Charities

A History of the County of York East Riding: Volume 6, the Borough and Liberties of Beverley. Originally published by Victoria County History, London, 1989.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:

A P Baggs. L M Brown. G C F Forster. I Hall. R E Horrox. G H R Kent. D Neave, 'Charities', in A History of the County of York East Riding: Volume 6, the Borough and Liberties of Beverley, (London, 1989) pp. 261-270. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/yorks/east/vol6/pp261-270 [accessed 21 May 2024].

A P Baggs. L M Brown. G C F Forster. I Hall. R E Horrox. G H R Kent. D Neave. "Charities", in A History of the County of York East Riding: Volume 6, the Borough and Liberties of Beverley, (London, 1989) 261-270. British History Online, accessed May 21, 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/yorks/east/vol6/pp261-270.

Baggs, A P. Brown, L M. Forster, G C F. Hall, I. Horrox, R E. Kent, G H R. Neave, D. "Charities", A History of the County of York East Riding: Volume 6, the Borough and Liberties of Beverley, (London, 1989). 261-270. British History Online. Web. 21 May 2024, https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/yorks/east/vol6/pp261-270.

In this section

CHARITIES

The charities described below are those established for the benefit of the poor, including several for almshouses and hospitals and some for education. The 'parish charities' are those for St. Mary's and for St. John's or St. Martin's. The 'general charities' are those for a wider area: some were restricted to the borough, excluding the outlying parts of St. John's parish. 'Nonconformist charities' were mainly for the poor or for ministers. Almshouses are grouped together, but benefactions for their inmates will be found among the parish and general charities. Although all educational charities are included the schools themselves are described elsewhere, (fn. 1) as is that part of Sir Michael Warton's charity which became known as the minster New Fund. (fn. 2)

Many of the charities were administered by private trustees. Others were vested in the corporation, and from 1836-7 they were managed by charitable trustees appointed under the Municipal Corporations Act of 1835. They were later known collectively as the Municipal Charities, although each was administered separately; they were Ashmole's, Bradley's, Dalton's, Davies's, Dymoke's, Foster's, Green's, Ann Hall's, Leake's, Metcalfe's, Myers's, Pinckney's, Routh's, Michael Warton's, Sir Michael Warton's, and Wilson's, together with the Charity school and the corporation almshouses. (fn. 3) A Charity Commission inquiry in 1877 revealed the need for improved administration of several charities, both private and municipal, (fn. 4) and a Scheme to that end was made in 1882. (fn. 5)

By a Scheme of 1911, confirmed by Act the following year, some 44 charities were amalgamated as the Beverley Consolidated Charities. They were the Municipal Charities, together with Atmar's, Bell's, Brogden's, Buck's, Clarkson's, Darcey's, Doyle's, Ellinor's, Fox's, Greaves's, Hunter's, Jackson's, Keningham's, Marshall's, Myres's, Nelson's, Nelthorpe's, Parker's, Read's, Robertson's, Smith's, Tesseyman's, Tymperon's (Beverley almshouse part only), Charles Warton's, Sir Ralph Warton's, Westowby's, and Wride's. The Consolidated Charities were to have two branches: an almshouse and pension branch, to maintain the almshouses and pay stipends to the inmates, and a poor's branch. Not less than £11 a year of the income of the poor's branch was to be used in St. John's parish outside the borough (i.e. in the outlying townships). Expenditure was authorized on a wide range of subscriptions or donations, the purchase of goods, and the provision of temporary relief in money. (fn. 6) In 1914 the income of the Consolidated Charities was £1,649 and in 1944 it was £1,923. (fn. 7) In 1986 it was £114,000 and there were 80 residents in the almshouses, which comprised the former corporation bede houses and maison dieu and the foundations of Keningham, Parker, Routh, Walker, Westowby, and Charles Warton, (fn. 8) together with the Smedley almshouses provided by the Consolidated Charities.

When the grammar school was refounded by a Scheme of 1890 it was assigned the endowments of the former Charity school (including the benefactions of Legard, Nelson, Roberts, Routh, Sir Michael Warton, and Wilson), that of the Foundation school (namely Archer's benefaction), and those of the old grammar school (the benefactions of Coates, Ferrer, Green, Lacie, and Metcalfe). (fn. 9) The income from those gifts could not be discovered in 1987.

Parish Charities

ST. MARY'S.

Margaret Atmar or Smales, by will proved in 1616, left £20 for the poor, 4s. of which was to be given to the occupants of the North bar maison dieu. (fn. 10)

James Bell, by will proved in 1812, left £20 for the poor, to be distributed in bread. (fn. 11) The income was under £1 in 1911. (fn. 12)

John Bradley, by will proved in 1775, left £100 to buy coal or bread for the poor. (fn. 13) The income was £5 in 1882 and £4 in 1911. (fn. 14)

Frances Brogden (d. 1722) left £40 to provide relief for poor widows, subject to the payment of £1 a year to the vicar for a sermon. (fn. 15) The income was £2 in 1911. (fn. 16)

William Coates, by will proved in 1682, left £100 to provide an exhibition of £6 for a poor scholar to be sent from the grammar school to Cambridge; failing that the money was to be distributed to the poor. (fn. 17) The income was £6 in 1882. (fn. 18) Margaret Darcy, by will proved in 1629, left £40 to keep poor scholars at university or bind poor apprentices. (fn. 19) The scholarship was later lost but the principal sum was still held in 1911. (fn. 20)

The Revd. George Davies, by will dated 1764, left £100 to provide meat for the poor. (fn. 21) The income was £5 in 1882 and £4 in 1911. (fn. 22)

Priscilla Doyle in 1685 gave £5 to be distributed in bread. (fn. 23)

John Jackson in 1712 gave £10 to be used for the poor of 'North bar ward'. (fn. 24)

John Marshall, by will proved in 1807, left £200 to provide bread for the poor. (fn. 25) The income was £5 in 1911. (fn. 26)

Henry Myres, by will proved in 1793, left £300 to provide coal for poor widows and housekeepers. (fn. 27) The income was £9 in 1911. (fn. 28)

Frances Pinckney, by will dated 1788, left £100 for the poor. (fn. 29) The income was £5 in 1882 and £4 in 1911. (fn. 30)

Mr. Read about 1623 gave £20 for poor tradesmen. (fn. 31)

Lambert Smith, by will proved in 1620, left £10 for the poor. (fn. 32)

William Tesseyman about 1806 gave £10 10s. for the poor, to be distributed in bread. (fn. 33) The income was under £1 in 1911. (fn. 34)

Michael Warton (d. 1688) gave £100 to the corporation, which by indenture of the same year created a rent charge of £6 a year from lands at Weel to be distributed to the poor. (fn. 35) The income was £6 in 1882 and 1911. (fn. 36)

William Wilson, by will proved in 1816, left £400 to provide bread for the poor. (fn. 37) The income was £10 in 1911. (fn. 38)

Ann Wride, by will proved in 1779, left £800 so that £20 might be distributed to eight poor men and eight poor women, £5 to the poor generally, and £4 to the occupants of the North bar maison dieu. The vicar was to have £1 1s. for seeing that the trusts were fulfilled. (fn. 39) The income was £25 from £1,002 stock in 1911. (fn. 40)

The benefactions of Atmar, Darcey, Doyle, Jackson, Read, and Smith were later used to build lofts in the church and the pew rents provided the charitable income. (fn. 41)

ST. JOHN'S AND ST. MARTIN'S.

