Charles I - volume 176: December 1-14, 1630

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1629-31. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1860.

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'Charles I - volume 176: December 1-14, 1630', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1629-31, (London, 1860) pp. 396-410. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/domestic/chas1/1629-31/pp396-410 [accessed 13 April 2024]

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December 1-14, 1630.

Dec. 1.
Norwich.
1. Mayor and others of Norwich to the Council. There is little store of corn in any of the granaries in that city, but the markets on Wednesday and Saturday are well supplied, though at dear rates. Wheat is at 50s. the quarter; "meslyn," 40s.; rye, 36s.; barley, 30s. At the last Sessions they suppressed all the maltsters who use brewing of beer, and also ordered the price of strong beer at 6s. the barrel, and small beer at 4s.; they also appointed the wages of servants and labourers. The brewing maltsters find out cautelous devices to frustrate the order of suppression.
Dec. 1.
Trinity College, Cambridge.
2. Dr. Samuel Brooke to Bishop Laud. Has written to the Lord Chamberlain, and his secretary, Mr. Taverner, to put Dr. Micklethwaite in the writer's place ; and if the writer may be forgotten, let him be so. The tract [on predestination] is almost done already. Fifteen years ago he determined in the Schools, after Cajetan's way, that these questions were unintelligible in this life, or, as the Bishop says better, unmasterable. But, since, the writer thinks he has found an issue out of that wood and wilderness in which we have been lost all this while. If the Bishop of Norwich, the Dean of Lichfield, the Dean of Christchurch, with his friends at Oxford, and Dr. Beale, with others, cannot commend it as a thing so indifferently written as might content Arminius and Gomar, and not a new way so much as the making the old even and clean against stumbling hereafter, or sticking fast, he has done.
Dec. 2. 3. Petition of Edward Ramsey, Thomas Parker, Edward Bisse, and Richard Jarett, to the King. Petitioners have found out a new invention for raising water from out any mines, gruffs, coal pits, or any other place how deep soever, to any high place, and that by way of a barrel engine never yet in use. Pray for letters patent for sole using the same for 14 years, at the rent of 26s. 8d. Underwritten,
3. i. Minute that the King grants the prayer of the petition. Mr. Attorney General is to prepare a book accordingly. Whitehall, 1630, Dec. 2.
Dec. 2. 4. Petition of Edmund Markant to the King. Petitioner has found out divers new ways for making salt. Prays letters patent for sole using the same for 14 years, at the rent of 20s. per annum. Underwritten,
4. i. Minute that the King grants the above prayer and directs the Attorney General to prepare a book accordingly. Whitehall, 1630, Dec. 2.
Dec. 2. 5. Petition of Stephen Gibbes to the same. Petitioner, after long and costly search, has attained to the understanding of a more certain means for defence of marsh lands against the sea and fresh surroundings; also to recover havens swarved up by "the sea and "fresh waters strife and imbarment." Prays letters patent for the sole use. Underwritten,
5. i. Minute similar to that under the preceding petition.
Dec. 2. 6. Petition of Edward Marlyn, John Clarke, Joan Moore, Jasper Laxton, and Thomas Phillips, convicted prisoners in Newgate, to the same. Petitioners were respited in respect of the birth of Prince Charles, but are altogether impoverished, and not able to sue out pardons. Pray that by warrant they may be transported into the state of Venice, under the command of Capt. Lodovic Hamilton. Underwritten,
6. i. Reference to the Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas to certify concerning these delinquents and their crimes. Whitehall, 1630, Dec. 2.
Dec. 2.
Westminster.
7. Justices of the Peace for Westminster to [the Council]. Set forth the names and descriptions of 42 persons, chiefly cooks and innholders, whom they have fined to the poor according to the laws, and for breach of the King's late proclamation for abstinence from flesh, and against dressing any meat in victualling houses on fish days.
Dec. 2. 8. Phineas Pett and others, Masters of the Navy, to [the Lords of the Admiralty]. In pursuance of their directions to examine whether the worm had come into his Majesty's ships at Portsmouth since they came into that port, or by any quality in that place, or whether the same was brought in by ships from other parts, they report their proceedings. The jetty head of the King's yard is much eaten and perished on one side thereof with a small worm close by the ground. At the mouth of the harbour a round tower and palisadoes have stood time out of mind, and have not the least touch of any worm. Inclose testimony of sundry seamen of Portsmouth who never heard of any worm bred there. Find the Triumph eaten by the worm, but other ships not touched therewith. The Triumph rode there between three Flemish East India ships which remained there above two years, from which they conceive it probable the worm might come. The Eighth Whelp and Henrietta, which have been there two years, are quite free. Are of opinion that the worm bred in the harbour is not dangerous to ships, and that if ships are seasonably careened they may ride at Portsmouth in as great security as in any other place. Inclosed,
8. i. Separate certificates of John Deal and 12 others; Samuel Smith, Lambert Peachy, and Jonas Day, in relation to the above subject. Day states that there is a certain worm called a sand-worm which eats by the ground and touches plank or timber lying near the same, but the art-worm which eats dangerously into ships is not bred there.
