BHO

Charles I - volume 19: January 21-31, 1626

Pages 229-245

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1625-26. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1858.

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January 21-31, 1626

Jan. 21. 1. Bond of Troilus Lovell of Glanfield Wotton, co. Dorset, for 100l., conditioned to appear before the Council, at the house of Dr. Ryves, his Majesty's Advocate, within 30 days after warning.
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
Sec. Conway to Attorney General Heath. For preparing warrants for receiving and issuing such monies as shall be raised by the prizes. [Minute, Conway's Letter Book, p. 243.]
Jan. 21. The same to the same. To prepare two pardons one for Cardeus, a prisoner at Plymouth, and the other for Heren, a prisoner at Rochester, for killing two men. [Minute, ibid.]
Jan. 21.
The Savoy.
2. George Lord Carew, Master General of the Ordnance, to Sec. Coke. Sends his opinion on certain suggestions of the Earl of Warwick, respecting the immediate fortification of Harwich, referred to Lord Carew by the Council. As to sending brass ordnance until iron may be cast; in and since Queen Elizabeth's time it has been thought fit to furnish forts with iron ordnance and to reserve brass for the ships. As to exchanging demy cannons for culverins; he thinks whole culverins will do sufficient execution. Nevertheless, if in consideration of the present time, the Lords direct otherwise, he will willingly obey.
Jan. 21.
Whitehall.
3. Form of letter sent by Thos. Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Earl Marshal, to each of several noblemen and gentlemen, to give attendance at Westminster, on the 30th inst., to receive the Knighthood of the Bath.
[Jan. 21.] 4. Warrant of the Earl Marshal, intimating that the King had appointed Thos. Caldwell, his Majesty's barber, to make provision of necessaries to be used at the ceremony of bathing the Knights of the Bath at the coronation, the number for whom provision is to be made being 80.
[Jan. 21.] 5. Notes by the Earl Marshal for regulating various matters connected with the ceremony of the coronation.
Jan. 21. 6. Memorandum by Sir George Holles, that the serjeants from the Low Countries, being in number 117, landed at Gravesend on the 7th inst., and that he had paid them for present relief 15l. 5s.
[Jan. 21.] 7. List of counties in England; with names of Lord Lieuts., and numbers of the Trained Bands, both horse and foot.
[Jan. 21.] 8. List of serjeants from the Low Countries, with names of their several regiments, and captains of the companies from which they had been derived.
[Jan. 21.] 9. Another list of the serjeants; with suggestions as to the counties in England to which they should be severally assigned.
[Jan. 21.] 10. Estimate of the sum to be paid the serjeants as expenses of travelling to their several destinations in England. [Draft.]
[Jan. 21.] 11. Fair copy of the preceding as ultimately settled. The serjeants were allowed 2s. 6d. per day for travelling expenses, and were to travel 16 miles per day; total 102l. 4s. 4d
[Jan. 21.] 12. List of shires in England, and names of serjeants to be sent into each. [Incomplete.]
Jan. 21. 13. Complete list of the same kind as the preceding.
Jan. 21.
Tenby.
14. Sir Jas. Perrott to Sec. Conway. Refers to previous letters respecting the ship and soldiers at Milford Haven, and solicits favourable consideration. Complains that despatches of state come thither so slowly; the sheriff has just received three proclamations dated long since.
Jan. 21.
Landends, near Hexham.
15. Wm. Carr to the same. His Lordship's letter for the delivery of Christopher Hogg to a messenger received that day. He was enlarged at Christmas sessions by order of the Bench.
Jan. 21.
Plymouth.
16. Mayor of Plymouth to Sec. Conway. Recommends to his consideration the petition of "a distressed Portugal," who has lain in prison a long time at Plymouth. His ship and goods were seized by Sir James Bagg, and sent to London, so that the petitioner is utterly destitute. Incloses,
16. i. Petition of Paio Dreeges de Paz, Portuguese prisoner, to the Mayor of Plymouth. Has lived four days without any earthly sustenance; his case most miserable and contrary to the laws of God and nature; whilst his goods are detained, he is left to perish in a loathsome prison; has sold his clothes for food, and knows not what else to do.
Jan. 21.
Dover Castle.
17. Sir John Hippisley to Buckingham. The greatest ship belonging to the Archduchess had been blown up "with a Hollander" in the road, and also another great ship laden with victuals. Sir John Suckling had been elected for Sandwich with great applause. Had been holding an Admiral's Court all that week, and may say boldly that he had made for the Duke 30,000l., which he will proceed with all speed to make into ready money. Desires a warrant to put a ship of his to sea, and doubts not to give the Duke a good account of what she will do.
Jan. 22.
Newark-upon-Trent.
18. Wm. Earl of Exeter to Sec. Conway. Begs a licence to be absent both from the coronation and the Parliament, having a grievous fit of the gout. This is not written to save charges. Before he attended the King into Kent, both he and his wife had all things ready, both for the entry and the coronation.
Jan. 22.
Newark-upon-Trent.
19. The same to Buckingham. The Duke's honourable acceptance of the Earl's proxy in the last Parliament makes him the bolder humbly to present the same again, being grievously afflicted with the gout.
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Sec. Conway to Lord Chief Justice Crewe. Concerning the reprieve of a prisoner. [Minute, Conway's Letter Book, p. 243.]
