Nicholas's church, preached in a place called the Dutch church, (at present converted into a theatre) till he was again silenced. But the town, being about to choose a lecturer, who was also to be approved by the Bishop of Norwich, made great interest to get Mr. Brinsleye into that office. Whereupon they addressed their letters to the Bishop, who was willing to confirm their choice after being satisfied in these two particulars, viz. first, Whether their election of Mr. Brinsleye was unanimous, and if any were dissentient, to have their objections communicated to him: secondly, On account of the decree in Chancery having debarred him from holding the cure, whether it did not also exclude him from all ministerial function in Yarmouth; for his satisfaction in which, he solicited that the court might again be moved on that question.

To the first enquiry, the town returned a satisfactory answer in the affirmative; to the second they replied, that as the lecturer was paid out of the town's stock, and not out of any church revenues, they did not imagine that the decree could in any wise affect their election of him, nor did they conceive that Chancery interfered in matters of that nature, but that, for the Bishop's satisfaction, they would send their recorder, Mr. Miles Corbet, to confer thereon with his lordship.

Another complaint, on oath, was alleged against Mr. Brinsleye, in the court of Chancery, the principal of which was his interrupting the service, by going into the pulpit before it was finished. In opposition to which, a certificate, utterly denying the charge, was sent to him, signed by the bailiffs and principal people of the town.

Notwithstanding all the interest the corporation could make, Mr. Briusleye, in consequence of a commission taken by order of the King and his council, was forbid to exercise his function within the town and liberties of Yarmouth, of which he was thereby declared ineligible, but not of any other place, being lawfully called, and conforming himself to the church of England.

Soon after this, the King gave permission for them to nominate their own lecturer, on their paying him his stipend; which nomination was to be confirmed by the lords of the council, to whom they were to present two, or more, for their choice of one of them; but if it appeared to them that neither was eligible, then they were to nominate others, and so on, till one was approved. Agreeable to which Mr. Vincent, Mr. Norton, and Mr. George Burdett were presented to the board, who made choice of the latter.

The lecturer's salary was fixed at one hundred pounds a year, the instrument for the payment of which, sealed with the common seal, was to be sent to the board, for their approbation: counter articles of agreement were also signed by the lecturer, for the satisfaction of the corporation. These, after reciting the salary and mode of payment (i. e. at four equal quarterly payments) continue:

"Item, It is agreed that the said Mr. Burdett shall weekly preach one sermon every Sunday, and one sermon every Wednesday (being a market day, and the usual day for the lecture) at such hours as the lecturers in the said town have formerly used to do.

"Item, It is agreed that he shall preach one sermon on every coronation day, for the King's Majesty, and upon every great festival day; i. e. upon the feast of St. Michael, the archangel, the feast of All Saints, the fifth of November, Christmas day, Twelfth day, Candlemas day, Ascension day, and on the twenty-ninth of August, being the day of election of bailiffs and other officers in the said town, and also upon the session days.

"Item, It is agreed that he shall be helpfull to the curate in the said town, in the administration of the sacrament of the Lord's supper, when he is thereunto required.

"Item, If by sickness or any other cause of absence, he cannot discharge the place himself, that then, for such time of intermission, he shall provide some other able and sufficient minister to supply his place.

"Item, That he shall not leave, nor give over his said place, without half a year's warning first given to the town, to provide themselves of another.

"Item, If by any cause of suspension or deprivation, arising upon any matter of neglect or default in the said Mr. Burdett, or if by taking any other ecclesiastical promotion, or otherwise, he the said Mr. Burdett shall be disabled to exercise the said lecturer's place, that then for that time he shall demand no allowance of the said town, but they provide another in his stead. George Burdett."

For the final determination of the difference lately agitated between the town and the dean and chapter of Norwich, on the 19th of March 1633, Matthew Brooks, minister, and George Burdett, lecturer of Yarmouth, with Thomas Johnson and Mr. Medowe, appeared before the Bishop of Norwich, when the following articles were agreed to by both parties.

"Imprimis. It is ordered between the said minister and lecturer of Great Yarmouth aforesaid, that each of them, so often as they shall there preach, shall read divine prayers before their own sermons, according to his Majesty's directions in that behalf.

"Item, It is ordered, that the minister shall have all fees belonging to christenings, marriages, funerals, the churching of women, and all other duties whatsoever, properly belonging to his curateship.

"Item, It is ordered that the lecturer shall preach all the scarlet days (as they call them), and that the minister shall preach the blessing to their fishing yearly, which they call their fishing sermon.

"Item, That the lecturer upon Wednesday, being his day to preach, begin his sermon about ten o'clock in the forenoon, except occasion so fall out, either by reason of a christening sermon, marriage sermon, funeral sermon, or at the churching of any woman at that time; then it is ordered that the minister shall have his pulpit free at ten o'clock, giving notice the day before to the lecturer, and the lecturer to begin his sermon at eight o'clock in the morning, on the same day.

"Item, It is ordered that if there shall happen any such occasion, as is before named, for the minister to preach on Sunday in the afternoon, it being the lecturer's time to preach, then the minister shall give warning to the lecturer on the day before, and the lecturer shall supply the forenoon's course.

"Item, It is ordered that upon Sunday in the afternoon, the minister begin catechising at two o'clock, and so continue half an hour, then prayers to begin and to be read by the lecturer, then christenings to be performed by the minister, and then sermon to begin presently after. Richard Norwich."

This agreement was not long effectual; for in July following, Mr. Brookes cited Mr. Burdett to appear before the chancellor of Norwich, for not bowing at the name of Jesus. Mr. Burdett accordingly ap peared, attended by several gentlemen of Yarmouth, who were ready to depose, upon oath, that he actually did bow at the name of Jesus; and he himself in answer to the chancellor's demand, said that in that point he had, did, and would observe the canon. Mr. Brookes's letter, however, and his affirmation, joined to that of some of his friends, had sufficient weight with the chancellor, to procure Mr. Burdett's suspension; which was removed, the following month, by the intercession of the bailiffs.

Still we find the ecclesiastical too much for the civil power; for in April 1635, Mr. Burdett having been again suspended, in the high commission court, he left the town precipitantly, took his passage on board a ship, and set sail for New England, leaving behind him a distressed wife and family, towards whose support the corporation generously allowed an annuity of twenty marks.

The said year, the vicar general came to town, and ordered several alterations and reparations in the church; the principal of which are;

That there be but one pulpit, set up at the east end of the body of the church, the most convenient for preaching and hearing, at the discretion of the bailiffs and the minister.