Dec. 2. 9. Copy of the same, with the inclosure.
Dec. 2. 10. Henry Earl of Manchester, Lord Privy Seal, to Mr. Keeling, Clerk to the Commissioners [for disafforesting Waltham Forest]. Mr. Alford, dwelling near the sea coast in Sussex, his claim to the Manor of Pinest is now to be received.
Dec. 2.
Apthorpe.
11. Mary Countess of Westmoreland to [Sec. Dorchester]. Understands that his Majesty has detained the licence he signed for the Countess, conceiving it to be a warrant for inclosure. She explains that she does not desire to inclose any whole manors, neither will she depopulate or decay any one dwelling house, but only in two manors she desires to inclose the demesnes to the manor house, and that for housekeeping, the late Earl, on the late King's command, having straightened them by putting 300 acres of his demesnes into his red deer park. Has the consent of most of the inhabitants of both parishes.
Dec. 2.
Swansea.
12. William Herbert to Nicholas. If Nicholas disallows the certificate of the Commissioners respecting the disputed seizure of a ship by Mr. Mansell, begs him to suppress it. Mansell's seizure was for the Earl of Worcester, and Mansell's servants declared that the Earl would protect them. Has sent a certificate to the Lord Chamberlain, and written to Mr. Oldisworth to attend to this business.
Dec. 2.
St. Columb Major.
13. Certificate by Justices of Peace for Cornwall of the number of persons in every house in the hundred of Pider, in that county, with the quantity of corn of every inhabitant, and what corn every inhabitant is to sow this year to come, and also what every maltster, baker, brewer, and tippler malts, bakes, and brews weekly, and what corn has been sold out of the markets since the last harvest. Totals of wheat within the hundred, 11,144 bushels; of barley, 11,217 bushels; of oats, 1,919 bushels.
Dec. 3.
Westminster.
14. The King to Horace Lord Vere, Master of the Ordnance. Understanding that the use of Drakes is grown common in other countries, so as our merchants will be much disadvantaged if they be debarred of them, and for other reasons presented to the Council, and by them allowed and recommended to the King's consideration, the King permits his founder of iron ordnance to cast and make sale of Drakes to the King's subjects, the former warrant remaining in force only against aliens.
Dec. 3. 15. Petition of William Willett, Thomas Wright, William Cann, Richard Vickris, and Robert Kitchen, to the Lords of the Admiralty. Petitioners received commission out of the Court of Admiralty to sell the St. John of Dunkirk, taken by the Convertive, and return the proceeds into that Court. They sold the ship and goods for 1,000l. Having been required by their Lordships to make inquiry for the remainder of her lading, the inventory returned by petitioners coming far short of what was in her when she was taken, they find that 30 tons of salt were put aboard the Convertive by Sir Thomas Button, and that the ropes and other things wanting were taken away by some of the mariners unknown. Having also been required by their Lordships to pay the 1,000l. into the Exchequer, they pray that they may be discharged from the Court of Admiralty, and be permitted to do so, being allowed the charges mentioned in the note annexed. Annexed,
15. i. Account of moneys paid about the St. John of Dunkirk. Total, 120l.
Dec. 3. 16. Petition of William Davyle to the same. The sentence in the Admiralty respecting the St. John of Dunkirk has been stayed by an order of the Council concerning the claims made by the French. By advice of his Majesty's Advocate presents unto them the brief annexed. Annexed,
16. i. Brief ex-parte the King for the St. John of Dunkirk, taken by Capt. Thomas, employed under Sir Thomas Button.
Dec. 3.
Falmouth Road.
17. Capt. Sidrack Gibbon to Nicholas. On the 1st inst. set sail with his Admiral from the Sound of Plymouth. After eight hours sprang a leak, and was in danger to founder, for he pumped 800 strokes every half hour. Bore up for Falmouth. The carpenter assures him that he has found the leak, and that she will yet be serviceable for the voyage. She is a very weak vessel.
Dec. 3.
Wellington.