Anna Elliott, by will proved in 1821, left £300 to provide clothes for six poor widows of St. John's parish. The legacy had not been paid by 1823 (fn. 42) and the will was evidently ineffective.

James Graves, curate of the minster 1779-1807, (fn. 43) by will proved in 1807, left £1,000 stock, together with the residue of his personal estate, for the teaching of poor boys and girls of St. Martin's parish. A small sum was to be used to buy bibles and £5 paid to someone to inspect the school. The residual estate amounted to £1,400. The charity income was at first applied to existing dame schools, but Graves's boys' and girls' schools were established in 1810. In 1814 £750 stock, along with a gift from Henry Legard, was used to buy a schoolroom in Register Square, with adjoining ground and cottages. In 1823 the charity had £1,716 stock and the dividend was £83; the cottages produced £17 rent. The cottages were sold in 1834 and the schoolroom in 1849. The trustees also supported the minster infants' school, and after the closure of Graves's schools payments were made to several National schools, £55 in 1862 and £75 in 1903, for example; contributions were also made to the building fund of the girls' school. The principal amounted to £2,530 in 1906. (fn. 44) The income in 1984-5 was c. £700; grants were given to students and payments made to the minster Church of England and Sunday schools and to the grammar school. (fn. 45)

John Greaves, by will proved in 1709, left £50 for the poor of both parishes, to be distributed in bread. (fn. 46) The income was £3 in 1911. (fn. 47)

The Revd. Thomas Leake, by deed poll of 1784, gave £200 stock, the income to be distributed to poor widows and widowers of St. Martin's parish. (fn. 48) The income was £5 in 1911. (fn. 49)

James Nelthorpe, by will proved in 1701, left £1 a year from an estate at Walkington. It was used with the poor rates of St. John's parish. (fn. 50) The income was still £1 in 1911. (fn. 51)

William Popple, by will proved in 1656, left a rent charge of £2 3s. 4d. to the poor of both parishes from an estate at Sutton on Hull. The charity was also called Howards's or Liddell's from later owners of the estate. In 1823 it was used with Greaves's charity. (fn. 52)

Anne Routh, by will proved in 1722, devised a house in Toll Gavel, out of which £2 a year was to be paid to the incumbent of the minster, £1 10s. to the Charity school, and the residue to the poor. By a Scheme of 1875 payments to the poor were ended and the residue was divided between the schools in St. John's parish, at Aike, (fn. 53) Tickton, and Woodmansey. The income in 1882 and 1911 was £20 a year. (fn. 54) After the closure of the Charity school in 1890 its share went to the grammar school. From 1922 the payments to Tickton and Woodmansey schools took the form of scholarships to the grammar school and the high school. (fn. 55) In 1923 the payments to the incumbent and the grammar school were redeemed for £80 and £60 stock respectively, and the house was sold. (fn. 56) The income was £27 from £1,073 stock in 1983-4 and the schools receiving grants included Molescroft. (fn. 57)

William Wilson, by will proved in 1816, left £400 for the poor of both parishes, to be distributed in bread. (fn. 58) The income was £10 in 1911. (fn. 59)

General Charities

Margaret Appleyard, by will proved in 1768, gave £100 to Fox's hospital. (fn. 60)

Susanna Archer, by indenture of 1740, conveyed an estate to trustees to distribute the profits to the poor. In 1823 the estate comprised three houses and 72 a. at Halton Holegate (Lincs.) and the rents amounted to £90; the charity also had £144 stock of unknown derivation, a balance of £168, and accumulated dividends. Only the rents were then distributed, twice a year, in doles of 2s. 6d. (fn. 61) In 1847 11 a. were bought at Weel. (fn. 62) The charity fell into abeyance and by a Chancery Scheme of 1854 the endowments were used to establish the Foundation school. (fn. 63) The land was sold in 1920. (fn. 64)

Matthew Ashmole, by will proved in 1727, gave a close in Beverley so that £3 a year might be distributed to 24 poor burgesses. (fn. 65) The income was still £3 in 1882 and 1911; at the latter date, after the sale of the land, it came from £120 stock. (fn. 66)

Mary Bettison (d. 1928) by will provided for the foundation in Keighley (Yorks. W.R.) of a home for ladies. The residuary estate was, however, inadequate and by a court Scheme of 1938 a charity was established to benefit, in equal shares, the Boyd home for gentlewomen, Beverley, and two other homes; the endowment then comprised £5,329 stock and £480 cash. (fn. 67)

John Bowman, by will proved in 1799, left £100 for the Charity school. The income with that from the benefactions to the school by John Green, Henry Legard, Ann Nelson, Anne Routh, Sir Michael Wharton, William Wilson, and others unknown was £126 in 1823. Bowman also left £100 to Fox's hospital and an additional sum was said to have been given by his relatives. (fn. 68) In 1764 it was recorded that John and Anne Bowman had given £40 to Fox's hospital. (fn. 69)

Peregrine Buck, by will dated 1693, left £50 for the poor, the minister, and the schoolmaster. A rent charge of £2 10s. was raised in 1695 on Further Figham Bank. (fn. 70) About 1900 less than £1 was distributed to the poor each year, and similar sums were paid to the vicar of St. Mary's church and the grammar school. (fn. 71) The income was £4 in 1911. (fn. 72)

Thomas Bury, by will proved in 1628, devised a house in Hull for a scholarship for a poor boy of Hull or Beverley at school and at Cambridge. By 1823 it had long been administered with Thomas Ferries's charity. (fn. 73) From 1960 exhibitions or bursaries were given to students at any British university. (fn. 74)

Robert Clarke, by will proved in 1675, left £200 for a scholarship for a native of Beverley at St. John's college, Cambridge. It was worth £9 a year and evidently benefited the grammar school. (fn. 75)

Thomas Clarkson, by will proved in 1862, left £1,000 to provide gifts of 5s. each to 100 men aged 55 and over. (fn. 76) The income was £31 in 1911. (fn. 77)

Benjamin Dalton, by will proved in 1713, devised 10 a. in Beverley so that £4 a year might be paid to the poor by his trustees and the residue of the income similarly by the corporation. The income in 1823 was £48. The trustees always belonged to the Independent chapel in Lairgate and the £4 was distributed to members of the congregation. The residue was distributed with no such limitation. (fn. 78) The income was £35 in 1882 and £33 in 1911. (fn. 79)

John Drinkall before 1823 gave £100 producing £5 a year interest for Fox's hospital. (fn. 80)

John Dymoke (d. 1687) by will left £150 for charitable purposes and in 1823 £8 a year was distributed to the poor. (fn. 81) The income was £8 in 1882 and £6 in 1911. (fn. 82)

Christopher Eden, by will proved in 1823, left the residue of his personal estate for the education of poor boys in the National school. The proceeds, amounting to £656, were used in 1825 to buy 5 a. (fn. 83) in Beverley which later produced an income of £17 a year; from the 1840s it was shared equally between St. Mary's and the minster boys' schools. The trusts were administered by Beverley corporation and passed to the East Riding county council under the Education Act of 1944, whereupon the charity became inactive. Accrued rents totalled c. £800 by the 1950s. The land was sold in 1971 (fn. 84) for £23,200, and investments and cash amounted to nearly £39,000 in 1978, with an estimated income of £3,750. A Scheme of 1980 gave wide educational objects for the benefit of males under 25 years old; by an Order of 1982 disbursements were also to be made to females. The income in 19845 was over £8,800, of which c. £5,600 was distributed to 30 applicants. (fn. 85)