Jan. 22. 20. Sir Henry Glemham to Thos. Earl of Suffolk. Gives him information of the captures made by a Dunkirker on the previous Wednesday at Orfordness, and Aldborough [see 1625, Jan. 20, letter of Earl of Warwick and inclosure]. The country in great fear of the enemy's landing. Has prepared the towns to be in a readiness, especially for guarding the fort erecting at Languard; but the country is so backward in furnishing themselves with arms, that unless an example be made of some few there is little hope. They say that the ancient laws for these things are repealed. He fears that the Lord Lieut's. patent gives the Dep. Lieuts. no power to imprison but only in time of war.
Jan. 22.
Hodsock.
21. Sir Gervase Clifton to the Council. Reports his proceedings with reference to 45 Privy Seals sent to him as collector for the co. of Nottingham. He had received the amounts from 34 persons (500l.) Five (100l.) had been silent or denied, and six (90l.) had sent excuses. Inclosed,
21. i.—vi. Six letters addressed to Sir Gervase Clifton by persons who had excused themselves from lending.
21. vii. List of the names of all persons to whom the Privy Seals were addressed, with the sums required of them.
Jan. 22.
Whitehall.
Proclamation for a General Thanksgiving for stay of the late fearful visitation of the plague. [Coll. Procs., Car. I., No. 40.]
Jan. 22.
Pendennis Castle.
22. Capt. John Bonython to Sec. Conway. Had stayed a Dutch East Indiaman under the authority of a letter from the Duke of Buckingham to Sir Robert Killigrew; there are 30 sail of Turks on the Spanish Coast, one of them (the Admiral) is sailing under his Majesty's flag, and threatens to visit Pendennis and Fowey, and so coast it along. Repeats his application for the command of the fort building at the latter place.
Jan. 22. 23. Order of Council made in the cause between the Company of Merchants Adventurers and Matthew de Quester, Postmaster of England for foreign services. Both parties are to attend the King's learned Council, who are to certify the true state of the cause. In the mean time, Mr. Billingsley is to forbear meddling with the conveyance of letters.
Jan. 22.
Burghley.
24. George Fielding to Nicholas, as one of the executors of Samuel Hopton. Relative to 100l. of the Duke's money left in Hopton's hands.
Jan. 22.
London.
25. Jo. Barnard to Sec. Conway. Claims some portion of the lading of the Orange Tree, stayed many months before at Weymouth, and solicits Conway's recommendation to Sir Henry Marten, that he may have a speedy trial. He is at present, the King's Sheriff, of Kingston-upon-Hull, and has been a great benefactor of the customs there for 20 years.
Jan. 22. 26. Receipt of Sir Allen Apsley for 1,500l., paid to him, for preparing victuals for the navy, by Sir John Suckling, Comptroller of the Household, by direction of the Duke of Buckingham.
Jan. 23.
Westminster.
27. Warrant for payment to Hugh Wood, one of the Pages of the Bed Chamber, of 30l., for washing sheets for one year. [Copy.]
Jan. 23. 28. Capt. T. Best to Nicholas. Recommends Wm. Cock, who has made several voyages in the Mediterranean, and has been towards the sea for 8 or 10 years, as well fitted for Captain of one of his Majesty's ships.
Jan. 23.
Aboard The Happy Entrance in the Downs.
29. Sir Henry Palmer to the same. Requests the Duke's warrant for payment of his entertainment from his coming into the Bonaventure, June 8 till Sept 9. Two Dunkirk sloops have come by close, within a week; to prevent them is impossible without small vessels.
June 23. 30. Petition of Robt. Watson, John Bee, and others, owners of the ship Barbara, to the King. Their ship seized by Mons. Soubise, and carried into Rochelle, where it was captured by a French Admiral and adjudged prize. They pray for a remedy by reprisal. The petition is referred to the Duke of Buckingham as Lord High Admiral.
Jan. 23.
Yarmouth.
31. Petition of Thos. Reeve to the same. Sends a sermon preached by him before the choice of Parliament-men, desiring that they might be such as might be forward to yield help to the King's designs. Offers it for publication, or, if the King will signify his command by Jeffrey Neave, a quarter waiter, Reeve will come up and preach it before the Parliament-men.
Jan. 23.
Paris.
32. Sir Dudley Carleton to Dr. Balcanquall. Sends him two pieces set forth by an assembly of the French Church on politicotheological subjects. If all Churches in Christendom had maintained the liberty of that of France, very few had been reformed; and if all which are reformed had followed the example of England, few or none had remained popish. Wishes his successor in Holland the four elements, the buildings and conversation of France, but not the superstition of its populace, the dirt of Paris, or the confusion of the Court. Contrasts the fortunes of Elizabeth of Bohemia with those of the Queen of France.
Jan. 23.
Dover Castle.
33. Sir John Hippisley to Nicholas. Recommends to his care Mr Brome's business which was to be heard in the Exchequer on the 30th. "One Sir Dearinge" has taken away a mast from the Duke's droitgatherer at Hythe. Recommends that this should not be suffered, or other lords will do in the like kind. Mr. Prinsell, Mr. Eaton, Mr. Kemp, and Mr. Monings, likely to be chosen canopy-bearers for Dover. The last objected to as too low of stature, and as having been the cause of Sir Wm. Becher having lost his election. Sir John has now 30,000l. worth of goods of the Duke's in his hands. Wishes for a warrant for putting his ship the Have-at-all to sea. Begins the Musters to-day, and will then come to London.