18. Justices of Peace for the Division of Milverton and the Four Western Tithings of Kingsbury, in co. Somerset, to Sir Francis Dodington, Sheriff of the same county. There is sufficient plenty of corn in their division for the relief of the inhabitants, and the prices are, wheat 7s., rye 5s., barley 4s. 4d., beans 4s., peas 3s. 8d., and oats 2s., per Winchester bushel.
Dec. 4. 19. Petition of James Jeffreys, marshal to Sir Francis Willoughby in the expedition to Rhé, to the Council. On the return from Rhé petitioner was commanded to billet divers gentlemen soldiers of the regiment for a long time, among whom was Lieut. Stanhope, Lieut. to Col. Norton, who remains indebted to petitioner 4l. 1s., for want of which money petitioner has been cast into prison by his own creditors, where he has continued two years and upwards. Prays relief. Underwritten,
19. i. Order for petitioner to produce a sufficient warrant for the billeting above alleged. Whitehall, 1630, Dec. 4.
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
20. Minutes of answers to various petitions given by a Committee of the Council of War at their meeting this day. Among them are the petitions of Dorothy Cope, Dorcas Hamond, James Jeffreys, Elizabeth Darby, William Browne, Robert Chamberlain, Colonel Robert Farrer, and Capt. Porter.
Dec. 4. 21. Minutes of various petitions and reports upon petitions, prepared with a view to the sitting of the Committee of the Council of War referred to in the preceding article. Among the petitioners mentioned are Lieuts. Stephen Hussey, John Disney, and Matthew Mainwaring, Richard Bond, administrator of Capt. Bond, and Thomas Lowther, James Jeffreys, mentioned in the preceding article, John Cornewall, Richard Hill, Capts. Deacons Bull, Walter Fowke, and George Heigham, John Brooke, Henry Heigham, Jane Bell, and Mary Stamford.
Dec. 4. 22. Petition of Ambrose Groome, cook in the Assurance, to the Lords of the Admiralty. Being stricken in years he prays permission to assign over his place to John Greene. Annexed,
22. i. Certificate of Philip Ward, Stephen Alcock, and others, of the sufficiency of John Greene. 1630, Dec. 4.
Dec. 4.
Carleton, near Penrith.
23. Thomas Carleton to Sec. Dorchester. Has written to Sir Richard Graham as the Sec. directed concerning the enhancing of moneys. Concerning the postages, a constant payment hereafter, with a year's pay in hand, and liberty to dispose of their places, living or dying, without check of the postmaster, would give most of them content.
Dec. 4.
London.
24. Dr. John Moseley to the same. Hoped to have had opportunity to have spoken with him and the Lord Treasurer, how it would redound to the advancing of his Majesty's honour, and the promoting of peace with his people, to release those gentlemen that are restrained without the expected submission. There is now a very fair opportunity offered in the solemnity of the peace with Spain. Beseeches them not to let this opportunity slip.
Dec. 4.
Ludlow Castle.
25. Sir John Bridgeman, Sir Nicholas Overbury, Sir Marmaduke Lloyd, and Edward Waties, Council of the Marches of Wales, to Sec. Coke. Have lately received his Majesty's letter, of which they inclose a copy, occasioned, as they conceive, by some misinformation, whereby, being deeply wounded in their justice and integrity, they thought it their parts by petition to present their grief for his Majesty's displeasure and their humble defence, which they send inclosed. Pray him to present the same when the Lord Keeper shall be present, whom they have desired to assist them. Inclosed,
25. i. The King to [the Council of the Marches of Wales]. Declares his resentment and dislike of their proceedings in reference to Thomas Adams, deputy ranger to Sir Robert Harley, Master of the Mint and of the King's game in the Forest of Bringwood. Requires reparation to be made to Sir Robert Harley, not only in the release of his under officer, but in the punishment of Jervis. [See 1630, Nov. 16, Vol. clxxv., No. 61.] Westminster, 1630, Nov. 21. [Copy.]
25. ii. Petition of Sir John Bridgeman and the others of the Council of the Marches of Wales before mentioned to the King. They have released Adams in obedience to the King's directions, but set forth the circumstances, which show that Sir Robert Harley had never complained of any affront, and that the proceedings had all been in due course of law.
Dec. 4. 26. Minutes in Nicholas's handwriting of business to be dispatched this day by the Lords of the Admiralty. Mr. Bond desires the papers concerning the abuses of the saltpetremen may be sent to the Attorney General, without which a bill in the Star Chamber cannot be prepared against Stevens and Hilliard; letters to ViceAdmirals to notify peace with Spain; instructions to the Captain of the Garland now peace is agreed on.
