BHO

Charles I - volume 501: April 1644

Pages 86-140

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles I, 1644. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1888.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Please subscribe to access the page scans

This volume has gold page scans.
Access these scans with a gold subscription.Key icon

April 1644

April 1.
Court at Oxford.
Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer. To pay 56l. 14s. to John Castle, Esq., Clerk of the Privy Seal, for the like sum disbursed by him in an extraordinary service which did much import us. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8, p. 32. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 1.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Say, Wharton, and Maitland, Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Browne and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That it be reported to the House [of Commons] by Mr. Browne, as the desire of this Committee, that the Nottinghamshire gentlemen may be furnished with 150 backs, breasts, and pots from the Tower, where Mr. Millington informs they now are, and not designed for any service, likewise with 200 pairs of pistols and as many swords for recruiting their horse. 2. That the business of Mr. [Bryan] Stapleton be taken into consideration to-morrow. 3. That a letter of thanks be sent to the Committee of Kent for their great readiness to serve the public. 4. That Mr. Recorder [Glynn] do report to the House [of Commons] about the 500l. unpaid of the 1,000l. appointed to be sent to the forces with Col. Browne; this money to be sent before Wednesday next, else those forces will be like to return home. 5. That a lord and two commoners, Lord Wharton, Sir Philip Stapleton and Mr. Solicitor St. John, do go to the Militia to see in what state they are about raising those forces that are now to go out as a reserve. 6. That Sir Philip Stapleton do desire the Lord General [Essex] to write to Commissary-General Behre to go to Warwick and attend the service of Gloucester. 7. The like to the Committee of Northampton read and approved of. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 35.]
April 1.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Commanders in Lancashire, Derbyshire, and Nottinghamshire. We have appointed Sir Thomas Fairfax upon a present design, wherein it will be necessary that he has the assistance of your troops. We therefore desire you, upon receipt of his orders, forthwith to march with him for the execution of that design, whose commands therein we desire you will carefully observe, and doubt not of your readiness so to do in regard of the great concernment of it. Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland. Underwritten,
Ten copies of this letter were written for troops from Lancashire, Derbyshire, and Nottinghamshire, and sent by Mr. Saml. Taylour of Derby, commended to the Committee by Mr. White, viz., six letters for six troops of horse from Lancashire, two letters for two regiments of foot from thence, a letter for 300 horse and 500 foot from Derbyshire, and one letter for 200 horse from Nottinghamshire. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 41. Copy. ½ p.]
April 1.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Thomas Fairfax. You are forthwith, with all your horse and as many musketeers as you can speedily mount, to march and join with Lord Fairfax's forces, and march towards the Tees, there to make the best advantage of all occasions that shall offer themselves to your judgments, and to take with you such of those forces (for which you receive orders by the bearer) as are ready and enjoin the rest to follow with all speed. You are not to stay until they are all ready. Keep frequent intelligence with the Scots' army, and give us an account from time to time. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent by Mr. Saml. Taylour, who had it sewn up in his sleeve; he was despatched between 7 and 8 p.m. [Ibid., p. 41. Copy. ½ p.]
April 1.
Derby House.
The same to Ferdinando Lord Fairfax. The Committee of both kingdoms formerly wrote you and Sir Thomas Fairfax to join your forces and march towards the Tees, which we do not understand to be yet put in practice. We conceive it for divers reasons, besides those formerly written, that it is now very necessary to be forthwith put in execution, and therefore we desire that all the horse you can spare, and what foot you can mount for dragoons, joined to Sir Thomas's horse and mounted foot, may march towards the Tees, and there make the best improvement of them that may be, either to divert Newcastle's forces, or to join with the Scots, or what else occasion upon the place shall suggest unto the judgment of Sir Thomas Fairfax, as best to be done for the advantage of the service. The list enclosed is of those forces that the Committee have ordered to be joined with them for their future supply, and we desire that for the present you will endeavour what you can to cause such as are presently ready to march, and not to stay at all for the others that are not ready, so that no longer time be lost of doing service in those northern parts, where it may conduce to the service of the whole kingdom, and for such as are not ready that you give order that they follow you with all expedition. We desire that you keep a constant intelligence with the Scots' army, that all advantage may be taken thereby to promote the service. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Note, that this letter was put into cipher by Mr. Weckherlyn, and was the same day about 11 o'clock, given to Mr. White to be sent to Lord Fairfax. [Ibid., p. 42. Copy. 1 p.]
April 1.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Kent. We have received your letter of the 1st inst., and cannot but take notice of the extraordinary care and cheerful affections we find in yourselves for the good of the public, and for which we return you our hearty thanks. For the money and provisions you mention to be sent to your countrymen that have so gallantly behaved themselves and well deserved in this late service under Sir Wm. Waller, as we shall for the present only recommend it to your care to send them as you shall understand from themselves their necessities require. And in regard we understand that out of your provident care you have some forces of foot and horse in readiness to march, for a reserve to the forces you have already sent out, we have thought fit upon this occasion to acquaint you that there is an intention of setting forth with all possible speed a considerable strength of horse and foot to be made use of upon occasion for the general good of the kingdom, until the army under his Excellency be fully recruited, which is now in a very hopeful way, and those forces to join with such of his Excellency's as are now in readiness, in which respect we shall desire you that what horse and foot you can spare for this service to give us speedy notice thereof, that accordingly we may give directions concerning the same. The greatest need we stand in is likely to be of horse, and therefore we desire you to employ your principal care that way. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent by Mr. Butler, who carried it to Sir Thos. Walsingham, about 5 p.m., to be conveyed into Kent. [Ibid., p. 43. Copy. 1 p.]
April 1.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee at Northampton. The Committee of both kingdoms considering the necessity of relieving of Gloucester, have given order for the same proportions of forces to be sent to Commissary-Genl. Behre to Warwick that were with him before for that purpose, and therefore desire you forthwith to send thither for your parts that proportion which you sent before to be commanded by him in that service. You may also take notice that God has been pleased to give good success to the forces with Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour against those of Sir R. Hopton, whose army was wholly routed by them on Friday last. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent by Gardener, who was despatched between 7 and 8 p.m., and returned on Thursday about 5 p.m. [Ibid., p. 44. Copy. ½ p.]
April 2.
Coventry.