That the boarded partition, at the east end of the chancel, be taken down, and that the walls, pavement, and windows of the said east end be repaired and beautified, and that the communion table be set at the east end thereof; that rails be set at the first ascension towards the place of the communion table, and a table of the ten commandmen's to be placed on the east wall, over the table, &c.

That the roof of the chancel, where necessary, be decently repaired; and that the doors at the west end of the church be set open during divine service.

That the font be beautified, and a rail made against it.

That the addition lately made to the gallery be taken down, it obstructing the light, and those who built it to be decently placed in some other convenient seats in the church, at the discretion of the church-wardens, &c.

Amongst other instances of the misconduct of the clergy here, in times of Popery, we find the following, which were presented by the jurors, and fines levied accordingly.

51. Edward III. That Thomas, dean of Flegg and Yarmouth, took unjustly, for proving the will of John Ocle, 56s. above and contrary to the statute of the church.—Fined 6s. 8d.

Also, that the said dean took extortionally, for proving the will of Simon Horner, 4s. and the said will did not contain more than 14s.

Also, the said dean maliciously ravished (rapuit maliciose) Alice the wife of John Boys of Norwich, in the house of John Lewe, in spite of her husband, contrary to the peace, &c. and keeps her in his adulterous embraces, and is a common adulterer and fornicator.—Fined 2s.

3. Henry IV. That Sir Richard, dean of Yarmouth church, broke into the house of Philip Glover, &c.—Fined 13s. 4d.

4. Henry IV. Also that the said Richard, dean of St. Nicholas's church, and Thomas Walbot, parish chaplain of the same, are common vagabonds in the night.—Fined 4s.

4. Henry VI. That the rector of Burgh church, dean of Yarmouth, keeps and maintains fornicators in the town, taking of them bribes, and does not correct them.—Fined 40s.

9. Edward IV. That Thomas Aleyn, clerk, keeps and daily receives and entertains a certain woman of bad character, called Joan Flantyf, &c.—Fined 40d. and to dismiss her, under pain of 20s.

And that Jone Barflet keeps and entertains chaplains, friars, and other strangers suspected in her house, with herself and other women of bad behaviour, day and night.—Fined 10d.

9. Henry VII. That Richard Ashley, chaplain of the hospital, and John the deacon, chaplain, &c. are common night-walkers at unlawful hours.—Fined 20d. each.

13. Henry VII. Received of Joan, the wife of John Crepon, because she lay in the night with a chaplain, as evidently was proved before the bailiffs.——Fined 5s. 6d.

Several other instances are upon record, of the shameful misconduct of these clerical gentry, which it is not our intention to recount.

In 1460, Constantine Dally, rector of Maultby in Norfolk, was buried in the chapel of St. Mary de Arneburgh, in this church. And William Fenn, citizen, willed in 1439, to be buried in it.

In the 31st of Edward I. Jeffrey, son of Oliver Wyth, gave 5s. per annum to maintain a lamp to be continually burning before the Great Crucifix, in this church.

In the 43d of Edward III. Margaret, wife of John de Beverle, of Yarmouth, gave 30s. 6d. annual rent, towards the support of eight candles burning on the perch (the loft) in the chancel of St. Thomas of Canterbury, in this church, for ever, &c.

And in the 18th of Richard II. the same lady gave 8s. 6d. annual rent, towards the support of a wax candle of two pounds weight, to be burnt before the crucifix hanging in the nave of the church.

In the 6th of Henry VII. Thomas Pond, burgess of Yarmouth, bequeathed five annual rents for supplying a lamp, burning day and night, and five wax candles of 1½lb. each, burning about the said lamp before the Sacrostrum, or high altar, in time of divine service.

Thomas Mount, in 1280, gave to St. Mary's light 2s. annual rent, for ever.

In 1355, William Oxney, burgess of Yarmouth, gave to the high altar, for his tenth and trespasses forgotten 40s. to the new work 40s. to St. Mary's light 13s. 4d. to each parish chaplain of St. Nicholas 40d. to each parish clerk of the said church 12d. &c. &c.

In 1356, Richard Fastolf, of Great Yarmouth, bequeaths his body to be buried in St. Katherine's chapel, in this church, to the high altar, 40s to St. Mary's light, 20s. to the new work, 20s. to the head parish chaplain, 1s. to each of his two partners, and the deacon, 6d. to each of the three parish clerks 3d. also 6s. annual rent to St. Mary's light, and five shillings to that of St. Katherine, for ever.

Stephen de Stalhom, burgess of Yarmouth, in 1362, bequeaths his soul to God, the blessed Virgin, and all saints, and his body to be buried in St. Nicholas's church; to the high altar of this church, for his tenths forgotten 20 marks; to the repair of the church 5 marks; to St. Thomas's light, one mark; to celebrate 20 annuals for his soul, and his benefactors, after his decease, 120 marks; to St. Mary's light, 20s &c. &c.

In 1374, John de Stalham, of Great Yarmouth, bequeaths to the high altar 10 marks; to St. Mary's light 20s. to the repairs of the church 20s. &c.

The same year, Jeffrey de Drayton bequeaths to the high altar, 2 marks; to the support of the light of Corpus Christi, to be carried to the town for visiting the sick 6s. 8d. to be distributed in masses and other alms deeds, for his soul, 40l. &c.

In 1379, Thomas Cobald gave to the high altar a wey of salt, and his best holiday vestment, there to be used as long as it shall last; to Martin Wodesyde, chaplain, for the term of his life, one missal, two vestments, and a chalice; and after his decease, they were to go to St. Mary's altar, in this church, and there to continue for ever.

In the same year, William de Stalham, of Yarmouth, bequeaths to the high altar 20s. to the fabrick of St. Nicholas's church, 20s. to St. Mary's light 20s. for the buying of books in the choir of St. Nicholas's church 100s. &c. &c.

And Simon atte Gappe of Yarmouth the same year, commends his soul to God, and his body to be buried in the church yard, before the door of the new chapel (the new work) on the west part; gives to the high altar 100s. to the fabrick of the church 20s. to St. Mary's light 6s. 8d; to Corpus Christi light 20s. to the fabrick of St. Nicholas's church of South Yarmouth 6s. 8d. Of this church there now remains only an old ruin, called Gorleston old steeple, which has, for many ages past, been an excellent sea-mark.