Dec. 4. 27. Colonel Robert Farrer to the Council of War. Gilbert Ware, formerly ensign-bearer to Capt. Stephen Countrey, in May 1627, resigned his office to John Farrer, petitioner's brother, and authorized him to receive all moneys due to Ware. Nevertheless Ware received and detained 22l. of the same moneys. Petitioner also lent moneys to Capts. Countrey, Hinton, Reynolds, and Paddon, in the Isle of Rhé, who all died in that service. Prays order for Ware to pay petitioner for his brother, and the treasurer and paymaster to discharge the other debts before mentioned. Underwritten,
27. i. Reference to Sir William Courteney to examine the business and require Ware to pay or appear before the Board; and to Capt. Mason to pay the other debts on proof.
Dec. 4. 28. Petition of William Browne, serjeant to Capt. Meautys in the late Cadiz action, to the same. Capt. Meautys received on account of petitioner three sums, amounting to 11l. 18s., payment of which petitioner has solicited these two years past. Prays order to Capt. Mason that petitioner may receive satisfaction out of the arrears due to Capt. Meautys. Underwritten,
28. i. Order for petitioner to bring certificates from the Clerk of the Company's book, or other sufficient proof of his debt, to Capt. Mason, that he may certify their Lordships. Whitehall, 1630, Dec. 4.
Dec. 4. 29. Bishop White, of Norwich, Lord Almoner, to Bishop Laud, of London. Dabb [?], a draper in Paul's Churchyard, having stabbed himself, some of his friends have been with the writer, signifying that he has left a widow and six children, and an estate of 2,000l., with many desperate debts; also that there is a deed of gift made by him to the Lord Keeper's brother, and another gentleman. Before the jury has returned a verdict, his friends offer 300l. composition. Begs his advice as to accepting the offer. Knows there will be a loud cry at Court, as lately, in one Burgess's case, of Norfolk, where, because of the noise, having refused an offer, he has got nothing, but is put to a chargeable suit in the Star Chamber. At his first coming down into his diocese had been visited with a tertian, and 24 of his household had been sick. Finds his diocese in as good order as most places are. His suit with Sir John Hubberd [Hobart] concerning Brant Fen continues, and because of Sir John's power is very chargeable and dangerous, but the Bishop will do what he can to maintain the right of his Bishopric. Desires to resign his Almonership, and to retire wholly to his diocese.
Dec. 4. 30. Grant and confirmation by Sir John Borough, Norroy king-atarms, of certain armorial bearings of Thomas Chedley, and Roland his brother, as representatives of the ancient family of that name in co. Chester. Lat. [Copy.]
Dec. 4. 31. Receipt given by Robert Chambers, servant to Auditor Hill, for certain letters, books, and documents respecting the accounts of the late Duke of Buckingham, and the jewels belonging to him pledged for the public service.
Dec. 5.
Westminster.
Proclamation that his Majesty has renewed the ancient amity and good intelligence with Spain, whereupon not only all hostility is to cease, but the former trade and commerce, as settled by the treaty made in the reign of James I., is restored. [Coll. Procs. Car. I., No. 137.]
Dec. 5.
Apthorpe.
32. Mary Countess of Westmoreland to Sec. Dorchester. Particularizes the loss and dishonour which she shall sustain if the stop given to her design of inclosing be not removed.
Dec. 5.
Kingham.
33. Certificate of George Morecroft, H. Elsynge, and others, to Henry Earl of Danby, in behalf of Simon Hathaway, complained of by the Bailiffs of Chipping Norton, for buying corn to make malt in this time of restraint. Believe that Mr. Cornise [Cornish], in regard of a suit between him and Hathaway, has out of mere malice caused him to be accused.
Dec. 6. 34. Henry Earl of Manchester, Lord Privy Seal, to [the Council]. Their Lordships having referred to him the differences in the town of Huntingdon about the renovation of their charter, and some wrongs done to the Mayor and Mr. Barnard, by disgraceful and unseemly speeches used of them by Mr. Cromwell, of Huntingdon, as also certain complaints against one Kilborne, postmaster of Huntingdon, and Brookes his man, the Earl reports that the supposed fears of prejudice to the town by their late altered charter from Bailiffs and Burgesses to Mayor and Aldermen are causeless, and the endeavour used to gain many of the burgesses against this new corporation very indirect and unfit, and such as he could not but much blame them that stirred in it. For Mr. Barnard's carriage of the business, in advising and obtaining the charter, it was fair and orderly done, and the thing effected by him tends much to the good and grace of the town. Three constitutions, or local regulations, are suggested for the removal of doubts. For the words spoken of Mr. Mayor and Mr. Barnard by Mr. Cromwell, as they were ill, so they are acknowledged to be spoken in heat and passion, and desired to be forgotten, and he found Mr. Cromwell very willing to hold friendship with Mr. Barnard, who with a good will, remitting the unkind passages past, entertained the same. "So I left all parties reconciled, and wished "them to join hereafter in things that might be for the common good." As to Kilborne and Brookes, has written to some Justices of Peace of the county to make precise inquisition.