59. Basil Earl of Denbigh to [the Committee for Safety of both kingdoms]. At the earnest solicitation of this Committee and the Committees of Leicester and Northampton, I advanced with the forces of this county [Warwick] and Commissary-General Behre's to Leicester, in hope of joining with other forces to recover the loss sustained at Newark. I remained there from the 24th of last month till Thursday, when, upon the uncertainty of a reinforcement and intelligence from several parts of the advance of the enemy towards us, it was resolved, with the consent of the Commissary-General and other commanders there, that all the horse should be drawn into a body at the rendezvous appointed near the Commissary-General's quarters, and then according to the more certain advertisements of the enemy's march and the hope of joining with the Earl of Manchester's horse—which the Committee of Leicester upon several grounds expected—we might either keep the field or make a safe retreat into Warwickshire. Scouts were sent out, and upon my giving notice thereof to the Committee of Leicester, they did with great instance press me to stay in that county till the next morning, lest my too abrupt leaving them might occasion as much fear as they had received encouragement from the appearance of these forces in a time of eminent danger; giving assured hopes that night of some satisfactory answer from my Lord of Manchester to letters they had sent to invite him to unite his forces with ours for the present service. For this and other reasons I willingly [con]descended to their desires, and after I had made ready three case of drakes, which took up more time than I expected, we marched out with the Governor of Leicester [Henry Grey] to the rendezvous where I desired Mr. [Thos.] Haselrigg would meet me that we might confer together and communicate our intelligence the better to ground the resolutions we were to take. When I came upon the place to my great astonishment I understood Colonel Purefoy's regiment was commanded back by the Commissary-General to the first rendezvous at High Cross, upon the edge of Warwickshire, without any notice given to me of such a change. I sought the Commissary, and not finding him at his own regiment, I was directed to his quarters and thence back to his regiment, which I found upon my return had newly received an order to march towards High Cross. This put me into a greater wonder, and engaged me to stop their motion by giving a contrary order, and sending Capt. Hins [Innes] to the Commissary and others, to let him know the necessity of hearing such advertisements as the Governor of Leicester and Mr. Haselrigg had to communicate before we could take any resolution. All the answer was that the troops should march; whereupon I put myself at the head of the regiment and gave peremptory commands they should make a stand, telling them if they were resolved to march on they should march over me; and sent again to the Commissary to let him know, that by this proceeding, he had broken his promise to me before our setting forth, wherein he condescended to obey my orders as his commander-inchief as long as that action should last, the Lord General [Earl of Essex] having assigned him for the service of Wem under me, the expedition for Gloucester being first brought to a conclusion. This respect appeared in him very voluntary, for telling him, before our setting forth, that if he stood upon points of honour, rather than the service should miscarry I would stay at home, or if he pleased to let me have the 200 horse assigned me by your Lordship for Shropshire, I would march thither according to your directions, and he might dispose of the rest; he refused and chose rather to submit to my command and follow my orders, which till that instant he had received with all civility and application to me. Notwithstanding this remonstrance which so nearly touched him in point of honour, Captain Hins [Innes] returned the second time with a more resolute command that they should march, which though I opposed with all the persuasions and threats I could use, they got of one side of me and by force prevailed, [I] having nothing left with me but some few officers of mine, and a just resentment for so high an injury, till the troops of Northampton, moved with the honour of our nation and the barbarity of my usage against all discipline of war and common civility, offered me their service and gave themselves up wholly to my direction, which I was glad to accept. This disorderly and sudden retreat might well have drawn the enemy into those parts, as it gave great discontent to the Governor of Leicester and Mr. Haselrigg, who thought themselves more prejudiced by such a shameful departure than before advantaged by my coming. But since it hath pleased God to divert those inconveniences I shall only desire such a reparation as may stand with honour and justice. I shall acquaint you with my unhappy condition here, that as formerly some persons in the Committee of Coventry have opposed me in the assistance I would have given to Shropshire,—which may well be thought the occasion of those losses we are put to there,—so upon my agreeing to take the advice of the Committee in all military affairs so wrong a use is made of my compliance that I can neither manage the affairs of war with expedition or secrecy, nor can I use the authority given me by Parliament to raise forces by reason of their opposition, as appears by the enclosed order of the Committee sent to me at Warwick, whither I went to raise forces by calling in the country; which but the day before the Committee then sitting, and many of those whose names were set to that order, consented unto. Since they propounded ways of raising forces which I knew would not prove effectual, and yet by adding a clause which the Committee would not assent to I am in a probable way of raising 400 horse by way of free contribution, wherein the Committee will in no kind give any assistance, as if they feared nothing so much as my raising forces, though I offered to maintain them without charge to this county. Had not these interruptions interposed, and Commissary-General Behre's forces by their plundering and intolerable insolences discontented the people, I may with confidence affirm the number had been doubled. To prevent future inconveniences of this nature and be the better enabled to defend this Association and to oppose the Irish, which flow so much into these adjacent parts, I offer to your consideration the enclosed proposition given me by several gentlemen of this Association, which I hope will not be thought unreasonable, since there is no more desired than what is already conferred upon me by the Ordinance of Parliament, and which all commanders-in-chief exercise in their several Associations, and without which it will be impossible to perform any remarkable service with honour or success. Our scouts bring news that Prince Rupert, with all his forces, is about Lichfield. Thanks for the communication of the victory in the west, which came seasonably to make a reparation with advantage for that business at Newark. I have often desired a list of the forces from this Committee, but cannot prevail; your Lordships giving me assistance in the exercise of my power will enable me to obey your commands in this as in all other services. [8 pp.]
April 2.
Oxford.
Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer, to pay 1,000l. upon accompt to Leonard Pinkney, Esq., Commissary-General for the victualing of our foot army, to be employed towards the victualing of the said army and garrisons. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8, p. 35. Copy. 1 p.]
April 2.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton. and Maitland, Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir H. Vane, junr., and Messrs. Wallop, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the Committee of Militia be desired to use their endeavour, and particularly by sending some of their number, to persuade the City forces with Sir Wm. Waller to tarry yet there for some time. And that Sir Arthur Haselrigg do go to the Committee of Militia about that business. 2. That the Lord General [Essex] be desired to write to Commissary-General Behre and to the other forces designed for the convoy to go to Warwick to attend the opportunity of relieving Gloucester. 3. That the Lord General be desired to appoint the City forces of horse and foot to be at Uxbridge on Friday next. 4. That the Lord Admiral [Warwick] be desired to despatch away Captain Kerse into the Irish seas toward Scotland. 5. That Sir H. Vane, junr., do acquaint the Committee at Goldsmiths' Hall that this Committee thinks it necessary that a considerable sum be speedily sent to the Scotts' army, and that they be desired to let this Committee know what proportion and in what time it can be in readiness to be sent away. 6. That the letter from the Committees of both kingdoms in the Scotts' army to the Committee of both kingdoms here be reported to the House [of Commons] by Sir Philip Stapleton it being the earnest desire of this Committee that all means may be used to supply that army. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 36.]
April 3.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir Gilbert Gerard, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Wallop and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the horse and foot ready to march be at once dispatched to Sir W. Waller, and not tarry till all be ready. 2. That Sir Philip Stapleton do speak to Lord General [Essex] to write to Commissary-General Behre to go to Warwick about the business of Gloucester. 3. That Sir Philip Stapleton do declare to the Lord General the resolution of this Committee about sending the City forces toward Sir W. Waller and to desire him to appoint a rendezvous. 4. That Sir Arthur Haselrigg do go to the Militia to acquaint them with the necessity of their forces going to Sir W. Waller with all expedition lest the fruit of the victory should be lost. 5. That he do also deliver to the Committee of Militia [the recommendation] that the brigade, which is now to go forth with Sir Wm., be put under the command of Col. Harvey. 6. That he likewise do represent to the Militia that they send a sufficient strength to Windsor in order that the garrison there may be sent to Sir W. Waller. 7. That the gentlemen from Herts. be called in and informed that this Committee has had further intelligence of the necessity of putting a body into the field; and therefore that they will send to that county a command to make ready a regiment of foot to march toward Kingston. 8. That a letter now read be sent to the Committee of Kent. 9. That a letter now read be sent to Sir H. Vane, senr., together with a copy of the letter of the Kentish Committee to this Committee, and the answer to the same. 10. That Sir Walter Erle, M.P., be entreated to be here to-morrow, when Lieut.-Col. Owen Rowe and the officers of Ordnance are required to attend to give information about the stores of the magazines. 11. That Thursday in each week be appointed for considering about money and the magazines. 12. That letters be written to Sir W. Waller and Sir W. Balfour, informing them of the force that is coming toward them, and that this Committee will advertise them of any other forces that may draw toward them. They are to keep a vigilant eye on the enemy's motions. Their money is ready, and tarries only to come with this convoy. 13. That Mr. [Robt.] Wallop, M.P., do report to the House the desire of this Committee that 3,000l. may be provided for payment of the garrison of Aylesbury because there may be use made of them in this present expedition. 14. That Sir Philip Stapleton and Sir H. Vane be desired to speak with Mr. Stapley about the garrison at Chichester to know what can be spared of it to go to Sir W. Waller, and to desire his presence here if it be necessary. 15. That Mr. [Robt.] Wallop do speak with the gentlemen of Surrey for securing the gunpowder mills near Guildford, and that this Committee be certified of the state thereof, and what shall be done for security thereof. 16. That Lord Say and Sir Phil. Stapleton be desired to report to the Houses respectively, the paper and letters now presented to this Committee by the Scotts' Commissioners. 17. That the Eastland merchants and the Merchant Adventurers be desired to be here to-morrow afternoon. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 36, 37.]