[Jan. 24.] 34. Letters patent, whereby Lord Keeper Coventry, Lord Treasurer Ley, Henry Viscount Mandeville, President of the Council, Edward Earl of Worcester, Keeper of the Privy Seal, Thos. Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Earl Marshal, Wm. Earl of Pembroke, Lord Chamberlain, James Earl of Carlisle, Edward Earl of Dorset, and Lord Chief Justice Crewe, were appointed Commissioners to hear and determine all claims to perform services at the ensuing coronation. [Copy.]
Jan. 24. 35. Another copy.
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
Sec. Conway to Lord Keeper Coventry. Recommending the business referred to his Lordship by the King, between Sir John Borlase and Mr. King. [Minute, Conway's Letter Book, p. 243.]
Jan. 24.
Haughton.
36. John Earl of Clare to his brother Sir Geo. Holles. Has just received the King's letter for his and his wife's attendance at the coronation. He is 110 miles from London, the ways are hardly passable. Even if they were ready on the morrow, and no family can be under two or three days in preparation, they could not perform the journey under five days, and should then only have 24 hours to fit themselves with robes. Begs him to represent these things to Buckingham and Conway, that they may satisfy the King respecting his enforced absence.
Jan. 24. 37. Commissioners for sale of prize goods to Buckingham. They had had one day's sale, which produced 7,000l., by the candle. A second sale held that day had been altogether fruitless, because similar goods were selling at Dover at an under price. They recommend that all these goods should be brought to London for sale.
Jan. 24. 38. The Council to the Lord Lieutenants of the several counties. Requiring them to take effectual order that the King's commands, with reference to instructing and exercising the Trained Bands by men experienced in that service, be carefully executed. The necessity of this course is so obvious, that the Council assure themselves that no subject will account the small increase of charge any way considerable. [Minute.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
39. The Council to Buckingham. Letter in conformity with the above minute, addressed to the Duke as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. Inclose,
39. i. Copy of the letter from the King to the Council, 1626, Jan. 14.
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
40. The same to Francis Earl of Cumberland, Henry Lord Clifford, and Theophilus Lord Howard of Walden, Lord Lieutenants of Cumberland, Northumberland, and Westmoreland. Similar letter.
Jan. 24.
Hastings.
41. Mark Sargeant to Nicholas. Requests that he will procure him the Duke's warrant, establishing him in his office. Will be in London about Shrovetide, and will give him full satisfaction for his pains.
Jan. 25.
Deptford.
42. Kenrick Edisbury to the same. Explains, in answer to an application, the history and succession of the officers termed Masters Attendant upon the Commissioners of the Navy. Thanks for procuring a carpenter's warrant: sends "the thankfulness," which the carpenter left with him.
Jan. 25.
Southampton.
43. Mayor of Southampton to Sec. Conway. Reports that 172 soldiers out of the Samuel, of London, part of the regiment of Col. Bruce, had been billeted in that town, and were now strong and able to do his Majesty's service. They should be apparelled as soon as possible, which would cost 40s. each soldier. Solicits directions as to apparelling two broken companies billeted at Fareham. Had received from the Collectors of the Privy Seals 1,000 marks, which would not long hold out, the weekly payment being 47l. Another Commissioner needed, the others dwelling at a distance. He had built a court of guard near the market-place, to keep the soldiers in practice and order.
Jan. 25.
Dover Castle.
44. Sir John Hippisley to Buckingham. According to the Duke's command he had sent up Abraham Hugessen and Mr. Berry, but had stayed James Hugessen, who was so engaged in the business of the prize goods that he could not be spared. Sir John awaits the Duke's pleasure as to his coming to the coronation or the Parliament.
Jan. 25.
Dover Castle.
45. The same to Nicholas. There had been a wreck at Seaford, but Lady Cotton and her son had taken all the goods. If this be suffered the ports will come to nothing. Cause why he has not sent up James Hugessen. The Lord Treasurer should remit the customs on the Duke's prize goods. Sir John has set Mr. Monings to his light horse again, which was struck out by Sir Henry Mainwaring; he will take it ill, but Sir John hopes Nicholas will give him no countenance.
Jan. 25. 46. Sir Robt. Karr to Sec. Conway. Sends him Capt. Walker, one who asserted that some whom he could name said that the King would not live to be crowned, and that he was married to the Infanta; with words concerning the late fleet.
Jan. 25. 47. Attorney General Heath to the same. The Archbishop of Canterbury had informed him that it was his Majesty's pleasure to renew the Ecclesiastical Commission, but the Archbishop being a principal Commissioner, it was not proper for him to signify the King's pleasure. He sends a warrant for the King's signature.
Jan. 26. 48. Sentence of Archbp. Abbot and others, Commissioners authorized under the Great Seal, in the cause between Samuel Widdowson and Thos. Goode, Vicar of Lowdham, Gunthorpe, and Cathorpe in co. Nottingham. They decree the deprivation and deposition of Thos. Goode for the offence of habitual drunkenness.