In 1381, Peter Bennet, burgess of Yarmouth, bequeaths to the high altar 13s. 4d. to the fabrick of the church 2s. to St. Mary's light 5s. annual rent for ever, &c.

In 1385, Nicholas Wildegoose, of Yarmouth, gives to the high altar 40s. to St. Mary's light 10s. to the fabrick of St. Nicholas's church 10s. &c.

And in the same year, Alice, his wife, bequeaths to the high altar 20s. to St. Mary's light 40d. to the repairs of St. Nicholas's church 40d. the residue of her estate to be sold and the money to be distributed in masses and other pious uses.

Besides these there are several wills still upon record, of persons who died of the plague in 1349, all containing legacies and bequests somewhat similar to the above.

In the reign of Henry VIII. we find frequent disturbances made in this church, concerning religion. Of this we have an instance, in 1535; in which year, on November 1st, as Dompnus Robert Cotton was preaching a sermon, a great riot was made by 24 persons, with William Swarton, chaplain, at their head, who, it seems, were opposers of the superstitious doctrine of the Romish church, and publickly declared, "That no honour is given to the seynts, to the pictures and ymages of them within the chirche, with lights and suche other lyke thyngs; and that a christen man shall profight nothyng by makyng of intercessions and prayours to the seynts of hevyn, to be meditatours and meanes for him to Almighty God. And also that our lady is not in heavyn. And that all holy water is good sawce for a capon, and other suche lyke sayings."

And in 1541, October 28th, four merchants of Yormouth came into the church together, in the time of divine service, and administration and elevation of Corpus Christi, and in a tumuliuous manner spoke heretical words, and swore by all the members of Christ, to the great disturbance of the congregation, &c. but afterwards putting themselves on the king's mercy, by sureties, they were each fined 2s.

Having thus given an account of the most material things relative to St. Nicholas's church, we shall conclude with such monuments and monumental inscriptions therein, as seem worthy the reader's attention.

As you come in at the south door, in the south isle of the chancel, to the right hand, on the wall, is a neat white marble monument, thus inscribed,
S.
To the Memory of MARY The last survivor of five children Of Robert and Mary JACKSON Who was born at Yarmouth Oct. the 30th, 1709.

And died universally lamented at Ipswich, May 21st. 1728, In the flower of her age.

Dearest to us of human kind, Lovely in body and in mind, Farewell—with many a flowing tear Thy friends this monument prepare, Little, alas! to thee 'tis true, But all thy PARENTS love can do.

Solatia luctus Exigua Ingentis

Behind this monument lie the four other children of the same sorrowful parents.

On the some south wall, a little more easterly, is another white marble monument, with this inscription,
Near this stone are interred the remains of ERASMUS JARY, Gent.

Who died 7th of August, 1766, at the early age of 25.

He had long been the only hope of a widowed mother: He lived to become her pride and joy: And his affectionate wife (Who pays this tribute to his memory) Only knew him long enough to know his value.

A little distance from the same wall, is a black marble on the floor, thus inscribed,
S. M.

MARIÆ JOSEPHI COTMAN, Generosi, Conjugis merito dilectissima Obiit quinto die Novembris Anno Domini 1727 Anno Ætatis 19 Amata JOSEPHI COTMAN, Generosi, conjux Nuptiarum ordine secunda Nata fuit Martii die 27, A. Dni. 1705, Denata Aprilis 20, 1731.

De qua susceptos duos habuit filios; Hunc Josephum Octobris 15 natum 1729, Denatum Februarii23 1730; Illum Josephum natum Aprilis 11mo, 1731, Junii 19no 1731 denatum Ad quorum memoriam mariti fidei Animique patrii non immemor, Hoc marmor posuit. Quod mortale fuit Josephi Cotman, Armigeri, Sub hoc marmore reconditur.

Obiit Augusti die 30° Anno Domini 1762° Anno Ætalis 57° East of this stone, is the following inscription,

HERE LYETH INTERED THE BODY OF MARY THE WIFE OF THOMAS CLARKE, GENT. COLLECTOR OF THEIR MAJESTYS CUSTOMS IN THIS PORT OF YARMOUTH AND ELDEST DAUGHTER OF JOHN HAFORD OF HAFORD IN THE COUNTIE OF WORCESTER, GENT. SHE DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 16th DAY OF JULY 1622, AGED 50 YEARS 8 MONTHES. ALSO ON THE NORTH SIDE LYETH MARY THE DAUGHTER OF THE SAID THOMAS AND MARY CLARKE WHO DIED THE 28th of DECEMB, 1696, AGED 28 YEARS.

THO. CLARKE, GENT.

Obiit 25 Aug. 1708 Ætat. 68

More northerly lies another stone, thus inscribed, In memory of ELIZ. MISSENDEN, Who was a sincere christian, an affectionate wife A tender parent, a faithful friend, In every relation exemplary.

Under her severe, and almost incessant pains, For many years, She was ever resigned, and mostly chearful.

She died in hopes of a joyful resurrection April 18, 1751, aged 55.

Her afflicted husband, T. M. Cl. M. A.

Will ever retain a just sense Of the greatness of her merit, and his loss.

Still north of this stone, lies another, bearing this inscription, HIC JACET FRANCISCUS CORTENAYE NOBILI STIRPE COURTENAICA DE CASTRO POWDERHAM IN ARGO DEVONIENSI NAVIS PRÆSIDIARIÆ, CAPITANEUS, QUI CONTRA BELGAS PRO REGE ET PATRIÆ FORTITER DIMICANS LETHALI VULNERE PETITUS OBIIT VICESIMO DIE NOVEMBRIS Anno Domini 1673.

Next to this, northerly, is this, MORS MIHI LUCRUM EST.

HERE UNDER LYETH BURIED THE BODYE OF THOMAS BVTTOLPH ALDERMAN DECEASED THE LAST DAY OF FEBREWARYE ANNO DOMINI 1614.

A little more to the north a stone M. S.

RICHdi FERRIER, Armigeri.

Hujus Burgi et decoris et desiderii.

Exunnahtem Ingeni Fontem morum Suavitatem Et quæ generosum ornant et cohonestant, Dicant Familiares; Eximiam Rei politicæ peritiam, Regni Comitia; Labores indefessos et præ cæteris Delicias Solum natale.

Quæ suscepit munia (et varia certe) Graviter explevit affabre expolivit, Vixit satis patriæ; At quantula est aura popularis Quantula gloria fluxa et fragilis.