Thomas Ellinor the younger, by will dated 1728 and proved by 1731, devised two houses, out of which after his parents' deaths £1 1s. a year was to be given for a sermon in St. Mary's church and the remaining profits distributed to the poor. From the residue of his personal estate ground was to be bought to build an almshouse, and his personal estate in Jamaica was to be appropriated to the uses of the will, but no effects reached the trustees and those clauses did not take effect. In 1823 the houses were let for £27 a year. After payment for the sermon an average of £15 a year was distributed to the poor in 1816-22. (fn. 86) The income was £55 in 1911. (fn. 87) The houses, by then divided into three, were sold in 1925. (fn. 88)

Margaret Ferrer, by will proved in 1671, left £150 to buy land so that 5s. a year might be paid to each of 12 poor women, £1 to the vicar of St. Mary's for a sermon, £2 to send a boy to the grammar school, and the residue to send the boy to university. The money was used in 1672 to buy c. 16 a. with appurtenant low grounds and three cattle gates in Weel, forming part of an estate then purchased by the corporation; an allotment was made for the gates at inclosure in 1786 but the share of the charity was not distinguished from the rest. The corporation treated the conveyance as the grant of a rent charge and up to 1823 never paid more than £9 a year to the charity. (fn. 89) By 1882 the charity land had been separated and amounted in all to 39 a., producing £42 rent a year. By a Scheme of 1890 the land was used to endow the grammar school, subject to the continued payment of £3 to the poor and £1 to the vicar. The income of the eleemosynary part of the charity in 1911 was that payment from the school governors. (fn. 90) The land was sold in 1920-1. (fn. 91)

Christopher Fletcher, by will proved in 1591, left a rent charge of £4 to the three corporation almshouses. (fn. 92)

John Foster, by will proved in 1816, left £100 to provide payments to the occupants of the bede houses in Lairgate and £100 for Fox's hospital. (fn. 93) The income was £2 from £90 stock in 1911. (fn. 94)

Anne Gee, perhaps she who died in 1694, was said to have given £368 for the Charity school and interest on it was paid until 1782; it was later lost. (fn. 95)

William Grayburn, by will proved in 1731, instructed that after his wife Anne's death 5s. a year out of his house in Beverley should be paid to each of 20 poor housekeepers. She died in 1736. (fn. 96) The money was paid until 1822 but then withheld by the owners of the house (fn. 97) and the charity was evidently lost.

John Green, bishop of Lincoln, by will proved in 1779, left £1,000 stock to provide an exhibition of £10 at Cambridge for a boy from the grammar school, to maintain two boys at the Charity school, and to provide £1 a year for a sermon. (fn. 98)

Ann Hall, by will proved in 1820, left £200, half of the income to be paid to the occupants of the bede houses in Lairgate and half to poor widows. (fn. 99) The income was £5 in 1911. (fn. 100)

William Hall, by will proved in 1816, left £100 for Fox's hospital. (fn. 101)

Lady Elizabeth Hastings (d. 1739) left £28 a year for a boy to be sent from the grammar school to Oxford. Advantage was not taken of the bequest and by the terms of the will it was transferred to another Yorkshire school. (fn. 102)

Sarah Hobson (d. 1924) by will left £1,000 to the 'Minster Moorgate hospital'; it was assigned to Charles Warton's hospital and invested in £1,192 stock in 1925. (fn. 103)

Mary Hunter, by will proved in 1871, left £100 stock to the vicars of the minster and St. Mary's church to distribute to the poor in coal. (fn. 104) Twelve people benefited in 1911, when the income was £3 from £100 stock. (fn. 105)

The Revd. William Lacie, D.D., by will dated 1670, left £350 in reversion to provide exhibitions of £8 each for two boys from the grammar school at Cambridge. In 1688 the annuity was charged upon St. Giles's crofts. (fn. 106) The income was £16 in 1882. (fn. 107)

Henry Legard, by will proved in 1819, left £10 a year for the Charity school. The benefaction was void in law but in 1823 Henry's sister Jane was making the payment. (fn. 108) In 1877 the charity had £975 stock and the income of £30 was divided equally between the Charity school, the dispensary, and debtors in York castle. (fn. 109)

Lying-in charity.

The charity was founded in 1812 to provide linen and food for poor, reputable, married women and was supported by donations and subscriptions. (fn. 110) By the early 20th century only a small amount of work was done by the charity. (fn. 111) By a Scheme of 1946 it was administered by the trustees of James Taylor's charity, the income to be applied primarily to further the objects of the Lying-in charity, otherwise for those of Taylor's charity; it then had £957 stock and £117 cash. In 1948 the income was £36, of which £4 was used to cover payments made from the James Taylor charity and the rest was allowed to accumulate. (fn. 112) By a Scheme of 1952 it was administered with Taylor's charity without separation of objects; it then had £978 stock. It was inactive for some years until, by a Scheme of 1981, it was combined with Sample's and Taylor's charities. The income was then divided into shares, of which the Lying-in charity had 443; jointly with Taylor's charity it had £5,930 cash. (fn. 113)

The Revd. Robert Metcalfe, D.D., by will proved in 1653, devised 109 a. at Guilden Morden (Cambs.) which yielded £47 rent in 1651, so that £10 a year might be paid to the town's lecturer, £10 to the master of the grammar school, and £20 to his sister Prudence for life, then to send three scholars from the grammar school to Cambridge. By his will he also left £450 for the corporation to buy land yielding £22 10s. rent so that £20 might be distributed to the poor, but by a codicil he recited that land at Over (Cambs.) had already been bought. At inclosure in 1805 the corporation was allotted 90 a. for its land at Guilden Morden; the estate at Over comprised 47 a. in 1823, reduced to 27 a. at inclosure in 1840. After the payment of the benefactions the residue of the income was used for the common purposes of the corporation. (fn. 114) Attempts were later made to have the whole income used for charitable purposes, but after lengthy court proceedings a Chancery order was made in 1857 in the corporation's favour. (fn. 115) The land at Over was sold in 1861 and the charitable charge transferred to the Guilden Morden estate. (fn. 116) The income was £60 in 1882. By a Scheme of 1890 the educational part of the charity was used to endow the grammar school, subject to the continued payment of £10 to the lecturer. The endowment of the eleemosynary part of the charity was evidently later separated, and in 1911 the income was £17 from £667 stock. (fn. 117) The Guilden Morden estate was sold in 1922. (fn. 118) Elizabeth Monson, by will proved in 1765, left £40 to provide payments to the occupants of the bede houses in Lairgate. (fn. 119)

Rachel Myers, by will proved in 1867, left £500 to provide payments to the occupants of the bede houses in Lairgate. (fn. 120) The income was £12 in 1911. (fn. 121)

Ann Nelson, by will proved in 1780, left £60 to provide payments to the occupants of the bede houses in Lairgate; it was added to Monson's charity. She also left £50 to the Charity school. (fn. 122) The income for the bede houses was £4 from £156 stock in 1911. (fn. 123)

James Nelthorpe, by will proved in 1701, left £200 to provide £10 a year for the poor. By c. 1775 a charge of £10 was made on an estate in Beverley, and when that was sold in lots in 1805 the rent charge was divided. The charity was in abeyance from 1805. (fn. 124) It was evidently revived in 1827, (fn. 125) but in 1877 it was found that no payments had been made since 1855. (fn. 126) The income was £10 in 1911. (fn. 127)