Dec. 6.
Avington, near Hungerford.
35. Sir Gabriel Dowse to the Council. Being given to understand that the Lords had received information of disorders committed near Newbury, upon carts going from thence to Reading laden with corn, and desired speedy punishment of the offenders, the writer and Thomas Fettiplace, in the presence of the Mayor of Newbury, convented before them as many of the offenders as they could have notice of, twelve or thirteen poor ragged women, many of them very aged. Seven were committed to the house of correction, five others were whipped, and directions given for watches to be kept for preventing the like tumults. Want of Justices of the Peace for the Newbury division of the county. The writer the only one. Humphrey Dolman, Roger Knight, and Thomas Nelson are recommended for the service.
Dec. 6.
Freefolk.
36. Sir Thomas Jervoise to Lord President Conway. The complaints of the poor so fill his ears with their miserable wants, being at this present like to perish for want of work, as he is bold to present the same to his Lordship. The King's orders do not the good supposed. Though there be corn appointed to be brought into the market, the poor have no money to buy. The only means they have to subsist is the work from the clothiers, which trade is now wholly falling, their cloths lying upon their hands, and the merchant refusing to buy. Many of his neighbours that are clothiers will present a petition, testifying their griefs. Beseeches him to assist them.
Dec. 6. 37. Separate depositions of William Tyler and Thomas Rodman, in support of the claim of William Browne, preferred against Capt. Meautys, in his petition, calendared, 1630, Dec. 4, No. 28.
Dec. 7.
Woolwich.
38. Francis [?] Sheldon, Clerk of the Cheque at Woolwich, to Nicholas. Only four watchmen are allowed at Woolwich. They watch by turns every night, and there is a porter at the gate, but they are all unfurnished of means of defence. Within these two nights a bark, riding close by the dock, was surprised by two boats well manned, who robbed her of goods to the value of 40l., and escaped undiscovered.
Dec. 7.
Watchet.
39. Justices of Peace for divisions of Williton, Free Manors and Carhampton, in co. Somerset, to Sir Francis Dodington, Sheriff of the same county. There is sufficient plenty of corn for the relief of the inhabitants of their divisions, and the prices are, wheat, 7s. 6d.; rye, 5s. 6d.; barley, 5s.; beans, 4s. 4d.; pease, 5s.; and oats 2s., per bushel.
Dec. 7.
Aboard the Garland.
40. Certificate by the officers of the Garland, that 483 pieces of their ship's sea-store of beef are utterly unserviceable.
Dec. 7. 41. Memorandum that certain papers relating to the misdemeanors of the saltpetremen were sent to Mr. Bond. On the same paper are memoranda respecting the previous sending of other papers relating to the same matter to the Attorney General.
Dec. 7. 42. Letter of Attorney whereby Edmund Meire, merchant tailor, of London, appoints Charles Franckland, of Westminster, gentleman, to demand and recover of William Gomeldon 80l., for nonpayment of 41l., secured by obligation of William Gomeldon and Richard Hamby.
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
43. Lords of the Admiralty to Lord President Conway as ViceAdmiral of Hants. Send him proclamation of the peace with Spain, to be notified in all parts of his Vice-Admiralty, and to all owners and officers of ships within the same. No ship is to put to sea unless the captain take with him one of the same proclamations, or some other authentic signification that the peace was proclaimed on the 5th of this month, O.S., and that thereafter no ships are to be lawful prize on either side. Inclosed,
43. i. Printed Copy of the Proclamation of Peace with Spain. 1630, Dec. 5.
Dec. 8.
Carleton, near Penrith.
44. Thomas Carleton to Sec. Dorchester. In defence of his scheme for a re-issue of money at a greater nominal value. [Considerably mutilated.]
Dec. 9. 45. Officers of the Navy to the Lords of the Admiralty. Have examined the differences between Capt. Rowland Walters, of the Report, of Ipswich, and Daniel Cooper, purser of the same. Capt. Walters improperly ordered 96 men to be victualled upon 80 men's victuals; he occasioned an arrear of victuals upon the Anthony, of Ipswich, and his present ship to the value of 160l.; and he received shirts and shoes for his ship's company which are unaccounted for.