Vixit et sibi et suis, Obiit die quarto Calend. Xbris Anno Ætat 57mo. Anno Dmni 1728vo. Sub hoc etiam marmore Requiescit Richdus FERRIER, Armiger, Richdi. illius filius unicus Ingenii acumine, et indolis suavitate Alter idem.

Obiit pridie Idus Aprilis Anno Ætat 44 Anno D'mni 1739

Another stone, at the west end of this,
The Remains Of Mrs. SARAH LEAKE, widow, relict Of JOHN LEAKE, Gent.

Nephew of Sir Andrew Leake, Admiral of the Blue.

She died on the 25th of March 1743 Aged 47 years.

Another stone to the north, thus inscribed,
M. S.

ROBERTI GALLANT, M. B.

Quem Medicorum principum modeste æmulum Modo languidi et tremula voce Requiem anhelantes, Jam sani et vigore juvenili reviviscentes Læte fatentur.

Deo, Patriæ, Conjugi, Amico Quæ debentur astatim explicuit Nec vaga, nec larvata pietas: Pauperibus salutem (auro potiorem) Inemptam impertivit Immenso cum fœnore, In cœlis potitur mercede.

Obiit Junii die 27mo Anno Dmni 1746 Anno Ætat. 55

Helena prædicti ROBERTI GALLANT uxor Tali digna viro, Omnimodis virtutibus ubertim ornata, Obiit xxiiio Septris Anno Dmni MDCCLVI.

Ætat. LXIII.

The next stone, still northward bears this,
AD DOMINVM PRÆMISSIS SEX LIBERIS JOHANNE GEORGIO GVLIELMO HANA FRANCISCA ET ABIGAELE IN VIVIS QUATVOR MARIA MARGARETA THOMA ET JOHANNE HVIVS MVNICIPII BALLIVVS ITERVM ET IN SVPREMIS REGNI COMITIIS ASSESSOR DENVO GEORGIVS HARDWAR MAY VLT. 1635 ÆTAT. 66 MIGRAVIT. QVEM MARGARETA UXOR ET AMANTISSIMA ÆTAT. 62 SEQVVTA EST OCTOB. II. 1638.

A few yards from the south door is the following
IN MEMORY OF ROSE HUNTINGTON, LATE WIFE TO RICHARD HUNTINGTON, WHO DIED SEPTEMBER THE 8th. AGED 57 YEARS, ANNO 1678.

WITHIN THIS WOMB OF EARTH, THIS BED OF DUST, LONG THE REMAINES OF ONE LAYD UP IN TRUST.

WHO WHILE SHE LIV'D WITH US, DID NOT SO LOVE THIS LIFE, AS NOT TO THIRST FOR A REMOVE; RELIGION WAS HER AIM; AND IF HER SENSE THEREOF DID DIFFER: YET THE DIFFERENCE IS RECONCIL'D: SHE'S GOTTEN WHERE SHE SEE THINGS AS THEY ARE; AND SO I HOPE SHALL WE.

WHAT ERE THE HUMBLE, AND THE FAITHFUL MISS WHILE THEY ARE HERE, IS CLEERED UP IN BLISS, WHERE THE SINCERE SHALL JOIN BOTH HEARTS AND HANDS, IN ONE CONTRACTED, BY ETERNAL BANDS, M. Thompson 1700, Near the south-west corner of the same isle, a stone Here lyeth the body OF RICHARD BATHURST, GENT.

(Who was the seventh son of EDWARD BATHURST Of Finchcocks, in the parish of Gowdhurst, in the county of Kent, Esq. by MARTHA his wife) Who departed this life the 7th Day of April Anno Dom. 1707, and In the 58th yeare of his age.

On a neat white marble mural monument, against the west wall is this.

Near This place lay the remains of ELIZABETH The widow of Mr. John Ramey, Who was lost at sea In the 29th year of his age, in December 1718.

She surviv'd him near 40 years, Of which she spent the former part in the care of her only son, And the latter in a course of unaffected piety, and virtue.

She died Feb. 14, 1758, aged 64 years.

In justice and gratitude to those abilities of her mind, And that goodness of her heart, To which, under providence, he is chiefly indebted For his posterity, Her son, JOHN RAMEY, Esq.

Has caused this monument to be erected.

We come now to the middle isle of the chancel, in which, at the foot of the steps ascending to the rails before the communion table, is a black marble stone thus inscribed.

JOHN MANCLARKE, A. B.

Minister of this parish died 8 Novr. 1770, aged 38 years.

A marble stone next to this, westward, has the following on the four edges, which are cut aslant, for the purpose of preserving the legend.

JOHN COWLDHAM 4 TYMES BAILIFF OF THIS TOWNE AND SON OF ALLIN COWLDHAM, BAILIFFE ALSO BEFORE HIM SUCCEEDINGE HIS FATHER IN THE CHAIRE OF MAGISTRACYE, GOD CALLED TO ACCOMPANY HIM IN THE THRONE OF GLORIE THE 21st OF DECEMBER 1620, LEAVING NO ISSUE, AND AGED 84 YEARES.

Another stone still westward.

HERE LYETH THE BODY OF MARGARET SOMETIME THE WIFE OF JOHN ARNOLD, MERCHANT, AND ONCE BAILIFF OF THIS TOWNE, AND LATELY THE WIFE OF THE REVEREND AND FAMOVS WILLIAM BRIDGE MINISTER OF THE GOSPEL AND PASTOVR TO THE CONGREGATIONALL CHVRCH IN YARMOVTH. SHE WAS AGED 76 YEARS, AND DIED ON THE FIRST DAY OF NOVEMBER IN THE YEARE 1675 Her soul in glory, and her body staies The time 'till Christ to union it doth raise.

On another stone westerly, this inscription,
M. S.

The remains of JOHN ALBERTSON Formerly Alderman of the corporation Of Great Yarmouth, And Bailiffe in the yeare 1655.

He Departed this life the 28th of Oct. 1693.

Aged 71 yeares.

Waiteing for a blessed resurrection.

On another stone the following. Cineres Joannis Dasset, Generosi, Viri prudentis, docti, pii, Qui non varios hujus vitæ labores Et multa rerum discrimina —Dyonisia uxore, Unica et amantissima Viva prole suscepta Cœlos petiit Feb. 25, 1637 Ætatis suæ Anno 68.

