Wivenhoe: Roman Catholicism

A History of the County of Essex: Volume 10, Lexden Hundred (Part) Including Dedham, Earls Colne and Wivenhoe. Originally published by Victoria County History, London, 2001.

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Citation:

'Wivenhoe: Roman Catholicism', in A History of the County of Essex: Volume 10, Lexden Hundred (Part) Including Dedham, Earls Colne and Wivenhoe, ed. Janet Cooper( London, 2001), British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/essex/vol10/p292 [accessed 22 July 2024].

'Wivenhoe: Roman Catholicism', in A History of the County of Essex: Volume 10, Lexden Hundred (Part) Including Dedham, Earls Colne and Wivenhoe. Edited by Janet Cooper( London, 2001), British History Online, accessed July 22, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/essex/vol10/p292.

"Wivenhoe: Roman Catholicism". A History of the County of Essex: Volume 10, Lexden Hundred (Part) Including Dedham, Earls Colne and Wivenhoe. Ed. Janet Cooper(London, 2001), , British History Online. Web. 22 July 2024. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/essex/vol10/p292.

ROMAN CATHOLICISM.

William Drury, whose wife Mary was the sister of the staunchly recusant Catherine Audley of Berechurch, lived in Wivenhoe and was involved in papist activi- ties locally in 1577. (fn. 1) Two recusants were recorded in 1586. (fn. 2) After the Second World War mass was celebrated in a former school in High Street. In 1967 St. Monica's Roman Catholic church was opened off De Vere Lane. In 1995 it was served by a priest from Brightlingsea and attracted c. 100-110 people every Sunday. (fn. 3)

Footnotes

  • 1. Essex Recusant, v. 41; xii. 41; xxi. 29.
  • 2. E.R.O., D/DU 318/1.
  • 3. Butler, Story of Wivenhoe, 334-5; inf. from Father M. Butler.