April 3.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour. Considering the consequence of prosecuting that victory which it has pleased God to give you, and being desirous that you should do it thoroughly and with security, we have thought fit to appoint those additional forces to be sent to you, whereof a list is enclosed, and of whose approach towards you advice shall be continually given you, and we doubt not but you will keep a vigilant eye upon the motions of the enemy, and what you understand thereof you will certify to us. Money is ready to come to you for both of your forces, and only tarries to come with security under the convoy of those forces that are now marching towards you. Besides these forces there will be a further reserve speedily ready both of my Lord General's army and other forces to be employed as occasion shall offer. Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland. Underwritten,
[Sent by a scout of the Lord General's at 9 p.m., and carried to Essex House by Mr. Butler. Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 44, 45, Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 3.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of Kent. Your letter came very seasonably to us informing us of a regiment of horse that may be made for the service of the kingdom. In regard we have intelligence that the enemy gathering all the strength of horse and foot they can to fall upon the forces under Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour, in which, if they should prevail, yourselves can easily judge of what concernment it would be not only in regard of the kingdom in general but of your county in particular. We must, therefore, desire you that with all possible expedition that regiment of horse may be sent to Sir Wm. Waller which will be of extraordinary service, to be there in point of time, considering the intentions of the enemy. We hope this service will not require the stay of this regiment above a month, and therefore doubt not but we may assure ourselves of the affections of your county for a month's pay for them, in all which we are confident of your forwardness and care from the experience we have of your zeal to the service of the kingdom, and desire your speedy answer hereto. P.S.—What you do herein do with all possible speed, expedition being as much as the thing itself, as the affairs are. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Despatched at 9 p.m. by Mr. Butler, who carried it to Sir Thos. Walsingham, and he promised to send it next morning. [Ibid., p. 45. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 3.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Henry Vane, senior. The intelligence we have that the enemy is advancing with all the strength he can make to fall upon Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour has caused us to send from hence all the foot and horse that are ready to join with those forces, and we have written to the Committee of Kent for a regiment of horse forthwith to march thither, which we conceive to be a business of so absolute necessity to be speedied that, besides our general letter to the Committee, we thought fit to recommend the speedying hereof to your particular care and to advertise us of what progress is made herein with all possible diligence. We desire the regiment may not stay for any new order, but march directly to Sir Wm. Waller upon receipt of this letter. Signed and despatched as above. [Ibid., p. 46. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 4.
Court at Oxford.
Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer. To pay to George, Kirke, Esq., Gentleman of our Robes, 250l. upon account for provision of apparel for our own royal person. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8, p. 40. Copy. 1 p.]
April 4. 60. Order of both Houses. That a proportionable part of the salt-petre bought of Mr. Courten be delivered to Sir Walter Erle, Lieutenant of the Ordnance, by the Committee for Safety of the kingdom as shall suffice for providing 600 barrels of gunpowder at 4l. 10s. per barrel. And the Lieutenant of the Ordnance is required upon the credit of the salt-petre to make present provision of the 600 barrels of powder for supplying the stores of the navy. [Printed in Commons' Journals iii., p. 448. Copy. ¾ p.]
April 4.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Essex and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir H. Vane, junr., Sir Phil. Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor St. John, and Messrs. Browne, Crew, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That a letter be written to the Committee of [the Militia] to-morrow. 2. That the gentlemen of Sussex, Surrey, and Hants. be desired to be here to-morrow. 3. That Sir Arthur Haselrigg be desired to go to the Committee of Militia and to the Common Council [of the City] in the name of this Committee to desire them to send presently away that force they have ready towards Sir Wm. Waller, and to hasten the rest. 4. That Lord Maitland and the Solicitor General [St. John] be also desired to go to the Committee of the Militia and to the Common Council for the purpose aforesaid. 5. The letter to MajorGeneral Browne read and approved of. 6. That Colonel Stapley be desired to go into Sussex to expedite the raising of forces there, and to give an account both of the progress and of the obstacles thereof. 7. That Mr. [John] Crew shall take the paper now given in by the Derbyshire men and show it to Sir John Curson, and see if the business can be composed to both their contents, and to desire Sir John Curson to come here to-morrow if there be cause. 8. That the business of Jersey and Guernsey now offered by the Lord Admiral [Warwick] be taken into consideration to-morrow. 9. That Sir Philip Stapleton be desired to speak with the General of Ordnance, and desire from him a certificate of the quantity of arms and ammunition which are in the stores at the army. 10. That Mr. Weckherlin make a breviate of the letters now presented. 11. That the business of Gloucester be taken into consideration tomorrow. 12. That Sir Philip Stapleton do desire the Lord General to send an express to Sir Wm. Waller to advertise him of the King's drawing his forces together. 13. That a copy of the letter sent to the Lord General be sent to Sir Henry Vane, senr., now in Kent, and to the Committee there. 14. This Committee, taking into their consideration the letter from the Committee of both kingdoms residing in the Scotts' army concerning what correspondence was fit to be held with the Crown of Sweden, do order that it be reported to the House [of Commons] to-morrow as the opinion of this Committee by Sir Henry Vane—That there be some persons in the nature of Agents from both kingdoms sent with all speed to the Swedes with instructions to maintain a good correspondence with the Crown, and such as may be an occasion of nearer alliance with the same. [Interregnum 7 E. Book of Orders, pp. 38, 39.]
April 4.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Henry Vane, senior. My Lord General has received letters which he has communicated to the Committee assuring from eye-witnesses that the King is drawing his forces together, and the rendezvous is appointed at Marlborough on Saturday next. The garrison is all marched out of Reading, and the report is that they will presently face Sir Wm. Waller again and do their utmost to recover their losses, by which you will see the great necessity of all expedition to be made in the dispatching away of those additional forces that are appointed to be sent to Sir Wm. Waller. We therefore desire you to do your uttermost to promote the sending away of that regiment of horse which in our letter of the 3rd instant we desired. We should not have written so soon after our former letter but that this renewed intelligence of their speedy growing requires all possible diligence to obviate, in which we are well assured you will not be any way wanting. Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland. Underwritten,
Note, that a similar letter was sent to the Committee of Kent, this clause being added, "having had experience of your zeal and care for the public." These letters were sent by Rowland Fawkerd from hence, 4th April, about 10 p.m. He returned on Friday, 5th April, about 4 p.m. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 46, 47. Copy = 1 p.]