On a stone towards the north side,
HERE LIETH INTERR'D THE BODY OF WILLIAM BURTON THE ELDER, WHO WAS TWICE BAYLIFFE OF THIS TOWNE, AND DIED THE 8th DAY OF APRIL 1673, Aged 65 yeares.

HE LIV'D TO CHRIST, HE DIED IN CHRIST, AND MUST APPEARE WITH CHRIST: DISTURB NOT THEN HIS DUST.

And under this, is WILLIAM BURTON, M. D. obiit July 23 1756, aged 53.

In passing towards the nave of the church, at the west end of the isle, on the right hand, is an elegant mural monument, with this inscription,
M. S. SAMUELIS FVLLER, armigeri, Qui hujus burgi bis ballivus, dein Prætor, et ad memorabilem illum anno 1688 conventum multaque inde parliamenta missus hinc burgensis Egregiæ ubique justiciæ, prudentiæ, pietatis monumenta reliquit. Ex Rosa, Ricardi Huntington, armig. filia Hic juxta posita Samuelem, Elizam, Joannem, Mariam, Ricardum, Rosam suscepit liberos: In quibus Samuel ejusdem burgi aldermannus, Ricardus L. L. D. in foro admirallii advocatus generalis Et Elizabetha parentum ad latera requiescunt. Obiit 19 Maii 1721. Annum agens 75m.

Beneath this,
Parentibus optimis Johannes filius natu secundus, Regiæ majestati nuper ad Etruscos consul Et in primo Georgii secundi parliamenti senator Et Rosa filia unica superstes Marmor hoc mœrentes f. MDCCXXVIII.

Near the middle pillar, on the south side, is the following,
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF MR. MITCHEL MEW TWICE BAILIFFE AND ONCE MAYOR OF THIS TOWN OBIIT THE 21st DAY OF APRIL 1670 AGED 71 YEARS.

In the north isle of the chancel, is an elegant monument of curious workmanship, upon a pillar at the west end, having this inscription,
Ego HANNA DASSET virgo Juxta hanc stelam dormio At Expergefiam Resurgam In Æternum vivam, NAM Redemptor meus vivit.

Migravi 18 die Augusti Anno Salutis 1631 Ætatis 27.

Near the middle of the isle, to the north, is this, Here lieth Mary the wife of James Artis, Esq. who departed this life 30 April 1715 Also ELIZABETH the daughter of The above James and Mary Artis Who departed this life the 9th of March 1720 Here lies JAMES ARTIS, Esq.

Bailiff, mayor, captain of militia Fuzileers of this town, he died January,
28th 1724, aged 68 years.

Towards the north-east of the above, is this,
HERE UNDER LYETH ELIZ. WHEELER, THE ONLY DAUGHTER OF ABRAHAM WHEELER AND REBECCA HIS WIFE, WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE BEFORE SHE HAD FULLY ACCOMPLISHED THE NINETEENTH YEAR OF HER AGE, 8 NOVEM. 1636. ALL YOU WHO DOE THIS GRAVE BEHOLD LOE HERE A YOUNG * * * * LADYE IN MOULDE, THE OLDE MUST NEEDES, THE YOUNGE MAY DYE, BOTH OLDE AND YOUNGE THEREFORE BE SHYE HOW YOU YOUR LIVES ON EARTH LET PASSE THAT YOU IN HEAVEN MAY HAVE A PLACE.

A little distance from the north door is the following inscription, AUDI VIATOR SIVE SIS EXTRANEUS SIVE INCOLA NON LEVE PRETIUM MORÆ IPSA MATERIA VATEM FERE TERRUIT AT TANDEM COMPOSUIT. NON FORTUNÆ LUGEMUS CASUM, SED PROVIDENTIÆ CULTUM UT DECET CEDIMUS. HIC PARVO JACET IN LOCO JOHANNES COOPERUS SENIOR DOMI FORISQUE SATIS NOTUS PROPTER NOTIORA ET POTIORA. AB OPTIMIS, ID EST, AMICIS DESIDERATUS EST ET INIMICIS NON INGRATUS FUIT. NEC SUI UT AUGUROR UNQUAM ERIT INGRATA MEMORIA OBIIT ANNO A SALUTE RESTITUTA OCT. 3° 1684. VIXIT ANNOS 63. ET VIVIT IN ÆTERNUM: HOC NULLI DUBIUM.

HÆRES INTER HÆREDES PRIMUS, HOC MONUMENTUM PONENDUM CURAVIT THOMAS COOPER 1704.

In the north east corner of the isle,
Hic sita est Maria Thomæ Macro S.T.P. Conjux unice chara Quæ duos feliciter enixa est liberos (O! si trium superfuisset mater) Dein adverso puerperii opere fessa Inter amicorum preces et lachrymas Placide spe fultam afflavit animam X. Cal. Feb. anno. Salutis 1724. Ætatis 33. Cui per debitum corporis sui contubernium (ut unam eadem fovea tumuletur caro) Mortus fidem præstitit qui vivus nunquam fefellit Tho. MACRO, hujus ecclesiæ per 21 annos Pastor fidus, Obiit xvi Cal. Apr. A.D. 1743. Ætatis 60— Tho. MACRO A.B. filius unicus Coll. Caii Cant. Alum. & Theologiæ Candidatus, Qui triste sui desiderium reliquit Cum non diu, sed bene vixisset Obiit Apr. 5. A.D. 1746. Ætatis 23.

On the south side, adjoining to this, is another stone, MARIA filia Samuelis Pake, M.D. Et Elizabethæ uxoris, natu maxima, Obiit Vto. Kalend. Junii, MDCCXIV. Ad VI annos, et II menses nata Reliquias egregii viri SAMll, PAKE, M.B. Inter hæc marmoris claustra reconditas venerare lector. Quem alma medendi Arte cum peritum Tum felicem gravissime modo ægrotantes Jam sani grata mente recolunt multi; Ne nimio plures sanando triumpharet, Mors invida ocyus ipsum rapuit: Galeni puta et Hippocratis æmulum reformidans: Obiit 4to Kal. Aug, anno. Dni 1743. Ætat. 36.

On the south side of the isle, the following,
HERE Lieth the remains of ELIZABETH HALL Sister to the wife of THOMAS MACRO, D.D. Who departed this life December 28, 1746.

Also MARY LOVE, daughter of JOHN GOSLIN LOVE and MARY his wife, who departed this life the 30th of May 1747, aged 3 years. JOHANNES GOSLIN LOVE, Armiger, Natus 2do Feb. 1721, Denatus 3tio Oct. 1767.