Jan. 26.
Gray's Inn.
49. Francis Viscount St. Albans to Sec. Conway. Mr. Percy, his friend and late servant, has a suit to his Majesty for the making of a friend of his, a baronet: Lord St. Albans prays Lord Conway to commend his friend's petition to the King.
Jan. 26. 50. Petition of Wm. King and John Parkehurst to Buckingham, for a pass for a ship of Hamburgh, wherein they may fetch home certain merchandise from the Azores.
Jan. 26. 51. Dep. Lieuts. of Wilts to the Council. Having been directed by the Council to take order to indemnify the collectors of the second subsidy granted in the 21st of King James, against payments made by such collectors to the soldiers of Count Mansfeldt; the Dep. Lieuts. entreat the Council that if it be their meaning they should levy the money upon the country, they should have an express warrant to do so, and not be left to their own construction as to whether by rules of equity the same may be levied contrary to the Act of Parliament.
Jan. 26. 52. Order of Sir Henry Marten, Judge of the High Court of Admiralty, in the suit respecting the St. Peter, of Havre de Grace. It being proved that the owners were French subjects, and that the lading did not contain certain alleged Spanish goods, it was ordered that the ship should be released from all further detention.
Jan. 26. 53. Estimate, in the handwriting of Capt. Richd. Gyffard, of the charge of 8 merchant ships and 4 tartanas, with 800 men, for 12 months: 10,943l. 6s. 8d., [Apparently with reference to some suggested expedition.]
Jan. 26.
Downs, from aboard The Happy Entrance.
54. Sir Hen. Palmer to [Buckingham]. Ships sent to the westward met with no other ships than eleven Holland men-of-war. He had put to sea, but was driven back by a great storm. The Earl of Warwick had requested him to send ships to Harwich; they sailed on Saturday last. Visit to the Downs of Dunkirk spies. Solicits instructions concerning the two "Danskers" stayed by him; their victual is spent.
Jan. 26.
Dover.
55. Peter Cannon to Nicholas. Since his coming to Dover he had endeavoured to do the Duke good service [as Droit-gatherer], but was not encouraged by Sir John Hippisley, who supported one Peter Dibbs in his stead.
Jan. 26. 56. Commissioners of the Navy to Sec Coke. Term for which the King's ships are victualled expired on the 12th inst.; the Commissioners solicit an order to prepare an estimate for a month's supply. Other suggested arrangements for ships to serve under Capt. Pennington, and also for those needed for guarding the Thames. The Garland to have her ballast shifted; by long continuance it has infected the ship, and caused great mortality; no less than 20 men thrown overboard.
Jan. 26. 57. Bond of Nicholas Bacon, of Gray's Inn, Gent., in 200l., conditioned for his appearance before the Secretaries of State within three days after warning left at his chambers.
Jan. 26. 58. Statement addressed to Nicholas respecting a suit instituted in the Exchequer by Jacob Brames against John Berry and Thos. Fulnetby, for a matter which was already in dispute between the same parties in the Chancery of the Cinque Ports. It is suggested that the Duke of Buckingham should take such order therein as was necessary for preserving the right of his Chancery of the Cinque Ports.
Jan. 26.
Westminster.
59. The King to Thos. Earl of Suffolk. The Lords and Commons in Parliament having petitioned his Majesty that the ancient discipline of the two Universities, which has much declined in these latter days, might be restored, the Earl as Chancellor of Cambridge is directed to write to the Vice-Chancellor and heads of Colleges to consider what are the true occasions of this general offence taken at their government, and what are fit to be the remedies thereof, whereunto the King will put to his hand if there be cause. [Copy.]
Jan. 27.
Beaumaris.
60. Dep. Lieuts. of Anglesea to Wm. Earl of Northampton. Their island lies subject to the spoil of shipping bound for Ireland. It has of late been much depopulated by sickness and extreme poverty, so that last harvest great store of corn perished for want of men to bring it in. The fortifications which existed in 1588 are decayed and levelled with the ground. They desire permission to renew the same; with liberty to remove the ordnance from the castle of Beaumaris to places where it may be more useful.
Jan. 27.
Westminster.
61. Order of Council, on the suggestion of the Lord High Admiral, that his Majesty be moved to increase the medium of allowance for every sailor serving the King from 14s. to 20s. per month, allowing thereout 4d. to a preacher, 2d. to a baker [barber ?], and 6d. a month to the chest; also that there be allowed a bounty of 5s. per ton to shipbuilders on every ship built of above 100 tons.
Jan. 27. 62. Memorandum for the Duke of Buckingham to move his Majesty for the increase of pay to sailors mentioned in the last article.
Jan. 27. 63. Memorial of George Lord Carew, Master General of the Ordnance, to the Council. The Lord Treasurer had agreed with Burlamachi for 100 lasts of powder from Amsterdam and Hamburgh, and with Mr. Evelyn for 20 lasts monthly, but it is suggested that the shires and maritime towns should be warned to make provision for themselves without depending upon the King's stores, and that liberty should be given to manufacture gunpowder for home consumption from foreign saltpetre.
Jan. 27.
Kinsale.
