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Charles I - volume 501: March 1644

Pages 32-86

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1644. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1888.

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March 1644

March 1.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir Wm. Waller, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir Philip Stapleton, Mr. Recorder Glynn, and Messrs. Pierpont, Browne, Wallop, and Robert Barclay. Resolved, 1. That Mr. Recorder move the Commons from this Committee that the fleet appointed for the Irish coasts be speeded forth, and money sent to oppose any forces coming out of Ireland either into England or Scotland. 4,000l. will do the business. 2. That it be moved by Mr. Recorder in the House, that the London regiments be desired to stay in those parts where they are till the forces of the Association march towards them, and that a letter be written to them from the House to that purpose. 3. That Col. Welden's regiment march into Sir W. Waller's quarters in Sussex, and observe such orders as they shall receive from him. 4. That the Lord General [Essex] give orders that the forces appointed to go by Banbury shall go the western way. 5. That Sir Arthur Haselrigg do go to the Western Committee to quicken their expediting of Sir Wm. Waller. To meet at 3 p.m., when those of the Committee here named were present. 6. That Mr. Browne do report to the House of Commons that the money due to Thomas Cunningham for arms may be paid him, as he is a fit man to be employed in Holland in joint agency with Mr. Strickland, but is hindered by reason of his engagement there for the said arms. 7. That he also report as the opinion of this Committee that the supply of victuals for the Scottish army is most pressing, and that the House be prayed to give order to the Committee at Goldsmiths' Hall to consider of and expedite the same. 8. That the letters from the Scottish army be reported to the House of Lords to-morrow by the Earl of Northumberland. 9. That Sir Wm. Brereton, Commissary Copley, and three others be desired to be at the Committee to-morrow. 10. That the removing of Sir Thos. Fairfax's horse into Yorkshire be taken into consideration to-morrow. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 10, 11.]
March 2.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir W. Waller, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, and Robert Barclay. This day nothing put to the vote.
March 2.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Basil Earl of Denbigh. Your letters to the Committee and his Excellency have been received, and we give you thanks for your care of the design of Gloucester and for your advertisements concerning it, and assure you that we have taken all the care we can for the safety of that action by way of diversion and leave the carrying on of that design wholly to the Commissary-General Behre, according to the instructions which he has received from his Excellency, who being upon the place is best able to judge what is fit to be done there. Signed by the Earl of Northumberland and Lord J. Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., p. 9. Copy. ⅓ p.]
March 4. 1. Order of the House of Lords. That the Archbishop of Canterbury shall appear before them on Tuesday the 12th instant, at 9 a.m., when the House will proceed on the First and farther Articles of his Impeachment. [See Lords' Journals vi., 449. ½ p.]
March 4. 2. The Committee for the Accounts of the kingdom, sitting at the late Alderman Freeman's house in Cornhill, to Martyn Dallison and Lawrence Newman, at Haberdashers Hall. Requiring a perfect account of all moneys received by them by virtue of any ordinance for the assessment of the twentieth or fifth part of estates or which have been paid or deposited with them any other ways for the public service. [Damaged by damp. 1 p.]
March 4.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Colonel [Oliver] Cromwell. Hearing your forces are about Hilsden we desire you to stay in those parts until you hear further from us, and in the meantime to be as active to the prejudice of the enemy as with your safety you may. Signed by the Earl of Northumberland and Lord J. Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., p. 10. Copy. ¼ p.]
March 4.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. [Names of the Committee wanting.] Ordered, 1. That order be sent to Sir Wm. Waller to take care of Sir Richd. Greenvile's regiment so as to prevent any further inconvenience from the going of Sir Richard, and that the foot may be put into a posture of service. 2. That such of the Committee of the Militia as can give best information of the state of the regiment of horse now or late under the command of Col. Turner be desired to attend this Committee, as also Cols. Turner and Thomson to attend. 3. That a party of 3,000 horse, 5,000 foot, and 600 dragoons shall march westward against the forces of Lord Hopton. 4. That the King's forces may not go to the assistance of Sir Ralph [Lord] Hopton, your forces are to be used in the best way for a diversion, and to keep up good intelligence with the forces at Warwick under Commissary-General Behre for the better carrying on of both designs, of the convoy to Gloucester and against Hopton. 5. That a copy of these orders be sent to the Earl of Manchester and Col. Cromwell in cypher. 6. That the particular ordering and expediting of this party be referred to the Lord General Essex and Sir Wm. Waller. 7. That Rowland Fawkerd be appointed a fifth messenger to attend this Committee. [Interregnum, 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 11, 12.]
March 5.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, the Earl of Northumberland, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Wm. Waller, Sir H. Vane, junr., Sir Philip Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop and Robt. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Thursday weekly be set apart for Foreign Affairs and next Thursday for Mr. [Hugh] Peters' relation and that of Sweden. 2. That Sir Philip Stapleton do report to the House [of Commons] the Earl of Manchester's letter of 2nd March concerning the fortifying of Newport Pagnell. 3. As also two letters, one from Sir Samuel Luke and the other from Major-General Skippon. 4. That Mr. Solicitor [St. John] do report to that House from this Committee for money for messengers and other necessaries. 5. That there be employed into Yorkshire for the settling thereof all the horse of Lord Fairfax and Sir Thos. Fairfax. 6. That Lord Fairfax's foot and two Lancashire regiments supposed to muster 1,500 foot shall be employed in Yorkshire. 7. That Sir Thos. Fairfax be employed in this service into Yorkshire. 8. That there shall march into Shropshire two Lancashire regiments, 500 of Sir John Gell's forces, 600 foot out of Cheshire, 350 out of Staffordshire, and 300 out of Warwickshire, besides the 400 foot at Wem to continue there. Of horse for the same service, 200 from Warwickshire, 150 from Staffordshire, 150 of Lord Grey's, the 200 of Wem to continue there, 300 of Lancashire, besides those of Cheshire and all Lord Willoughby's. The Earl of Denbigh to command this party in chief. 9. That Sir Wm. Brereton, Sir Thos. Middleton, and the gentlemen from cos. Warwick, Salop, Stafford, Lancashire, and Cheshire be desired to be here at the Committee to-morrow. 10. That the two letters written to Lord Fairfax and Sir Thos. Fairfax concerning the business for Yorkshire are to be sent by Mr. White after having been shown to the Lord General [Essex]. 11. That Mr. Wallop do report to the House [of Commons] from this Committee that course may be taken by the Western Committee for payment of the supernumerary forces of Sir Wm. Waller that have not been taken on by the Association, and for two or three thousand pounds for present setting forth of Sir Wm. Waller. 12. That the business of Viscount Clanneboy be first taken into consideration to-morrow. 13. That to-morrow care be taken that ships may be sent to look after the ships that are to come from Holland with arms. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 12, 13.]
March 5. 3. The Committee for the Accounts of the kingdom, sitting at Cornhill, to Martin Dallison, at Haberdashers Hall. Requiring him to deliver to them on Thursday next at 9 a.m., a certificate of the names of all accountants which were accountable to the Lords and Commons for advance of money, sitting at Haberdashers Hall. [Damaged by damp. ½ p.]
March 5.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Ferdinando Lord Fairfax. We have considered the opportunity that is now offered for reducing and assuring of Yorkshire, whilst the Marquis of Newcastle has drawn the greatest part of his forces towards the north to oppose the Scots, and how necessary it is to hinder all further levies there to increase his army, which the better to effect, we have written to Sir Thomas Fairfax to forthwith march into the West Riding, with all his horse, and take with him two regiments of foot out of Lancashire. We desire that you will also take the field with as great force of horse and foot as you can, and joining with Sir Thomas Fairfax make the best advantage you can of the present opportunity and of those forces for effecting the ends aforesaid. We also desire that you will hold a continual intelligence with the Scottish army, and by drawing near to the Tees or otherwise to give them the best accommodation you shall be able, and that you will continually advertise us of all your occurrencies and affairs. Signed by the Earl of Northumberland and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., pp. 9, 10. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 5.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thomas Fairfax. To the same effect as the preceding. [Ibid., pp. 10, 11. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 6.
Vienna.
Sir Griffin Markham to John Tupper, in the Marquis of Newcastle's army in England. The old saying is Nemo propheta in patriâ suâ, but I swear he was a poet who wrote it, for I never was so much esteemed as in my own country., and if Queen Elizabeth had lived I had found it really, but her death was my undoing. Oh ! that I could come to serve that good King whose virtues are esteemed of all honest men, and by my brother Thomas's relation of his nature and goodness, I wish with all my heart I could serve him, but my hurts and old age do hinder me from that honour and contentment. I have written to your Marquis [of Newcastle] and recommended you to him, and so I have recommended Colonel Preston, and wished him to procure that he may be called out of Ireland and be with him, for trust me the great soldier Leslie will have no advantage of him either in judgment, skill, or valour, his actions have witnessed that, and if I be not deceived he will deserve what any man can say in commendation of him. I recommend to you all my friends and kinsfolk there who have done and I assure myself will set up their rests to do good service. I would be glad to hear what becomes of our late ambassador Sir Thos. Roe, a great friend of yours as he made us believe here, but I believed him only by discretion, I think he will have more of the fox than the Roe. I pray deliver my letter to the Marquis, and if you dare write me I dare answer you and I would I were with you. God send you contentment in your own country for it is better than here. I am in doubt whether to stay here or ask my leave, and I think to do the latter and hope to do it with grace. If things happen to my benefit in any reasonable manner I will return to end my days in Flanders, otherwise in an hospital to the shame of my masters. [Seal with crest. 1 p. German Correspondence.]
March 6. The Committee of Parliament for receiving those who come in on the Declaration of both kingdoms to the Committee for preachers at Whitehall. That it be recommended to the Committee of St. James's to appoint a certain day and a certain person, in the presence of some of that Committee, to tender the Covenant, according to the Orders of both Houses. [Interregnum G., 76, p. 561.]
March 6.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Say. Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir H, Vane, junr., Sir Wm. Waller, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, and Robt. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That it be propounded to the gentlemen of Salop how the forces that are designed for their aid shall be maintained either in money or other provisions. 2. That Mr. Pierpont shall declare by word of mouth to the gentlemen of cos. Cheshire, Lancashire, Salop, and Stafford, severally and apart from each other the numbers of men that are to be raised in the several counties for the Salop expedition. 3. That Sir H. Vane, junr., shall go out to Viscount Clanneboy to tell him that when the Committee has considered of his business they will send for him. 4. Memd., that this day I received of Sir Philip Stapleton five papers, viz.:—1, from the Earl of Forth to his Excellency [the Lord General], 29 Jan. 1643–44; 2, from his Excellency to the Earl of Forth, 30 Jan.; 3, from the Earl of Forth to his Excellency, 15 Feb. 1643–44; 4, from his Excellency to the Earl of Forth, 19 Feb. 1643–44; 5, Earl of Forth to his Excellency; 5. That a sub-committee be named to make a Declaration to the kingdom upon the three letters of the King, viz., Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Wharton and Warriston, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Mr. Pierpont or any two of them. 6. That the business of the King's letter be first taken into consideration to-morrow. 7. That Col. Carne do attend this Committee to-morrow at 3 o'clock, and Messrs. Scofield, Baskett, and Bury. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 13, 14.]
March 7/17.
The Hague.
Charles Louis the Elector Palatine to Sir Thos. Roe. I trust you will not believe Lord Goring a fit instrument to solicit such a business [as the command of the Wismar army] at the French Court, where his of late intercepted letters have put him in no very good predicament; and at no time the recommendation of the Court of England will, as long as it has the reputation to be Spanishly inclined, benefit me. I wish with all my heart your health were as firm as I see your affection is to my interests. If you had stayed here when your daughter and I desired, you had avoided many inconveniences and not have put yourself into troubles. I wish those of England may soon end in a true peace. [Extract. In German correspondence.]
March 7. 4. Ordinance of the Lords and Commons for upholding the Government and Fellowship of Merchants of England trading into the Levant seas; for the maintenance of clothing and woollen manufactures, the renting of lead, tin, and sundry other commodities of this kingdom. [Printed in Lords' Journals vi., 455. Broadside.]
March 7. 5. Note of privileges granted to the Levant Company. By charter, dated Dec. 14, 1605, they have power to appoint Consuls or ViceConsuls of the Company at all places in the Seigniory of Venice or the Levant. By ordinance of both Houses of Parliament of March 7 [see above] they have free choice and removal of all ministers and officers maintained by them at home or abroad. [2/3 p.]
March 7. 6. Certificate of Martyn Dallison, clerk to the Committee of Lords and Commons for Advance of money to the Committee for the Accounts of the kingdom. I certify that, taking such to be accountants as have received the money raised by the Committee of Lords and Commons for Advance of money, these are their names, viz., Sir John Wollaston, Aldermen Towse, Warner, and Andrews, Treasurers on the Propositions, and Sir Gilbert Gerrard, Treasurerat-Wars. But more immediately those appointed by the Committee, are, Samuel Gosse, receiver of moneys and goods distrained, Lawrence Newman, receiver of money deposited on the 20th part. There have been long since divers employed in the Wards of London who gathered money on divers propositions, whose names are omitted, but if required I shall endeavour to certify them time being allowed me. [1 p.]
March 7. 7. Order of the Commons' House. That such moneys as Sir Thos. Middleton shall from this time discover to belong to delinquents shall be employed by him for raising forces for North Wales, provided it exceed not 10,000l., and that it be referred to the Committee for Examinations to examine the proof of the delinquency of the persons whose estates he shall discover, and [he] to be accountable to the State for the same. [Printed in Commons' Journals iii., 420. Copy. ½ p.]
March 7.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir H. Vane, junr., Sir Wm. Waller, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Browne, Wallop, and Robt. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Sir Arthur Haselrigg do report to the House of Commons to-morrow the petition against Col. Carne, who, with the three gent. petitioners, are to attend the resolution of the House. 2. That the letter formerly sent to the Committee of both kingdoms resident in the Scottish army be again written and sent by this ship [not named]. 3. That the consideration of the petition from the Committee at Grocers' Hall be put off until Monday next. 4. That Col. Carne and Mr. Lisle do attend this Committee to-morrow at 3 p.m. 5. That letters be sent to the Earl of Denbigh to draw out that proportion of forces out of the several counties of his Association, appointed for Salop. 6. The like to Lancashire and Cheshire. 7. That the Lord General [Essex] be desired to write to Commissary-General Behre. 8. That Sir Arthur Haselrigg do report to the House with the recommendation of this Committee, that Sir Wm. Bereton and Sir Thos. Middleton may be dispatched into the country in regard their service is so necessary there at this time. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 15.]
March 8.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir H. Vane, junr., Sir Wm. Waller, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, and Robt. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the papers given in by the Scotts' Commissioners 8 March be presented to the House to-morrow. 2. That a sub-committee be appointed to draft a letter to be sent to his Majesty so far as is agreed upon by both nations, viz., Lords Say, Wharton, and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor, and Mr. Pierpont, or any three of them. 3. That the Committee meet to-morrow at 8 o'clock to peruse the draft of the letter. 4. That the Lord Admiral [Warwick] write to Mr. [Walter] Strickland to have care to free the ships stayed in the Low Countries, and to send to the Judge of the Admiralty to take examinations concerning the unkind actions done against some English ships by the Hollanders, and to attend this Committee on Thursday next. 5. That the Lord Admiral do speak with traders to Newcastle about transporting provisions to the Scottish army and to bring back coals. 6. That it be reported to the House [of Commons] as the desire of this Committee that Sir Wm. Brereton be speeded away. 7. That the letter now read be sent to the Committee of Kent. 8. That a letter be sent to the Committee of the Isle of Wight to desire 300 men for assistance of Sir Wm. Waller. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 16.]
March 8.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Basil Earl of Denbigh. We have taken into our serious consideration the distressed estate of Wem, and the great consequence of that place not only to the adjacent counties but to the whole kingdom, and how we may reduce those counties from being under the power of the enemy. The best means for this now occurring to us is that your Lordship, with 200 horse and 300 foot out of Warwickshire, and 150 horse and 350 foot out of Staffordshire, do march to join with the forces already in the county of Salop to Wem. We have desired my Lord General to give you directions accordingly, and to appoint six troops of Lancashire horse and two regiments of their foot, and all the horse of Cheshire and 600 of their foot to meet at such rendezvous as you shall appoint. We have written to Sir Thomas Fairfax for his best assistance in pursuance thereof as soon as Lord Willoughby's horse, which are about 500, can be spared from a service they are now employed in, the Lord General will send them to you, and 150 horse of Lord Grey's. The necessitated expediting of this service makes us earnestly desire you not to stay, though many conveniences are wanting which we will supply as soon as we can. We know you will consider that the design for Gloucester be not hindered but as far as both may consist together. My Lord General has written to Commissary-General Behre to be aiding in this service. We inclose several letters to Sir Thos. Fairfax, Col. Purfoy, and others, which we desire you to peruse and to send them, together with any of your own, as you shall think best conducing to this design. We hope few of these forces will fail, but if any of them should we desire you to go with the rest if you conceive them able to oppose the enemy. Signed by Northumberland and John Lord Maitland. P.S.—It is not intended that any of the forces now at Warwick shall be drawn away until the design of Gloucester be performed. [Interregnum 18 E., pp. 11, 12. Copy. 1¼ p.]