Dec. 9. 46. Passage of a letter of [Bishop Laud] to Dr. Samuel Brooke, respecting his intended tract on Predestination. Likes well that he means to have the judgment of such men upon it. Is yet where he was, that somewhat about those controversies is unmasterable in this life, neither can he think any expression can be so happy as to settle all these difficulties. Doubts whether the King will have these controversies further stirred, which now begin to be at more peace, and the rather because should that he calls smoothing the old way, raise any new doubt in opposite judgments, it would make more noise than ever.
Dec. 10.
Serjeants' Inn.
47. Sir Thomas Richardson, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, to the King. Relates the circumstances of a quarrel and scuffle in which John Morgan, Thomas Throckmorton, Anthony Morgan, and John Minton were engaged, and in which John Minton was killed. John Morgan and Thomas Throckmorton had been tried and found guilty of manslaughter, and the writer thought that Anthony Morgan's offence was the same.
Dec. 10.
Whitehall.
48. Order of Council. The mariners who served in the expedition to Rhé shall be paid only until the 31st of July past, for that they appeared not at Portsmouth, before the departure of the fleet for Rochelle. ["Copia vera," attested by Dennis Fleming, but it is dated in 1630 by mistake for 1628. This is clear from internal evidence, and also from another copy, Vol. clxxvii., No. 57. i.]
Dec. 10. 49. Petition of John Wright to the Lords of the Admiralty. Served purser in the Swiftsure for ten years, but having been suspended these three years, has wasted his estate, run himself in debt, been lain in prison, and is still forced to keep close. Prays them to take his miserable estate into their charitable consideration.
Dec. 10. 50. Petition of William Drake to the same. The Francis, of Calais, and the St. John Baptist, were about six weeks since taken by petitioner's ship, the Swan, of Lyme Regis, but by stress of weather, the Francis was driven into St. Ives, and the St. John Baptist into Dartmouth. Prays warrant that they may be brought about to Lyme Regis.
Dec. 10.
London.
51. Officers of the Navy to the same. Return their opinion on the estimate of the yearly charge of maintaining the Ninth and Fifth Lion's Whelps on the coast of Ireland, presented by Sir Thomas Button. They conceive that 60 men is a full number; and that the victual being provided in Ireland will not require above 6d. a day, whereas 8d. is demanded. Sir Thomas's demands for boatswains' and carpenters' stores are higher than will be needful. For gunners' stores, an estimate obtained from Sir John Heydon is not half as much as Sir Thomas Button's. Inclose,
51. i. Estimate of Sir Thomas Button above mentioned; the number of men being calculated at 80 for each vessel, and 8d. per day charged for victuals. Total, 5,124l. 10s.
51. ii. Estimate of the Officers of the Navy. Total, 3,534l. 9s. 4d.
Dec. 10.
London.
52. The same to the same. A difference has been of late between Mr. Wells, keeper of the stores at Deptford, and Mr. Faulkener, clerk of the cheque there. Mr. Faulkener contracted with Mr. Burrell to take in and issue out the outstores at 12d. per ton, and now desires to make this contract reach to the instores. After considering Mr. Wells's objections, they think the contract will be a moderate and fitting one, but deem it not right to conclude without acquainting their Lordships.
Dec. 10. 53. Referees for investigation of Sir Allen Apsley's accounts to Peter Apsley and Stephen Alcock. To send to the referees on Wednesday, the 15th inst., at Sir John Wolstenholme's house, a schedule of all the moneys imprested and received by Sir Allen out of the Exchequer, or by any other way. [Draft. Appended is a list of 76 claimants against the estate of Sir Allen, and a memorandum that there appears to have been received by imprest by Sir Allen Apsley 303,292l. 7s. 10d.]
Dec. 10.
London.
54. William Drake to his noble friend —. Does not remember that the person addressed desired to hear when Drake went to London, nor that Drake promised to stop the payment of his friend's moneys until the time of his payments. Will not do anything that will do him prejudice. Has received from Mr. Ratt, 400l. on his account.
Dec. 10. 55. Certificate of the Justices of the Peace for Martock, Tintenhull, and various other hundreds, in co. Somerset, as to the quantities of corn found in those hundreds, and their proceedings in abating the number of alehouse-keepers, regulating rogues and vagabonds, and relieving the poor. Salt and oatmeal, with which the poor people were wont at an easy rate to relieve themselves, are now grown to very high prices, by reason the merchants monopolize the salt, and the clothier in the making of his mingled cloths, consumes an infinite quantity of oats.