April 4.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Browne. We have received notice that since the victory which it pleased God to bless your endeavours withal the enemy is doing his utmost to rally and re-collect his forces so as to fall again upon that army and take from you (at a second and unexpected attempt) the honour, and from the kingdom the fruit of those labours, and that he resolves speedily to put some design upon you for which purpose they take their men out of all their garrisons and strip the country of all their horses where they come. To obviate their undertakings, and to make that army able with effect and security to prosecute their victory to a happy issue, we have ordered some additional forces from divers parts to march to you, which shall be with all possible expedition, and we are assured few days will effect it. In the meantime we desire you, both for the reputation of the action and also for the safety of your own retreat, not to withdraw those forces, and are very well assured that in respect of the engagement of your honour and the common safety you will need no other arguments from us but this advertisement, and we desire you to communicate this letter to your officers, of whose good affection to this work and desire to perfect it we doubt not. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Note, that this letter was delivered to Sir Arthur Haselrigg about 4 p.m., who carried it to the Committee for the Militia of London to be sent away. [Ibid., pp. 47, 48. Copy = ¾ p.]
April 5.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. There being but one Scottish Commissioner present there was no vote passed. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 39.]
April 5. 61. Order of the Committee of the Navy appointed by Parliament,—That the sum of 3,292l. 7s. 8½d. shall be paid to Sir Walter Erle, Lieutenant of the Ordnance, out of the first money arising out of the prize goods lately brought in at Portsmouth, towards payment of the said sum, for which Erle and the Officers of Ordnance have engaged their credits to the artificers and others who are to furnish the stores for the setting forth of this summer's fleet. [Certified copy. ¾ p.]
April 6.
Aylesbury.
62. G. Palmer to the Committees for General Accompts of the kingdom at London. I received your letter of 30th March, and will give you account of the particulars mentioned therein, but at present I stand so engaged in the service for sequestration within this county [of Bucks] that I have no leisure to draw up those particulars for your satisfaction. I have sent out warrants for three several hundreds to appear between this and the end of this month, nothing having hitherto been done [in this business] by reason of the presence here of the King's forces, who have imposed contributions on the inhabitants. We have taken advantage of this opportunity to sequester those estates and secure the rents now due, if the inhabitants can be got to appear, being in danger to be spoiled of their goods if it be known they obey any warrants from the Committees of Parliament. For these reasons I hope you will please to dispense with my attendance till this service be over. P.S.—At this instant I received your letter for Bedds., and when the business I have written of is over, I shall give you a full account for both counties. Bedds. is wholly done, not having the like causes of impediment as Bucks. [Seal with device. 1 p.]
April 6.
Coventry.
63. Basil Earl of Denbigh to [the Committee for Safety of both kingdoms]. It has pleased God to give a happy success to two attempts made by Lieutenant-Colonel Ferrar and Major Bridges to relieve Gloucester, having at several times conveyed 30 barrels of powder, 200 weight of brimstone, and 500 weight of match, by means of small parties and the great diversions made in other parts by our late victories. Yet upon pretence of late orders from the Lord General, Commissary Behre is willing to have his share in what hath been already so successfully performed by others, having surprised us by his sudden return and giving orders to put all things in readiness for his march to Gloucester, though the 40 horse with panniers which, of the 60 assigned by your Lordships, were all that could be found here for that service, were already employed and sent thither but not returned. This with other reasons moved the Committee and myself to send the enclosed paper to the Commissary, to which others were added concerning myself, but thought fit by the Committee to be left out in regard of the late difference betwixt us, though I declared my readiness to join with him in all public occasions, which I held unfit to put in balance with my private interests, till you should dispose otherwise of me; wherein I am confident in due time you will do me that right that I shall not continue long under these sufferings nor be subject to interruptions of this nature in the exercise of a power conferred on me by both Houses of Parliament and the [Earl of Essex] Lord General. The reasons concerning myself were that his [Commissary Behre's] lying here upon free quarter and the disorders of his soldiers would divert the country from bringing in horses to complete my regiment, and hinder the people from enlisting in my regiment of foot; of both these I have had sad experience, being forced to abate much of the proportion of horse the country was willing to bring in, upon their just complaints of the insolent behaviour and plunderings of Commissary Behre's forces, of their unjust taxes of horse, money, and provisions, and the unequal distribution of his men in their quarters, sometimes 20 or 30 of them having defrayed themselves for diet and provender at the charge of one poor family; and since my return from Leicester in the absence of the Earl of Manchester's forces, upon which the Commissary was willing to lay the burthen of the miscarriages of his men, some of his own troop, who are all Dutchmen, so plundered and wounded the people near some towns belonging to me, where my officers were then raising my own company of foot, and so disaffected them, that I could not raise any considerable number, though amongst my own tenants. Their injuries had been more insufferable had not an officer of mine frighted them away with the report of Prince Rupert's drawing near, and giving the same alarum to the Commissary, then at my cousin Sir William Boughton's house, he held it fit to remove into Northamptonshire, which before he had promised to Colonel Purefoy and myself. By the enclosed from Stafford you will perceive how prejudicial these distractions are likely to prove to Wem. [3½ pp.]
April 6.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Essex and Warwick, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir Henry Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor St. John, and Messrs. Wallop and Crew. Ordered, 1. That the Committee meet again to-morrow in the afternoon. That Sir Arthur Haselrigg do go to the Committee of the Militia to desire them to send a convoy with the money to Sir Wm. Waller. 2. To consider of the business of Colonel Stapley on Monday next. 3. That the Earl of Manchester be desired to march with what force of horse and foot he can to the place of rendezvous and to bring what horse he can. 4. That the two letters to the Committee of Kent be sent down to Sir H. Vane. 5. That a letter be written to Lord Grey to send his regiment to this service, and one to co. Leicester to send a month's pay. 6. The like to Northampton to send 200 horse and 500 foot, with ammunition. 7. Do. to the Committee of Herts. for a regiment of their foot, and to send a month's pay. 8. Do. to Col. Purefoy to march with his regiment to the rendezvous for this service. Do. to the Committee at Coventry to furnish that regiment with a month's pay, and to the Earl of Denbigh to further the same. 9. That the Lord General [Essex] be desired to write to Comy. General Behr to consider whether the relief of Gloucester can be effected with the force he has, if not, then to come away for this service. 10. That such forces shall be drawn out of this city as now can be spared for this service. 11. That such of the forces as are under the immediate command of his Excellency [the Lord General Essex], and can be ready, be drawn out to this service. 12. That Sir Philip Stapleton do report to the Commons on Monday what is done by this Committee in pursuance of their order. To tender this advice to the House, that some course be taken with the counties for supply of corn to make biscuit, for cheese and butter for victualing the army, for oats for the horses, likewise [to supply] horses for service and for draught. That the Houses will stir up the City to assist in this service, with as great a proportion of horse and foot as possibly they can. And that some way be thought on for [providing] 1,000 barrels of gunpowder and ammunition proportionable both for a magazine and to furnish this service. 13. To write to Col. Purefoy that if he see the way open to Gloucester, that he can go thither with safety, then to go notwithstanding the former letter, and join with Col. Massey to do service there, but if the way be not open then to come to Aylesbury according to the former letters. 14. That Mr. Solicitor [St. John] do speak with the Gloucestershire gentlemen to prepare ammunition and money to be sent to Gloucester. 15. That Sir Henry Vane do report to the House the paper now offered by the Scotts' Commissioners. 16. That the chairman and one of the Scotts' Commissioners may give passes and post-warrants. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 39, 40.]