March 8.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thomas Fairfax. We have desired my Lord General to give directions to the Earl of Denbigh to relieve the besieged in Wem and the distressed people in Shropshire, and those parts from the enemy. How much this is conducing to their safety and the good affairs of the whole kingdom, you, who have done so exceeding good service, well know. We have desired my Lord General to direct you to appoint six troops of horse and two regiments of foot of Lancashire to meet at such rendezvous as the Earl of Denbigh, who is to command them in chief, shall appoint. We desire you and do assure ourselves that you will show them that their own safety will most consist in the good success of those their neighbours, and that no way will be so much to their own ruin as the enemies taking them. There are appointed other very considerable forces of horse and foot to meet them. We inclose some letters which we desire you to subscribe with the names of such Colonels or other officers as are most fit for this service. Signed by Northumberland and Lord Maitland. [Ibid., pp. 12, 13. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 8.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Thomas Fairfax. We have taken into consideration the opportunity that is now offered for reducing and assuring of Yorkshire whilst the Marquis of Newcastle has drawn the greatest part of his forces towards the north to oppose the Scots. And how necessary it is to hinder all further levies there to increase his army: for the better effecting whereof we desire you forthwith to march into the West Riding of Yorkshire with all your horse and to take with you two regiments of the Lancashire foot, of those that are fittest for that march, and for that purpose we have sent you enclosed two letters [see next entry] to those two Colonels whose regiments you would have to march with you, with blanks for their names, which we desire you to fill up. We have also written to Lord Fairfax to take the field and join with you with as great a force of horse and foot as he conveniently can, and we desire that you will make the best advantage you can both of the opportunity and of those forces for effecting the ends aforesaid, as also that you will hold a continual intelligence with the Scottish army, and by drawing near the Tees or otherwise to give them the best accommodation you shall be able, and that you will continually advertise us of all your occurrences and affairs. And because we have been willing that you and your forces should serve the opportunities now offered in Yorkshire, we have endeavoured to provide for the present necessity of Shropshire and the parts adjacent by forces from other parts, the particulars whereof we think fit to communicate with you, and desire you to give the best furtherance you can thereunto by that interest that we know you have in the hearts of the Lancashire forces. Signed by Northumberland and Lord J. Maitland. (Ibid., pp. 13, 14. Copy = 1 p.]
March 8.
Derby House.
The same to a Colonel of Lancashire foot. We know your judgment such as cannot but take notice that your safety is best secured when the war is furthest from you, and that it will be a very great difficulty if not an impossibility to defend yourselves if all your neighbours should be ruined. How great an opportunity is now offered to reduce and assure Yorkshire in the absence of the Marquis of Newcastle's forces you cannot but know, and how great your security will be if that shire be once in the Parliament's hands, to effect which we desire that your regiment do march forthwith into Yorkshire [to serve] under the command of Sir Thomas Fairfax for the reducing and settling thereof, which we doubt not your readiness to do, for that besides all other motives your own interest is so deeply concerned therein. Underwritten,
Note, that another letter of the same tenor and date was sent. [Ibid., p. 14. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 8.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of both kingdoms resident in the Scottish army. We have sent you a quantity of butter and cheese in the "Hopeful Reformation," of London, Humfrey Blunt master. [Ibid., Copy ¼ p.]
March 8.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Purefoy. We have desired the Lord General to appoint the Earl of Denbigh to go with divers forces to the relief of Wem. If that place should be lost, the consequence thereof so much concerns your own and the kingdom's safety as we earnestly desire you and doubt not of your readiness to assist with two hundred horse who may carefully observe such directions as they shall receive from his Lordship, to whom we have written how this may best be not crossing the design for Gloucester. Signed by the Earl of Northumberland and John Lord Maitland. Underwritten, Note, that a similar letter was sent to Colonel Barker for 300 foot. [Ibid., p. 15. Copy. ½ p.]
March 8.
Derby House.
The same to Colonel Ridgley. We have desired the Lord General to appoint the Earl of Denbigh to go with divers forces to the relief of Wem. If that place should be lost, the consequence thereof so much concerns your own and the kingdom's safety as we earnestly desire you and doubt not of your readiness to assist with [those to be named] who may carefully observe such directions as they shall receive from his Lordship. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Note, that a similar letter was sent to the Committee at Stafford, with a clause to let them understand that the same is written to Col. Ridgley. The like to Cheshire. Also six letters to six captains of horse in Lancashire to be nominated by Sir Thomas Fairfax. Two letters to two colonels of foot in Lancashire to be nominated by Sir Thomas Fairfax, and another to Col. Dukenfeild for two companies of his foot and his horse. Another letter of the same to Lieut.-Col. Massie for two companies of Col. Booth's foot. Another to Major Croxton to assign one or two companies as may stand with the safety of the garrison at Nantwich. Another to Henry Mainwaring and his brother for their horse; Also six letters to captains of horse, sent to Lord Denbigh, to be forwarded to Sir Thomas Fairfax who is to nominate them. [Ibid., pp. 15, 16. Copy.= 1 p.]
March 8. 8. The Committee for the safety of co. Surrey to the constables of Kingston and Elmbridge. You are to warn the inhabitants within the said hundreds who have any horses or mares fit for dragoons or troopers or any arms in their keeping to repair to this Committee sitting at the Crane at Kingston-on-Thames, and bring them to be listed with meet riders and the arms with able men to use them to be listed and to serve under the Sheriff Edmond Jordan, Esq., for defence of the Parliament, preservation of the peace of the county, and resistance to all unlawful plundering, incursion, and violence. If any of the constables or inhabitants shall refuse or neglect to obey this order on Tuesday the 12th instant they shall be reputed and taken as evil members to the State. [¾ p.]
March 8. 9. Copy of the same. [¾ p.]
March 9. 10. Additional Instructions by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament for John Earl of Rutland and the other Commissioners from the Parliament to the Convention of Estates of Scotland. You shall make known to our brethren of Scotland: That the several treaties concerning the Assistance desired from the kingdom of Scotland by the Parliament of England, and concerning the garrison of Berwick, are assented unto, confirmed and approved by both Houses in the manner and form they were subscribed by the Committees of both kingdoms and sent from them to both Houses, whereof you shall receive copies under the clerk's hands; and that Colonel Hume is approved of by both Houses to be Governor of Berwick pro tempore. You are also to declare to our brethren of Scotland: That the Parliament have settled a course for taking of the late Solemn League and Covenant throughout this kingdom and dominion of Wales. [Printed in the Lords' Journals iv., 461. 12 pp.]
March 9. 11. Copy of the same; wrongly dated March 6. [12½ pp.]
March 9. 12. Note of the contents of some of the above Additional Instructions. [1 p.]
March 9. 13. [Despatch communicating the doings of the army under the Marquis of Newcastle to the King.] It is headed "A true relation of all the observable passages that have happened in these [northern] parts since my last to your Majesty; with the reason of the impossibility of making good the Tyne against the Scots." Sir Thos. Riddell sent about 50 musketeers from Tynemouth Castle to destroy some corn in the enemies' quarters, from whence they were drawn out, as he was informed; but it seems his intelligence betrayed them to the enemy and about 45 of them were taken prisoners, who being carried to Leslie [Earl of Leven] he sent them to me as a token, and I returned him thanks for his civility, with this answer, that I hoped very shortly to repay that debt with interest, which I did in a few days. The 19th of February 1643[–44] Sir Marmaduke Langdale fell upon their quarters at Corbridge in Northumberland, but the enemy having timely notice of his coming were drawn into the field. He thereupon sent troops to second those that first entered the town, who charged the enemy, but the enemy with their lancers forced them to retreat. He sent more, but the enemy charged them gallantly, but durst not pursue them because of our reserve. At last he rallied his forces, and taking about 200 foot with him forced the enemy to retreat. He routed them totally, and followed the chase 3 miles, killing above 200 and taking about 150 prisoners, besides divers officers slain, whereof one [was] named Captain Haddon. The prisoners [taken were] Major Agnio [Agnew] dangerously hurt, Archibald Magee [Mackie], Quartermaster, [Major John] Haddon's Cornet, Cornet Carr [Ker], grandchild to Lord Roxburgh. There were 15 of their troops of horse, whereof Leslie's [Earl of Leven's] lifeguard was one, and 3 troops of dragooners. Leslie's son [Major General, David Leslie] was their General, who is shot through the shoulder. There are two horse colours and a dragoon colour taken. The same morning Colonel Dudley from his quarters about Prudhoe marched over the river with some horse and dragoons and fell into a quarter of the enemy's in Northumberland, and slew and took all that was in it, 55 prisoners, and gave such an alarum to four of their quarters that they quitted them in disorder and with some loss; in which [skirmish] we should have suffered no loss at all had not Colonel Brandling been taken prisoner through the unfortunate fall of his horse; and Colonel Dudley perceiving a greater force preparing to assault him retreated, and in his retreat took 8 of the Scots prisoners both horses and men, but they took 4 of his dragoons whose horses were so weak they could not pass the river. After I had made true inquisition of the passes over the Tyne, I found there were so many fordable places between Newburn and Hexham, a distance of 12 miles, that it was impossible with my small number of foot to guard every place, but to hazard the loss of them at any one place and yet not do the work; so I resolved of two evils to choose the lesser and left them [the Scots] to their own wills: so they passed the river [Tyne] and after some days' quartering upon the high moors beyond the river Derwent so that I could by no means march to them, they marched thence over the Newbridge near Chester[-le-Street] to Sunderland, which pass our horses in respect of the inclosures could not hinder them from nor charge them. Upon Wednesday the 6th inst. at one o'clock afternoon our first troops passed Newbridge, and a while after the enemy appeared with some horse; when they advanced toward us with more than they first discovered, after some bullets had been exchanged and they appeared again in greater force, we backed our party with Lord Henry [Percy's] regiment,—Lieutenant Colonel Schrimsher [Scrimgeour] commanding them—being part of Colonel Dudley's brigade, with which he drew up after them, with whom also we sent, some musketeers; which caused the enemy that day to look upon us at a farther distance. We judged they were about 500 horse when they appeared most, yet they continued most of that day in our sight. Describes an unsuccessful attempt made by the English next day to cut off the Scots from Sunderland. Owing to the continual snow that fell, the strong positions held by the Scots, and their slowness to engage, the English thought best to retire to their quarters, which they did after a skirmish of cavalry. Describes their retreat. [Copy preserved amongst the Conway Papers. 4 pp.]
March 9. 14. Articles against Archbishop Laud by Richard Day of Mitcham, Surrey, gent. 1. That he had appropriated 4,000l., to repairing Paul's or some other use, left by Mr. Smith towards the redeeming of impropriations to the use of the parochial ministry. 2. That he has surreptitiously taken all his chief means of collecting money for repairing Paul's from the particular ways suggested by Day to certain committees at the Council Board for redeeming impropriations to the church. 3. That he did most enviously, impiously, and maliciously hinder the King's satisfactory proceeding in redeeming impropriations to the church, for which he stands excommunicate by one of the exhortations before the Communion in the book of Common Prayer, which prohibiteth any hinderer of the Word of God to participate of the holy mysteries of the Blessed Saviour. 4. That he perjured himself, swearing falsely the only cause why he did not further the King's proceeding in Day's proposition for redemption of impropriations was that it was not feasible; though Sir Robert Heath, then Attorney General, declared and proved that it was feasible. The very reading of the proposition excludeth all possibility of swearing against it as the Archbishop did. But complainant is assured in his conscience that the Archbishop is of that dispensing and equivocating religion that giveth him leave to swear or do anything whatsoever for the advancement of the Antichristian kingdom. 5. That he is a favourer and defender of Papists, Day having seen a Seminary Priest in layman's habit in the Archbishop's great chamber at Lambeth without any keeper or any to watch him. 6. That having procured the dissolution of the last Parliament, which would not grant subsidies to renew the war with Scotland, he tried to raise money by extracting from Day information as to a money matter concerning which Day had formerly written to him in general terms. P.S.—Day desires the Archbishop's answer to Art. 4 may only be received in writing, that a just and brief reply may be made thereto; for the Archbishop will protest and swear most falsely in things contrary to his own knowledge. [2 pp.]
March 9.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, and Robt. Barclay. Ordered, 1. The draft of the letter to his Majesty read and approved of. 2. That the paper given in by the Scottish Commissioners, the 5th inst., and the draft of the letter [to his Majesty] be communicated to both Houses by the Earl of Northumberland and Sir H. Vane respectively if it shall please the Houses to call for the same. The Committee to meet again at 3 o'clock. 3. This Committee considers 300l. a week necessary for incidental charges of intelligence, &c., for the present. 4. That 200l. a week be desired to be supplied for the purpose aforesaid from the Committee of the Revenue. 5. That Mr. Recorder [Glynn] be desired to speak to the Committee to see if they can furnish the whole 300l. weekly, and to draw up an ordinance accordingly. 6. That the sum proposed by this Committee to be borrowed, under order of the Commons of the 4th present, is 300,000l. That Lord Wharton, Mr. Pierpont, and others do agree upon and present the names of such as they shall think fit to use the credit of for procuring the sums of money aforesaid. 7. That Sir H. Vane do go from this Committee to the Committee of the Navy to be informed what moneys are to be rested on for payment of the ships that are to come in on 25th March 1644, and to set out others. 8. That the business of the Swedish Agent be taken into consideration on Monday next. 9. That Lord Warristone, Mr. Solicitor [St. John], and Mr. Recorder [Glynn], or any one of them, be desired to draw up a declaration upon the three letters according to the order of 6th March. 10. That the Secretary go to Mr. [John] Browne, Clerk of the Lords' House, for two copies of the instruction and of the other papers and orders of both Houses concerning the business passed in the Lords' upon the report of Lord Wharton, to be brought to the Committee of both kingdoms on Monday. 11. To write to Col. Cromwell informing him what forces are gone out toward Hants, that he may make a strong diversion towards Aynho or where he shall think fit that way. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 17, 18.]
March 9.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir John Gell. We have received your letter containing your desire to have some forces from from Warwickshire, Northampton, or Leicester sent to you for the taking in of some garrisons in your country, concerning which forces they are all at present employed in other service, which we hope will not last long, but if you will inform us of the places of garrison you mean, of their force, and what force you think to be necessary for that service, we shall take it into further consideration. Signed by the Earl of Northumberland and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., p. 16. Copy. ⅓ p.]
March 11. 15. The Committee for Safety in Essex to Lieutenant-Colonel Birkhead. This day, Mr. Leigh or Lee, vicar of Walthamstow, being appointed by the Deputy Lieutenants and Committees for this county according to an Ordinance of Parliament to preach before the Deputy Lieutenants, Committees, clergy, high constables, churchwardens, and other officers that then were to appear at Romford, before the taking of the Solemn League and Covenant, which he performed with so much zeal, learning, and great encouragement to the people then assembled, that it was thought fit by the Deputy Lieutenants and Committees in gratification of his great pains to present him with a piece of plate value 5l. These are therefore to desire Lieut.-Col. Birkhead to buy the plate and present it to Mr. Leigh, out of the treasure remaining in his hand. Underwritten,
15. i. Acknowledgment by Rev. Richard Lee that on the 3rd April 1644 he received the said piece of plate value 5l. of Lieut.-Col. Birkhead. [1 p.]
March 11. 16. Order of the Committee for the Navy appointed by Parliament to Sir Henry Vane, junr., Treasurer of the Navy. That Sir Henry do imprest upon account to Sir Walter Erle, Lieutenant of the Ordnance, 1,000l. to be paid to John Browne for provisions of ordnance and shot to be delivered into the Office of Ordnance for the use of his Majesty's ships serving in this next summer's expedition, whose receipt with this order shall be sufficient discharge to Sir Henry Vane. P.S.—This money to be paid out of the 8,000l. advanced by the Levant Company. Subjoined,
16. i. Receipt by Sir Walter Erle for 1,000l. received of Sir Henry Vane according to the above order, 12 March 1643–44. [1⅓ pp.]