64. Sir Thos. Love to Buckingham. Since their arrival they have had great mortality both of sea and landmen; the soldiers are billeted ashore. Order given to the Rainbow and various other ships, which they had made as able as they could, to proceed to England with the first fair wind. The Reformation has lost all her masts and cannot depart until masts and rigging come from England. A Dutch East Indiaman of 1,000 tons has come into Kinsale dismasted. Sir George Chudleigh has made stay of a bark from Bilboa, having on board six Jesuits with divers letters. They have also stayed a ship from Lisbon, with a cargo of tobacco and sugar, and "a small bunch of diamonds." The two stayed ships are ordered for England.
Jan. 28.
Plymouth.
65. Capt. John Pennington to Buckingham. Had made choice of 16 ships in those parts, which, with the 14 coming from London would make up 30, the number for which he had commission. The great wants of the fleet, with suggestions for their supply. The masters of the merchant ships most unwilling to serve. The master of the Swiftsure very backward, and "very cross," as the report goes, to his Captain Sir Samuel Argoll, which broke his heart, and four days since he died. Interview with Mons. Soubise, and final arrangements for the despatch of his ships. Several ships had been stayed as prizes, and handed over to Sir James Bagg. Warrants should be sent to the Dep. Lieuts. in those parts to press 1,400 or 1,500 seamen, for all the best men have run up into the country. Requests 200l. on account to enable him to furnish himself for so long a voyage. Also desires to have his commission, and that it may be made so large that he may be able to govern these disordered people. Incloses,
65. i. Names of the 30 ships he has chosen, with their Captains.
Jan. 28.
Plymouth.
66. Sir Wm. St. Leger to [Sec. Conway]. The charge of keeping these men were better spared than spent, if the present course be allowed to continue. The men live at more ease than if they were at home, but they will never be of use as soldiers unless paid beforehand, whereby the men will learn to live on their means, the Captains will be enabled to redeem their arms that now lie in pawn for the repairing, and the soldiers may be clothed that now lie abed for want of covering. Difficulty of getting the contracts for clothing executed in that country, and unwillingness of the Commissioners to deprive the country of advantage by reporting the fact. The increase of the soldiers weekly lendings to 3s. has benefitted the country, but not the soldiers. Begs for a payment to himself, having hitherto lived on his own poor fortune, and that he may have some authority above that of the town clerk.
Jan. 28.
Bishopsthorpe.
67. Tobias Matthew, Archbishop of York, to Sec. Conway. Desires that he may be excused attendance at the Parliament on account of great infirmity and weakness of body.
Jan. 28.
Compton.
68. Wm. Earl of Northampton to the Council. Sends certificates for Privy Seals for the Counties of Gloucester, Denbigh, Carmarthen, Brecknock, Merioneth, and Cardigan, no small task, having had so little assistance.
Jan. 28.
Bridport.
69. Bailiffs and 12 inhabitants of Bridport to Buckingham. They had returned to Parliament Sir Richd. Strode, whom the Duke had recommended to them, and would have returned Mr. Clarke, but two days before the receipt of the Duke's letter they passed their promise to Sir Lewis Dive.
Jan. 28. 70. Sir Geo. More, one of the collectors of the loans on Privy Seals for co. Surrey, to the Council. Sends a list of persons (26) who made excuse or delay in paying the sums required of them. Has paid in the money received. The Privy Seals unpaid amount to 600l. Incloses,
70. i. The list before mentioned.
Jan. 28.
Londesborough.
71. Henry Lord Clifford to Sec. Conway. Has received letters out of Northumberland with a long roll of strange disorders committed there. If he will send down a Commission of Inquiry, his Majesty will see how far the papists and the thieves have gotten the upper hand.
Jan. 28. 72. Minute of a communication from the owners of the merchant ships lent to the French [to Sec. Conway]. On the contract made at Dieppe, security was to have been given to these owners within 15 days after the delivery of the ships. This has not been given, nor any satisfaction for the monthly pay, likewise specified in the contract. Burlamachi offers, that if the owners will authorize a party to be named by him to receive the money in France, he will pay the same here in London at certain periods. Desire to know if they may accept Burlamachi's offer.
Jan. 28. Buckingham to Sir Henry Palmer. There is daily advertisement of English and Scottish ships taken by the enemy between Yarmouth and the Downs; and complaint is made that, notwithstanding Buckingham's many directions, no diligence is used in this service. Once more Sir Henry is required, presently to command to sea so many ships as may chase away or apprehend such ships as make spoil of the King's subjects. He is to send up the names of any Captains whom he finds careless or negligent. [Copy. See Vol. xviii. No. 67.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
Sec. Conway to Attorney General Heath. To renew the Commission for the reprieve and employment of convicted prisoners. [Minute, Conway's Letter Book, p. 243.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
The same to Henry Lord Clifford. Giving him an account of the reasons of such omissions as his Lordship conceived were made to him, by the not answering of his letters concerning Privy Seals. [Minute, ibid.]
Jan. 29.
Hinton.
73. John Poulett to Sec. Conway. Yesterday, in the evening, he received letters from Lord Arundel, giving him notice that the King had nominated him amongst others to receive the Knighthood of the Bath at the coronation, and for that cause requiring him to be at Court, furnished and appointed, on the 30th inst. His house being distant 120 miles, it is impossible for him to be there at the time appointed. Takes singular comfort to find himself in his Majesty's memory.