Dec. 11.
Leicester.
56. Justices of Peace of co. Leicester to the Council. Excuse the tardiness of their certificate, they having been prevented holding a sessions on two occasions by the absence of the Clerk of the Peace, whose father is a maltster. Stratagems of the holders of corn to raise the price of the markets, and the inability of the Justices to prevent them. Some of them refuse to be bound to appear before the Council, "and then we know not what further to say unto them, "more than a terrifying threatening, which some for fear value, "others not at all." Return the prices of corn, similar to some before mentioned.
Dec. 11.
Bodmin.
57. Sir John Roe, late Sheriff of Cornwall, to the same. By reason of due respect had by the Justices to the orders of the Council, the markets have been plentifully furnished, and the export of corn is carefully reformed. But the price of corn still increases, from the report of scarcity in some parts of the kingdom. Wheat is 9½d., barley, 5½d., and oats at 2½d. per gallon. Rates it by the gallon, because the bushel in that country is uncertain. Has delivered their last letter to Sir John Trelawney, his successor.
Dec. 11. 58. Minutes by Nicholas, of business to be considered by the Lords of the Admiralty. Among them divers petitions and references that have lain long, some of them half a year, in Nicholas's hands. The attention of the Lords was to be drawn to a grant made to David Ramsey, of two parts of all pirates goods happening in Ireland for 21 years. This was objected to, the like never having been granted to any one but the Lord Admiral. From a marginal memorandum, it appears that the Lords disapproved of this grant, as a thing unfit to proceed, but resolved nothing, because the rest of the Lords were absent.
Dec. 11.
Swansea.
59. William Herbert and others to the Lords of the Admiralty. Under a Commission from the Court of Admiralty, dated the 2nd inst., for seizing the St. Michael to his Majesty's use, they repaired on board that ship, and read their commission, but by Henry Mansell, a Justice of the Peace, with divers other unruly persons, were forcibly ejected, and have been unable to recover possession. Mansell and Matthew Francklyn have embezzled and daily diminish the merchandize of the ship.
Dec. 11.
Swansea.
60. The same to Philip Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Lord Chamberlain. Relate the circumstances mentioned in the preceding letter. The ship is of great value; but such as now possess her being men of desperate fortunes, are likely to embezzle her lading. Thomas Mansell is gone to Court with some pretensions of service to his Majesty, but the truth is, that he seized on her to the use of the Earl of Worcester.
Dec. 11.
Whitehall.
61. Lords of the Admiralty to Capt. John Mennes, of the Garland, appointed to guard the Narrow Seas. He is to ply to and again between the Downs and the West of the Isle of Wight, to defend all ships belonging to his Majesty's subjects and friends from the spoil of pirates and sea-rovers.
Dec. 11. Copy of the same. [See Dom., Car. I., Vol. clvii., fo. 114.]
Dec. 12.
Aboard the Garland.
62. Captain John Mennes to [Nicholas]. Has brought the Garland from Chatham to Gillingham, and purposes to-morrow to come into the Hope. Is victualled for six weeks, with an order for beer at Rochester, and is ready to sail when their Lordships shall order.
Dec. 13. 63. Questions and Answers upon theological subjects given by Mr. Archer, extracted out of his sermons preached in Allhallows, Lombard Street, on Sundays, in the afternoon, with this indorsement by Bishop Laud, "Mr. Archer's catechism, for which I "suspended him," and this memorandum, also by Bishop Laud, in the margin; "not catechising according to the Catechism in the "Common Prayer Book."
Dec. 14. Grant to Henry Earl of Holland, of fines due to the King for admittance to copyhold lands within the Lordship of Wakefield, co. York, whose fines are yet arbitrable and uncertain, by being excepted out of a composition made with the rest of the copyholders in 9 and 10 Jac. I., all which fines accrued between 5 Jac. I. and 28 July last, when the whole Lordship was passed in fee-farm to the Earl of Holland. [Docquet.]
Dec. 14. Warrant for delivery of stuff to Henry Whittingham, for his livery as Groom of the Privy Chamber, in the place of Robert Levingston, deceased. [Docquet.]
Dec. 14.
Whitehall.
64. The Lords of the Admiralty to the Officers of the Navy. The Lords are informed that on sale of the St. Anne, Capt. Mason got into his custody, besides the tackle and furniture of the ship delivered by indenture to the Lord Chamberlain, the tackle and furniture bought by his Lordship. They are to examine what tackle has been delivered to Capt. Mason.