South of this, the following,
M.S. Venerabilis GVLIELMI LYNG A.M. Ecclesiæ Anglicanæ PRESBITERI Parochialis etiam Sancti Vigoris de FULBURN in Com. Cantab'si. Per novem lustra RECTORIS non indigni cujus Exuviæ in hâc Æde Sancta reponuntur In qua pr. triginta annos feliciter ministravit. FIDEM CATHOLICAM intrepidus propugnavit Summam autem Humilitatem & Reverentiam adhibens Laboribus functus & fractus Animam DEO reddidit Pridie Idus Novembris Anno Dom. 1719 Ætat. Suæ 71 Cætera qualis fuerat dicat desiderium ejus Apud eos quibus maxime notus vixit. Cum GULIELMO ILLO LYNG Requiescit Dilecta sua MARIA, conjux Nuptiarum ordine, Secunda; Pietate vero NULLI: MICHAELIS DALTONI de FULBURN præfat, armigeri FILIA dignissima Quæ obiit nono calander; Junii, Anno Dom. 1729 Ætat. suæ 79 In eodem tumulo reponuntur exuviæ venerabilis BENJ. LYNG ille Gulielmi et Mariæ filii unici per Multos annos Rectoris parochiæ Si. Laurentii de South Walsham Com. Norf. Obiit 30mo. Jan. Anno Dom. 1742, Ætat. 48. Ac etiam Annæ uxoris ejus secundæ Rdi. Ferrier Armigeri, filiæ quartæ Obiit 14mo. Feb. Anno Dom. 1763 Ætat. 57

On a stone further to the south, In Memory Of Mr. William Spooner, who was once bailiff and afterwards MAYOR of this town, obiit 2d. Octob. 1722. Æt. 67.

Yet further southward, the following, Here resteth the body of William Browne, Esq. once Bayliff and Mayor of this town, who departed this life Nov. 7, 1710 Aged 46 years.

There are likewise in the chancel two tables, containing the several benefactions to the corporation, to the church, to the hospitals, to the poor, &c. one being in the north isle, the other in the south, against the west wall.

Near the north door of the CROSS ISLE, as you pass out of the chancel into the church, is the following, on the floor,
D. O. M. S. JVVENIS OPTIMI ET INTEGERRIMI DNI HALL-THORIS BRVNOLFI ISLANDI QVANTVM CLAVDI POTVIT HOC SAXVM COERCET. IPSE LIBER IN PATRIAM VIVENTIVM ABIIT NASCITVR SCALHOLTI IN AVSTRATI ISLANDIA ANNO CHRISTI MDCXLII DIE XIII DECEMBRIS; PATRE BRVNOLFO SVENONIOP. EPISCOPO SCALHOLTINO; MATRE MARGARETA HALL THORIDE; POST DOMESTICAM SCHOLASTICAMQUE IN PATRIA DISCIPLINAM ANNO ÆTATIS XX IN ANGLIAM NAVIGAT. VBI CVM ANNOS IV INTEGROS AC PERPETVOS PIE ET SOBRIE BONORVM TESTIMONIO VIXISSET, IN EVNTE QVINCTO TABE LENTA ADFICI CŒPIT, ET MENSE POST QVINCTO ANNO DNI MDCLXVI, ÆTATIS INCIPIENTE ANNO XXV DIE XV DECEMBRIS STILO VETERI CONFICI FELICITER DESIIT, NEC VITÆ PVDVIT NEC PIGVIT MORI REQVIESCAT IN PACE. HALL THORIS ISLANDI CINERES HVMVS ANGLICA SERVA DEPOSITVMQVE BONA QVANDOQVE REDDE FIDE VIXIT ANNOS XXIV DIES VII PATER MŒSTISS: FILIO VNICO DESIDERATISS; P. C. T. W. 1723.

Westward of the north door, is a mural monument, thus inscribed,
Here resteth the body of Mr. Thomas Bradford, Alderman, once bailiff, and afterwards Mayor of this town, who departed this life the 3d of July 1703, aged 74 years.

On the same wall, more southerly, is a monument of white marble, thus inscribed,
Near this marble, his mother, and other relations, Are interr'd the remains of Sir Wm. Gooch, bart. born in this town October 21, A. D. 1681. He went young into the army, and behaved gallantly during all Q. Anne's wars, at the end of which he married Mrs. R. Staunton, of Hampton Middx. whither he retired, But not till after he had loyally assisted in, subduing the rebellion in Scotland in 1715. In 1727 the king made him lieut. govr. of Virginia, And of him 'twas justly (and what could be better) said that he was the only governr. abroad, against whom inhabitant or mercht. never once complained. In 1740 he became coll. of an American regiment, and was sent with them to the siege of Carthagena, where, tho' providence remarkably preserved him, his wounds and a bad climate greatly impaired him. For this and his other services he was advanced to the rank of brigadier, and major general; but these neither increasing his fortunes nor restoring his health, he returned to England, Where, after unsuccessful journies to Bath, he concluded his life December 17th, 1751. To whose memory his much afflicted widow has erected this monument.

On the floor, further southward, an a black marble is the following,
JAMES the Son of JAMES HANNOT died 5th Octr. 1754 aged 65 years. M. S. HERE LYETH THE BODY OF MARY LATE WIFE OF JAMES HANNOT WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE JVNE THE THIRTEENTH ANNO DOM. 1696 ÆTAT. XXXVII; WAITING FOR THE RESVRRECTION OF THE JVST. ALSO THE BODY OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED MR. JAMES HANNOT WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE ye, 7th DAY OF JVNE 1704 AGED 50 YEARS, ALSO ye, BODY OF ANN ye. LOVELY WIFE OF CHA. LOVELL DAUGHTER OF ye. ABOVE Sd. Mr. JAMES HANNOT WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE ye, 27 OF APRIL 1706, AGED 21 YEARS. And SARAH his daughter, wife of Mr. ISAAC SPILMAN obiit 12th Sept. 1742 Ætat. 50 YEARS As you pass into the NORTH ISLE, sometimes called the OLD CHANCEL, to the west, under the arch, is the following,
The remains of John Brinsley, senr. M. A. And late Lecturer in this place, who Deceased Jan. 22, 1664 Aged 64.