April 6.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir John Gell and others. It having pleased the Divine goodness to bless with a very happy and seasonable success those forces that are with Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour against the forces commanded by Sir R. Hopton (the Earl of Forth being also upon the place), we have thought fit to give you this short account of it. That upon Friday the 29th of March (the forces having faced each other for two days before) they began the fight near Cheriton, a village in Hampshire, not far from Winchester, about 8 in the morning, which held doubtful for some time, but ended at night with the total rout of the whole army of Sir Ralph Hopton, their foot wholly scattered, and their arms lost and thrown away. They drew off their cannon and carriages undiscerned of our men, which marched away with some of their horse and could not be followed in the night, yet their horse were also mainly shaken, and especially the Queen's regiment. Amongst those that are slain it is reported by their prisoners that Lord John [Stuart], brother to the Duke of Richmond, is one besides some others of quality, and many wounded, among whom is the Earl of Forth, as their prisoners report. Of prisoners there are 2 Colonels, 1 Lieutenant-Colonel, 7 Captains, 20 other officers, and 300 common soldiers. The enemy's forces were about 10,000, ours not so many. They have only one prisoner of ours, Capt. Milton, one of the City captains. We trust such use shall be made of this victory, through the blessing of Him that gave it, that the whole West may in a short time be reduced and delivered from under their power. Signed by Phil. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland, and sent by Mr. Fleetwood. Underwritten,
[Note, that copies were sent] to Colonels Hutchinson, Moore, Ashton, and Rigby, to Mr. Hunt, and to Leicester and Nantwich. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 48, 49. Copy = 1 p.]
April 6.
Derby House.
The same to Colonels Moore, Ashton, and Rigby. Having been informed that divers forces have gone out of Westmoreland to Newcastle's army to the increase thereof and also to the western borders of Scotland, of which it is very necessary that a present diversion be made for the better facilitating the progress of the Scots' army, we therefore desire you forthwith to draw out 1,000 of your best horse and foot into Lancaster and those parts adjoining to Westmoreland and join them with the forces of Col. Dodding, and to make such use of them for a diversion as occasion shall offer to your judgment being upon the place. We have also ordered diversions to be made in Yorkshire to the end the army of Newcastle, being thereby weakened in the Bishopric, the Scots' army may the better deal with the rest for the clearing of the country, enlarging, and for finishing the war in those parts, which service we commend to your special care and speedy execution. Signed and sent as above. [Ibid., p. 49. Copy. ½ p.]
April 6.
Derby House.
The same to Colonels Moore and Rigby. By a letter we have seen under Col. Moore's own hand, we perceive there are some jealousies amongst you of the fidelity of Col. Dodding. We should be very sorry that he who has done so well and suffered so much for this cause when the condition of it was to sense more doubtful, should now (when by the great goodness of God it begins everywhere to gather strength and grow more assured) entertain any thoughts of deserting the same. We are very tender of his reputation, and are desirous, without blemishing the same, to take from him all opportunity of declaring himself, and thereby to do so great a disservice to the cause and to bring your country again into new troubles and dangers. As an expedient to prevent which we have thought fit that you raise 1,000 men and with them march to Lancaster under the pretence of making a diversion only, as we have expressed in our other letter (which therefore you are to make public) and conceal all other intents. Being there you are to find means to possess yourselves of Lancaster Castle, whereby you will easily prevent his declaring himself, or if he should you may easily secure all against him, if you do not continue him in his duty; we are well assured of your wisdom and judgment for the managing of this business, and know that it is very necessary that he be kept from declaring himself against the cause, for that once done he is lost to all further service. Keep this therefore with all secrecy to yourselves, and act the rest with all possible expedition, unless you see cause to continue your confidence in him, which we leave to the consideration of your judgment. Signed and sent as above. Underwritten,
Note, that this letter was enclosed to Mr. Hunt, who was desired to deliver it privately. [Ibid., p. 50. Copy. 1 p.]
April 6.
Derby House.
The same to the Deputy Lieutenants of Lancashire. The great service you have done to the common cause of the kingdom in clearing your county of your enemies and so worthily defending it against them (besides the help by you afforded to your neighbours) is such as not only deserves acceptance, but also requires thanks, and we doubt not but you have such a sense of the fruit of your labours in what you enjoy thereby (beyond those that lie under the power of the enemy) that you shall need no other arguments from us to persuade you to maintain the good condition you have purchased. And among all your services we cannot but let you know how acceptable it was to us and of how great use to the public that you have furnished that noble gent. Sir Thomas Fairfax, a man of so much worth and honour and so much deserving of the State, with some seasonable and considerable sums of money, for the supply of his troops, without which they had in likelihood been so weakened as he would have been disabled for the execution of what we have designed him unto, wherein we trust, by the blessing of God, the success will be such as you will have much content in having been conducing to the work, yet we cannot but let you know that rumour and report here give out that some of you should have declared against some proceedings of Sir Thos. Fairfax among you, which we cannot be induced to believe both in respect of him whom we know to be a gentleman of much wisdom, integrity, and honour, and who has managed all his actions with so great a judgment as they have still (by the blessing of God) been successful in themselves, and of great service to the common cause. And therefore must believe that his actions there have been also such as cannot deserve a declaration against him, and especially from men of your wisdom and temper, who we cannot believe should attempt any public act against their Commander-in-Chief, before they had acquainted the Parliament with it. And will therefore believe they are but groundless rumours, and that we shall hear no further of it. Your want of arms and ammunition is represented unto us by some of your countrymen which we shall endeavour to supply as soon as possible, and desire you will continue that unanimous care for the defence of your country by which you have vindicated it, and doubt you not but your good services and great charges are taken into consideration. Signed as above. Underwritten,
This was sent with eight more, six of them being relations of the victory, directed to several persons and places, viz., to Colonels Moore, Ashton, Rigby, and others, by Mr. Fleetwood, who was despatched hence between 5 and 6 p.m. [Ibid., pp. 51, 52. Copy. 1½ p.]
April 6.
Derby House.
The same to Edward Earl of Manchester. Having received certain intelligence that the King is drawing all his force together into a body both out of his garrisons and otherwise, and considering what danger it will be to the whole kingdom if we should not have a power in the field that might be able to oppose the same, and to fight with them if opportunity shall offer, we have therefore thought fit also with all expedition to draw together all our forces in those parts of the kingdom into one body, hoping it may be a good means by the blessing of God to put a speedy and happy period to these unhappy distractions. We do therefore desire you to march with all the force you can make of horse and foot, and especially of horse, that can be spared from your Association, leaving only what may be for the safety of your necessary places of garrison towards Aylesbury, and that you will be there on Friday the 19th inst., and certify us what forces of each kind you shall be able to bring to the rendezvous at that time. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent by Mr. Jennings from hence about 7 p.m.; he returned on Monday, April 8, about 4 p.m. [Ibid., pp. 52, 53. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 6.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee at Knole, co. Kent. By fresh intelligence which we receive from several hands, we are informed that the King is gathering all the force he can to fall upon Sir Wm. Waller's forces, and himself, as is said, intends to be with them in person, in which respect we are the more confirmed in our opinion of the necessity of sending away your regiment of horse with all speed to Sir Wm. Waller, whose main body lies now at Rumsey. He having taken Christchurch a place of importance near Poole with a regiment of foot in it with their Colonel Sir John Mills and many other gentlemen of quality, from thence he is marched with a party to take in Weymouth. We are despatching away with all speed what strength of horse and foot are in readiness to join with Sir Wm. Waller's forces, amongst which we depend upon your regiment of horse. It is very true when we first wrote to you about sending forth additional forces we did not then think of sending out some of the Lord General's forces with others for a reserve under the command of Major-General Skippon, but since, finding that the preparations of the enemy require the sending away of such forces as are in readiness for the present, we thereupon resolved to fall upon that course which might be most speedy, which was the cause of our sending direction to yourselves for your regiment of horse to march directly to Sir Wm. Waller's forces at Rumsey. In which we are confident no endeavours will be wanting in yourselves. We desire to hear from you speedily. Signed as above. [Ibid., pp. 54, 55. Copy = 1 p.]