March 11.
Vienna.
Sir Griffin Markham to Wm. Marquis of Newcastle. Your wars of England fill the ears of all the world, and amongst the rest your Lordship has not the least share. I am sorry that my old age and hurts disable me so much that I cannot come to serve in a war so just, against those rebellious subjects who do not deserve so good a King, and this is not only my opinion but the opinion of the whole world. I am sorry to hear that [the Earl of] Essex will inherit his father's fortune [i.e., be attainted]; also for the death of my nephew, whom I hoped to have called hither to comfort me in my old age. We are all bound by the laws, both human and divine, to be faithful to the Crown. I hear that there are many Irish [gone] to serve the King. If Col. Preston come to command any of them, I beseech you take him into consideration. If the Duke of Niborg [Count Palatine of Neuburg] had gone forward with a levy as he pretended, he had called me to command, when Col. Preston would have been my second and commanded both horse and foot. Services rendered by Preston in the wars of Germany and Flanders. If you will procure that he may come into England, I beseech you set him against Leslie, and trust me that Leslie will neither in skill, judgment, nor valour overmatch him, for he hath been bred always in a better disciplined war than either Poland or Sweden, for he has been Captain in Flanders both of horse and foot. [Extract. In German Correspondence.]
March 11.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Maitland and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir H. Vane, junr., and Messrs. Pierpont, Solicitor [St. John], Recorder [Glynn], and Robt. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Mr. Bryan Stapleton and Mr. Alleyn be desired to prepare themselves to speed away to the Scottish army with the instructions that are this day passed the House of [Commons]. 2. That copies of this order be sent to each of them. 3. That two copies of these instructions be sent to the Scottish army, one by Messrs. Stapleten and Alleyn, the other by Wm. Bond. The instructions to be sent to Mr. Bond this night. 4. That the Committee at Goldsmith's Hall be desired to meet to-morrow for expediting [the dispatch of] victuals for the Scottish army. 5. That the business of the Irish Committee be deferred till Wednesday next. 6. That Mr. Frost shall desire certain merchants to attend this Committee on Wednesday next. 7. That it be reported to the House [of Commons] from this Committee by the Solicitor [General St. John] to take into consideration the reversing of those ordinances forbidding trade to Newcastle. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 18.]
March 12.
Vienna.
Sir Griffin Markham to his sister Mary Markham. Since I heard of the death of [my nephew] Griffin I have had no desire to renew your memory. I procured as many masses for him as I could, but his age and breeding were such as he needed them not. I hear that the unworthy Crawford is both hurt and disgraced, those that are so interested and unthankful can never expect good ends, yet if I live awhile I hope to be able to do something for you and the rest of my poor friends. If I can make a good end here shortly I will come to end my days in Flanders to be so much nearer to England to hear the news, and by that time I hope the King will triumph over those base rebels. I have heard that the Earl of Rutland and another are intrusted by the Parliamentarians to keep the Great Seal of England which they have made; I doubt not but Rutland will do anything to keep himself afoot, his nature goeth more that way than the right way. [½ p. In German Correspondence.]
March 12. 17. Resolutions of the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled at Oxford. That as many of the Lords and Commons of Parliament assembled at Westminster as have at any time voted or consented to the raising of forces under the command of the Earl of Essex, or have been aiding or abetting thereunto, have levied and made war against the King, and are therein guilty of high treason. That as many of the Lords and Commons of Parliament assembled at Westminster as have at any time voted or consented to the making and using of a new Great Seal, which hath accordingly been made and used, have thereby counterfeited the King's Great Seal and committed high treason. That as many of the Lords and Commons of Parliament assembled at Westminster as have voted or consented or have been abetting or assisting to the present coming in of the Scots into England in a warlike manner have therein committed high treason. That as many of the Lords and Commons of Parliament assembled at Westminster as have committed the crimes mentioned in the three former votes have therein broken the trust in them reposed by their country, and ought to be proceeded against as traitors to the King. That the uttermost endeavours and offers of peace and treaty made by his Majesty by the advice of the Lords and Commons of Parliament assembled at Oxford have been refused and rejected by the Lords and Commons of Parliament remaining at Westminster. [Draft, with various suggested alterations; found amongst the Conway Papers. 1 p.]
March 12. 18. Examination of John Bartlett, of St. Faith's parish, London, stationer. About December 1637 he was apprehended and brought before Sir John Lambe to Doctors Commons, and accused of having given Nathaniel Wickins, Mr. Prynne's servant, certain of Dr. Bastwick's and Mr. Burton's writings to be copied; which he denied, but confessed he had put to writing to one John Willett, then prisoner in the Counter, certain passages of the proceedings in Scotland to copy out, which he then delivered to Sir John Lambe, whereupon he was committed to the custody of a messenger till he had taken the oath ex officio. Being a bookseller in Cheapside, where he had kept shop about 16 years, Mr. Bartlett was, in 1637, by an order of the Council subscribed by Archbishop [Laud] directed to the then Lord Mayor [Sir Edward] Bromfield, warned to shut up his shop and depart his house; and soon after he had his shop violently shut up and was imprisoned in the Compter in Woodstreet for 3 months till he had entered into bond of 100l. not to use his trade in Cheapside, and to quit his house within 6 months, and let it to none but a goldsmith, to his damage of 600l. Soon after he was brought before the Council by warrant from the Archbishop and sent to the Fleet, where he remained 6 months a prisoner without any cause shewed. [Endorsed: "Article 3." 1 p.]
March 13. 19. Proclamation, dated 25 March 1610, prohibiting the uttering of Dr. [John] Cowell's book "The Interpreter" [published in 1607] "and requiring all who have copies thereof to bring them in. Endorsed: "Proclamation calling in Cowell's book; lecta 13 March 1643–44." [This would appear from the endorsement to be the identical copy of the Proclamation produced and read in evidence at the trial of Archbishop Laud, before the Lords, on the 13th of March 1643–44. See Lords' Journals vi., 648. Another copy of this is calendared in James I. under its proper date. Broadside.]
March 13. 20. Order of the Commons' House. That Mr. Speaker shall have liberty to grant warrants for apprehending and detaining such persons as are accountable to the State for money or goods received, and as shall be suspected by the Committee for Accompts to go away to avoid their accounting; and that the Treasurers at Haberdashers' Hall shall pay to the Treasurers at Guildhall for the use of the said Committee upon account 200l. to be employed for the better carrying out of that work. [Printed in Commons' Journals iii., 426. Copy. ½ p.]
March 13.
Derby House.
Proceedings of the Committee of both kingdoms this day Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, junr., Sir Philip Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder and Pierpoint, Wallop, and Robt. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the letters now read for Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour be signed and dispatched. 2. The letters to the Committee of the Parliament of England residing with the Scottish army read and approved of. 3. That the copy of the instructions for Mr. [Walter] Strickland be sent to the Committee of both kingdoms resident with the Scottish army. 4. That the business concerning the Governor of Plymouth be taken into consideration to-morrow. 5. That the business about the Irish Committee at Grocers' Hall be taken into consideration to-morrow at 5 p.m. 6. That it be demanded of the merchants now attending without what expedient they can propose to this Committee to open the trade into the Sound and to ease the imposition now upon the trade. 7. That Mr. Recorder [of London] do inform the House [of Commons] to-morrow of the necessity this Committee has of money for messengers, &c., and to desire that the House will command the Committee of the Revenue to furnish 200l. till a further course be settled for money for incident charges for this Committee. 8. That Mr. Bond shall have 20l. for his journey to the north out of the money to be received from the Committee of Revenue. 9. That the business of Tong Castle [Salop] be first taken into consideration to-morrow and then that of Lancashire. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 19.]
March 13.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Wm. Waller. We understand by letters from Sir Wm. Balfour that he has been three or four days at Petersfield in expectation of your joining with him in prosecution of the design resolved upon by this Committee. And we hear that you are not yet with your forces, nor any of them yet joined with Sir Wm. Balfour according to your intentions and our resolutions. We most earnestly desire that you with your forces will immediately join with Sir Wm. Balfour, fearing that there is some opportunity already lost, as we hear that Prince Maurice is ready to join with Lord Hopton and the country summoned to come in to join with them, also Wareham and Poole in danger to be lost. And because we look upon this business as that which very much concerns the public, and are confident that you and Sir Wm. Balfour before your departure from this town agreed upon all particulars for carrying on of this business as well in point of command as otherwise, we therefore earnestly desire you that no accident whatsoever may alter or interrupt those resolutions, the like whereof we have written to Sir Wm. Balfour. Signed by Northumberland and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., pp. 16, 17. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 13.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Balfour. We understand that you are upon the place in prosecution of the design resolved on by this Committee in expectation of the joining of Sir Wm. Waller's forces with you. We likewise hear of divers particular good services done by you since your going out which the Committee give you thanks for. And knowing very well how great disadvantage it may be to lose the opportunity of your design we have written to Sir Wm. Waller to get his forces ready with all speed and join with you in pursuance of that design according to the resolutions of the Committee. And because we look upon this business as that which very much concerns the public, and are confident that you and Sir Wm. Waller before your departure from this town agreed upon all particulars for carrying on of this business as well in point of command as otherwise, we therefore earnestly desire you that no accident whatsoever may alter or interrupt those resolutions (the like whereof we have written to Sir Wm. Waller), and we are the more confident that you will be very careful herein knowing that all your aims are so public that nothing can alter you therein. Signed as above. [Ibid., p. 17. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 13.
Derby House.
The same to the Commissioners resident in the Scottish army. The Parliament having passed the inclosed instructions, and returned their answer to the paper of the Scots' Commissioners concerning supply of the Scottish armies in England and Ireland, the particulars whereof we send you herewith, it was thought fit by this Committee to dispatch the bearer Wm. Bond expressly to you intending to send doubles of all these particulars by Mr. Bryan Stapleton and Mr. Fras. Allen, whom we have also desired with all speed to repair to you being of your number for your further assistance in the public service. We shall refer the other matters of occurrences from hence to this bearer, whom also we have thought fit to recommend to you to be employed about the excise or otherwise as you shall see cause from what is intrusted to your care by the instructions now sent you. Signed as above. [Ibid., p. 18. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 14. 21. Petition of Michael Molyns to the King. Petitioner has suffered in his houses and lands at Clapcot, Berks, to the value of 3,000l. at least, by reason of Wallingford garrison, for which his Majesty promised satisfaction in lands in his forest of Shotover, Oxfordshire. Prays warrant to the Lord Treasurer for perfecting the exchange. [Copy. 2/3 p.] Subjoined,
21. i. Reference of the above petition to the Lord High Treasurer and Chancellor of the Exchequer, to certify their opinions of what is fit for his Majesty to do. At the Court at Oxford, 14 March 1643[–44]. [Copy. ⅓ p.]
21. ii. Petition of Michael Molyns to the King. Difficulty is found upon his Majesty's above reference, some writings for clearing title remaining in London in the offices of Chancery. He has been damaged 1,500l. since his first petition. Prays a commission or reference whereupon his losses may be estimated and part of Shotover set forth in recompense, by the grant whereof afterwards he may receive the hoped for benefit. [Copy. 1 p.]
21. iii. Reference of the above petition to Col. Blagge, Governor of Wallingford, who is to take two or three others with him and certify the extent of petitioner's damages. At the Court at Oxford, December 4, 1644. [Copy. ¼ p.]
21. iv. Certificate of Col. Thos. Blagge, John Smyth Mayor of Wallingford, and three others. That upon the view of carpenters, masons, farmers, and others we find petitioner's damages amount to 4,026l. 10 December 1644. [Copy. ¼ p.]
21. v. Reference to the Lord Treasurer and Chancellor of the Exchequer. To certify how his Majesty may with justice satisfy petitioner in the way proposed. At the Court at Oxford, February 21, 1644[–45]. [Copy. ¼ p.]
21. vi. Note of the state of the case of Michael Molyns, Esq., as it now stands. Giving a brief abstract of the proceedings between 1643 and 1646, including all the above papers, and following entries. Mr. Molyns petitions his late Majesty and recites all the former petitions, references and certificates, and prays that about 401 acres of Shotover Forest might be passed to him and his heirs, and names the parcels and the value which comes not to 20 years' purchase, 1646. His late Majesty by Sir Edward Nicholas recommends it to the Lord Treasurer to cause a value to be taken of the lands with their condition, &c., and how he conceives his Majesty may satisfy petitioner's desire either then or when it shall be disafforested or otherwise. 14 April 1646. [Copy. 1 p. These papers were evidently drawn out in 1661, but have been placed here as having reference to the time of Charles I. and the Civil War. They are endorsed by Nicholas as "Received 5 Dec. 1661, Mr. Mich. Molyns' account certified to be in all 4,000l., for which he desires a Privy Seal."]
March 14. Order of Edward Earl of Manchester for settling the parsonage and vicarage of Gedney, co. Lincoln. Mr. William Howe, minister of Gedney, having attended the Assembly of Divines by my direction, and they having made trial of his abilities and sufficiency find him to be every way well qualified for the ministry, I therefore according to Ordinance of Parliament, and upon the humble request of the parishioners of Gedney [In margin: "Sequestered from Dr., "Weemes"] do authorise and appoint Wm. Howe to officiate and exercise the office of a minister, and to preach and catechise there. He is likewise authorised by this warrant to take into his possession the parsonage houses, glebe lands, and vicarage there, with all tithes, profits, and rents belonging to the same, for which he is to be assisted by all officers and constables in the county of Lincoln. [Committee for Plundered Ministers. Order Book F, No. 1, p. 350. Copy. 1 p.]
March 14. 22. The Committee for the Accounts of the kingdom, sitting at the house late of Alderman Freeman at Cornhill, to Martyn Dallison, requiring a certificate under his hand of all sums assessed and paid for the 20th and 5th parts of the estates of persons in London by the Committee of Parliament [for advance of moneys] sitting at Haberdashers Hall, from October 1642 till June 1643, together with the names of the assessors in every parish and division, which certificate is necessary for the examination of the Treasurer's accounts at Guildhall. [Damaged by damp. 1 p.].
March 14.
Coventry.
23. Basil Earl of Denbigh to the Committee of both kingdoms. I have sent your Lordships' letters to Sir Thomas Fairfax and the other commanders from whom I am to have assistance, and have desired their forces may be in readiness against a general rendezvous, which had been very sudden but that the design of [relieving] Gloucester will not spare me all the forces assigned unto me, and that I am in a way of raising some speedy levies of horse and foot the better to carry on the work, and to give a safer passage to a considerable proportion of ammunition I am to carry with me, which those parts stand in great need of, and which will require some considerable convoy. Within 14 days I hope to be ready to march, but if the necessities of Wem and those parts shall exact a quicker despatch I shall govern myself according to the opportunities that shall be offered and the information I shall receive from thence. Prince Rupert is said to be gone for Wales to raise great forces, which he is likely to do if not timely prevented; and therefore well hath it become your wisdom to provide a remedy to his growth which by the grace of God shall be applied with all convenient speed. I will not take upon me to deliver anything to your Lordships concerning Gloucester, in regard that charge is imposed upon a commander of great worth and abilities who can best give an account of that business, only it is the opinion of the best soldiers here that if greater diversions be not attempted than have yet been made and a party set forth of horse and dragoons strong enough to fall into Gloucestershire if occasion require, the enemy will not remove from their places of advantage there which cut off all passages from our convoy, nor leave off recruiting their forces which every day will grow greater by our delays; our design will remain unattempted in the same condition it now stands, and Gloucester in the end will fall into some inconvenience and hazard. [Endorsed: "Read March 16, 1643[–44]." 3 pp.]
March 14. 24. Petition of Robert Curtis, master of the barque "Porpoise" of Hythe, Kent, to Robert Earl of Warwick, Lord High Admiral. Petitioner upon notice from the mayor and town clerk of Hythe and the mayor of Folkestone that the coasts of Sunderland were free for trade, did with license from the customer and comptroller of Hythe set forth with his vessel for Sunderland; but on February 25th last the vessel and lading were seized by Captain Browne in the "Sampson," pretending they were for the aid of the enemy, and he still detains them. Petitioner prays order to Captain Browne to restore the vessel and lading, he being ready to make oath they were not intended for relief of the enemy. Underwritten,
24. i. I refer this to the Judge of the Admiralty, whom I desire to determine the matters contained in this petition in an ordinary way of proceeding in the Admiralty. Earl of Warwick, March 14, 1643[–44].