Ellen Pearson, by will proved in 1931, devised two houses in Beverley out of which doles of £1 a year were to be given to poor persons aged 70 or over. (fn. 128) The houses were later sold. In 1986 gifts were made to the almspeople of Beverley Consolidated Charities. (fn. 129)

Thomas Roberts, by will proved in 1725, left £100 for the Charity school. (fn. 130)

Ebenezer Robertson, by will proved in 1826, left £250 to provide food for the poor. (fn. 131) From 1902 to 1911 gifts were made to c. 50 people each year, and the income in 1911 was £7 from £298 stock. (fn. 132)

Anne Routh, by will proved in 1722, made a bequest to the Charity school. (fn. 133)

Harriett Sample, by will proved in 1908, left £1,400 to assist poor women in confinement and provide nursemaids and helps for poor mothers. In 1910 the income was £49 and payments were made to helps for 45 women. (fn. 134) In 1967 the charity had £1,387 stock. By a Scheme of 1981 it was combined with Taylor's charity and the Lying-in charity under the name of Sample's and Taylor's charity. It was to provide relief in need for expectant and nursing mothers or, failing that, for pre-school children and their mothers. Sample's charity then had 488 of the shares into which the income was divided, besides £344 cash. (fn. 135) In 1984 the income of Sample's and Taylor's charity was £836, of which £566 was applied in grants to seven individuals and two organizations. (fn. 136)

Henry Simpson, by will proved in 1785, left £10 a year, charged on an estate at Brandesburton, to be distributed to poor housekeepers. (fn. 137)

William Spencer, by will proved in 1910, left £100 to provide oranges for pupils of Spencer council school. In 1985 the income was c. £3 and the oranges were distributed at Swinemoor county junior school, which had replaced Spencer council school. (fn. 138)

Decima Sykes, perhaps she who died in 1793, gave £100 for the use of Sunday schools in the town. From 1813 the income was given to the National school. (fn. 139) The charity was evidently lost soon after 1823. (fn. 140)

James Taylor's Charity.

By deed of 1906 Mary Taylor settled £2,000 in reversion to provide nursemaids or helps for poor married women who were about to be or had lately been confined; it was to be known as James Taylor's charity, after her late husband. She died in 1918 and the charity became operative in 1922, when the income was £99 from £1,875 stock and mortgage; payments were made that year to 73 helps. (fn. 141) By a Scheme of 1952 it was administered with the Lying-in charity; it then still had £1,875 stock. It was inactive for some years until, by a Scheme of 1981, it was combined with Sample's charity and the Lying-in charity; it then had 731 of the shares into which the income was divided and, jointly with the Lying-in charity, £5,930 cash. (fn. 142) Matthew Turner, by will proved in 1856, left part of his residuary estate to establish a fund from which payments of £10 10s. each might be made to female domestic servants, living within 8 miles of the guildhall, none of whom would receive a second disbursement within 10 years. The charity was regulated by a Chancery Scheme of 1860 and the proceeds of the bequest were £12,880 stock. (fn. 143) When the first distribution was made in 1862 there were 68 recipients, but the usual number later was c. 35. (fn. 144) The income was £353 in 1911 and £368 in 1954. (fn. 145) In 1960 and later the qualifications for applicants and the sums to be disbursed were varied, but it became increasingly difficult to find recipients. In 19845 the income was £1,530, of which £615 was disbursed, and in 1986 nine women received a total of £885. (fn. 146)

William Tymperon, by will proved in 1729, founded an almshouse charity which by the 19th century had a large surplus income. By a Scheme of 1852 the residual income was consequently ordered to be used for various day and Sunday schools in Beverley. (fn. 147)

Robert. Walker, by will proved in 1856, left £1,400 to the pasture masters to provide payments to poor freemen or their widows or children who had suffered by the death of livestock or otherwise needed help. It was to be known as Walker's Pasture Freemen's Gift. (fn. 148) In 1877 it was said that more than 30 people received from £1 to £7 each a year. (fn. 149) The income was £52 from £1,400 stock in 1909, when payments were made to 20 people; c. 10 people benefited each year in the 1920s. In 1931-2 the income was only £8 from £1,022 stock and no payments were made. (fn. 150) Payments were made to 23 people as late as 1949. (fn. 151) In 1985 the income was £9, but no payments had been made for some years. (fn. 152)

Charles Warton, by will proved in 1714, devised an estate to support an almshouse and to provide payments for the poor and for apprentices. (fn. 153)

Sir Michael Warton, by will proved in 1725, left £500 for the Charity school, together with other sums for the repair of the minster and for an almshouse. The various sums were used to buy an estate in Lincolnshire and under Acts of 1766 and 1806 2/21 of the income were used for the school. In 1823 the school's share was £37. (fn. 154)

The educational part of the endowment, then benefiting the grammar school, was in 1911 ordered to be administered separately as the minster New Fund Educational Foundation. (fn. 155)

Sir Ralph Warton, by will proved in 1700, left £200 to the corporation to begin a stocking manufactory. The corporation refused to accept it for that purpose but his nephew Charles Warton, by will proved in 1714, required the money to be paid over. The corporation was seeking the nomination of trustees in 1727. The money was evidently used to buy £300 stock, the income from which was in 1823 handed to the overseers of the poor in Beverley to apply with the rates. (fn. 156) From the 1830s the income was distributed in bread but it was later allowed to accumulate and the principal was £500 in 1876. (fn. 157) The income was £17 from £670 stock in 1911. (fn. 158) William Wilson, by will proved in 1816, left £400 to the Charity school. He bequeathed the residue of his personal estate for some unspecified charitable purpose. The residue amounted to £1,533. Up to 1822 £50 of the annual income from it was used to buy medicines for the poor, £10 8s. was given to the occupants of Fox's hospital, and £12 9s. was paid to the Lying-in charity. (fn. 159) In 1823 it was decided to give £27 6s. of the income to the dispensary established that year and £14 14s. to the occupants of Sir Michael Warton's hospital. (fn. 160) In 1908-11 payments were made to the Cottage Hospital and Routh's hospital and the annual income was £38 from £1,530 stock. (fn. 161)

Nonconformist Charities

Mark Bell, by will dated 1789 and proved by 1790, left £276 for the minister of the Independent chapel in Lairgate. In 1829 the income was £8 (fn. 162) and in 1914 it was £7. (fn. 163)

John Crawford, by conveyance of 1743, gave a house in Lairgate to serve as a manse for the minister of the Independent chapel there. (fn. 164) It was sold in 1939 and a house in Willow Grove was bought in 1946. (fn. 165)

Benjamin Dalton (d. 1713) devised an estate which benefited the Independent chapel in Lairgate. (fn. 166)

Richard Galloway before 1833 left £2 a year for the Independent chapel in Lairgate. (fn. 167)

Ann Jarratt, by will proved in 1757, devised 3 a. at Broomfleet, in South Cave, for the minister of the Independent chapel in Lairgate; it produced an income of £4. (fn. 168) It was sold in 1902. (fn. 169)

The income was £8 in 1914. (fn. 170)

Harriett Sample (d. 1908) left £1,000 to the Baptist chapel in Well Lane. (fn. 171)