Jan. 29. 74. Certificate of John Royston, Curate of St. Andrews, Holborn, under the Rev. John Hackett, Rector, that Stephen Birkbeck, [Birthbeck], late attendant on the Spanish and French Ambassadors, had been reclaimed from the Roman Catholic religion.
Jan. 29.
The Downs.
75. Sir Hen. Palmer to Buckingham. Perceived that the Duke had received information of much neglect in that service. Beseeches him to consider what could be done. Has in charge 12 ships; 4 are at Harwich, with instructions to scour the coast between that place and Yarmouth; 3 are ordered to the westward; 1 is gone to Flushing; 2 are employed to convoy the ships laden with deer and horses to Dieppe. The Hollanders have been little out of the Downs. Having had the happiness to become "his Grace's," Sir Hen. hopes he shall be favoured until he is found faulty.
Jan. 29.
The Downs.
76. The same to Sec. Conway. Perceives that he has some back friends. Repeats the information in the preceding letter respecting the disposition of his fleet.
Jan. 29.
Dover.
77. Daniel Urrye to Sir Henry Palmer. Thinks long to hear from him what shall become of the [St.] Peter. Sir Henry being in London, Urrye hopes he will procure order for her being fitted for sea. Sends account of what ordnance she will want.
Jan. 29. 78. Petition of the Master and Wardens of the Trinity House to Buckingham. The cause of the great abuses amongst the seamen of the navy is the smallness of their pay. The Duke is solicited, either by his Majesty's pleasure or by a bill in Parliament, to procure them such fair pay that they make a poor living of it.
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
79. Buckingham to Sir Hen. Palmer. There are under his charge at least 12 merchant and prize ships; he is to send three parts abroad to range the sea, to meet with Dunkirkers, or to intercept Hamburghers carrying prohibited provisions to the enemy. As before directed, he is to search the two Dunkirkers he had stayed, and if they contain prohibited goods, to send them to London; if not, to release them. [Copy.]
Jan. 30.
Westminster.
80. Letters patent, whereby Thos. Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Earl Marshal, and Wm. Earl of Pembroke, were appointed Commissioners for making Knights of the Bath previous to the coronation. [Copy.]
Jan. 30.
Lincoln.
81. Dean and Chancellor of Lincoln to Sir John Lambe, Commissary of their Peculiars, within the Counties of Northampton, Rutland, Leicester, and Huntingdon. Send him copy of a letter received from the Bishop of Lincoln, enjoining upon them the performance of the requirements contained in a letter addressed to the Bishop by the Archbishop of Canterbury; such last-mentioned letter containing a copy of a letter from the King to the Archbishop, in which he charges him to execute the laws against popish recusants. Sir John is required to put the said letters in due execution within the peculiar jursidiction in his charge.
Jan. 30.
Dover Castle.
82. Thos. Benson to Nicholas. Letter sent by Mr. Van Hobrooke does not seem to have been delivered. It principally related to his helping Benson to resign his present place. News of ships stayed at Dover, and questions as to the ownership of their cargoes.
[Jan. 30.] [The King to Attorney General Heath.] Roger North and Robert Harcourt having discovered means to take journies into the river of the Amazons in America, the Attorney General is to prepare a bill for the King's signature, certifying a grant of incorporation of the said two persons and their company with all customary privileges. The limits within which they were to traffic are set forth. [Draft, in the handwriting of Nicholas, written on the blank page of the preceding letter.]
Jan. 30. 83. List of ships taken up for his Majesty's service.
Jan. 30. 84. Survey of victuals on board the Adventure, taken by Mr. Duffell and Mr. Terne.
Jan. 30.
Chatham Dock.
85. Joshua Downing to Nicholas. Recommends Henry Hubbard, Thomas Corrall, and John White, boatswains, for promotion. Does not desire that any whom he recommends should not be as beneficial and thankful to him as any other.
Jan. 30.
Dover.
86. Peter Cannon to Buckingham. Complains of the interference with his office of Peter Dibbs, formerly deputy to Fulnetby. The St. Clare, a Dunkirker, on the Goodwins last year, but seized by the Hollanders as a prize, having come into Dover Harbour, Cannon claimed her best anchor and cable as a forfeiture to the Duke for coming aground. The Captain contested the right, but ultimately gave bond for the value. Cannon submits that the Duke is also entitled to the ship as a drift.
Jan. 30.
Whitehall.
87. Sec. Coke to Captain John Pennington. So much corn and other provisions must be bought in the markets there, as, upon conference with Mons. Soubise, shall be found necessary for the relief of the town [Rochelle]. As these cannot without great hazard be put into the town by Mons. Soubise alone, Pennington's whole fleet is to be made ready to convoy them, and he is to be sure to fit himself so that he may be able to encounter the French. Advice as to his selection of ships and preparation of victuals. He should treat the Commissioners with due respect, and endeavour to concur with them in advancing the service. Care to be taken as to powder and other munition. Authority to press he has already; monies and instructions will be sent by the Duke. When he takes prizes he should seize the bills of lading; he should have done so with the St. Peter.
Jan. 31.
Plymouth.