24. ii. I was with the Judge of the Admiralty in behalf of this poor man, whose good affection to the Parliament I can avow, and the Judge did advise to repair to the Committee of the Navy for relief 22 March 1643[–44]. [p. 1.]
March 14. 25. Notes by William Ryley, Bluemantle, for the funeral of Mary Countess of Kent, who died March 9, 1643–44. Fees for banners to be provided, the Latin inscription to be put on the coffin, the order of the funeral procession, &c. [1 p.]
March 14.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Phillip Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, and R. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That letters be written to the Committee of Stafford and to the Earl of Denbigh to give all possible assistance to Tong Castle and the town of Wem in Salop. 2. That the Lord General be desired to write another letter to Commissary General Behre, requesting him when the business of Gloucester was done to contribute his best endeavours for the relief of Tong Castle and the town of Wem. 3. That the desire of this Committee be reported to the House [of Commons] by Mr. Recorder, that order may be given to the Committee of the Revenue for the payment of 3,000l. due to the garrison of Aylesbury, and that the money may be speedily paid. 4. To desire the gentlemen of Gloucestershire to be here to-morrow. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 20.]
March 14.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Col. Browne. Some of the Committee of the Militia attended us to-day to desire that the City forces, both horse and foot, under your command might return home within 14 days at the furthest. We should most willingly concur with their desires to your satisfaction, but that Sir Wm. Waller has a design in hand wherein your assistance will be necessary which we hope also may be at an end within that time. But in case that should require further time for the effecting thereof, we believe you so tender both of your own honour and of the public safety that you will not for a few days longer tarrying leave the design imperfect, which we forbear to urge you to by any further argument because the experiences we have had of you gives us assurance of your willing concurrence herein. Signed by the Earl of Northumberland and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., pp. 18, 19. Copy. ½ p.]
March 14.
Derby House.
The same to Basil Lord Denbigh. We formerly wrote you of the necessities of Shropshire and particularly of the town of Wem, and then gave you a list of the forces you should command in that expedition. We have daily further information of their increasing dangers and of the present danger of Tong Castle. We therefore desire that you will make all possible speed to their relief with all the force you can, so far as may not hinder the business of Gloucester. We have also written to the Committee at Coventry and Stafford to give all possible and speedy relief. Signed as above. [Ibid., p. 19. Copy. ⅓ p.]
March 14.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee at Coventry. We have intelligence of the danger that Tong Castle is in and that the garrison of Longford will go away if that place miscarry. We desire you speedily to assist them with all the force you can possibly make to serve under the Earl of Denbigh in your county not hindering the design for Gloucester or not unfurnishing your garrison from necessary forces. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Note, that a similar letter was sent to the Committee at Stafford, but without the clause "not hindering, &c." [Ibid. Copy. ⅓ p.].
March 15.
Court at Oxford.
Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer. To pay to Richard Foley the several sums of 588l. 6s. 11d. and 250l., the former for divers quantities of bullets, iron, timber, and other emptions delivered for our service, and the latter for 5,000 pike-heads to be delivered into our stores, at the rate of 5l. the hundred as agreed upon. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8, pp. 25, 26. Copy. 1¼ pp.]
March 15.
Oxford.
26. Sir Edw. Nicholas to [Patrick Ruthven Earl of Forth] Lord General of the King's forces. I have acquainted his Majesty with what your Excellency and Lord Hopton have written, who commanded me to advertise you that by his appointment the regiments of horse of Colonel Thos. Howard and Lord Percy are now at Farringdon in Berkshire, ready to attend your commands; they are conceived to be near 500 horse effective. If any of the horse commanded to attend your Excellency at Newbury have failed to obey their orders, upon notice from you what regiments or troops they are, his Majesty will forthwith take a strict course to hasten them to you to such place as you shall appoint. It seems by letters from Lord Wilmot and Sir Wm. Vavasour that the convoy is retired back, and that there appears not at present any forces of the rebels in the parts where they are; whereupon his Majesty hath given order to Lord Wilmot to send two strong regiments of horse to lie at Chipping Norton and thereabouts to secure those parts [from] the horse and dragoons of the rebels who have lately plundered some villages thereabouts, taking advantage of our horse being absent upon other employment. There is a messenger come from the Marquis of Newcastle who says his lordship is in a very good condition, he has had several encounters with parties of the Scots, and ever had the better of them; they are gotten to Sunderland, but his Majesty's forces lie now almost round them. The rebels assaulted Newark in several places, but were repulsed with loss of above 500 dead on the place, besides some of their ordnance, particularly the great brass piece they took at Hull from my Lord of Newcastle, which being dismounted they could not carry off. God bless your noble enterprises with prosperous success. [2 pp.]
March 15. 27. Lawrence Squibb to Mr. Auditor Phillips. Pray deliver to this bearer the particular for houses in Shrewsbury for which I lately sent you a warrant. I have sent your fee by bearer, and desire you not to fail as it concerns a friend of mine, and requires haste. [½ p.]
March 15.
Vienna.
Sir Griffin Markham to Colonel Preston in England. When Don Francesco di Melos went from these parts to govern the Low Countries I recommended you and my nephew John Smith to him, and he bid me write to you both, and he would do what was in his power to favour you, but you took the better part to assist your country. Now I hear that the King [of England] will have many of your countrymen to encounter the Scottish rebels, and I have written to the Marquis of Newcastle to procure that you may be recalled to England and to set you against the great Leslie, and have assured him that Leslie neither in valour nor judgment of war shall have any advantage of you, and wish that may be so, for I desire your honour much out of my old true affection. If you come thither assist my friends and kinsfolk with your good advice. Your countrymen here have done good service, but find the same requital that I have found, and wish themselves in their country. [Impressed seal with crest. 1 p. In German Correspondence.]
March 15.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Essex and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Wallop, Pierpont, and Robt. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the letter now read be sent to Cols. Purefoy, Bosvile, Farrar, and Major Bridges. 2. That letters be written to the Earl of Manchester and Col. Cromwell or the officer commanding that brigade in chief. 3. That those forces be not withdrawn, with the reasons for it which were now debated. 4. That Mr. Pierpont do signify the desire of this Committee to Mr. Knightley to speed the payment of the sum assigned by the Commons' Ordinance for the Scottish Reformado officers. 5. That Monday next be appointed for the business of the Committee for Irish Affairs at Grocers' Hall. 6. That the further debate concerning a real diversion to be made by the Earl of Manchester's forces be taken into consideration to-morrow. 7. That it be recommended to the Commons' House as the desire of this Committee by Mr. Recorder, that they take into consideration the enabling of the Lord General's army speedily to move. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 20, 21.]
March 15.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Colonels Purefoy, Bosvile, Farrar, and Major Bridges. We desire you forthwith to take an exact account of the money, ammunition, and arms that were brought by Col. Farrar and are now at Warwick, for the service of the garrison at Gloucester, and how many men are there under Col. Farrar that came with the convoy and are to serve at Gloucester. We earnestly entreat you to send speedily duplicates to us of the said accounts by several messengers lest one of them should miscarry. Signed by Robt. Earl of Warwick and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., p. 20. Copy. ⅓ p.]
March 16.
Gravelines.
28. Henry Bardou to William Marquis of Newcastle, at Newcastle. Has been prevented from keeping his promise to return in six weeks. Was nearly assassinated by some at the Exchange at Amsterdam for supporting the King's cause; they follow him everywhere, but the late victory over the Scots may have brought them to their senses. Is sorry to have been absent from his lordship on such an occasion, and so is Mons. Ogle. Intends to be quickly with his lordship to acquit himself of the commission received from the Queen. [Endorsed: "This contains 10 letters from foreign parts." Seal with arms broken. French. 2 pp.]
March 16.
Calais.
29. Lieutenant-Colonel John Ogle to the same. Intends to requite his delay in returning, having been retarded by staying for passes from the Prince of Orange, Francesco di Melos, and the French King, by bringing his lordship 600l. or 700l. worth of arms, for which he has already taken order at Dunkirk. Though Flanders is very forward for the King, Holland is no less ready to assist the Parliament with hand and voice, and your Royalists there are like the true people of the Lord, a very little flock, and I hope to see the others receive their portion according to their number. [Endorsed: "This is a priest as I hear, a lieutenant-colonel of the Marquis of Newcastle, and a great engineer, he is lieutenant-colonel to my Lord Widdrington." Seal with arms. 1 p.]
March 16.
Calais.
30. The same to Mr. Rolleston, secretary to the Marquis of Newcastle, at Newcastle or elsewhere in the north. Will be at Paris within five or six days, and home the middle of next month. Meantime he is sending over a ship with arms. Hopes to see a day of greater slaughter than the late victory over the Scots. [Seal with arms broken. 1 p.]
March 16.
Calais.
31. The same to Wm. Lord Widdrington. To the same effect as above. Is come to Calais from Brussels by reason of the danger of the other way, the French and Spanish armies advancing towards the frontiers, and having generally but small compassion upon all sorts of travellers. [Seal with arms. 1½ pp.]
March 16.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Lord General Essex, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Mr. Solicitor and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, and Robt. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That it be recommended by Mr. Recorder [Glynn] to the Committee of the Revenue to hasten away the 1,000l. that is remaining to be sent to the London forces with Col. Browne, which if not paid before Monday then to recommend the business to the House. 2. That Mr. Cordell shall send a messenger to his brother to attend this Committee on Monday next, also to send up all the gunpowder already made, at which time Sir Walter Erle also to attend. 3. That the debate about the diversion to be made by the Earl of Manchester's forces be taken into consideration on Monday next. 4. The order of the House of Commons about moving of the Lord General's army to be considered on Monday next. 5. The business of Lancashire propounded by Mr. Ashurst to be taken into consideration on Tuesday next. 6. The relation of the business of Derbyshire presented in writing to be taken into consideration on Tuesday next. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 21.]
March 16.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edward Earl of Manchester. We have read your's to his Excellency signifying your desire to withdraw your forces some few miles back in respect of the ill quarters they had been in. We would very willingly you should find good quarters for them to continue their strength for this summer's action, and doubt not but you may thereabouts find better quarters. But as the affairs now stand it will be a great prejudice to them if your forces shall retire, for Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour are upon a design in expectation of a diversion to be made by those forces which, if they should now retire, would bring upon them in the West a greater number than they, perhaps, would be able to deal with. We therefore desire that you will so dispose of your quarters as that you may either join with Com.-Gen. Behre if that by them shall be thought fit, or otherwise to make the best advantage you can of those forces for a real diversion in such a way as shall seem best to their judgment that have the command upon the place. And we doubt not but in those parts you may find good quarters whereby the forces may continue their strength for future service; and in the meantime we desire that you will hasten the recruits of the rest of your forces that you may be ready as speedily as you can to take the field with your whole strength. [Interregnum 18 E., pp. 20, 21. Copyp.]
March 16. Note, that two letters were sent to the Committee of both kingdoms resident in the Scottish army concerning victuals sent by two ships, one called the "Blessing of Kirkcaldy," Capt. John Keirffe master, and the other the "Dorcas," of London, Wm. Iles master. [Ibid., p. 21. =¼ p.]
March 17.
Oxford.
32. Sir Edw. Nicholas to [Patrick Ruthven Earl of Forth, Lord General of the King's army]. The money for pay of the 500 foot which came to our Excellency from Reading, was on my word sent hence yesterday afternoon, and will, I doubt not, be with your Excellency this night at furthest. Sir Thos. Aston's regiment was none of those appointed to attend you, it being now in Dorsetshire, near Wareham, whither it was sent about three weeks since. Col. Croker's regiment we hear nothing of; it was commanded to come to Dorchester in Oxfordshire, but what is become of it we shall not know till Lord Wilmot come, which I believe will be to-morrow night, his Lordship being commanded to send his horse to their old quarters, all saving those which were in Wilts, which are now to be quartered in Gloucestershire, to be ready to assist Sir Wm. Vavasour if the convoy, which is now retired back between Warwick and Coventry, shall advance towards Gloucester. Lord Jermyn will hasten away to your Excellency the officers in chief belonging to the Queen's regiment, with all speed. Smith, the Provost-Marshal General, is here committed close prisoner by the Lords and Commons assembled here, and I have endeavoured to get a deputy Provost-Marshal to be sent you, but there is here none fit to be trusted or employed; and therefore his Majesty would have you appoint one there with you. There is no hangman here, insomuch that the last person executed here was hanged by one of his fellows. His Majesty is extremely well satisfied that your Excellency and Lord Hopton have with so much prudence disposed of your affairs there which he hopes will succeed accordingly. The King has written twice or thrice to Prince Maurice to advance eastward, but we hear nothing of it from him as yet. Your Excellency's letters are all delivered safely, and all your commands shall be carefully obeyed. [2 pp.]
March 18.
Coventry.
33. Basil Earl of Denbigh to the Committee of Safety for both kingdoms. This morning intelligence is come that several forces from Bridgnorth and other parts of Shropshire and the trained bands of that country were seen within a mile upon one side of Tamworth, and General Hastings with the forces which the other day faced Leicester is drawing near to surround that place on all sides. I am sorry the enemy by their proceedings have added so many reasons and grounds of my former intimations and desires, which I submitted to you, that a considerable party might make a more powerful diversion and be strong enough if occasion required to fall into Gloucestershire, for now the question is not only of putting a supply into Gloucester, but of the preservation of this county and association, Tamworth being the line of communication betwixt Warwick and Stafford; and my march into Shropshire with those forces allotted to me out of this county being impossible to put in execution, according to your commands, till I be enabled by a sufficient strength to make my passage through these forces, which will probably attempt my interception. And if I should move with the whole force of this county and Commissary-General Behre's horse, which, with mine, will be little enough to prevent the enemy from any design here, we shall lie open to the Earl of Forth's forces in Gloucestershire and be sure to have them in our rear unless you take care to entertain them where they now are. I shall humbly beseech you to have a care of these parts and to reflect something upon my honour which is so far engaged, that, after so many distractions and impediments purposely cast in to hinder me from raising forces and putting myself into a posture of serving the Parliament, I should now in the beginning of action find myself reduced to these straits, and at my very entrance into employment exposed to so much hazard and disgrace. I fear Tamworth is in some want of powder and ammunition. Some say Prince Robert [Rupert] is with these forces, others that he is at Chester. No care shall be wanting in the execution of my charge. P.S.—Intelligence is now brought that the enemy is set down before Tamworth. [Endorsed: "Received and read March 19." 3 pp.]
March 18.
Cambridge.
34. Order of the Committee for the Association, co. Cambridge, that Mr. Gawsell and Mr. Leman, treasurers, shall receive and take the accounts of all high collectors and others within the Association who have or shall receive and pay any money falling within the receipt of the Association; and shall also charge on their own accounts the money so received by the said high collectors and others, and discharge themselves therefrom by the several payments made by such high collectors or others, whose certificates or this Committee's allowance of the said accounts shall be the treasurers' discharge. [1 p.]
March 18.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Henry Vane, junr., Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Philip Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Browne, Wallop, and R. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Mr. Cordall shall send up to the Tower all the gunpowder so soon as made, and shall not have at his mills [in Surrey] above 7 tons of saltpetre at any time. 2. That some Officers of Ordnance attend to-morrow, with an account of the ammunition in store. 3. That the furnishing of a magazine at Hull for the northern parts be considered to-morrow. 4. That the business concerning Ireland offered by the Committee at Grocers' Hall be taken up on Wednesday, when Sir John Clotworthy and others of the Commons on that Committee are desired to be present. 5. That a letter, inclosing a bill of lading of the provisions sent, be written to the Committee of both kingdoms resident in the Scottish army. 6. That the Committee be all desired to meet to-morrow at 8 o'clock. 7. That the gentlemen from Bucks. be desired to be at the Committee of the Revenue to-morrow at 2 p.m., concerning the money to be paid for Aylesbury. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 22.]
March 19. Ordinance of the Lords and Commons in Parliament concerning currants. By Ordinance of Parliament, dated 26 Aug. 1642, the importation of dried currants was absolutely prohibited, but since the making of that Ordinance the enemy is possessed of divers havens and port-towns where currants are daily imported, thus rendering the prohibition nugatory. The Parliament therefore now ordain that from the 12th February last it shall be lawful for all merchants of the Levant Company to import in English bottoms currants, being the growth of Zante and Cephalonia, into the port of London, or any port being within the power of the Parliament, for the space of 12 months next after the publication of this Ordinance, from any port beyond sea, paying 6s. per cent. for every cwt. over and above the customs and excise due for the same. The Commissioners of the Customs are hereby required to take entries for the same and to receive the said impost of 6s. per cwt., which they are to pay over to Nathaniel Stephens, Thos. Hodges, and Thos. Pury, M. P.s, for the use of the garrison of Gloucester upon account, taking their receipt for the money. [Printed in Lords' Journals vi., 474. Levant Company, vol. i., No. 101. Copy. 1½ pp.]