Thomas Sample (d. 1904) made provision for the Baptist chapel in Well Lane, and pursuant to his will two houses were conveyed to the chapel in 1905; they were sold in 1925. (fn. 172)

Robert Stephenson, by conveyance of 1711, gave an estate in Drypool for the benefit of the minister of the Independent chapel in Lairgate. A new lease of the estate in 1800 was made at the old rent of £4 with a large fine which was used for rebuilding the chapel. In 1853, to increase the minister's income, the lease was cancelled by Chancery order; costs were, however, heavy and debts were not cleared until 70 years later. (fn. 173) The estate was sold in lots in 1894, 1902, 1954, 1956, and 1966. (fn. 174) The income was £173 in 1914. (fn. 175)

Amina Waudby, by will proved in 1908, left half the residue of her personal estate to the Baptist chapel in Well Lane; the proceeds amounted to £306 stock. (fn. 176)

Wesleyan Methodist School Foundation: after the sale of the school in 1905 the proceeds were used to establish a charity to help children, who had attended a Wesleyan Sunday school for more than two years, at elementary schools in Beverley. From 1922 the income of £20 a year was available for education other than elementary. (fn. 177) The income was about £90 a year c. 1980. (fn. 178)

Almshouses

Alexander Boyd, by will proved in 1911, devised Walkergate House as a home for gentlewomen. The home was established in 1924; it was to house six wives, widows, or daughters of officers in the armed forces, of members of the civil service or the legal or medical professions, or of country gentlemen. (fn. 179) In 1925 the income was £574, mainly from £27,062 stock. (fn. 180) Part of the grounds was sold in 1934. (fn. 181) The house was requisitioned in 1941 and payments were made to four surviving inmates who moved elsewhere. The income in 1944 was £988 from rents and interest on stock. (fn. 182) The rest of the grounds and the house were sold in 1953 (fn. 183) and the income was later used for the almshouses of Beverley Consolidated Charities. Four flats for gentlewomen, known as the Boyd Homes, were built behind Charles Warton's hospital. (fn. 184)

Corporation almshouses and bede houses.

After their suppression several medieval hospitals were maintained by the town council as almshouses. (fn. 185) Trinity hospital, Toll Gavel, was retained as a maison dieu until it was converted to a prison in 1573 (fn. 186) and St. Mary's hospital, next to North bar, until it was demolished soon after 1792. (fn. 187) St. John the Baptists's hospital, Butcher Row, which was granted to the corporation by the Crown in 1585, presumably became the maison dieu recorded there in 1591 and later. It was probably rebuilt in 1788-9 and comprised nine rooms. (fn. 188) It was sold in 1823 and was later demolished. (fn. 189) St. John the Evangelist's hospital, Lairgate, with the close behind it, was also granted to the corporation in 1585; the close, called Maison Dieu garth, was let by the corporation until 1798-9. (fn. 190) It was presumably the maison dieu in Lairgate recorded in 1591 and in the 17th century. (fn. 191) It was rebuilt, with 13 rooms, in 1823 (fn. 192) and replaced by a new building, with 14 rooms, in Morton Lane in 1934. (fn. 193) The old building was sold in 1937 and much of it later demolished. (fn. 194) Apparently unconnected with any medieval institution were the bede houses in Lairgate. They were presumably those mentioned in 1625-6 (fn. 195) and were described as an 'old hospital where several poor women inhabit' in the late 17th and early 18th century. (fn. 196) They comprised four cottages and were rebuilt in 1862. (fn. 197)

Thwaites Fox, by deeds of 1636, conveyed cottages in Minster Moorgate as a hospital for four poor widows, together with £10 a year from lands at Arnold, in Skirlaugh, and Coniston, in Swine, to maintain the hospital and make payments to the occupants. The corporation, as trustees, also gave money from other sources to bolster the income. In 1823 the occupants received 10s. a month, together with clothing and coal, from Fox's bequest, 8d. a week from Foster's and Hall's, and 1s. a week from Wilson's. (fn. 198) Other benefactions were made later. (fn. 199) The hospital was sold in 1872 (fn. 200) and later demolished. By a Scheme of 1873 weekly payments were made to certain named poor widows until the last one died in 1922. (fn. 201) The income was £10 from the rent charge and £25 from £1,015 stock in 1911. (fn. 202)

Ellen Keningham, by conveyance of 1862, gave two houses and three cottages behind them, all newly built, in Toll Gavel and declared her intention to invest £200 for the same charitable purposes. (fn. 203) The cottages were afterwards used as almshouses. The income in 1911 was £90 from the houses, and there was £572 stock. (fn. 204) The houses were sold in 1925. (fn. 205) The three almshouses were later converted to two. (fn. 206)

William Parker, by conveyance of 1868, gave 35 a. in Holmpton and 15 a. in Welwick to endow the almshouses, of four rooms, that he was building in Love Lane (later Woodlands). (fn. 207) The income was £38 in 1911, when one of the inmates was to be from the East Riding outside the borough. (fn. 208) The land was sold in 1918. (fn. 209)

Anne Routh, by will proved in 1722, devised her estates in Yorkshire, with remainder to the corporation, to buy a site and build a hospital for at least six poor widows who were to receive 2s. each a week. It was decreed in Chancery in 1740 that her intentions should be fulfilled and a Scheme for the erection of a hospital for 12 widows was made in 1743. The hospital, in Keldgate, was built in 1749 and enlarged in 1788 to accommodate another eight widows. The estates comprised 15 a. at Allerthorpe, 26 a. at Arnold, in Skirlaugh, 12 a. at Barmby Moor, a house and 41 a. at Baswick, in Leven, a house and 38 a. at Bielby, in Hayton, a house and 152 a. at Bridlington, 13 a. at Murton, in Osbaldwick (Yorks. N.R.), 39 a. at Pocklington, and 31 a. at Sewerby, in Bridlington. In 1809 the rents amounted to c. £638, and there were accumulations of £1,095 stock and £715 annuities and cash. It was consequently ordered in Chancery that 12 more rooms should be built and that each widow should receive 5s. a week, with gowns and coal; three of them were to have extra payments to act as matron and nurses. A surgeon or apothecary was to receive £16 a year to attend the hospital and a rent receiver £15. The new building was erected in 1810. (fn. 210) The land at Pocklington was exchanged for 41 a. in Beverley Parks in 1833. (fn. 211) In 1882 endowments comprised the estates and £311 stock. The income was £544 from the estates and £2,039 stock in 1911, when one in six of the inmates was to be from St. John's parish outside the borough (i.e. from the outlying townships). (fn. 212) The estates were later sold, mostly in 1918-19. (fn. 213)

The original hospital, designed by James Moyser, has a front of three bays and three giant arches, surmounted by a pediment containing a cartouche; the six-bay building of 1810 also has giant arches. (fn. 214)

The James Arthur Smedley almshouses, comprising two houses, were built in Ladygate in 1985 by the Consolidated Charities, of which J. A. Smedley was a former chairman. (fn. 215)