April 7.
[Derby House.]
Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Wallop and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That a letter be written to the Committee of the Militia, to desire them to stay their forces abroad in regard of their own danger to return, having no horse for their convoy, and for that there are some forces now upon their march for their relief; and to desire the militia to send some of their own number to them for that purpose. 2. That a letter be written to Major-General Browne and his officers to that effect. 3. That a letter be written to the Committee of Kent, to desire them to send their regiment of horse to Kingston upon Tuesday next, where the City regiments will be at that time. 4. That a letter be written to Waller and Balfour, to let them know what forces are coming presently to their assistance, and that the enemy are gathering all their forces together, and therefore to be vigilant. Also to acquaint them with the resolutions taken by the Committee for gathering all our forces to a rendezvous, and to let them know in general the news from York sent from Hull. 5. The Earl of Manchester to be desired to bring with him ammunition and artillery; and to inform him of the directions given to Herts. 6. That the news from Yorkshire concerning the Scotts' army and Sir Thos. Fairfax be added in a postscript to all the letters to be sent at this time from this Committee. 7. That it be reported to the House [of Commons] by Sir Philip Stapleton, as the desire of this Committee, to provide speedily 3,000l. for the garrison at Aylesbury, to enable them to march. 8. That it be offered to the gentlemen of the western parts by Mr. Wallop to take Col. Thomson into the service of their Association, and to be paid by them accordingly. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 40, 41.]
April 7. Note, that letters from the Committee of both kingdoms, to the same effect as that sent to the Earl of Manchester on the 6th April, were this day sent by Lord Wharton for Colonel Purefoy and for the Committees at Coventry, Hertford, Northampton, and Leicester, also for the Earl of Denbigh and Lord Grey. The letter for Northampton had a clause inserted, "for convenient ammunition," and that for Leicester a clause, "for one month's pay." [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 53 = ¼ p.]
April 7.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Committee in Kent. Upon the constant intelligence which we have of the enemies' resolution to gather all the strength they can to fall upon Sir Wm. Waller's forces, we are very solicitous to send away what strength we can for to speedily join with them, and to this effect have prevailed with the City to send forth two or three regiments of foot, who will be at Kingston on Tuesday night next, in expectation to meet with some horse there besides what goes out of the City. In which respect we thought fit to desire you that your regiment of horse may not fail to be at Kingston at the same time. We hear from Hull that the Earl of Newcastle's forces received a blow on Thursday seven-night by the Scots, and that Lord Fairfax and his son are joined in Yorkshire and make up 2,000 horse and 4,000 foot going to join with the Scots' army Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland. Underwritten,
Sent by Mr. Butler, between 7 and 8 p.m., to Sir Thos. Walsingham, to have it forwarded. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 53, 54. Copy = ½ p.]
April 7.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour. The several informations we have of the King's drawing all his forces together have made us appoint a general rendezvous of the Lord General's army with what supply the City will send out, the whole forces under the Earl of Manchester, and all that can be drawn together out of all the country and garrisons on this side Trent, on Friday come sevennight the 19th inst. The place appointed is Aylesbury. The supply marcheth out of this city towards you to-morrow, the trained bands of the Hamlets, the auxiliaries of Westminster, and those of Southwark; the horses under Col. Harvie will not be ready so soon, but we hope the Kentish regiment of horse shall meet the City foot on Tuesday night at Kingston, and we have written to that Committee to that effect. Our preparations being in this forwardness we are confident you will be very watchful over yourselves and look to the motions of the enemy, giving us daily intelligence of what passes, as we shall to you upon all occasions. Sir Hen. Cholmoley has come from Hull, and reports that the Scots have given the Earl of Newcastle a good blow, which is also confirmed by letters, and that Lord Fairfax and his son have a good body together of 4,000 foot and above 2,000 horse. Leeds is taken by Sir Thos. Fairfax, and they are marching towards the Tees. We have written to the City forces again to stay with you, and to the Militia of London to send one to them to persuade them to it. Your money will come up with your supply. Signed as above. Underwritten,
Sent about 9 p.m. into London by John Priestley to the Scoutmaster-General. [Interregnum, vol. 18, pp. 55, 56. Copy = 1 p.]
April 7.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of the Militia. Having received notice that the forces under the command of Col. Browne are returning home, we think it necessary to desire you to write to them with all speed to stay; their return at this time, when most of our forces on this side Trent are drawing thitherward, would not only prove inconvenient to the public service but dangerous to themselves, who, being without horse, might be in danger to be cut off. The Committee thinks this to be of such importance that they desire that some of yourselves would go down to persuade their stay. The Committee has written to Col. Browne and his officers to the same purpose. Signed and sent as above. [Ibid., p. 56. Copy. ¾ p.]
April 7.
Derby House.
The same to Major-General Browne and his field officers. Having received intelligence that your forces have an intention to return home, we think it necessary to entreat your longer stay, in regard that the King is drawing all the forces he can together, and with them in his own person to fall upon Sir Wm. Balfour and Sir Wm. Waller, and therefore the Committee have commanded most of our forces on this side Trent to come up to [Waller's] assistance, and if at this time you should march away it would not only prove exceeding prejudicial to the public by discouraging our own party and encouraging the enemy, but dangerous to themselves to be cut off in their march being without horse. We are well assured of your good affections and courage, whereof you have given ample testimony in your late service, and we doubt not of the continuance thereof by your stay for some longer time. Signed and sent as above. [Ibid., p. 57. Copy. 1 p.]
April 7.
Derby House.
The same to Col. Purefoy. We have written to you to march with your regiment of horse to be at Aylesbury on the 29th inst. as the place of the general rendezvous, yet if you find the way to Gloucester to be open so as you may safely march thither, whether the ammunition be gone or not, we desire that you will, notwithstanding that letter, go to Gloucester and join your forces to Col. Massie, who we doubt not with the assistance of your horse will be able to do very good service there in the county while we are facing the enemy. But if you find the way for the present shut up then we would not have you spend any time in waiting for an opportunity, but to come to Aylesbury according to that letter. Signed as above and sent to Lord Wharton to be forwarded with many others by Rowland Fawkerd. [Ibid., p. 58. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 8. 64. Order of the Commons' House. That there shall be a collection made on Tuesday, 9th April, being a day appointed for Public Thanksgiving for the great victory obtained by the forces under Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour over the army of Sir Ralph Hopton, in all the parish churches and chapels in and about London and Westminster, that are included in the weekly bill of mortality, toward the relief of sick and maimed soldiers, the money so collected to be paid in to the treasurers at Tallow-chandlers' Hall near Dowgate, on the 12th present. It is likewise ordered that the ministers of the several parishes and chapels shall earnestly persuade the people freely to contribute to this so pious, charitable, and honourable a work, it being for those who have, and will be ready again to venture their lives for the defence of all our lives, liberties, and religion. [Printed Form. 1 p.] Dorso,
64 i. Receipt by Wm. Greenhill for 15s. 3½d. received of the churchwardens of Islington for sick and maimed soldiers, and the widows whose husbands were slain in the Parliament service. [¼ p.]