March 19.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir H. Vane, junr., Sir Philip Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, and R. Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the Lord Admiral [Warwick] be desired to appoint another packet boat for conveyance of letters between here and the Scottish army. 2. That a letter be written to Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour, informing them that [Patrick Ruthven] Earl of Forth is still about Sudeley Castle [co. Gloucester]. 3. That Sir Arthur Haselrigg do report to the House of Commons about payment of that part of Sir W. Waller's army which does not belong to the Association, and Sir Wm. to be informed that care is taken about supply of money. 4. That the business of the north and of Gloucester be first taken into consideration this afternoon. 5. That the letters from the Scottish army to this Committee be communicated to the House [of Commons]. 6. That a subcommittee be named to prepare business for the afternoon [members named]. In the afternoon the Committee met again, when some of the members above named did not attend. Ordered, That duplicates of the former letters sent to Sir Thos. Fairfax, of 8 March, concerning his march into Yorkshire, be sent to him again by special messenger, with a renewal of the desire to put them in execution. 7. That the Lord General [Essex] be desired to write to Commissary-General Behre to give such relief to Tamworth as may stand with the business of Gloucester. 8. That the letter now presented by Mr. Pierpont be written out and sent to Sir John Meldrum. 9. That there shall be 3,300 horse and 4,000 foot employed in the service of Gloucester. 10. That Lord Willoughby's horse shall go under the command of Lord Denbigh for relief of Shropshire, as was before ordered. 11. That the six troops of Lancashire horse which should have gone into Shropshire shall go into Yorkshire. 12. That duplicates of the letters to Sir Thos. Fairfax be sent to Lord Fairfax, to be forwarded to the former. 13. That duplicates of the letter to Sir John Meldrum be sent to the Earl of Manchester and to Lord Fairfax. 14. That a letter be written to the Earl of Manchester, informing him of the disposition of the forces at Newark and of those appointed for the business of Gloucester. 15. That the same be written to Col. Cromwell, mutatis mutandis. 16. That the members for Gloucestershire in the House be desired to be at this Committee to-morrow morning. 17. That there be 8 drakes appointed to go with the army for Gloucester; to have four of those drakes from St. Alban's. 18. That 200 of Lord Willoughby's foot about Newark, with those of Lord Fairfax also there under Sir John Meldrum shall go to Lord Fairfax. 19. That the Declaration now read by Mr. Recorder [Glynn] be by him reported to the House [of Commons]. 20. That a sub-committee do meet to-morrow at 8 o'clock to sign and dispatch those letters now resolved on. 21. That Sir Philip Stapleton do acquaint his Excellency with all the design now resolved on, and that he desire his Excellency to give order accordingly. 22. The list of the forces to go to Gloucester with the ammunition now at Warwick are [as follows], foot, Lord General's 500, Earl of Manchester's 1,500, Aylesbury garrison 400, Newport garrison 400, Northampton garrison 500, from Warwick with the convoy 200, total 3,500. Dragoons now with CommissaryGeneral Behre 500, horse with Commissary-General Behre 1,000, Earl of Manchester 1,300, Lord Grey 350, total 2,650. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 23, 24.]
March 19.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir John Meldrum. Your several letters to us of your confident belief that if you might have the forces you mentioned you would in a short time take Newark, moved us to those directions we sent to my Lord Manchester, yourself, and others. All those supplies duly came to you, and the time whereon we grounded our resolutions is elapsed, some designs wherein we intended to dispose part of those forces after the taking of that town are lost, and some others of greatest consequence if the siege should last many days longer will miscarry. You write for 500 horse more and 2,000 foot, with which we find you cannot suddenly be furnished. The pressing necessity of sending forces into Yorkshire and elsewhere is so great as we are of opinion that the making any attempt upon Newark which shall break those forces, or their long stay there, will be more inconvenient than the not taking that place. We earnestly desire you forthwith to take the advice of your Council of War, and with them considerately to think upon what we have written, and to ground your resolutions and actions accordingly. Signed by Wm. Viscount Saye and Sele and John Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., pp. 21, 22. Copyp.]
March 20. 35. Award of Thomas Chamberlain and Thomas Lenthall, merchants of London, arbitrators of all actions, debts, and claims between Ignatio de Landehole and Marcus la Rumbee, merchants, and Daniel Fairvacks, Isaac le Gay, and John Marston, merchants of London. That Marston, Fairvacks, and le Gay shall pay 206l. 18s. 2d. to Landehole and la Rumbee in settlement of the accounts between them; upon payment whereof the latter are to give bond in 300l. to pay the former 150l. on repayment to them of 30,000l. lent to the Parliament by Landehole and La Rumbee out of the silver brought to Southampton in the "Clare" [or "Santa Clara"]; and in 120l. to pay the same 66l. 13s. 4d. on repayment of 15,000l. lent the Parliament out of the cochineal brought in the said ship. [Indented sheet.] Annexed,
35. i. Statement of the accounts between the above English and Spanish merchants, on which the award is based. [2 pp.]
March 20.
Dunkirk.
36. John Clarke to Mr. Rollestone, secretary to the Marquis of Newcastle. These are sent from Lieutenant-Colonel Ogle, who is gone for France; I expect him here again in a month. I have two Dane [Danish] ships yet I hope in Tynemouth haven; [they] are consigned to Mr. John Housden, as also this ship which is bound hither again. [½ p.]
March 20.
Derby House.
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor St. John, and Messrs. Wallop, Browne, Pierpont, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the consideration of the propositions concerning Ireland presented to this Committee by the Committee at Grocers' Hall, and of any other propositions for the carrying on of the war in Ireland, be referred to a sub-committee to report to this Committee, upon Monday next at furthest, their opinions concerning the same. And that they have power to confer with the Committee for Irish affairs of the House of Commons or of Adventurers at Grocers' Hall, or any of the said Committees or any other persons; and are to meet at such times and places as they shall think fit. 2. The sub-committee is also to consider of the third and fifth articles of the "Result" of both kingdoms and what answer is to be given thereunto. The sub-committee is [to consist of] Earl of Northumberland, the Scottish Commissioners, Sir Henry Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor St. John, and Mr. Wallop, or two of them [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 25.]
March 20.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Ferdinando Lord Fairfax. The Committee, taking into consideration the opportunity now offered of reducing Yorkshire, have written to Sir Thomas Fairfax to march into Yorkshire, with all his horse and with six troops more of the Lancashire horse and two regiments of their foot, with whom we desire you to join as great a force of horse and foot as you can, and to make the best use of them that opportunity shall offer both in reducing and assuring that county and giving all the accommodation you shall be able to the Scottish army, with whom we desire you to keep a constant intelligence. Enclosed are duplicates of what we have dispatched to Sir Thomas Fairfax by another messenger, which we desire you to send to him by an express lest the other should miscarry. You have also here a duplicate of what we have written to Sir John Meldrum, by which you will perceive that your foot under his command will ere it be long return to you, and we have ordered 200 foot more to come to you, together with them. Signed by Wm. Viscount Saye and Sele and John Lord Maitland, [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 22. Copy. 2/3 p.] Underwritten,
The day before one was sent of the same substance.
March 20.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thos. Fairfax. The enclosed are duplicates of what we despatched to you the 8th inst. We now think fit that those six troops then appointed to go for Shropshire shall march with you into Yorkshire, and for that purpose have sent you six letters which you are to direct to those captains of horse that you will have to go with you in that service. In case the horse and foot of Lancashire shall not be presently ready to march with you we desire that you will not tarry for them, but march forthwith with all your own horse and give them direction to follow with all speed. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Note, that a duplicate of this letter was sent to Lord Fairfax to be forwarded to Sir Thomas Fairfax, also that duplicates of the letter of March 8 to Sir Thos. Fairfax were sent by Major Copley and Mr. Jennings to Hull and so from thence to Sir Thomas. A duplicate of the letter to the colonels of foot was sent as above said. The same mutatis mutandis for six troops of horse were sent both by Major Copley and Mr. Jennings. [Ibid., p. 23. Copy. 1 p.]
March 20.
Derby House.
The same to Edward, Earl of Manchester. We have considered of your letters and of that which the Earl of Northumberland has imparted to us from you. For your readiness to undertake any service for the good of this kingdom and to be disposed as we shall direct, with our thanks we return our desires in every way to comply with you, and for the present give you this account. Herewith you will receive a copy of our letter to Sir Jo. Meldrum. We have desired my Lord General to send to you, besides your horse and dragooners now with Commissary Behre, 1,300 more of your horse and 1,500 of your foot with 400 out of the garrison at Newport which may join with other forces to bring the arms and ammunition at Warwick to Gloucester. The intelligence from thence shows the necessity that town is in, and the exceeding great importance of securing that place is well known to you. Herein is sent you a list of the forces resolved on to effect this design against any opposition that is likely to be in those parts, and to find the enemy employment elsewhere, by Sir Wm. Waller in the west and the Earl of Denbigh in Shropshire and those parts, we have taken especial care. We earnestly desire you to put this in the most speedy way that your forces may meet at such time and place as you shall. hear of from my Lord General. The Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire forces we desire may return to secure their own countries. The foot of Lord Willoughby now at Newark are to go with Sir John Meldrum into Yorkshire, and his horse to the Earl of Denbigh as was formerly appointed. Your other horse and foot we desire may be disposed in the best way for recruiting for future service and the securing your Association and the garrisons therein. Subjoined,
List of the forces to convoy the ammunition, arms, and other things now at Warwick to Gloucester, viz.,—
The foot. The Lord General 500, the Earl of Manchester 1,500, out of Aylesbury garrison 400, out of Newport garrison 400, out of Northampton garrison 500, from Warwick with the convoy 200, Total 3,500.
Horse. Dragooners now with Commissary Behre 500, horse with him 1,000, Earl of Manchester 1,300, the Lord Gray's 350. Total 3,150. Eight drakes, whereof two of the Earl of Manchester's. [Interregnum 18 E., pp. 24, 25. Copy. 2 pp.]
March 20. 37. Committee for Safety of co. Surrey to the high constables of Elmbridge hundred. The ministers of the several parishes here named are required to exhort their parishioners upon the next Lord's Day in performance of the covenant by them entered into to advance this service, it being for the defence of all they enjoy and the preservation of the peace of their country. And the said ministers are to make return herewith of all who have not taken the covenant. And the constables do join with the several persons herein nominated for each parish to make return of all those who do list or are able to list any troop horses, dragoons, arms, or soldiers on Monday next. The parishes here designated are Cobham, Esher, Walton-on-Thames, Weybrige, Stoke-Dabernon, Ember and Weston, and West Moulesey. [1 p.]
March 21.
Oxon.
38. Sir Edw. Nicholas to the Earl of Forth, Lord General of the King's army. I have this morning received yours of the 20th, and shall forthwith send his Majesty's warrant to the sheriff of Berks. to send provisions both for men and horse to Andover to your quarters. The King approves very well your Excellency's and Lord Hopton's proceedings, and will see what may be done for some small contentment for the officers, but he hopes the assignments made by the members of Parliament here for payment of divers sums of money to Lord Hopton's army will shortly enable his Lordship to allow them some pay. Concerning Viscount Andover's letter, I read it to his Majesty myself, so as to him there was no other expression made than his Lordship's own words, and I am glad those regiments are come up to you. The total defeat of the Scots in the north by the Marquis of Newcastle is with much confidence advertised from London, Leicestershire, and other parts; but having no express with that news from the north, we know not what credit to give to it. It is also reported that the rebels have quitted the siege of Newark after the loss of about 1,000 killed and dead of sickness there. We have advertisement that there are 4,000 or 5,000 horse and foot drawn together at Buckingham, Stony Stratford, and those parts, and that they have 12 pieces of ordnance; they expect the Earl of Manchester with a greater strength to join with them. Lord Wilmot hath sent forth a party to learn what they are or intend. There is about 1,000 horse and dragoons now at Stratford-upon-Avon as a convoy to carry in their knapsacks and on spare horses powder and provisions into Gloucester, upon notice whereof yesterday Sir Wm. Vavasour was hastened away. Other news the Mercury herewith sent will acquaint you withal. [2 pp.]
March 21.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, the Lord Admiral [Warwick], Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor St. John, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the letter from Sir Thos. Fairfax be reported to the Houses both of Lords and Commons. 2. A sub-committee for a magazine at London and Hull to serve for the northern forces, comprising Lords Wharton and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, senr., Mr. Wallop, or any two of them, to meet to-morrow morning at 7 a.m. 3. That the Officers of Ordnance do attend at the same hour. 4. That Sir H. Vane and Sir P. Stapleton be added to the sub-committee for Irish affairs. 5. That the Frenchman with the letters be set at liberty, and the Earl of Northumberland be desired to write to Prince Harcourt the whole state of the business about staying the messenger and opening the letters. 6. That copies be taken of the passes and letters and kept by the Secretaries. 7. That Mr. Wallop do report to the House of Commons the petition of the inhabitants of the Isle of Wight concerning Col. Carne, without any opinion given from this Committee. 8. That to-morrow be appointed to take the matter of money into consideration, concerning private security for borrowing money from Holland. 9. That it be returned in answer to the Committee of the Navy as follows:—This Committee is of opinion that the safety of the kingdom doth require there should be set forth a fleet of as great strength this year as last or greater if it might be, both to oppose that strength the King now has of shipping and to hinder the coming over of the Irish; also of arms and ammunition and in diverse other respects. But because what means there may be found to set forth and maintain such a fleet is best known to the House [of Commons], this Committee think it fit for them to leave the consideration of the number of ships and what burden they shall be of wholly to their disposing. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 25, 26.]
March 21.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Committee at Coventry. This Committee having upon mature deliberation laid a design to the execution whereof your forces among others were appointed, and by their letter of the 14th inst. desired you speedily to assist with all the force you could possibly make in your county to serve under the command of the Earl of Denbigh, not hindering the design for Gloucester nor unfurnishing your garrisons of necessary forces, to which letter we refer you and desire you to observe the directions therein, as we cannot alter the same without interrupting and breaking the whole frame of our affairs, which we assure ourselves you will not desire to do. Signed by Wm. Viscount Saye and Sele and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., p. 26. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 22. 39. Lord Chief Justice Heath's opinion, that in cases where the Bishop or other inferior judge will not, dare not, or cannot do justice, the Archbishop, Judge of the Arches or Superior Court may and ought to do it. The case supposed is that of a vicar suing for tithes detained, and the Bishop or Chancellor of the diocese beyond seas, in Gloucester, or some other unsafe place; then the Court of Arches should give relief, and if not obeyed the common law will and must assist them. [Endorsed by Sir John Lamb. 1 p.]
March 22. 40. Copy of the above. [1½ pp.]
March 22. 41. Articles of agreement concluded this day between Sir Wm. Middleton, Bart., and Sir Thos. Middleton, Knt., Major-General for North Wales, to the effect that Sir Thos. shall pay to Sir William towards the regiment of foot 6s. 8d. for every man, and shall provide trumpets, standards, saddles, furniture, and arms for the said troop; also arms, colors, drums, partisans, halberds, and scarfs for the sergeants and drummers, besides 6d. a-piece for ribbons for the said regiment of foot. [Copy. 1 p.]
March 22.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, the Lord General [Essex], Lords Say and Maitland, Sir H. Vane, senr., Mr. Recorder [Glynn], and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the Lord General be desired to send the letter now read to Sir Wm. Balfour and Sir Wm. Waller. 2. That the letter now read be sent to the Earl of Manchester. 3. That the business for borrowing of money and the petition of the gentlemen and inhabitants of the Isle of Wight referred to this Committee by order of the House be taken into consideration tomorrow. [Interregnum, 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 26.]
March 22.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edward Earl of Manchester by Colonel Mildmay. We perceive by your letters and the intelligence from Newark the state the forces there are in. We so exceedingly apprehend the consequence of their loss, as we earnestly entreat you forthwith to send what forces you can to their succour, notwithstanding any former design of ours or other design whatsoever; and that you do everything that may conduce to the safety of those forces. We conceive if your forces come timely Prince Rupert's army may well be in the same straits yours now is conceived to be. Concerning the forces of Commissary-General Behre we desire you not to stay in expectation of them for that he must pursue the design for Gloucester. What you do herein we desire you to give to us and them sudden and frequent intelligence thereof. Signed by Wm. Viscount Say and Sele and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 26, 27. Copyp.]