88. Commissioners at Plymouth to the Council. The letters of the Lords directing them to send certain regiments to other places according to a list said to be inclosed, arrived without any list inclosed, therefore they cannot give satisfaction therein. The troops cannot be drawn together for want of clothing. Their weekly payment is 600l., 12,000l. is wanted for 4,000 suits of clothes, and they have been there six weeks, so that 15,600l. is the amount required.
Jan. 31. 89. Commissioners of the Navy to Sec. Coke. Have received a charge, preferred by the master and company of the Sapphire, of London, against John Bond, their captain, in which many abuses and misdemeanours are attributed to him. The Commissioners entreat that the captain may be sent for, and the charges be investigated.
Jan. 31.
The Downs.
90. Sir Hen. Palmer to Nicholas. If it were as much in his power as in his will to prevent the spoils committed by the Dunkirkers, they should not molest his Grace. In proof that he has endeavoured to incite the ships of his fleet to diligence, he sends his last instructions. The ships were shortly provided with necessaries, especially Capt. Driver's ship, the John Bonaventure, although he had given the Commissioners notice. The Duke's commission to press much slighted; of thirty pressed only seven appeared. Incloses,
90. i. Instructions given by Sir Hen. Palmer to Capt. Maplesden to put to sea with the Delight, the Salutation, and the St. Claude, and to cruise in the Channel in search of ships of the enemy.
Jan. 31.
Downs.
91. The same to Buckingham. The Merchant Bonaventure found a man-of-war of Sallee at Flushing. Sent his boat aboard and took by force 20 Christian slaves, whom he has brought thither. Being seamen, he purposes to dispose of them amongst the ships. The ships intended for the westward were still wind bound. Ships with deer and horses came into the Downs on Sunday. If weather will permit he will stand over to the coast of France and Flanders. Complains of Captains of ships pressing without moderation or discretion, which proves a great distaste to the subject, and a great hindrance to trade. He has never received orders as to the two Danskers; intends to release one of them on security.
Jan. 31. 92. Commissioners at Plymouth to the Council. The Duke of Buckingham, by his letters to Capt. Pennington, had discharged them from the care of the fleet. Only 4,280l. received out of the 5,000l. promised by the Lord Treasurer. Difficulty of procuring money in that country. The allowance of 3s. per week to the soldiers will much advance the service. P.S. 1,100l. of Privy Seal money just received.
Jan. 31. 93. List of men mustered aboard the Adventure at Gillingham, by Capt. Downing.
[Jan.] 94. Wm. Viscount Wallingford to the Council. Having received letters to put Sir Peter Vanlore in possession of the Manor House of Sonning, he inquires whether Sir Peter ought not previously to give bond for payment of 50l. yearly for the maintenance of Lady Lydall; and also, whether an injunction in Chancery is a sufficient warrant to remove a possession settled by a verdict at common law.
[Jan.] 95. Suggestion for a proclamation to be sent out with the writs for the Parliament, charging electors not to make choice of any burgesses who are not at that time dwelling within their towns.
[Jan.] 96. Extract from Stat. 1 Hen. V., Cap. 1., for knights of shires and burgesses to be residents within the shires and boroughs for which they are chosen.
[Jan.] 97. "Remembrances against the Parliament;" being suggestions for Acts of Parliament for re-annexing all Hundreds and Wapentakes which had been severed from Counties, for annexing to the Exchequer the Court of the Duchy of Lancaster, and for the confirmation of Letters Patent from the Crown, where the patentee answered to the Crown after the rate of 60 years purchase.
[Jan.] 98. Petition of the owners and merchants of the Sampson to Buckingham. Having presented a former petition praying that their ship might be freed from the press made of her by Capt. Pennington, they have heard that the Duke has been given to understand that they desire to sell their ship; they certify that they are not willing to do so, and reiterate their former prayer.
[Jan.] 99. Richard Fitton [Phitton], Ensign to Sir Robert Knowles, in Lord Essex's regiment, in the service of Holland, to Buckingham. Coming to England for a supply of men about the last of October 1625, he and 60 of his men were taken at sea by the Dunkirkers, and have been kept prisoners at Ostend. They are helpless unless the Duke will interfere for their discharge.
[Jan.]
Middle Temple.
100. James Howell to Sec. Conway. A person who haunts the Court may be suspected to come for no good. The father of the person alluded to was an English minister and afterwards an officer of the Inquisition. He comes from Brussels, and has dependency upon Gondomar; suggests that he should be brought before the Secretary. His name is James Waddesworth.
[Jan.] 101. Justices of the Peace for co. Middlesex to the Council. Report their proceedings in obedience to directions to air and purify houses and stuff infected.
[Jan.] 102. Clause suggested to be inserted in Capt. Pennington's instructions, directing him to give assistance to the officers of the Admiralty, in making stay of ships at anchor in any of his Majesty's ports. [Draft, in the handwriting of Nicholas.]
[Jan.] 103. Reasons assigned by Blase Carill, why he cannot lend 40l. to his Majesty.
[Jan. ?] 104. Estimate for setting forth to sea two of the King's ships, and one merchant ship, with 530 men, to be employed in guarding the river of Hamburgh for six months; 9,519l. 16s. 8d.