April 8. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, the Lord General [Essex], Lords Say, Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpont and Crew. Ordered, 1. That the business of Shropshire and Wem be first taken into consideration on Wednesday next. 2. That the regiment of Herts. do go to Hitchen, where they shall receive further orders. 3. That in pursuance of the ordinance of both Houses of the 8th inst., it is ordered that the Committee of the Militia shall send out the regiment of trained bands of the Tower Hamlets, the regiment of the auxiliaries of Southwark, and the regiment of the auxiliaries of Westminster, to go to Sir Wm. Waller. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 41.]
April 8.
Paris.
Coat of arms claimed by Bonaventura Ireland, LL.D., as son of Robert Ireland, a native of Angus in Scotland, who going to reside in the Academy of Poitiers in France in 1521, obtained letters of naturalization from Francis I. In order to show that the house of Ireland is noble in France as well as in Scotland, from which the former is descended, it is desired to have letters patent of the King of England as customary in such cases. Sketch of the shield with the arms claimed. Underwritten,
Mr. Cotel brought this for Ireland to be certified [at the College of Arms] but nothing was done because not found. [Vol. ccclx., p. 240. Latin and French. 1 p.]
April 9. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. This being the day of General Thanksgiving no Committee sat. [Interregnum 7 E., p. 41. Day Book of Orders.]
April 9.
Court at Oxford.
Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer. Whereas we are pleased to command Robert Slingsby, Esq., to transport himself beyond sea as our Commissioner to perform such service as we have intrusted to him, and for his entertainment are pleased to allow him 40s. a day, to begin from the 1st present, and to continue till the day of his return into our presence; which allowance we require you to cause to be paid to him or his assigns, also to advance to him by way of imprest 100l., to be afterwards defalked upon his said entertainment, and to cause to be paid to him for his transportation, posting charges, intelligences, sending of letters and other private services such sums as shall appear to be due upon his bills, being subscribed by one of the Principal Secretaries of State. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8, pp. 41, 42. Copy. 1½ pp.]
April 10.
Colchester.
65. Henry Barrington to Oliver Cloberry and the rest of the Committee [for General Accounts], at the house of the late Alderman Freeman in Cornhill, London. I received yours of the 3rd March, but must ask extension of time till next week, when I will make a full report to you of all the estates sequestered, money received, money not received, and money paid by me. [Seal with device. ⅓ p.]
April 10. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Wharton, Say, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Recorder, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpont, Browne, Wallop, Crew, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That it be reported to the Houses by the Earl of Northumberland and Mr. Pierpont respectively, that there can be no intelligence expected from this Committee out of the King's quarters in regard none will undertake the same until an oath of secrecy be taken by this Committee. 2. That letters be written into Lancashire to send the two regiments of Cols. Booth and Holland, and to make them up with musketeers to 2,000. Also to send what horse they can spare, under Lord Denbigh's orders, to march for the relief of Wem. 3. That Cheshire do contribute 600 musketeers and all their horse for this service of the relief of Wem. 4. That 300 foot and 200 of Col. Fox's horse, or such other as the Earl of Denbigh can raise in co. Warwick, do go to the relief of Wem. 5. That all the Staffordshire horse and foot be employed for the same service. 6. Letters to be sent to the Earl of Denbigh and the several Committees for putting this service in execution. 7. That it be delivered to the officers of Windsor garrison, as the opinion of this Committee, that they receiving the 1,000l. appointed them, it is expected they should be ready to march. 8. That Sir Ph. Stapleton do desire the Lord General [Essex] to certify this Committee of the state of his recruits that this Committee may assist what they can. 9. That an order be drafted from this Committee to Col. Stapley to go to Chichester and recruit the garrison to 800 and keep them together for the safety of that city. 10. Form of the order to Col. Stapley to repair to Chichester or any other part of Sussex in order to prevent the disbanding of his regiment. He is hereby required to use his best endeavours to hasten away to Sir W. Waller the forces which that county ought to supply according to the ordinance for that Association, and to recruit his regiment as he best can, until he receive further directions from this Committee. 11. That in pursuance of an order of both Houses sent to this Committee it is desired that the Clerks of both Houses do prepare 14 or 15 copies of the letter to be sent to so many counties for providing of victuals and horses now to be sent out, and to get the same signed by the Speakers and sent to this Committee by tomorrow in order that they may be dispatched. 12. That it be submitted to the Commons from this Committee by Sir H. Vane, junr., that they would be pleased to adjourn the sitting of the House upon Friday next, and send Committees to the City to hasten the sending out of their forces against the day of rendezvous and for providing money. 13. Likewise that they would send some of their members to the Committee of the Militia and to Salters' Hall to know what forces they will have in readiness to send out with the Lord General [Essex]. 14. That the Earl of Northumberland do report to the Lords [the necessity for] speeding an answer to the papers given in by the Scotts' Commissioners, in respect the Scottish Estates do assemble this day and expect an answer before they dissolve, for which purpose the Commissioners have an express ready. 15. That a letter be sent to the Committee of Militia to desire them to send back Col. Thomson's regiment of horse to Sir Wm. Waller. 16. That Friday afternoon be appointed for the business of Jersey and Guernsey. 17. That Waller and Balfour be informed of the arrival of a troop of the Kentish horse at Kingston where the whole regiment will be on Friday night, also that two City regiments have marched and that care is taken for sending more. 18. That the letter now read and a copy of the order to Col. Stapley be sent to Sir Wm. Waller. 19. The request of the Committee of Kent contained in their letter of 5th April concerning the ordnance was approved. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 41—43.]
April 10.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Militia in London. We have received advertisement that the regiment of horse of Colonel Thomson is coming home without and against order. How necessary it is they should continue there you well know when we think it fit to send out all the rest of our forces. We therefore desire you to write to those horse to return back to Sir William Waller, for if such considerable forces shall leave him, they do what lies in their power to enforce him to follow and thereby bring the enemy home to our own doors. We desire you will take care of it with all expedition. Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 59, 60. Copyp.]
April 10.
Court at Oxford.
Warrant under the Privy Seal to the Exchequer. Whereas Richard Stephens, gent., steward appointed for the Western Circuit, begun 30 November last, to attend our two Chief Justices and others, riding as justices of jail delivery and Commissioners of Oyer and Terminer for cos. Wilts., Somerset, and Devon, has disbursed 300l. for the charges and expenses of diet, horsemeat, lodging, &c., for our said justices and their attendants on the circuit as by Stephens' account appears, of which sum he has already received 100l., our will therefore is that you cause to be repaid the remaining 200l. due to him and to cause a tally to be struck in the Receipt of Exchequer for 100l. upon Edward Kirton, receiver of the Composition money of delinquents in Somersetshire, and another tally for 100l. upon Francis Godolphin, receiver of cos. Devon and Cornwall, without accompt, imprest, or other charge. [Vol. ccccxcviii., No. 8, p. 45. Copy. 1 p.]