William Tymperon, by will proved in 1729, devised the manor of Aldbrough and 2 houses and 192 a. there for the purchase of a house for six poor men or women, of whom three should be from St. Mary's parish, one from St. John's parish within the borough (presumably meaning St. Martin's parish), and two from Aldbrough; the inmates were to have 2s. 6d. each a week. The hospital was established in Walkergate between 1743 and 1764; (fn. 216) it was evidently purpose built, having a front of three bays with three giant arches. (fn. 217) In 1823, when the income was £271, stipends of 6s. each were paid and coal was provided; a seventh room in the hospital was then occupied by a poor woman rent free. (fn. 218) The charity then had an accumulated surplus of over £600. By a Scheme of 1824 an additional regular inmate was placed in the hospital and a threeroomed almshouse was built at Aldbrough; the rest of the surplus was invested in stock. (fn. 219) By a Scheme of 1852 the residue of the charity income was diverted to educational purposes. (fn. 220) A house and plot of land at Aldbrough were sold in 1899 and 1901. (fn. 221) In 1896 the income was £450 but in 1904, after the sale of stock to improve the Aldbrough estate, only £260, of which the residue for educational purposes was £50. (fn. 222) The income apportioned to the Beverley almshouse was £148 in 1911, when it was laid down that one inmate, or two if none was available from St. John's parish within the borough, was to come from Aldbrough. (fn. 223) The rest of the estate was later sold, mainly in 1952, (fn. 224) and the hospital itself was sold in 1953. (fn. 225) The annual income in the 1980s was c. £2,500; the almshouse at Aldbrough was maintained and gifts were made to Minster and St. Mary's Church of England schools and Sunday schools at Beverley and Aldbrough. (fn. 226)

Caroline Walker, by will proved in 1957, devised 48½ a. in Beverley Parks to the Consolidated Charities. Some of the land was later sold and the proceeds used to improve the existing almshouses administered by the charity and to build 12 almshouses for married couples in New Walkergate, which were opened in 1984. (fn. 227)

Charles Warton, by will proved in 1714, recited that his father Michael (d. 1688) had devised to him a house and four cottages in Minster Moorgate and bequeathed to him £1,000 to build a hospital for six poor widows on the site; the hospital was built in 1689. (fn. 228) Charles devised the hospital to trustees, together with the 201-a. Killingwoldgraves farm, in Bishop Burton. From the income of £40 a year the inmates were to receive allowances, clothes, and coal; after the maintenance of the hospital, a sixth of the residue was to be distributed to the poor of Beverley, £1 1s. paid for a sermon in St. Mary's church, and the rest used to bind poor apprentices. The number of inmates was increased to 8 before 1790, 10 in 1808, and 14 in 1815, and the hospital was evidently enlarged by the building of a rear wing. The income in 1823 was £404. (fn. 229) The occupants were further increased in number to 18 in 1829 and 19 in 1872. In 1911 the income was £319 rent from the land and £29 interest on £1,178 stock. The residue available for the poor, the vicar, and apprentices was highly variable, sometimes exceeding £100 in the mid 19th century but often only a few pounds in the 1880s. (fn. 230) Killingwoldgraves farm was sold in 1918. (fn. 231)

Sir Michael Warton, by will proved in 1725, left £1,000 to augment the hospital founded according to the will of his father Michael (d. 1688), together with other sums for the repair of the minster and for the Charity school. It was ordered in Chancery in 1726 that up to £250 should be used to enlarge Charles Warton's hospital and the rest used to buy lands to support it. A new hospital was in fact being built, next to Charles Warton's, in 1727, (fn. 232) and the residue of the money was used, with the other sums left by the will, to buy an estate in Lincolnshire. Under Acts of 1766 and 1806 3/21 of the income were used for the hospital. (fn. 233) In the late 18th century, when the income was £33, the six widows occupying the hospital each received 1s. 6d. a week, together with clothing and coal. The income in 1821 was £73. (fn. 234) It was £61 in 1911. (fn. 235) The hospital was sold in 1952 (fn. 236) and later demolished. Elizabeth Westowby, by conveyance of 1863, gave 6 a. in Beverley and a newly built house in Keldgate as an almshouse for three poor persons. (fn. 237) The income was £29 in 1911. (fn. 238) Two acres were sold in 1921. (fn. 239)

