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Close Rolls, Richard II: December 1377

Pages 34-36

Calendar of Close Rolls, Richard II: Volume 1, 1377-1381. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1914.

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December 1377

Dec. 1.
Westminster.
To the mayor and sheriffs of London. Order, when required by Thomas Tyle the king's butler, to admit Nicholas Symcok to the office of coroner in the city of London, taking of him an oath to behave well so long as he shall be therein; as that office pertains to the said butler, who has made the said Nicholas his substitute, being engaged at the king's command upon divers business in divers parts of the realm. By bill of the butler.
Nov. 22.
Westminster.
To John Parker of Olneye escheator in Bedfordshire. Order to cause the abbot of Wobourne to have seisin of a messuage, 30 acres of land and 2 acres of meadow in Everesholt held by John Page hanged for felony; as the king has learned by inquisition, taken by the escheator, that the premises have been in his hand a year and a day, that the said John held them of the abbot, and that William de Otteford late escheator had the year and a day and the waste thereof.
Dec. 1.
Westminster.
To the mayor and bailiffs of Newcastle upon Tyne. Order to arrest and imprison until further order, according to the statutes, all those who shall be found by night or day making confederacies, congregations, unlawful assemblies or other mischief in that town, going armed, bearing arms or leading an armed power to the disturbance of the peace, and others who may be notoriously suspected, and by true men of their bailiwick to make inquisition of the names of such evildoers, their evildoings and those that harbour them, and likewise to arrest and imprison those who shall be indicted concerning the premises; as in the statute published at Winchester in the time of King Edward [I] it is contained that if any strange passengers be found by night in cities, boroughs or towns they shall be by the watch arrested until the morrow, and if suspicion be had of them they shall be delivered to the sheriff's custody, who shall receive them without gainsaying, and if they shall not suffer themselves to be arrested hue and cry shall be raised upon them, and the watch with the whole town and neighbouring towns shall pursue them with hue and cry until taken and delivered to the sheriff; and likewise in the statute published at Norhampton in 2 Edward III it is contained that, with particular exceptions therein specified, no man of whatsoever estate or condition shall go with armed force, lead any force to the disturbance of the peace, ride or go armed by day or night in fairs, markets or in presence of justices or other the king's ministers or elsewhere under pain of losing their arms and of imprisonment; and in the statute published at Westminster in 5 Edward III it is contained that if suspicion of evildoing by day or night be had against any called 'roberdesmen,' 'wastours' and 'draughlacches,' they shall be straightway arrested and delivered to the custody of constables of towns, of the bailiffs of liberties if arrested within liberties, and of the sheriffs if without, to be imprisoned until the coming of justices for gaol delivery; and now the king is informed that great number of evildoers and disturbers of the peace, fearing not the said statutes and pains, have heretofore made and cease [not] daily to make unlawful assemblies etc. by night and day in that town and neighbouring places, have gone and go armed and bearing arms wander hither and thither, laying snares for men coming to or from the town and those dwelling therein, beating, wounding and evil treating them, robbing some of their property and goods, and daily committing many other hurts and mischiefs not to be borne, in contempt of the king, in breach of the peace and to the terror of the people in those parts.
Et erat patens.
Dec. 7.
Westminster.
To the keeper or farmer of the lordship of Weysford in Ireland for the time being. Order to pay to John Botelston 10l. a year until the lawful age of the heir of John de Hastynges earl of Pembroke, and the arrears for Easter and Michaelmas terms last, suffering him to hold the office of constable of Weysford castle and chief serjeant of that county, and to take the fees and profits of old time belonging to that serjeanty; as for his good service the late king on 10 January in the 50th year of his reign granted that office to the said John Botelston until the lawful age of the said heir, taking for his fee for the office of constable 10l. a year and for the said serjeanty the fees and profits aforesaid, which grant the king confirmed on 27 November last.
Et erat patens.
Dec. 8.
Westminster.
To the sheriffs, mayors, the king's bailiffs, ministers, lieges and subjects, clerks and laymen, to whom etc. Order, upon petition presented by the commons of England before the king and council in this parliament, not to suffer Master John de Shepeye clerk to take possession in the deanery of Lincoln by colour of the pope's collation or of bulls or processes brought to England for the purpose, or to take any profit thereof, until the chancellor shall view the agreement made between the pope and the late king, and take order concerning what is contained in the said petition on behalf of the king and the parties, if any will make special complaint; as that petition shews that in the treaty between the pope and the late king made by ambassadors and legates sent to Flanders on either side it was agreed that the pope should abstain from provisions and collations whatsoever by way of reservation of benefices in England, and especially of elective dignities, provided the late king would refrain from presenting or collating to benefices which concern his regality and are alleged to be void by ancient voidance, which article the said king's ambassadors were charged to sue for to the best of their power, and that although on the cessation of the reservation aforesaid the late king specially wrote for confirmation of certain elections of elective benefices made after that agreement, certain of those legates after the said treaty and contrary to the effect thereof obtained of the pope as well elective dignities for which the king so wrote as great number of other benefices, wherefore prayer is now made to the king for remedy; and it is now newly come to the king's ears that the said John, who was with others a legate specially deputed in the matter, being aware of the premises but hiding the truth touching the said treaty, and preferring his own advantage, has craftily procured the pope's collation to the said deanery, an elective benefice whereto Richard de Ravenser the king's clerk was first duly elected, the pope it is believed knowing nought of such election nor being mindful of the said agreement, and in contempt of the king, to the hurt of the church of Lincoln and the prejudice of the whole realm and church of England has caused bulls and processes to be brought hither in order to take possession thereof. By pet. of parl.
Et erat patens.
Dec. 17.
Westminster.
To the mayor and sheriffs and the aldermen of London. Order to suffer the widow women of the city to enjoy all liberties and free customs which they used to have time out of mind, not troubling or charging them in aught, and correcting any wrong done to them, that henceforth they may have no cause of complaint; as the king is informed that time out of mind they have been quit of tallages and all manner of contributions. It is the king's will that anything done contrary to those liberties by force or constraint shall not be turned to their prejudice. By p.s. [190.]
Et erat patens.
Dec. 4.
Westminster.
To John de Stourton escheator in Somerset and Dorset. Order to cause Maurice son and heir of Ralph Russell knight to have seisin of his father's lands; as he has proved his age before John Tomere and John Leddrede specially appointed for the purpose, and the king has taken his homage and fealty. By p.s. [175.]
The like to Thomas de Illeston escheator in the county of Suthampton.