Within the said north isle, northerly, is this,
Hic sita est Maria, filia Nath. Symonds, Ad Garienis Ostium mercatoris, Et Mariæ uxoris, Obiit Sept. die Xmo MDCCXXXIII Anno Ætatis XXXIV. Et etiam Anna Mariæ prædictæ soror Edvardi White cler. A. M. uxor Amans et amabilis. Dixisse potuit, Nocturnis vigiliis et doloribus invicta Lætor, triumpho, Corripiat gradum, Mors furtim et lente properans (Hoc tamen ei indulsit filiolam ut pareret) Peperit, Occubuit Augusti die XXIII. MDCCXXXIV annum agens XXXIV, Mortem præmaturam conjuge ne quicquam plorante Juxta positi sunt cineres Annæ Edvardi White et Annæ uxoris filiolæ Obiit Oct. die XVIII bimestris tantum.

To the west is this,
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF JOHN CARTER, WHO WAS TWICE BAILIFF OF THIS TOWN, AND ONE OF THE ELDERS, &c.

His court, his fight, his race, Thus finish'd, fought, and run, Death brings him to the place From whence is no return Never did seamen harbour spie Nor pilgrim see his home draw nigh, Nor captive hear of his return; Nor servant his indenture burn, Nor banish'd prince retrieve his crown, Nor tired man at night lie down, With greater joy, than he exprest At sight of his approaching rest. Mortuus est canitie Bona, satur, dierum & Anno Ætatis 73 suæ Dni 1667.

Near the north wall is this inscription, ANN THE WIFE OF THOMAS ENGLAND DAUGHTER OF THOMAS BULWER OF BUXTON GENT. OB. 26 OF APRIL. 1682, ÆTAT. 40th, AND THOMAS HER HUSBAND, SECOND SON OF SIR GEORGE AND DAME SARAH ENGLAND, ALDERMAN AND TWICE BAILIFF OF THIS TOWN OB. 11th OF SEPT. ANNO 1693, ÆTAT. 48, ALSO EIGHT OF THEIR CHILDREN (viz) FIVE SONS AND THREE DAUGHTERS.

To the west of the stone preceding the above, is this In memory of THOMAS GODFREY, twice bailiff and many years town-clerk of this burgh. And of ELIZABETH his wife, one of the two Daughters and coheiresses of MAJOR THOMAS WILDE. He died April 30, 1704, aged 63. Their issue were ELIZABETH, born May 18, 1671, and died May 7, 1752, unmarried. JUDITH born Jan. 16, 1672, relict of SAM. WAKEMAN, Esqr. she died June 15, 1746 And lies buried with his family in the Adjoining chancel, MARTHA born Sept. 26, 1676, relict of FRANCIS TURNER, she died July 13, 1729 and is buried with him near this place ANNE, their youngest daughter, widow of SAM. FULLER, jun: reserved, alass! To pay the last melancholy offices To so many near and dear relations, With the utmost gratitude and affection Inscribes this memorial to her parents and sisters. 1752.

A little further to the west,
Here resteth the body of THOMAS BENDISH, of Grays Inn in the County of Middx. Esqr. descended from the very antient family of Sir THOMAS BENDISH of Essex Baronet who was Embassadour from K. Charles The 1st. to the Grand Seignior. He married Bridget the daughter of Henry Ireton, of Ireton in the County of Derby, Esq. sometime Lord lievetenant of Ireland. Obiit 27. Apr. 1707—Ætat. 61.

On the next stone to the south, is this, Beneath this stone lies the remains of HENRY BENDISH late of Tempsford in the county of Bedford, Esq. He died the 16th of June 1753 in the 49th year of his age.

On a stone to the west,
EDMVND THAXTER ALDERMAN AND TWICE BAILIFF OF THIS TOWN OBIIT 16 MAY ANo Domini 1690 Ætat. suæ LXII. SARAH THAXTER, RELICT OF THE SAME EDMUND BEFORE OF JOHN FOWLE OF THE CITY OF NORWICH, ESQR. AND ELDEST DAUGHTER OF SIR GEORGE AND DAME SARAH ENGLAND obt. 13th MAY ANo. DOM. 1696, Ætat. suæ 57.

Near the north wall is this inscription,
Hic requiescit corpus Philippi Page generosi qui obiit Ultimo die Januarii Anno Ætat suæ tricesimo septimo Anno Domini Milesimo Sexcentesimo Octogesimo quarto.

West of this, is a mural monument, thus inscribed,
VIR AMPLISSIMVS GEORGIVS ENGLANDVS, MILES, GARIENIS HONOR ET GLORIA. GENTIS ENGLANDORUM NVMEROSÆ COLVMEN ET CULMEN' SUB HOC SILICE CONTERMINO SEPELITVR, QVI SIC DEO, ECCLESIÆ, PATRIÆ, AMICIS VIXIT VT NIHIL DE EO NISI MORTEM DOLENDVM ARBITREMUR DIEM SVBEGIT DECRETORIVM COELVM INTRAVIT MAII CALEND. ANNO SAL. MDCLXXVII. ÆTAT. LXII. ECCE ALTERVM SEPVLCHRI DOMICILIVM PIENTISSIMÆ DOMINÆ ENGLANDÆ MANES AD MARITI CINERES VIX FRIGESCENTES JAM AGGREGANTVR, FOEMINA RELIGIONE PRÆSTANS MORIBVS CANDIDA REBVS SECVNDIS FATIGATA MAGISQVAM FASTVOSA SEPTEM LIBERIS COLLACHRYMANTIBVS VALEDIXIT AC IN MORTIS INCIDIAS FOELICI FVLGENS PVRPVRA TRIVMPHAVIT ANNVM AGENS LVII A PARTE VIRG: MDCLXXVII XVI Jan.

Beneath this, on the same wall, is a plate of iron, in which the following inscription, is cast in relievo,
VIATOR ET SI PROPERAS, SUBSISTE ALIQUANTISPER ET LEGE, ET LUGE VITÆ INSTAB ILITATEM. HIC EXTANT EXUVIÆ JOSEPI ENGLANDI QUI FUIT GEORGII ENGLANDI MILITIS FILIUS NUMERO QUARTUS: DOMINÆ CLARÆ VANDERLANÆ BATAVÆ MARITUS: JAM MILES EMERITUS ET CŒLO MARITATUS VIXIT ANNOS XXV ANTELVIT SIVE ENTERIORA QUASI TUNICAM RELIQUIT ANNO 1674, 30 APRILIS. ET NODUM FATALE SCRIPTUM EXPLEVIMUS: ECCE JOSEPHUM ALTERUM PRIORIS FILIUM UNIGENITUM POSTHHUMUM DUORUM MENSIUM SPATIO VIX INTERJECTO IN EADEM FOVEA TUMULATUM SIC ABIERUNT ILLI, SIC FESTINAMUS OMNES.