Footnotes

  • 1. Above, Education.
  • 2. Above, Churches.
  • 3. H.R.O., BC/II/7/11, pp. 106, 144-5, 177, 200, 227, 263-4; H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 4. Beverley Guardian, 28 July 1877.
  • 5. Copy in H.U.L., DDCV/15/604.
  • 6. Copy of Scheme in H.U.L., DDCV/15/607; Beverley Charities Schemes Confirmation Act, 2-3 Geo. V, c. 171 (Local & Personal).
  • 7. H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 8. Inf. from Mr. J. Chorlton, clerk to Beverley Consol. Char., 34 Lairgate, Beverley, 1986.
  • 9. Copy in H.U.L., DDMM/2/59; Beverley Guardian, 22 Feb. 1890.
  • 10. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 706; Wills in York Regy. 161219 (Y.A.S. Rec. Ser. xxviii), 107. Her name was variously spelt but the burial reg. has Atmar: H.R.O., PE/1/1.
  • 11. B.I.H.R., Wills, June 1812, Harthill; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 710.
  • 12. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 13. B.I.H.R., Wills, Mar. 1775, Prog.; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 687.
  • 14. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607.
  • 15. H.R.O., PE/1/6; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 708.
  • 16. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 17. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 678-9; Wills in York Regy. 16818 (Y.A.S. Rec. Ser. lxxxix), 15.
  • 18. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604.
  • 19. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 706; Wills in York Regy. 162736 (Y.A.S. Rec. Ser. xxxv), 23.
  • 20. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 21. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 687.
  • 22. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607.
  • 23. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 706.
  • 24. Ibid.
  • 25. Ibid. 710; H.R.O., BC/IV/5/2, p. 209.
  • 26. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 27. B.I.H.R., Wills, Sept. 1793, Prog.; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 709.
  • 28. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 29. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 687.
  • 30. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607.
  • 31. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 706.
  • 32. Ibid.; Wills in York Regy. 1620-7 (Y.A.S. Rec. Ser. xxxii), 87.
  • 33. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 709.
  • 34. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 35. H.R.O., DDBC/15/28; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 711.
  • 36. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607.
  • 37. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/2, p. 246; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 710.
  • 38. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 39. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/2, p. 157; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 709-10.
  • 40. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 41. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 706.
  • 42. Ibid. 704-5; B.I.H.R., Wills, June 1821, Harthill.
  • 43. Min. Bks. 59, 95.
  • 44. H.R.O., MIS. 207/101/30; P.R.O., ED 49/8521; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 705-6.
  • 45. Humbs. C.C. Review of Char. Rep. 27; inf. from Mr. D. G. Carrick, clerk to the char., 34 Lairgate, Beverley, 1986.
  • 46. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/2, p. 71; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 703.
  • 47. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 48. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 687-8.
  • 49. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 50. P.R.O., PROB 11/459, f. 7; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 704.
  • 51. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 52. 9th Rep. Com. Char. 808; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 704; Yorks. Wills at Somerset Ho. 1649-60 (Y.A.S. Rec. Ser. i), 148.
  • 53. Aike school was closed in 1904: E.R. Educ. Cttee. Mins. 1904-5, 50, 135.
  • 54. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604; H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 55. P.R.O., ED 49/8518; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 691, 704.
  • 56. R.D.B., 264/149/123; 264/150/124; 264/449/379.
  • 57. Inf. from Chief Admin. Officer, Beverley Boro. Counc., 1985.
  • 58. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/2, p. 246; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 704.
  • 59. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 60. B.I.H.R., Wills, May 1768, Prog.; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 681.
  • 61. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 701-3.
  • 62. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/6; R.D.B., GK/348/352.
  • 63. Schs. Inquiry Com. [3966], pp. 442, 446, H.C. (18678), xxviii.
  • 64. Grammar Sch. min. bk. 1917-43, p. 123 (in possession of the Governors, 1986).
  • 65. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/2, p. 106; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 687.
  • 66. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607.
  • 67. Inf. from Mr. Chorlton, 1986.
  • 68. H.U.L., DDCV/15/235; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 681, 690-1; Poulson, Beverlac, 703.
  • 69. B.I.H.R., Bp. V. 1764/Ret. 1, no. 57.
  • 70. H.R.O., DDBC/15/34; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 686.
  • 71. H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 72. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 73. 9th Rep. Com. Char. 791-2; Wills in York Regy. 162736, 14.
  • 74. Review of Char. Rep. 118; cf. V.C.H. Yorks. E.R. i. 339.
  • 75. B.L. Lansd. MS. 896, f. 6; Alum. Cantab. to 1751, i; T. Baker, Hist. St. John's Coll. Camb. 982; Poulson, Beverlac, 461.
  • 76. Probate Sub Regy., York, Calendar; Beverley Guardian, 10 Dec. 1864.
  • 77. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 78. B.I.H.R., Wills, Mar. 1713, Harthill; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 686.
  • 79. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607.
  • 80. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 681.
  • 81. Ibid. 686; H.R.O., PE/129/5; Boro. Rec. 181.
  • 82. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607.
  • 83. R.D.B., DA/425/80.
  • 84. Ibid. 1709/508/412.
  • 85. P.R.O., ED 49/8517; Review of Char. Rep. 28; inf. from Director of Admin., Humbs. C. C., 1985.
  • 86. R.D.B., L/427/782; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 706-8.
  • 87. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 88. R.D.B., 4/365/341 (1898); 303/445/363; 303/447/365; 303/487/394.
  • 89. Ibid. BG/95/5; H.R.O., BC/IV/5/3; ibid. DDBC/15/ 362; Boro. Rec. 155; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 681-3. Her name was variously spelt but the probate reg. has Ferrer: P.R.O., PROB 11/337, f. 143.
  • 90. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607; DDMM/2/59; H.R.O., DDBC/21/23 (rep. of 1825); ibid. BC/II/7/13, pp. 200-1, 205-7; Poulson, Beverlac, 800-1.
  • 91. Below, Outlying Townships (Weel, Manor).
  • 92. B.I.H.R., Prob. Reg. 24B, f. 647v.
  • 93. Ibid. Wills, Dec. 1816, Harthill; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 681, 689.
  • 94. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 95. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 691; J. Foster, Pedigrees of Yorks. iii (s.v. Gee).
  • 96. B.I.H.R., Wills, June 1731, Harthill; H.R.O., PE/1/6 (s.v. Anne Grayburn).
  • 97. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 701.
  • 98. P.R.O., PROB 11/1053, f. 202; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 679-80, 690.
  • 99. P.R.O., PROB 11/1629, f. 286; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 688.
  • 100. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 101. B.I.H.R., Wills, Oct. 1816, Harthill; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 681.
  • 102. D.N.B.; Poulson, Beverlac, 461-7; V.C.H. Yorks. i. 459.
  • 103. R.D.B., 299/409/344; inf. from Mr. Chorlton, 1986.
  • 104. Probate Sub Regy., York, Wills, Nov. 1871.
  • 105. H.R.O., accession 1681; H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 106. H.R.O., DDBC/15/29; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 679.
  • 107. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604.
  • 108. B.I.H.R., Wills, July 1819, Prog.; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 691; Poulson, Beverlac, 424 and facing.
  • 109. Beverley Guardian, 28 July 1877.
  • 110. Rules (in Beverley Pub. Libr.); Poulson, Beverlac, 815; Min. Bks. 118.
  • 111. Accts. 1812-1916 at H.U.L., DDCV/15/540-50.
  • 112. H.R.O., accession 1681; Char. Com. files, Liverpool, 1986.
  • 113. H.R.O., MIS. 207/101/30.
  • 114. Ibid. DDBC/9/22; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 677-8; V.C.H. Cambs. viii. 105; ix. 346.