March 23. 42. Commission of Basil Earl of Denbigh, Lord Lieutenant of cos, Warwick, Denbigh, and Flint, and General of all the forces raised in cos. Warwick, Worcester, Stafford, and Salop, with the cities of Coventry and Lichfield, appointing Edward Peyton to be Lieutenant-Colonel of that regiment of horse whereof Denbigh is Colonel, raised in the said counties and parts adjacent to serve for the defence of the King, Parliament, and kingdom. [Copy. 2 pp.] Subjoined,
42. i. Account of money disbursed towards the payment of my troop, &c. Total, 103l. [1½ pp.]
March 23.
Knowle Park.
43. Order of the Committee for defence of co. Kent sitting at Knowle. That the revenues of the King, Queen, and Prince belonging to the Crown in Kent., viz., parks, demesnes, and woods as Eltham park, &c., formerly sequestered be recalled and unsequestered, it being a violation of the ordinance for that purpose made by both Houses, and that the money, if any be received upon the sequestration, be restored again. [Certified copy. ½ p.] Underwritten,
43. i. Acquittance by Sir Thos. Walsingham for 25l. 4s. 5d., received of Daniel Chaterdon as rent for the demesne lands of the manor of Eltham belonging to the Crown. 2 May 1644. [¼ p.]
March 23.
Oxford.
44. The King to George Earl of Kinnoul. Considering the long affection of the Earl of Kinnoul to our person and service, and his many losses and sufferings for us, and taking kindly his forbearing at this time to urge the performance of our former engagements to him, we do, on the word of a prince, promise that whenever he shall desire us we shall admit him Gentleman of our Bedchamber; and to witness our sense of his forwardness to serve us we likewise promise upon the word of a prince that, if he die before he receive the benefit of this promise, his eldest son Lord Dupplin, shall be admitted Captain of our Guard or something equivalent; and [we] promise and think ourselves obliged to relieve his fortunes from these debts which he hath contracted since the beginning of these unhappy troubles, and are willing this be kept as a testimony of our promise and resolution. [Copy. ½ p.] Subjoined,
44. i. The same to the same. Whereas we have directed a warrant of the same date as this to Cadwallader Jones, Collector General of our Customs, for the keeping his account of all customs proceeding from all sorts of goods from the Caribee Islands separate, and to pay the same to George Earl of Kinnoul. These are further to declare that the reason of that warrant is because we cannot at present make any legal grant thereof unto the said Earl which we intend to do by way of lease under our Great Seal so soon as it is fully in our power, and that the same shall be for 21 years at the rent of 100l., and that in the interim he shall receive the full benefit thereof according to our warrant without account. All which we promise upon our royal word to make good unto him and his heirs. Given under our sign manual at our Court at Oxford, the 20th day of December 1643. [Endorsed by Nicholas: "Received 29th July 1658. Copies of two letters written by the late King to the late Earl of Kinnoul." Copy. ½ p.]
March 23.
Coventry.
45. Basil Earl of Denbigh to the Committee [of both kingdoms]. Since I gave you an account of the enemy's making a show of besieging Tamworth, they only faced the castle for two hours with their horse, whilst the foot marched behind, and then the horse followed upon a design of far greater consequence, the success whereof may prove as dangerous to our affairs as of extraordinary advantage to the enemy. It is true the inconveniences which have since happened have not befallen us here as men improvident and careless of the public service and our preservation, for when the enemy in our apprehensions intended to lay siege to Tamworth, Commissary-General Behre by my persuasion was induced to tight with the enemy, then almost in his "infancy," and divided from Lord Hastings; those of the military profession in this Committee were then cold and backward in the business. Since upon intelligence of a design of falling upon the enemy by our forces about Newark and other parts, this Committee and myself agreed that it would be of greater advantage to the kingdom to help in that attempt than to suffer these forces to lie idle in the long expectation of an opportunity of passing to Gloucester, whilst they remained useless to our friends, burdensome to this county, and by living upon free quarter and committing divers exorbitancies, the contributions assigned to the forces already raised would not only be weakened, but the levies of horse and foot which I am raising, together with other impediments purposely cast in to hinder those levies, in a manner frustrated; but the Commissary-General [Behre] was then at his rendezvous going for Stratford and could not agree to our propositions, in hope of passing the ammunition to Gloucester upon an appearance of the enemy's retiring from thence with the greatest part of their forces towards Oxford; which proving otherwise, ours retired without effecting anything. These reasons, now made stronger by our ill success at Newark, have made us consent unanimously to march to-morrow with all our horse and dragoons towards Leicester to join the forces of that county, of Northampton, Derby, Stafford (whence I am informed those forces assigned me for Shropshire are already removed for that purpose to Derby), and of Nottingham, to hinder the enemy's progress in those parts, which it is likely he will put on vigorously after the gaining so late an advantage both in arms, cannon, and ammunition. And because Commissary-General Behre conceives himself strictly tied to the design of Gloucester before any other action, he hath desired this Committee and myself to bear the blame if any error be laid to his charge, for deferring the putting in execution orders for the present so difficult if not impossible, and prefering a present action of so near concernment to the whole kingdom. This was assented unto by both; but whilst I excuse another I may fall into the same censure myself in regard of your commands upon me for Shropshire, wherein as the subordination of that design to that of Gloucester hath disabled me hitherto for that service, so your lordships will be pleased to make a favourable interpretation of my faithful endeavours to wade through the difficulties of an employment of this nature, if the necessity of sudden resolutions shall at any time drive me upon a rock. I humbly recommend to you the diverting those great forces in Gloucestershire from following us in the rear, and [so] preserving this country from the ruin it is likely to suffer by our removal. [4 pp.]
March 23.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, junr., and Messrs. Pierpont, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Philip Stapleton do report to the House [of Commons] concerning Lord Grey's regiment of horse, and to desire the House to take care that maintenance may be provided for them. 2. That the Lord Admiral [Warwick] be desired to take the business of Capt. Zachary into his consideration, and to use the best means he can for his enlargement. 3. That Sir H. Vane, junr., be desired to report to the House [of Commons] a Commission granted by the King and now brought in by the Lord Admiral; and for that and other considerations that the ships may be hastened away to sea. 4. That a sub-committee be appointed to treat with the Earl of Pembroke about the business of the Isle of Wight and Col. Carne, which was referred to this Committee from the House [of Commons] 22 March. [The sub-committee to comprise] Earls of Northumberland and Warwick, Lord Maitland and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, and Browne, or any two of them. 5. That a sub-committee be appointed to treat with some of the richest merchants and others to know if they will borrow 300,000l. in Holland, and have counter security for it, either personal or real, and to know what security they will accept of. [Names of sub-committee] Lord Wharton, Mr. Solicitor [St. John], Mr. Recorder [Glynn], and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, and Barclay. This Committee is also to treat about the proposition of buying the lands of Papists, &c. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 26, 27.]
March 23.
Derby House.
Robert Earl of Essex to Sir Wm. Balfour, Sir Wm. Waller, and Col. Dalbiere. I received your letter of the 21st instant from Peterfield, and have been considering of that proposition you make, but when I look upon the posture of my own army and the distance the Earl of Manchester's forces are at being so divided, some before Newark, some towards Stony Stratford, and the rest at Cambridge, I think the motion may admit of so much delay as to let me know the ground you go upon, what certain intelligence you have, for the report is uncertain whether Ruthven be there or towards Gloucester, and how you conceive this can be effected by me in this season by these forces you propose. The design were exceedingly to be wished for, I shall desire you therefore speedily to let me know your thoughts upon this fully, and I shall so frame my resolution after as may be most for the good of the kingdom. This is not any way to retard you from your advance towards the enemy as you find advantage. I shall endeavour to put my army in a posture [for action] as soon as can be. Signed by the Earl of Essex. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 27, 28. Copy = ¾ p.]
March 24.
Court at Oxford.
Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer. To pay to John Ashburnham, Esq., or his assigns, 100l., without accompt, in satisfaction of the like sum lent to us. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8, p. 26. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 24.
London.
46. Warrant of the Committee for Kent to the high constables of Bromley and Beckenham or either of them. The last expedition to Arundel, with the defence of our own county, have ingulphed us in such great debts that there is no present means to pay them, and now upon our association we have sent out 400 horse and 1,200 foot besides dragoons, the raising, arming, clothing, and payment of whom doth amount to a very great sum. These are therefore to require you to impose another tax of tenpence in the pound on real, and one penny on personal estate as formerly. [Copy. 1 p.]
March 24. 46a. Colonel George Goring to Mr. [Sir Isaac] Pennington, Lieutenant of the Tower. Not finding any of those yesterday that use to take notice of my letters before I send them, I sealed mine and sent it to the post, the Committee [of Accounts] desiring me to hasten it away. It contained only that which they directed, and that the answer might be addressed to yourself in my absence. I desire you will let me know when the same Committee returns again, or what any one of their names is, that I may rectify a small failing of my memory when I was last with them. [Endorsed: "Mr. Goring's letters to Mr. [Wm.] Cockayne [one of the Committee of Accounts, received] 25 March 1644." [Seal with device. 1 p.]
March 24.
Oxford, at 2 p.m
47. Sir Edw. Nicholas to Patrick Ruthven [Earl of Forth] Lord General of the King's army. Upon your first advertisement I procured his Majesty's warrant to the sheriff of Berks to send to you at Andover provisions for horse and men; and because I would have it effectually performed I delivered the warrant to Mr. Pinckney, who sent a deputy with it to the sheriff, and promised to have a care of it. The proportion of provisions his Majesty's warrant required the sheriff of Berks to send weekly to Andover is to the value of 200l. the week. I have sent you an extract of such advertisements as I have lately received from London, whereby you will perceive there was an intention as yesterday to fall on Lord Hopton, and that they do apprehend that if you fall on Sir Wm. Waller before the Earl of Essex's regiment be recruited you will destroy their raising of forces. I desire your Excellency to communicate this extract to Lord Hopton. The convoy was advanced so far this week as Stratford-upon-Avon, but are again retired. We have no news from Newark or the north, but Prince Rupert was last Monday at Lichfield on his way towards Newark, and we believe he came thither on Friday last. [2 pp.]
March 24.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Say, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Philip Stapleton, and Sir H. Vane, junr, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Mr. Frost desire the Lord Mayor [Sir John Woollaston] to call a Committee of militia to-morrow at 8 o'clock, and that Mr. Recorder [Glynn] do report to them the present posture of affairs, and desire from this Committee that they will continue their forces abroad that are now employed in the service of the King and Parliament. And he is further to desire them to recruit Col. Harvey's regiment of horse, and speedily to raise their auxiliaries, and to have them in such readiness as they may be able to assist the Lord General [Essex] whensoever they shall be desired. 2. That the Lord General be desired to acquaint this Committee what is most fitting to be done for recruiting his army, and what obstructions or impediments therein he desires to be removed. 3. That Sir Henry Vane, junr., move in the House [of Commons] the passing of an Ordinance for raising 3,000l out of Lord Petre's estate for the recruiting of Col. Harvey's regiment of horse. 4. That Mr. Recorder [Glynn] be added to the sub-committee appointed to consider of the borrowing of money. 5. That a letter be drafted and sent to the Earl of Manchester, approving of his drawing his forces together, and so to dispose of them as they may be in readiness upon any motion of the enemy, except the forces now with Col. Behre, and further to desire his Lordship to gather together the forces scattered by the enemy at Newark. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 27, 28.]
March 24.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour. We have received a sad account of our forces before Newark. We know not all the particulars, but that many of our horse and most of our foot, by the coming of Prince Rupert, retired to places conceived to be safe, but on Friday did agree to give up their ordnance, ammunition, and fire arms. Three parts of our horse and 500 foot, being at a distance from the rest, retreated safely with their arms. This agreement the enemy did not make good, but plundered our men of their arms and good clothes. On Friday night, when we were informed supplies might timely come, we directed all my Lord Manchester's forces except those with Commissary Behre at Warwick, to go to relieve those before Newark (who are a good part of their way thitherwards) so as you cannot for the present expect any diversion towards Oxford. This account we have thought good to give you, and you knowing we have no other reserve ready if your army should receive a blow, we assure ourselves you will be most careful not to engage in fight but upon such terms as, considering the state of our affairs, you believe to be most for the good of the kingdom, which we leave to you who are upon the place. Signed by Wm Viscount Say and Sele and Lord John Maitland. Underwritten,
Sent by a messenger, who brought theirs of the 23rd at midnight at 7 o'clock p.m. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 28, 29. Copy= 1 p.]
March 24.
Derby House.
The same to Edward Earl of Manchester. The Committee do well approve of your drawing your forces together, and putting the counties of your Association into a posture. They do desire you to dispose them in such places as they may be ready to wait upon and oppose any motion of the enemy, and to provide for the security of the Association. Only those forces that are with Commissary-Genl. Behre cannot yet be called away from that service. We desire you will use all the care and means you can to gather together and recruit those broken forces that they may not be wholly lost. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent by Mr. Hobard at the Bull in Bishopsgate-st., who departed this 25 March, in the morning. [Ibid., p. 29. Copy. 2/3 p.]
1644.
March 25.
48. An offer of [Thos.] Smithsby, the King's saddler, that he is willing for his Majesty's service to make up the sum of 5,469l. 8s. to 10,000l., to be paid out of the Petty farms at our Lady Day 1644. [Endorsed: "What doth your Lordship say to this?" ½ p]
March 25. 49. Note by Wm. Conyers of his disbursements from 1642 to 1644, while in the service of Sir Henry Vane at Raby Castle. Total 493l. 13s. 8d., besides 140l. 19s. 2d. remaining upon accompt unaccounted for. [Endorsed: "Exceptions against Conyers' receipts and disbursements since 29th of Oct. 1643 till Lady Day 1644." 6 pp.]
March 25. 50. Colonel George Goring [Governor of Portsmouth] to Wm. Cockayne, Governor of the East India Company, and to the rest of the Committee of Accounts. I must excuse myself to you for the failing of my memory in one particular which I have since recollected. That which I gave order to be paid to the garrison of Portsmouth of the 3,000l. was not a half year's pay to the whole garrison, but three-quarters of a year's pay to the old and one quarter to the new, which comes near the sum I named to you, the rest I account for in work. I have written according to your direction to him who was my paymaster, not doubting but within a few days you will have satisfaction in it. I have caused him to direct his letters to Mr. Lieutenant of the Tower [Sir Isaac Pennington] in my absence. You will find much more in his accounts for work than I received, which with a very great assessment due to the garrison and myself is not seasonable to importune you with further than to let you see how that all which I received since this Parliament sat, before these troubles began, was paid to the garrison and to labourers and workmen, according to the intention of the House. If I be removed into the King's quarters before the particulars of this account be manifested, I shall not be hindered by any public divisions from giving you and the rest any further light into this matter you shall require of me, since it is as well a vindication of my own credit as a satisfaction to you and the rest which I have promised to give you, and this is all I shall importune you with for the present. [3 pp.]
March 25.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Philip Stapleton, and Messrs. Wallop and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the Governor and Assistants of the Turkey Company be desired to be at this Committee to-morrow morning at 8 a.m., when the Committee is to sit. 2. That Mr. [John] Lisle [M.P.] be desired to be at the Committee to-morrow afternoon, and others able to inform of the state of the Isle of Wight. 3. That the two letters to the Scotts' army, being re-written, be dispatched with the provisions by the ships. 4. Another letter to be sent with the ship that carries the provisions. 5. That a letter be sent to the Committee of Estates at Edinburgh with the ship that carries clothes and provisions to Leith for the Scotts' army in Ireland. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 28]
March 26. An Ordinance of the Lords and Commons for the enabling of Sir Wm. Brereton, Bart., M.P., speedily to put in execution the ordinances for the sequestration of the estates of Papists and delinquents, the fifth and twentieth part, weekly assessment, and all other Ordinances of Parliament within the county and the city of Chester; and to take subscriptions for the better supply and maintenance of the forces under his command, for security of the said places and preventing the access of the Irish forces into those parts. Also allowing to Sir Wm. Brereton the personal estates of all Papists and delinquents in London and within 20 miles not yet sequestered or discovered for the service aforesaid. Ordered to be printed and published 26 March 1644. [Pamphlet printed for John Wright in the Old Bailey, 29 March 1644. Composition Papers, Interregnum G. 89. 7 pp.]
March 26.
Court at Oxford.
Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer. To pay to Leonard Lichfield, printer to the University of Oxford, or his assigns, 676l. 0s. 8d. without accompt, due to him for the several impressions of declarations, proclamations, prayers, speeches, books, and papers set forth by him under our direction between the 29th October 1642 and the 3rd Feb. last past. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8, pp. 42, 43. Copy=1½ pp.]
March 26.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Phil. Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Wallop, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That a letter be sent to the Earl of Manchester, acquainting him with the coming of Commissary-General Behre to his assistance upon the rear of the enemy, where his horse and dragoons may do him as good service as if they were in his own army, and that his lordship will keep intelligence with these forces for the good of the service. 2. That the Lord Admiral [Warwick] and the gentlemen of the Eastern Association be consulted about the security of Yarmouth. 3. That letters be sent to Sir Wm. Waller, Sir Wm. Balfour, and the Earl of Manchester, desiring them to send a messenger every day to this Committee, whether the posture of their affairs do require it or not. Afternoon sitting.—4. That the business of Derbyshire be taken into consideration on Thursday next. 5. That some of the Militia and of the several Committees which sit at the Savoy, at Savage House, and in Southwark, be at this Committee on Thursday afternoon. 6. This Committee being informed by Sir Walter Erle that to-morrow being the anniversary of the King's coronation a salute would be fired, do think fit that the ceremony be forborne to-morrow being the day appointed by law for a day of humiliation, as also all other circumstances [considered]; and that the Lord Admiral, the Lord Mayor, and Lieut. of the Ordnance be acquainted therewith. 7. That the Lord General [Essex] be desired to recruit his army with the 20,000l. assigned for that purpose, so far as it will extend, and that it be recommended to the House [of Commons] to cause 1,500l. to be provided for the train of artillery. 8. That [Philip] Earl of Pembroke be desired to write to John Bunckley, Wm. Boreman, Edw. Cheeke, and Mr. Leigh, Mayor of Newport, to take care of the Isle of Wight until the business of Col. [Wm.] Carne be determined. 9. That it be reported to the House [of Commons] by Mr. Browne on Thursday morning next, that it is the desire of this Committee that Sir. Wm. Brereton and Sir Thos. Middleton be immediately sent down into their countries. 10. That Sir H. Vane, junr., be desired to go to the Committee for Accounts with a request from this Committee that they would make all possible speed with the accounts of the sequestrations, and for the bringing in of the money for the Scotts' army in Ireland. 11. That the first proposition for raising of a considerable sum for payment of the Scotts' army in Ireland, offered to this Committee by the sub-committee appointed to consider the Irish affairs, is agreed to be presented to the Houses. 12. That the second proposition be presented to the Houses. 13. That the third article be recommitted to the sub-committee formerly appointed for Irish affairs to be further considered of. 14. That the 4th article be presented to the House [of Commons]. 15. That the sub-committee prepare a draft of an ordinance agreeable to the 5th article. 16. That the 6th article, as it is now altered, and the sum filled up be presented to the House. 17. That Sir H. Vane, junr., report the propositions agreed upon to the House on Thursday morning. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 29, 30.]
March 26.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edward Earl of Manchester. The sad condition of those countries by the ill success at Newark has been so deeply resented by my Lord Denbigh, CommissaryGeneral Behre, and the forces of those parts that they are upon their march thitherward; by the letter enclosed you will see their resolutions, and thereby you may consider whether your forces under Commissary-General Behre coming into that army may not do you as good service as if they were in your own army; we desire your Lordship to send back the letter of Lord Denbigh when you have conveniency. Meantime that you will keep a continual intelligence with Lord Denbigh, whereby there may be such a concurrence of your forces as may best promote the service now in hand. And that every day you will send a post to this Committee that we may continually know what is the state of those affairs. Signed by Wm. Viscount Saye and Sele and John Lord Maitland. Underwritten,
This letter and the original of Lord Denbigh's was sent by a messenger of the Earl of Manchester, about 11 o'clock a.m. [Interregnum 18 E., p. 30. Copy. ¾ p.]
March 26.
Derby House.
The same to [Sir John Woollaston], Lord Mayor, and the Court of Aldermen. The Committee of both kingdoms, taking into consideration the great likelihood of a dearth and famine to grow amongst us, both by the spoil of present provisions and preventing the supply of future by depriving the husbandmen of the means of tillage in many places where the armies march, and of how dangerous consequence it will be if the meaner sort of people shall once be distressed in the matter of their food, and how difficult if not impossible in such case to contain them in their obedience, and most of all other places in this populous city, so much abounding now with poor through the intermission of trade; they have thought good to commend it to your especial care, that your stores may be furnished with a greater proportion of corn and victual than heretofore, while it may yet be had at some reasonable rates. And they desire you not to rest in such proportions as you have thought sufficient in times of peace and hope of future plenty. And that besides your public stores from which the necessities of the poor may be relieved at reasonable rates when need require it, you would think of some way to commend it to all of ability within the city to be possessed of sufficient store for their own provisions according to the proportion of their families, whereby they may be freed from those inconveniences which if not prevented may prove dangerous. We doubt not you will be very careful hereof, and we desire to be certified of your proceedings herein. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent by Mr. Butler, messenger, about 10 o'clock a.m. [Ibid., p. 31. Copy. 1 p.]
March 26.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour. By our last of the 24th instant we gave a short account of the unhappy condition of our affairs about Newark. We have thought fit to give you further notice that Lord Denbigh and the forces of Warwickshire, Staffordshire, Derbyshire, and Nottinghamshire, and also those under Commissary-General Behre are marched that way to hinder those forces there, from that fruit of their victory they might hope to reap by arming the country with those arms they had taken from our men; towards which parts also the rest of the forces of Lord Manchester are marching, which we let you know lest you should expect a greater diversion than those forces can now make, as this unhappy accident has altered the state of our affairs; we desire you also that every day we may have a post from you, whereby we may continually know the state of your affairs. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent by Mr. Gardener about 2 o'clock a.m. [Ibid., p. 32. Copy. ¾ p.]
March 27.
Oxon.
51. Sir Edw. Nicholas to the [Earl of Forth], Lord General of the King's forces. This is only to convey to your Excellency the enclosed relation of Prince Rupert's good success before Newark and the declarations herewith sent. We hear nothing as yet from my Lord of Newcastle, but hope the good success of Prince Rupert at Newark will have a good influence on the Scottish forces, for thereby their passage is rendered the more difficult. Prince Maurice wrote to the King that he would march eastward on Monday last. P.S.—The Earls of Kinnoul and Traquair go this day northwards. [1 p.]
March 28.
Leicester.
52. Basil Earl of Denbigh to Sir Samuel Luke, Governor of Newport Pagnell. The intelligence I have lately received from Nottingham is that they fear the enemy will very speedily set upon them, or else, hearing of the Earl of Manchester's march and my being here, they will either fall down into his Association which, I fear, is not strong enough to resist them, or into these parts, or else retire—as some think—to Shrewsbury, in regard they have laden all the ammunition they lately gained and summoned in carts to march with all speed. But I am of opinion, they being so strong, will follow their fortune here; but had the Earl of Manchester's march been swifter and Sir Tho. Fairfax [with the] Derby and Nottingham forces joined with me, we might by God's blessing have been able to recover our loss, or at least surprised their ammunition; but now I fear we must be content to sit down with the loss here and endeavour to regain it in another place. Had not Sir John Meldrum's noble and gallant resolutions been betrayed by base and unworthy commanders and officers, it had not been so bad with him and us as now it is, which, I hope upon good examination, will be found out, that all such base and treacherous actions may receive their due punishment. [Seal with arms and coronet. 1 p.]
March 28./April 7.
The Hague.
Elizabeth Queen to Bohemia to Sir Thos. Roe. I had so great a cold as I could not give you thanks for yours of the 20th February. I am sure my son [the Elector Palatine] has given you an answer of his, where you will find that there is no hope of compassing what you mention; by what I have heard since out of England I fear the States' Ambassadors will return with as little effect as the Comte de Harcourt did. I have received as yet no answer to my letter concerning you, nor indeed have I had any letters from Oxford since my Lord Goring being here, from whence I can write you no news that are good. This French Ambassador, Monsieur de la Tuillerie, is going from his master to be a mediator for a peace betwixt my uncle [the King of Denmark] and the Swedes. The States send also, but their Ambassadors are accompanied with 40 or 50 ships of war which, I believe, will a little startle my uncle. I am sure you know that Ragozci [Prince Ragotzki] is in Hungary with God knows how many thousand men. This is all the news I have, only that which makes me very sad that my dear motherin-law the Electress is dangerously sick. I fear she is dead by this time. When the Polish Doctor comes you shall know it. You may trust Sir Wm. Boswell in it, who is very careful to let you know all, but if you will trust yourself into his hands you must come over, which I shall not be sorry for. [Two seals with arms and crown. In Holland Correspondence.]
March 28.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Wallop, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That it be reported to the House [of Commons] by Sir H. Vane, senr., that 3,000l. be borrowed from Haberdashers' Hall for the present use of Aylesbury, till it shall be repaid from the Committee of Revenue. 2. That it be recommended to the Committee of the militia and to the several sub-committees sitting at the Savoy, Savage House, and in Southwark, to expedite the execution of the ordinance for recruiting the Lord General's army, that it may be ready to march. Orders sent to them eo fine. 3. That letters be written to the Earl of Manchester and Lord Denbigh, to let them know that by intercepted letters of Prince Rupert's it seems probable that he resolves to return to his old quarters; and to desire them to communicate counsels, and upon occasion to join strengths, to do what is best, according to their judgments being upon the place, both for the public and the good of those parts and the Association's, and to send the number of their horse and foot, and where they are, to this Committee, the better to enable their judgments and resolutions. 4. That a considerable number of horse and foot be endeavoured to be sent into the field for a reserve to the forces abroad. 5. That a letter be written to the Committee of Herts., to require them to have two regiments of foot in readiness for present service in respect the Lord General's army is not yet recruited, but is carefully endeavoured to be recruited with all possible speed. 6. That there be presently sent into the field [the following forces, viz.] of the Lord General's foot 2,000, out of Herts. 1,500, out of Aylesbury 600, out of Windsor 500; and that there be sent of horse of the Lord General's 500, from the city of London, Col. Harvey's regiment, 500, from Kent 100, from Essex 100, Middlesex 60, Surrey one troop, Aylesbury one troop; and that Sir Philip Stapleton be desired to speak to the Lord General to get those of his own forces ready with all speed, and to appoint a Commander-in-Chief, the place of rendezvous, and to give orders for the rest. 7. That letters be written to the gentlemen of the Isle of Wight, taking notice of their good affections showed in their [furnishing] provisions for Sir Wm. Waller's army and for other assistance given [by] them, and to encourage the continuance of it. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 30, 31.]
March 28.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edward Earl of Manchester. By the letters of Prince Rupert intercepted which you sent us it appears probable to you that he is not of such a strength as he thinks it safe to continue where he is, but is resolved to return to his own quarters, which we have also written to my Lord Denbigh, and desire both you to keep so good correspondence and intercourse together as by the communication of your counsels and (if occasion offer) conjuncture of your forces you may do that which to your judgment (being upon the place) shall most conduce both to the public service in general as also to the good and safety of the Association and of those parts in particular; and that you will give us the numbers you have of horse and foot and where they are, that we may be the better able to ground our resolutions and judgments. We understand by letters from Hull that 2,000 of the forces that were raised from Newark are come to Hull with Sir John Meldrum. Signed by Wm. Viscount Saye and Sele and John Lord Maitland. Underwritten,
Sent from hence between 7 and 8 p.m., by a messenger who came from Huntingdon. [Interregnum 18 E., p. 33. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 28.
Derby House.
The same to Basil Earl of Denbigh. By the intercepted letters of Prince Rupert sent hither it appears probable to us that, whatever report makes of it, he does not esteem his forces so considerable as to continue with them long in Lincolnshire, but is resolved to return to his old quarters. We have written the same to my Lord Manchester, and desire both of you to keep so good intercourse and correspondence together as by the communication of your counsels and (if occasion offer) conjuncture of your forces that you may do that which in your judgments (being upon the place) shall most conduce both to the public service in general as also to the good and safety of the Association and of those parts in particular, and that you will give us the numbers that are with you, both horse and foot, that we may the better be able to ground our resolutions and judgments. Signed and sent as above. [Ibid., pp. 33, 34. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 28.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee in Hertfordshire. The Lord General's army being in a hopeful way of recruiting, and it being resolved that a good part of it shall presently be made ready to take the field, to be a reserve against all accidents, to which for this purpose we intend to join other forces, and among them desire you to make ready two regiments of foot to take the field for this service until the Lord General shall have his whole army ready, which we hope will be shortly done, and then they may return into your own country. Signed and sent as above. [Ibid., p. 34. Copy. ½ p.]
March 28.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour. By the intercepted letters of Prince Rupert it seems his intention is not to stay in the place where he is, but to return to his former quarters in Shropshire. We are also advertised by letters from Hull that 2,000 of those forces that were raised from before Newark are come to Hull with Sir J. Meldrum. We are also informed that some of the Kentish soldiers do return home from your army; we have given order to have some of them apprehended and sent to you to be made exemplary. It is also informed that Lord Hopton has the provisions of his army brought to him out of Somerset, and we doubt not but with as great facility you may be supplied from the Weald of Sussex and the places behind you that are now under the protection of your army. P.S.—We have propounded to ourselves and are endeavouring to effect a reserve of 4,600 foot and 1,300 horse, to be presently put into the field in the meantime that the Lord General's army be recruiting. Signed as above and sent by John Priestley, on Friday, at 8 p.m., and returned on Tuesday about 9 a.m. [Ibid., p. 35. Copy. 1 p.]
March 29.
Oxon.
53. Sir Edw. Nicholas to the [Earl of Forth], Lord General of his Majesty's forces. The King hath this day given order for a week's provision of hay, oats, or peas, to be forthwith sent for all the horse which were sent from the King's army with your Excellency in assistance of Lord Hopton; and Mr. Jay, the Commissary, is gone with it to the sheriff of Berkshire, out of which county those provisions are to be sent with all possible diligence to Andover, and from Andover Lord Hopton is to take order for carriages to bring it to his quarters. There is also order given by his Majesty to Lord Percy to send Lord Hopton 50 barrels of powder, 6,000 weight of match, and bullet proportionable to the powder, part whereof will be sent hence, as Lord Percy promiseth, tomorrow. You will herewith receive an order from his Majesty to the commanders for all the forces with your Excellency to obey Lord Hopton's orders in your absence, his Majesty being much troubled that your indisposition will not permit you to be abroad with the army. Your Lordship may be pleased to deliver that warrant yourself or leave it to Lord Hopton, as you think fittest. We have here had a flying report that the Earl of Essex is preparing to second Waller, but this day one that came from London, Tuesday last, says there are no forces there ready to march. We hear that the Earl of Manchester and Cromwell are drawing all the forces they can get together into Leicestershire, apprehending that Prince Rupert will disorder that county. [2 pp.]
March 29.
Oxon.
54. The same to the same. Recounts some of the particulars in the above letter to which he refers. His Majesty has now also sent Mr. Hinton, a gentleman of that county, to take order for provisions both for horses and men for your Excellency's forces. The Earls of Kinnoul and Traquair went two days since towards the north. Sir Wm. Vavasour has taken Painswick with small loss, and in it he took above 200 soldiers prisoners, besides many slain, and the arms of divers that ran away. We hear that the Earl of Essex stirs not from London as yet. P.S.—There is now a letter come from [Mr. Jay] the Commissary of the Victuals that there are provisions sent out of Berkshire to Andover for horses and men, but that carriages are there very scarce and hard to be gotten. [1 p.]
March 29. 55. Deposition of John Thorne of Arundel, Sussex, butcher, before the Lords' Committees appointed to take the examinations in the cause of Archbishop Laud. In 1631, being constable of Arundel, he with John Middleton the mayor found Wm. Lewes, a debauched minister, drunk in an alehouse, and took him into custody as he refused to leave and swore and reviled them. Next day, being penitent, he asked their forgiveness and importuned them not to carry him before the Bishop of the diocese, which they did not at his entreaty. Soon after he prosecuted them for having laid violent hands on him a minister, but he received little countenance till Laud was made Archbishop of Canterbury, when the cause was suddenly heard and Thorne and Middleton fined 100l. a piece to the King and 40l. apiece costs to Lewes. Their fines were afterwards reduced through the mediation of Sir John Shelley, a Papist, with the Archbishop. [Endorsed: "Article 6." 1 sheet.]