On the west side of this is a marble monument, with this inscription,
In memory Of GEORGE ENGLAND, Esq. eldest son of Sir GEORGE ENGLAND And dame Sarah his wife Who departed this life Thirtieth of June 1702, and Fifty ninth year of his age, He was recorder of this town And several times member of Parliament for the same, and A true friend to that and The liberty of his Country.

And on the east side of the iron monument, is the following,
And also of BENJAMIN ENGLAND, Esq. third son of the said Sir GEORGE and dame SARAH Who died the 30th of April 1711. He was several times bailiff, Mayor, and member of parliament For this town; his affection to it, And his just and generous Temper were known to most And will be exceeded by few.

Near this, on the floor, is this,
H S.E.

Gualterus Saltonstall Armr. hujus portus nuper dignissimus controrotulator; Morum condore, vitæ probitate et nota in Egenos Et cognatos charitate, ornatissimus Qui veram religionem sanctissime coluit et fidem Principi inviolatam præstitit omnia denique amicitiæ et societatis officia rectissime servavit Dierum satur, et spe beatæ resurrectionis plenus obiit 8—die mensis Maii Ao. Dni. 1750 Ætatis suæ 77 officii vero supradicti 47.

On a pillar, towards the west end, is a very neat monument, thus inscribed,
Viator siste Hic situs est JOHANNES HALL ad Garienis Ostium Mercator Insignis felix bonus Morte scilicet proxima e proprio thesauro nova antiqua produxit Herus, parens, maritus Optimus Numerosa prole Beatus orbatus Unica superstite Fortunam non semper æquam æquanimis pertulit Rebellionis faces CAROLO SECUNDO red.

fœliciter extinctas vidit.

Ipsa etiam pacis bona undique stillantia Allubescente fato, summam industriam amplissimo reditu compilavit Perduellium hydram centenis etiam capitibus Repullulantem et amputatam Civitatem suam seditionis peste tabescentem (ut Moses altera Pisgæ vertice) reformandam Seipsum, præturabis antea functum In fidelitatis resurgentis honorem Designatum conspiciens expiravit A.D. MDCLXXXIV.

On a marble, at the foot of the pillar, is this inscription,

Here rests, expecting an happy resurrection, The body of John Hall, merchant, alderman By the old and new charter, and twice bailiff of this town—and in the same place The body of Ann his daughter aged 9 years, which was the 13th child that he buried; to whose memory his mournful Widow erected the adjoining monument.

He deceased, aged 61 years the 7th day of May Anno 1684.

The memory of the just is blessed.

Prov. 10—7.

Also the body of Mrs. Ann Hall, Relict of Mr. John Hall, who dyed February 15, 1703, Aged 69 years.

On a handsome mural monument, in the same isle, is this inscription,
Near This place are Deposited the remains of HENRY SWINDEN Author of the History and Antiquities of Great Yarmouth.

Who died 11th Jany. 1772, aged 55.

To whose memory This Marble is erected By JOHN IVES, F. S. A.

In the MIDDLE ISLE, is this inscription,
Hic Requiescit in spem beatæ resurrectionis Henricus Church senator et semel ballivus hujus Oppidi. Qui — vita ad civitatem Dei I — — — tercio die Januarii anno Domini M. DC. LXXVI Ætatis suæ LX.

In the alley between the south and north door, near the font, is the following,
Here resteth the body of Christopher Spendlove, senior, M. A. late lecturer of Yarmouth, who died December 10th, anno 1665 Aged 69.

Near the west door, is this,

Here lieth interred the body of Seth Hawley, alderman, and once Mayor of King's Lynn, who in a desired Voyage breathed his last in this Town, buried here on the XXV of March, anno Dom. MDCLXXVI anno Ætatis LXVIII.

There are many other ancient stones, without inscriptions, in which have been fixed plates of brass of various forms, the matrices of which are still visible, but the brasses were all sent to London, in 1551, by an order of assembly, to be cast into weights, measures, &c. for the town's use.

There is a chamber vestry, in the north isle, at the north west corner, in which is a library of ancient books, consisting of above 200 volumes, most of them in folio. There is also a curious desk, in which are shelves so contrived as to revolve, and present the books on either to your hand, without letting fall those on the other.

In the CHURCH YARD,
Amongst others, are the following inscriptions.

Upon a head stone,
SOLIS ET PAUCIS NOTUS AMICIS HIC JACET SCOTTUS.

VIVITUR INGENIO.

As you pass out of the church to the west end of the church yard,
Here lieth the body of PRESERVED, the Daughter of Thomas Preserved Emms, Who departed this life, in the 18th year of her Age, on the 17th of November.

CICDCCXII.

SHE LIVED.

Dutiful to her Parents; Agreeable to her Acquaintance; Charitable to the needy; Industrious in business; Skilful in Œconomy; Prudent in her conduct; Temperate in her enjoyments; Modest in her deportment; Comely without pride; Religious without enthusiasm; Patient of rebukes; Calm under afflictions; Possessing youth, yet resigns it; Neither weary of life, nor afraid of death.

On the north side of the church, a tomb thus inscribed,

HIC SEPULTUS JACET JOHANNES YATES MEDICINÆ DOCTOR FILIUS JOHANNIS YATES THEOLOGI DE STIFKAY IN COMITATU NORFOLCIÆ, QUI ANNOS NATUS 42, EX HAC VITA AD BEATORUM SEDES MIGRAVIT AUGUSTI ANNO DOMINI 1659.

ET Qui Novis Toties Varios Expellere Morbos Terre Sibi Propriæ Non Valet Artis Opem.

On the south side,
Exuvias Antonii Allys, Armigeri Desiderium demissum sui Respicientes Hic humo mandaverunt Superstites.

Obiit Vicesimo nono die Octobris Anno Salutis 1709 Ætatis suæ 76.

On the south west side,
M. S. Redditur terræ corpus SARÆ uxoris JOHANNIS JEFFERY T. P.

Archidiaconi Norwicensis & filiæ Johannis Ireland Quæ obiit Feb. 8 Anno Ætatis 54.
Anno Domini 1705.