[Jan.] 105. Dep. Lieuts. of Cornwall to Wm. Earl of Pembroke, Lord Chamberlain. Report that they had caused the Trained Bands to be mustered and trained in the manner prescribed by the printed book, and that they had their beacons in readiness. Fowey, Looe, and Penzance are the places most liable to sudden incursions of an enemy. They especially recommend the fortification of the first. There are many other places where an enemy might land, but there they will be ready to oppose their bodies, which have ever been esteemed the best English fortresses.
Jan. ? 106. Petition of Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford [claimant of the title] to the King. The King appointed Lords Commissioners to examine the cause between the petitioner and Lord Willoughby. Petitioner has attended the Lord Marshal's appointments, but the cause is still unheard. Prays that the cause may be expedited, especially on account of the approaching coronation.
[Jan.] 107. Sir Dudley Digges to the King. Long letter of advice as to the course best to be adopted in the ensuring Parliament. Writes as one who had served the King's royal father for 20 years, and as one of the King's loyal subjects and true men; reviews the condition of Europe and the state of England; holds up to the King the example of Queen Elizabeth; advises him to give the Commons satisfaction with respect to the question of customs by proposing "another book of rates reformed"; and suggests to him to disregard the various opinions of over-forward Parliament men. He doubts not of the next Parliament's success, if the King will yield some such good things as the Parliament may desire. Counsels the King to take no notice of particular follies, to receive all petitions with good words, to allow the Parliament to examine the revenues of the Crown, to dispark unuseful lands of pleasure, with several other practical reforms, and above all, to look into the several abilities of his noblemen, and be served by ablest men for parts and breeding. [Copy of a rough draft, said in the indorsement to have been "found in his chamber," probably when his study was searched in May 1626.]
Jan. 108. Declaration in an action of trespass in the King's Bench, Robt. Burges against Wm. Tanner, for breaking and entering the house of the plaintiff, at Colyton, co. Devon, and taking therefrom a certain horse.
[Jan.] 109. Order of the Earl Marshal that Peers at the coronation are to take precedence as Peers, and to wear their Peers' robes; also that they and the officers in attendance are to robe in the Painted Chamber and Whitehall where the Court of Requests is usually kept. The King will seat himself on his throne in Westminster Hall at 7½ a.m., and thence proceed to the Church.
[Jan.] 110. Minute of the first part of the preceding order.
[Jan.] 111. A collection out of the Liber Regalis, remaining in the Treasury of the Church of Westminster, touching the crowning of the King and Queen together.
[Jan.] 112. The order and ceremonies used at the coronation of the Kings and Queens of England; with marginal additions and alterations apparently with reference to the coronation of Charles I.
[Jan.] 113. "The Abreviament of the Ordre how the King of England shall behave himselfe in his coronation, and the Ordre of the Quene, crowned togedder, and what services all other persons shall doe att the same." [Apparently a copy of a MS. transcribed with reference to the coronation of Charles I.]
[Jan.] 114. List of things necessary to be prepared before the day of coronation.
Jan. 115. Preparation and order of the feast in Westminster Hall after the coronation. [The feast was omitted on account of the plague.]
[Jan.] 116. Names of freeholders in Gloucestershire, whose lands are worth 40l. per annum, and who were owners of them for three years before the death of King James.
[Jan.] 117. The wholesale tradesmen of London who frequent Lynn fair to the Council. Lynn fair, which is usually held on February 2, had been put off on account of the plague, but that disease having ceased in Lynn and abated in London, the petitioners pray that goods sent by them to Lynn, and intended for the fair, may now be put to sale in that town.
[Jan. ?] 118. Petition of Capt. Richard Gyffard and Roger Gyffard to the Council. Their ship, the Fortune, was plundered on April 3, 1612, by the Dog or Hound of Rotterdam, Peter Cosson, master; they had sought for satisfaction in a variety of ways, and lately by the Lord Admiral in person, and had received a promise of reparation from the States; all being unavailing, they pray for letters of marque.
[Jan. ?] 119. Another similar petition of Capt. Richd. Gyffard and Roger Gyffard to the Council, praying for compensation out of the goods of Flemings, then under arrest.
[Jan.] 120. Petition of the Bailiffs, burgesses, and inhabitants of Aidborough, co. Suffolk, with the Dep. Lieuts. of the county, to the Council. Aldborough is daily in danger to be surprised by the Dunkirkers, who have not only taken a bark of the town worth 700l., but have assaulted the town by shooting at it. The petitioners pray that their town may be fortified, and that they may have 10 or 12 demy-culverins, with which they may defend themselves.
[Jan. ?] 121. Petition of the Chief Officers of the Field, Colonels, SerjeantMajors, and Captains, employed in this last voyage, to the King, for leave to resume their employments in the Low Countries. The petitioners make known to the King that they are most of them "men of fortune," wherefore they conclude he will think them "worthy to receive their entertainments."
[Jan. ?] 122. Statement of the King's intentions with reference to the pledging of the plate and jewels of the crown by Sackville Crow and Mr. Calandrini, and the purposes for which they were to stand as a security. Fr.
[Jan. ?] 123. Translation of the preceding paper into English, with the omission of the final sentence.
[Jan. ?] 124. Philip Burlamachi [to Buckingham.] Minute of advice received from Amsterdam that the men who have money will not lend it on the jewels, without the undertaking of some merchants that they shall be redeemed in three years; with suggestions for consideration thereon.