March 29.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Lords Say, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Wallop, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the propositions now read concerning the affairs of Ireland be reported to the House [of Commons] by Sir H. Vane, junr., which propositions follow, viz.:— 1. That some effectual course be taken for the due and speedy collection of the sequestrations appointed by both Houses for the payment of 60,000l. to the Scottish army in Ireland, and that this be recommended to the Committee for taking the accounts of all the kingdom. 2. That to enable the speedy raising of a considerable sum of money for the supply of the Scottish army in England and Ireland, an Ordinance be passed by the Houses of Parliament to the same effect as formerly, to levy by way of assessment 66,666l. 6s. 8d., being another third part of the 200,000l. appointed by both Houses for the purposes aforesaid to our brethren of Scotland, for which the public faith of both kingdoms is engaged. 3. That as another means for raising money for the affairs of Ireland the Bill presented by both Houses to his Majesty for compelling the Adventurers to pay the money due by their subscriptions upon the Acts of Parliament for that purpose should be turned into an Ordinance of Parliament. 4. That out of the ways and means above mentioned or otherwise, or by the credit thereof, the Committee hold it necessary that the sum of 30,000l. should by the 30th April be shipped from hence to Carrickfergus, upon which the said forces may depend, and that the remainder of the 60,000l. be sent away by the last of June next. For the future maintenance of the Scottish and British forces in Ireland, these propositions, viz.:—1. This Committee thinks it necessary that a settled course be established by Ordinance of Parliament or otherwise toward the monthly pay of the Scottish forces, 4,000l. to be paid to these forces; and that the surplus due to these Scottish forces according to the treaty, over and above the 4,000l. monthly provided, shall be assured to them upon the public faith; and of 4,000l. monthly to be paid to the British forces, which sums for the Scottish and British forces shall be paid into the hands of treasurers nominated for that purpose by both kingdoms or their Committees authorised in that behalf, and to be issued out according to that advice. 2. That whatever provisions of victuals or money shall be raised or collected within the States of the United Provinces by way of benevolence or otherwise, for the relief and maintenance of the said British and Scottish forces, they may be consigned to persons nominated for that purpose by the joint advice of both kingdoms or their Committees authorised in that behalf; and to be issued forth according to instructions given by that advice. For regulating the forces for Ireland,—1. That the Earl of Leven, Lord General of the Scottish forces in Ireland, being now by the votes of both Houses agreed to be Commanderin-Chief over all the forces as well British as Scottish (according to the fourth article of the Result of the Committees of both kingdoms passed both Houses), be desired by the advice of these Committees to nominate and appoint a Commander-in-Chief under his Excellency over the said forces to reside with them upon the place. 2. That Committees be nominated and appointed by the joint advice of both kingdoms of such numbers and qualities as shall be by them agreed on to be sent speedily to reside with these forces, and enabled with full and complete instructions by the joint advice of both kingdoms for the regulation of these forces and the better carrying on of the war. Memorandum.—That the Commissioners of Scotland denied to give any vote to the approbation of these propositions, but that whatever answer the House should please to return they would send [it] to those by whom they are intrusted. Afternoon sitting.—Ordered, 1. That there be the same proportion of horse and dragoons of the Earl of Manchester's [army] sent again to Warwick to Commissary-General Behre that were at first. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp 31–33.]
March 29.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the gentlemen of the Isle of Wight. The Committee of both kingdoms have taken notice of your good affection to the Parliament and the public cause manifested by those provisions sent from the island to the army under the command of Sir Wm. Waller, and the other assistance you have given them, for which they return you thanks, and doubt not but you will still be ready as occasion offers to do them all the good offices that shall be in your power, which we shall be ever ready to acknowledge, as we do account it to be good service to the kingdom. Underwritten,
i. Sent by John Priestley, who carried it to Sir Wm. Waller. [Interregnum, 18 E., p. 36. Copy. ½ p.]
March 29.
Derby House.
The same to Edward Earl of Manchester. We understand from Col. Behre that the 300 horse and 250 dragooners which we wrote to you were to be sent upon the design of Gloucester are recalled by you for your own assistance against Prince Rupert, and upon the supposition that the design of Gloucester is laid aside, which we taking into consideration and weighing well the necessity of pursuing the first design of Gloucester and diverting the enemy in those parts from strengthening the forces with Sir R. Hopton, we have resolved that it is very necessary that the same proportion of 300 horse and 250 dragooners be continued out of your forces under the command of Commissary Behre for relieving Gloucester, and therefore desire you with all speed to send 300 horse and 250 dragooners to Commissary Behre for the service aforesaid, and that you advertise us before you do recall them. By the enclosed from Prince Rupert you may perceive which way he intends to move, and we desire if you shall have intelligences more certain frequently to advertise us. Signed by Wm. Viscount Saye and Sele and John Lord Maitland. Underwritten,
Sent about 8 p.m. by a messenger who came from my Lord from Huntingdon, and paid him here 20 shillings. [Ibid., pp. 36, 37. Copy. ¾ p.]
March 30.
Court at Oxford.
Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer. To pay to Sir Arthur Gorges or his assigns 40l., to be employed by him in buying 50 arms for Henry Lord Loughborough for our service. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8, p. 31. Copy. ½ p.]
March 30.
Oxford.
The like. To pay to Sir Vivian Molyneux, Knt., or his assigns, 100l. for our secret service. [Ibid., p. 33. Copy. ½ p.]
March 30. 56. The examination of Captain George Palmer, taken before the Committee [for safety] at Leicester. Concerning an engagement that took place at Mountsorrel in Leicestershire between the Royalists and Parliamentarians, in which the examinant led the forlorn hope on the Parliament side. After some successful operations the forlorn hope was obliged to retreat, many of them being taken prisoners for want of assistance, which Sir Edward Hartopp refused to send them, being jealous of the examinant and other officers for acting without his orders. Signed by the Committee. [2½ pp.]
March 30.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Say, Wharton, and Maitland, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, and Messrs. Wallop, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That some of the Western gentlemen be sent for, likewise Mr. Recorder about money for the Western and London forces. 2. That a letter be written to the Committee of the militia, desiring them to continue their forces with Sir William Waller for a short time, and to assure them that care shall be taken by this Committee to provide 1,000l. for these forces within two or three days. Another letter to Col. Browne to the same effect. 3. To write to Sir Wm. Balfour and Sir Wm. Waller, taking notice of their good success and desiring them to draw their forces together and put them in such posture that they may be able to improve this present opportunity, with assurance likewise that care shall be taken to send them money speedily. 4. The letter to the Militia read and approved of. 5. To write to cos. Kent, Sussex, and Surrey desiring them to send provisions to their forces now in the army of Sir Wm. Waller that they may be better enabled to prosecute the late victory, and to use all other means for their encouragement. 6. The letter to Major-General Browne read and approved. 7. Ditto to Sir Wm. Waller. 8. To meet tomorrow afternoon after sermon. To desire the Lord Mayor to order a thanksgiving service for the victory of Sir Wm. Waller next Lord's Day in all the churches within the lines of communication and weekly bills of mortality. 9. To write to the Earls of Manchester and Denbigh, and to Commissary-General Behre, informing them of the success of Sir Wm. Waller's forces, and that they may communicate the same to others in the service of the King and Parliament. 10. That the draft of an ordinance concerning the raising of money upon land which was now presented by the Earl of Northumberland be taken into consideration on Monday next. 11. That the propositions presented to the Committee by Wm. White be taken into consideration to-morrow. 12. That the Committee of the militia be desired that the regiment of auxiliaries of Southwark may be in readiness to march with some of the Lord General's forces for a reserve to be used to the best advantage, and that care shall be taken for a fortnight's pay to carry out with them for their further entertainment. 13. To move them [the militia] to secure Windsor with some of their forces, whilst that regiment [auxiliaries of Southwark] may also be employed in that service. 14. To assure them that this Committee do engage themselves to see them supplied with the 1,000l. for Col. Browne's brigade by Wednesday next, and to desire them to send away that sum to Col. Browne and to take care for the convoy of it. 15. That the Committee of Militia will send to Col. Harvey to know in what time his regiment of horse will be ready for the same service; and that we [the Committee of both kingdoms] are informed that there is money ready for that purpose. 16. That the Lord Mayor [Sir John Woollaston] be desired to give notice to all parishes within the lines of communication and weekly bills of mortality that thanks may be given to God for the victory of the forces under Sir Wm. Waller. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 33, 34.]
March 30.
Derby House.
The Commissioners of both kingdoms to Edward Earl of Manchester. We have this day received the news of that good success which it has pleased God to give to the Parliament's forces under the command of Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour against those of Sir Ralph Hopton at Cheriton, between Alresford and Winchester, on Friday last. They began about 8 in the morning and continued until night, in which Lord John [Stuart] is certainly slain, and as said the Earl of Forth, besides Hopton's army wholly routed and scattered, a more full account whereof we shall hereafter give you. We desire you will send the enclosed to the Earl of Denbigh and Col. Behre. Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 37. Copy. 2/3 p. Underwritten,
To Lord Denbigh one of the same tenor, only this added, "to send the enclosed to Com. Behre and to as many of the Parliament's forces beyond him as conveniently he could."
To Com. Behre until this clause, "We desire your Lordship." Sent by Rowl. Fawkerd between 11 and 12 p.m.
March 30.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller, Sir Wm. Balfour, Sir Arthur. Haslerigg, and others. We understand by one Petsonne who was yesterday at the fight between your forces and the enemy that it has pleased God to give by your means a very great defeat to them, in which we acknowledge the great goodness of God for so seasonable a mercy after the unhappy business at Newark. We are very sensible of the great advantage that will come to the kingdom by a careful and diligent improvement of this success against the enemy for the recovery of the west, and how necessary it is to provide all manner of encouragement for the continuance of your forces in this service, for which purpose we have conferred with the Committee of the West, for the providing of money with all speed to be sent down to you, and concerning which they give us very good assurance of suddenly effecting the same. We have written also to the several Committees of the Associations to have the like care of their forces, and to the Militia of London for the encouragement of their forces to continue with you. We are also endeavouring to hasten out all we may some more forces for a reserve to yours, although they be not as yet in that forwardness we could wish. We must desire you, therefore, to be as watchful over yourselves as you can and give us frequent advertisements of the state of your affairs, that what we can contribute for the furtherance of this service may be endeavoured by us with all care. And from the late unhappy experience we had before Newark we think fit to offer to your considerations that you rather endeavour to prevent the rallying of the enemy by keeping the field than to put yourselves upon the attempt of any towns or places of difficulty except you find an apparent advantage, but which we leave to your own judgments, being upon the place. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent by Major Francis Rowe, Scout-Master-General of London. [Ibid., pp. 38, 39. Copy. 1¾ p.]
March 30.
Derby House.
The same to the Militia of London. The Committee of both kingdoms having received news of that good success which God has been pleased to give to the forces with Sir Wm. Waller, and being willing that the best use might be made thereof, do desire you to write to your forces there to stay some short time for the full pursuance of the same, and to let them know that a course is taken that the 1,000l. be presently sent to them, of the safe convoy whereof we pray you to be especially careful. Underwritten,
Signed as above, and sent by Mr. Estwicke, who received it here on Saturday night. [Ibid., p. 39. Copy. ⅓ p.]
March 30.
Derby House.
The same to the Committees of Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. We doubt not before this the newes has come to you of that good success which it pleased God to give the forces under the command of Sir Wm. Waller against those of Sir Ralph Hopton, wherein the enemy's forces were wholly routed on Friday last. And you cannot but know of how great a concernment it is that the victory should be pursued, and the best use that may be made of it for the ending of these great troubles. We therefore desire that you will give all possible encouragement to your forces there by all provisions necessary for them, and especially that of victuals, that they may be in nothing hindered to improve this opportunity that God has put into their hands towards the speedy ending of this war. Signed as above, and sent by Mr. Butler. Underwritten,
One copy for Surrey [was addressed] to Sir Ambrose Browne, one for Sussex to Sir Thos. Petham, and one for Kent to Sir Thos. Walsingham, all delivered on Saturday. [Ibid., pp. 39, 40. Copy=2/3 p.]
March 30.
Derby House.
The same to Major Browne. Being informed of the good service yourself and your brigade have done in the late good success against the enemy, and being very sensible of the great advantage it will be to the kingdom to pursue this victory and the utter routing of these forces, we have written to the Committee of the Militia for the continuance of your brigade in command in this service for some short time, to which effect we doubt not you will receive letters from them, and also 1,000l., for which we have taken care this evening to have it done, and therefore we shall desire you to encourage your men in this so necessary work, and to follow up this happy success which God has been pleased to give you. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent by the same messenger as carried the one of the 30th to Sir Wm. Waller, both of which were left with Major Francis Rowe about 11 p.m. [Ibid., p. 40. Copy. 2/3 p.]
March 31.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Wallop and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That a letter be written to the Committee at Northampton to send to Commissary-General Behre the same proportion of forces that were there before. 2. That the business of Derbyshire be taken into consideration to-morrow, and that Sir John Curson be desired to be here with them at that time. 3. That letters be sent to Lord Fairfax and Sir Thomas Fairfax to join their forces of horse, to mount what foot they can for dragoons, and to march forthwith toward the Tees, in order to make a diversion [against the Marquis] of Newcastle's army and render assistance to the Scots. Likewise, to let them know that the list enclosed is of those forces that this Committee has ordered to send [to be sent] for their future supply, that they take the best course they can to cause such of them to march as are ready, but not to tarry for them, and that they give order for those that are not ready to follow with expedition, and that they keep good intelligence with the Scottish army. 4. That the good success of Sir Wm. Waller's and Sir Wm. Balfour's forces against the enemy be reported to both Houses by the Lord General [Essex] and Sir H. Vane, junr., respectively. This Committee to meet to-morrow at 8 o'clock. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 34, 35.]
March 31.
Oxon.
57. Sir Edw. Nicholas to the [Earl of Forth] Lord General of the King's forces. I send this to acquaint you the King hath taken order by the Sheriff of Berks, by Mr. Hinton, a gentleman of his Privy Chamber living in Berks, and by the Commissaries both of the horse and foot, to send victuals for both to Newbury and Reading, or such other places as you or Lord Hopton shall direct, and Mr. Hinton writes that at Newbury and thereabouts he hath good store of bread and cheese, and also of oats. Lord Wilmot hath sent for all the King's horse to meet this night at Blewberry, about 5 miles from Abingdon, to be ready to join with your Lordship's forces upon all occasions. The King hath no perfect relation from your Excellency or Lord Hopton of the fight at Alresford, nor any certainty how many of the rebels or of his Majesty's forces were there lost; only we hear the King lost neither colours nor cannon, and that Sir William Waller came late on Friday night into Winchester, but whether he continues there or goes westward or what he doth or intends to do we hear nothing. Nor doth his Majesty hear where Lord Hopton is, or where his foot or horse are; whereof your Excellency may be pleased to send advertisement by the first express. There is much good news from divers parts, as by the enclosed you will perceive. P.S.—My Lord John Stuart is at Abingdon, and we hope will recover. [2 pp.]
[March.] 58. Sir Thos. Crompton and others, the Committee for Safety in Salop, to Basil Earl of Denbigh. We have long expected your presence among us, never more needed than now, for Wem is besieged; as we understand, Lord Byron lay about it for three days since, and now they are closer begirt. The Prince is gone to Shrewsbury. If you were now here we hope that out of these and other parts not far remote a considerable force might be raised for their relief. Our humble suit is that you will use all possible means for a speedy despatch unto or towards us. [Seal with arms, broken. 2/3 p.]
March.
Vienna.
Sir Griffin Markham to his sister the Lady Anne Smith. I hear that Beech is burnt down by the rebels, which will kill my brother Meldon if he did live there; yet I hear of none of his sons going to the wars, which I wonder at, for as things stand no man should think of anything else or of any quietness of life when the King is forced himself to be a soldier. If the King had begun to show his resolution sooner, they [the rebels] had all been by this time overthrown, but his dislike to proceed really and [desire to] win with clemency has wronged all the country. I hear that [the Earl of] Essex loses credit with his party, and Waller gains ground of him, and I wonder not at it. If his mother had lived it would have broken her heart to hear of his follies, but he must follow his father's fortune, who never had resolution either to do well or die well. If he forsake his party in good fashion he may yet hope for grace, but the devil that is author of all rebellions will not loose his hold, for in the Low Countries we have many mutinous rebellions, and there old soldiers have told me that there never was rebellion when the devil did not converse with them familiarly. Well may God send the King victory, and grant you health and all contentment. [Extract. In German Correspondence.]