  • 115. H.R.O., DDBC/9/32; Beverley Guardian, 25 July 1857.
  • 116. H.R.O., BC/II/7/15, pp. 56, 88, 94.
  • 117. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607; DDMM/2/59.
  • 118. V.C.H. Cambs. viii. 102.
  • 119. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/2, p. 135; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 703.
  • 120. H.U.L., DDCV/15/249; R.D.B., KE/265/373; H.R.O., PE/1/29.
  • 121. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 122. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/2, p. 174; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 691, 703.
  • 123. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 124. P.R.O., PROB 11/459, f. 7; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 68990.
  • 125. R.D.B., EB/168/177.
  • 126. Beverley Guardian, 28 July 1877.
  • 127. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 128. H.R.O., MIS. 207/101/30; Review of Char. Rep. 26.
  • 129. R.D.B., 1337/125/110; inf. from Mr. Chorlton, 1986.
  • 130. H.U.L., DDCV/15/287; Min. Bks. 14.
  • 131. B.I.H.R., Wills, Mar. 1826, Prog.
  • 132. H.R.O., accession 1681; H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 133. Above (Par. Char., St. John's).
  • 134. H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 135. Ibid. MIS. 207/101/30; Review of Char. Rep. 26.
  • 136. Inf. from Mr. R. J. Jackson, clerk to the char., 6 North Bar Within, Beverley, 1986.
  • 137. H.R.O., PE/1/6; R.D.B., BI/162/261; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 708.
  • 138. H.R.O., MIS. 207/101/30; Review of Char. Rep. 28; Beverley Guardian, 15 Apr. 1911; inf. from Chief Admin. Officer, Beverley Boro. Counc., 1985.
  • 139. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 709; Foster, Pedigrees of Yorks. iii (s.v. Sykes).
  • 140. Beverley Guardian, 28 July 1877.
  • 141. R.D.B., 195/23/21; H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 142. H.U.L., DDCV/15/606; H.R.O., MIS. 207/101/30; Review of Char. Rep. 26.
  • 143. Mins. and accts. (including will, probate, and Scheme) in the possession of Mr. R. J. Jackson, clerk to the char., 6 North Bar Within, Beverley, 1986.
  • 144. Beverley Guardian, 1 Feb. 1862. Details appeared annually in local newspapers.
  • 145. H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 146. Review of Char. Rep. 27; Hull Daily Mail, 17 Jan. 1986; inf. from Mr. Jackson, 1986.
  • 147. Below (Almsho.).
  • 148. Copy of codicil (in Beverley Pub. Libr.); H.R.O., PE/1/29; R.D.B., HL/392/392.
  • 149. Beverley Guardian, 28 July 1877.
  • 150. H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 151. Ibid. DDX/397/7.
  • 152. Inf. from Mr. M. C. D. Whitehead, clerk to the pasture masters, 1986.
  • 153. Below (Almsho.).
  • 154. H.R.O., PE/129/6; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 690.
  • 155. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 156. B.I.H.R., Wills, Dec. 1700, Harthill; ibid. Bp. C. & P. XVIII/4; R.D.B., D/246/407; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 694.
  • 157. Beverley Guardian, 18 Nov. 1876; 28 July 1877.
  • 158. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 159. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 688, 691.
  • 160. Min. Bks. 126; above, Public Services (Hosp. Services).
  • 161. H.R.O., accession 1681; H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 162. R.D.B., BO/515/797; Poulson, Beverlac, 793.
  • 163. H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 164. Ibid. EUR/1/temp. no. 148.
  • 165. R.D.B., 627/408/321; 727/371/314.
  • 166. Above (General Char.).
  • 167. H.U.L., DDSH/4/21.
  • 168. B.I.H.R., Wills, Jan. 1757, Harthill; J. F. Shepherd, Story of Lairgate Congregational Ch. Beverley, 1700-1950, 8.
  • 169. R.D.B., 44/465/451 (1902).
  • 170. H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 171. Ibid. EB/1/63, 65.
  • 172. Ibid. EB/1/63; R.D.B., 73/378/344 (1905); 74/384/366 (1905); 303/140/108.
  • 173. R.D.B., E/108/188; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 691-2; Shepherd, Story of Lairgate Cong. Ch. 6.
  • 174. R.D.B., 64/334/319 (1894); 45/252/241 (1902); 995/54/45; 1053/193/183; 1451/507/426.
  • 175. H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 176. Ibid. EB/1/43, 63; Probate Sub Regy., York, Calendar.
  • 177. P.R.O., ED 49/8520.
  • 178. Review of Char. Rep. 27.
  • 179. Probate Sub Regy., York, Calendar; H.U.L., DDCV/15/608; H.R.O., MIS. 207/101/30.
  • 180. H.R.O., accession 1681.
  • 181. R.D.B., 500/612/471.
  • 182. Inf. from Mr. Chorlton, 1986.
  • 183. R.D.B., 933/356/298; 934/376/335.
  • 184. Inf. from Mr. Chorlton, 1986.
  • 185. Above, Relig. Hos.
  • 186. H.R.O., BC/II/6/25, 33; BC/II/7/2, f. 31; BC/II/7/3, f. 25v.
  • 187. Ibid. BC/II/6/23, 25-6, 37, 42, 59-60; BC/II/7/3, ff. 25v., 47v.; BC/IV/1/3, s.v. 1793-4; Min. Bks. 71, 76. The site is occupied by no. 2 North Bar Without.
  • 188. B.I.H.R., Prob. Reg. 24B, f. 647v.; H.R.O., BC/II/6/46, 48, 60; BC/II/7/8, f. 244; BC/IV/1/2; Min. Bks. 116; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 688; Poulson, Beverlac, App. p. 36. It was sometimes called the Wednesday Market maison dieu.
  • 189. R.D.B., DP/140/121. It was in a yard later called Maison Dieu Court, Brigham's Yard, or Marble Arch Yard; a cinema was built on the site in 1916 and a supermarket occupied part of it in 1987: ibid. KA/316/429; 171/497/398; O.S. Map 1/1,056, Beverley 2 (1853 edn.).
  • 190. H.R.O., BC/II/7/4/1, f. 57; BC/IV/1/3; ibid. DDBC/16/30, 164; Poulson, Beverlac, App. p. 37.
  • 191. B.I.H.R., Prob. Reg. 24B, f. 647v.; H.R.O., BC/II/6/46, 62; cf. Hick, Plan of Beverley (1811); Min. Bks. 118.
  • 192. H.R.O., BC/IV/1/3, s.v. 1823-4; Poulson, Beverlac, 799; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 688; O.S. Map 1/1,056, Beverley 3 (1853 edn.); date stone on Morton La. building, 1985.
  • 193. Stone on building.
  • 194. R.D.B., 566/536/430. The remaining part is now no. 608 Lairgate.
  • 195. H.R.O., BC/II/6/55.
  • 196. Ibid. DDBC/16/27; DDBC/25/D, no. 30; R.D.B., F/331/712. For identification with the bede houses rather than the Lairgate maison dieu, see R.D.B., N/413/883; O/161/394; O/162/396; S/52/121; H.R.O., BC/IV/4/1.
  • 197. H.R.O., BC/II/7/15, pp. 168, 196; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 688; Min. Bks. 122. They are now nos. 60-6 Lairgate.
  • 198. 10th Rep. Com. Char. 680-1; Min. Bks. 86, 98, 101.
  • 199. Above (General Char., s.vv. Appleyard; Bowman; Drinkall).
  • 200. R.D.B., KZ/304/425; see below, plate facing p. 269.
  • 201. H.R.O., accession 1681; Char. Com. files, Liverpool, 1986.
  • 202. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 203. H.R.O., DDBC/15/128; ibid. PE/1/852; R.D.B., II/118/139.
  • 204. H.U.L, DDCV/15/607.
  • 205. R.D.B., 303/449/367; 303/450/368.
  • 206. Inf. from Mr. Chorlton, 1986.
  • 207. H.R.O., DDBC/15/249; R.D.B., KI/162/217.
  • 208. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 209. R.D.B., 189/364/318.
  • 210. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/4; H.U.L., DDMM/29/33; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 683-5; Min. Bks. passim.
  • 211. R.D.B., EU/104/102.
  • 212. H.U.L., DDCV/15/604, 607.
  • 213. R.D.B., 189/142/131; 189/275/243; 189/363/317; 189/468/411; 189/522/463; 190/576/497; 195/337/298; 315/150/109; 1440/457/391; 1548/200/173.
  • 214. Pevsner, Yorks. E.R. 188; Hall, Hist. Beverley, 45, 66; see plate opposite.
  • 215. Hull Daily Mail, 13 Mar. 1986; plaque on building.
  • 216. B.I.H.R., Bp. V. 1764/Ret. 1, no. 57; Herring's Visit. i, p. 101.
  • 217. Pevsner, Yorks. E.R. 186; Hall, Hist. Beverley, 51, 65; see plate opposite.
  • 218. H.R.O., BC/IV/5/2, p. 99; 9th Rep. Com. Char. 82931.
  • 219. H.R.O., DDBC/9/22.
  • 220. Above (General Char.).
  • 221. R.D.B., 16/492/454 (1899); 35/309/297 (1901).
  • 222. P.R.O., ED 49/8519.
  • 223. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 224. R.D.B., 518/534/401; 612/493/379; 910/444/379; 911/52/48; 911/376/319; 912/374/316; 913/376/315.
  • 225. Ibid. 934/374/334.
  • 226. Inf. from Mr. Chorlton, 1986.
  • 227. R.D.B., 1081/37/33; Hull Daily Mail, 16 May 1984; inf. from Mr. Chorlton, 1986.
  • 228. See above, plate facing p. 269.
  • 229. R.D.B., D/246/407; H.R.O., PE/1/5; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 692-4.
  • 230. H.U.L., DDCV/15/551, 607.
  • 231. R.D.B., 189/267/236.
  • 232. S.P.C.K. London, CR 1/13, no. 9193. It was recorded in 1743: Herring's Visit. i, p. 103.
  • 233. 6 Geo. III, c. 83 (Priv. Act); 46 Geo. III, c. 140 (Local & Personal); above, Churches.
  • 234. H.R.O., DDBC/15/79; R.D.B., 10/283/409.
  • 235. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 236. R.D.B., 235/343/287. See above, plate facing p. 269.
  • 237. P.R.O., PROB 11/602, f. 76; H.R.O., DDBC/9/2-3; 10th Rep. Com. Char. 695.
  • 238. H.U.L., DDCV/15/607.
  • 239. R.D.B. 917/308/274.