Dec. 14. Minutes of answers to Petitions given by the Council of War. Among the petitioners are the Rochelle Captains, Lieut. Hussey, Capts. Fowke, Deacons Bull, and George Heigham, Giles Williams, and Andrew Grandie. [Written on the same paper as Vol. clxxvi., No. 20.]
Dec. 14.
Brampton.
65. Brilliana Lady Harley to her father, Lord President Conway. Her long sickness has kept her from writing. Has some hope now that God will spare her life. Prays for his long and healthful life, and begs his blessing for Ned, Robin, Tom, Brill, and Doll.
Dec. 14.
Swansea.
66. William Herbert and others to Philip Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery. The messenger with their former letter, meeting one that came with letters from Mr. Taverner, returned again, the messenger assuring him that Thomas Mansell had wholly submitted himself to the Earl. Such as retain the ship for him acknowledge no such submission. Such of the malefactors as they could surprise they sent towards the gaol at Cardiff, but by the way they were set at liberty by Sir Thomas Mansell. The chief offenders are Henry Mansell, Matthew Francklyn, and Rowland Vaughan. The names of others may be seen in the examinations inclosed. Inclosed,
66. i. Information of John Francklyn that on Sunday, 30 Nov. last, Thomas Mansell took possession of the ship to the use of the Earl of Worcester. 1630, Dec. 11.
66. ii. Examination of Robert Donnell that he went to require possession for his Majesty's use; he was refused by the persons in possession, who told him they had seized the ship for the Earl of Worcester, who would bear them out 1630, Dec. 11.
66. iii. Information of Joseph Price that Thomas Mansell seized for the Earl of Worcester. 1630, Dec. 11.
66. iv. Examination of Lewis Thomas, that Thomas Mansell and Matthew Francklyn delivered to him and others muskets with powder in the pan to shoot off if any came to the ship from Mr. Herbert. When the boat came with a letter from Mr. Herbert, William Woolcock, one of the company, discharged a musket with bullet therein. 1630, Dec. 11.
66. v. Separate confessions of Matthew John Rosser and John Morgan, as to goods sent ashore out of the ship by Henry Mansell. 1630, Dec. 11.
66. vi. Examination of Morgan Vaughan, as to Mr. Herbert's going aboard the ship, reading his commission, and demanding possession. 1630, Dec. 11.
66. vii. The like of Matthew Francklyn to the same facts. 1630, Dec. 11.
66. viii. The like of William Woolcock, as to the same facts, and that Henry Mansell and Rowland Vaughan cast back William Morgan, one of the Commissioners who attempted to enter, and that he was in great peril. 1630, Dec. 11.
66. ix. The like of Thomas Richard, as to the incidents when the musket was fired, 1630, Dec. 13.
66. x. The like of Owen Vaughan, as to the firing the musket. 1630, Dec. 13.
66. xi. The like of Robert Donnell, as to Mr. Herbert's endeavour to seize the ship on the 8th inst., when he put the King's mark on the mast and read his commission. 1630, Dec. 14.
66. xii. Information of Robert Watkins and confession of Henry Watkins, as to goods sent ashore out of the ship by Henry and Thomas Mansell. 1630, Dec. 14.
66. xiii. Examination of Walter Griffith, as to the assault on Mr. Morgan, and incidents on the 8th and 13th Dec. 1630, Dec. 14.
66. xiv. Separate examinations of Henry Watkins and Edward Matthew, as to the original seizure, that Thomas Mansell sent a barrel of powder aboard, the reading the commission by Herbert, and the sending goods ashore. 1630, Dec. 14.
Dec. 14.
Aboard the Garland, in Tilbury Hope.
67. Captain John Mennes to Nicholas. Has received 12 tons of beer. Wishes warrants for his master, James Bamford, and his lieutenant, Andrew Mennes.
Dec. 14.
Morton.
68. Richard Bagnall to the same. Begs him to remember his business to the Lords when they sit. Desires to make the same single proportion as his father-in-law did, which was 700 a week.
Dec. 14.
Swansea.
69. William Herbert to Edmund Taverner. Urges him to procure them some other than written authority to seize the ship held by the Mansells. Begs him to consult Nicholas thereon, and to let the depositions be read to the Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, that he may be informed how fraudulently Thomas Mansell abuses his goodness.
Dec. 14.
London.
70. Thomas Hutchins, post of Crew Green [?], to "his loving "friends and fellows in office between London and Berwick." Had had conference with the Lord Treasurer for relief of their post wages. He confidently promised that they should have relief before the 15th inst. Sec. Coke hoped to procure twelve or sixteen thousand pounds in part, and to take a course for the residue, and that their wages should be better paid in future.