April 11.
Oxford.
The like. Whereas Francis Walker has by our command cast and founded divers pieces of ordnance and shot and performed other services, for which there was due to him 882l. 12s. 4d., whereof he has already received from Lord Hopton 300l. so that there remains due to him 582l. 12s. 4d., as by his account signed by Prince Rupert appears, our will is that you cause a tally to be levied and struck in the Receipt of Exchequer for the said sum upon Wm. Watkins, Esq., receiver of South Wales' revenues pertaining to the Queen and Prince Charles. [Ibid., pp. 36, 37. Copy. 2 pp.]
April 11. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Essex, and Warwick, Lords Wharton, Say, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpont, Crew, Wallop, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the report to be made by Sir H. Vane to the Commons be made on Saturday instead of 5th April. 2. That the letters of both Houses be directed to the Deputy Lieutenants and Committees of the several counties. 3. That a Sub-Committee be appointed to attend the Lord General [Essex] to-morrow afternoon to consider what proportions of victuals and other necessaries the several counties shall furnish to the army according to the letter of both Houses. [The Sub-Committee to comprise] Lords Say and Wharton, and Messrs. Wallop, Crew, and Pierpont, or any three of them. The Lord General is also desired to call the Commissary of Victuals to attend at that time. 4. That whereas it is desired by Mr. [Stephen] Estwick that the two City regiments now returning home from Sir W. Waller might be ordered by this Committee to return; the Committee do not think fit to give any further order therein, but leave it to the disposition of the Committee of Militia. 5. That this Committee think fit that the 400 men furnished by the City to guard Windsor Castle, while its garrison march out, shall be paid out of the 20,000l. borrowed upon their late ordinance. 6. That the Committee of Militia be desired to come to this Committee tomorrow morning to give account what is done by them touching the two regiments of horse belonging to Cols. Harvey and Thomson. 7. That the sending of additional forces to Sir W. Waller and recalling Sir Wm. Balfour for the better recruiting of the Lord General's forces under his command be first taken into consideration to-morrow. 8. That Sir H. Vane, senr., do report to the House [of Commons] on Saturday the contract between the Committee of Safety and Mr. [Samuel] Cordwell, the gunpowder maker. 9. That a letter be written to the Committee of Kent acknowledging their letters to this Committee and signifying that the Lord General will give warrant for ordnance as they desire, but that the sequestrations are already engaged, by ordinance of the Commons, for payment of the armies in Ireland and the Scotts' army in England. 10. That Sir Miles Hobart and Sir John Palgrave do relate their business to the Sub-Committee appointed to attend the Lord General in the afternoon. 11. That Sir Philip Stapleton do report to the House the petition of the Committee of Herts. [This Committee] to meet to-morrow at 7 a.m. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 43, 44.]
April 11.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour. We are informed that your forces have retired to Waltham, which we suppose is occasioned by the coming away of the City regiments. We have taken order for a greater supply to come to you, two of the City regiments of foot being upon their march and a regiment of Kentish horse besides other forces speedily to follow. It is evident your coming back gives the enemy encouragement and opportunity to recruit, and we hear Rumsey is a place of security and great advantage, which the enemy is likely to be possessed of if not prevented. You knowing this we assure ourselves that you (to whom we wholly leave it) being upon the place will do what shall most conduce to the public good. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 58, 59. Copy = ½ p.]
April 11.
Derby House.
The same to the same. You may see by the order enclosed what reasons have moved us to send Col. Stapley to Chichester and such other parts of Sussex as the services therein mentioned require. Of this we thought fit to give you advertisement, and desire to know from you the general rendezvous now appointed, and, all other things considered, which way Chichester may be secured, and that regiment employed for the best advantage of the public and prevention of distractions in that county and misunderstanding between yourself and Col. Stapley. We shall be glad of your advice herein with speed. Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland. Underwritten,
Sent these two letters by a servant of Sir Wm. Balfour who went hence on the 12th April in the morning. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 59. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 12.
Smithfield.
66. Capt. John Blackwell to Mr. Dethick, Common Council-man. Pray deliver to my clerk, Thos. Whittington, 100l. to pay for the horses which I shall buy this day for the raising of the troop, and I will give you fuller satisfaction afterwards for the laying of it out. Underwritten,
Acknowledgment by Thos. Whittington for 100l. received of Mr. Dethick, 12 April 1644. [Copy. ½ p.]
April 12.
Oxon.
67. Sir Edw. Nicholas to the [Earl of Forth,] Lord General of his Majesty's army. This bearer Edmond Woodruffe, lately taken by the rebels of Warwick, and having ten days parole to endeavour his exchange for two troopers Anthony Kirby and Philip Cauker prisoners at Banbury, or Lieutenant Bush prisoner at Evesham, I pray you to favour him. He is of great use to the Crown Office, which continually employed him as a messenger to carry his Majesty's proclamations into the country, especially into the North, and would be extremely inconvenienced by his loss. I have written what I had to advise to Lord Hopton, to whose letters and to this Mercury I refer you. [Seal with arms and crest, broken. 1 p.]
April 12.
Leicester.
68. Relation by Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Grey, Governor of Leicester, of the differences between the Earl of Denbigh and Commissary-General Behr. To the same effect as related in a letter of April 2 [see No. 59], from the Earl of Denbigh to the Committee of both kingdoms. [1½ pp.]
April 12. 69. The like by Thomas Hasilrige, one of the Committees for the county of Leicester. [1½ pp.]
April 12/22.
Paris.
70. George Lord Goring to [Lady Goring]. Two letters from you reached this town yesterday, but I only received one, the other having been lost. I had a letter from George of March 17, and Adrian shall go with the messenger to him this next week. I have striven all I can to give my servants no ill example, and they have not had much by any in my family save by the cook and footman that were both grown stark mad with drink and are by this time in England. If my son George were out my heart would be light. Bless him from me and conjure him to make all haste into the North. I do not believe I shall stay long here, but yet not be so soon in England, for 'tis likely I shall return by Holland where I have very much to do; but of this I am not certain till the return to my last despatch by Will. Crofts to Oxford, who I believe will be there by the time this will be with you. How knotty my work has been is well seen, and yet I hope to give such an account of my journey as shall make it appear I have not slept all this time without waking sometimes. As for your trouble of [my son] Charles being in England, I never intended he should long stay there, but I could not endure to see him here so much a man as he is now grown, learning exercises at ease and pleasure. No, had I millions of crowns or scores of sons the King and his cause should have them all with better will than to eat if I were starving; nor shall fear or loss of whatsoever ever change me therein. This Queen is now again singularly kind to me, and in the face of the whole Court brings her two sons, the sweetest children in the world, to salute me. [2 pp.]
April 12. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr. and junr., Sir Philip Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpont, Crew, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the officers of the regiments now in Windsor Castle on receiving a month's pay, whereof the 1,000l. remaining of the sum voted by Parliament is part, shall be ready to march on Friday next with two drakes and leave the rest of the train [of artillery] and its officers still in the Castle. 2. That all the Committee present, except the Scotts' Commissioners, Sir H. Vane, junr., and Mr. Solicitor, shall be at the Sub-Committee at the Lord General's this afternoon to prepare all business for to-morrow morning to be reported to the House [of Commons]. 3. To meet to-morrow morning at 8 a.m. 4. That the Earl of Northumberland take the chair for the next week. 5. That the Lord General [Essex] be desired to write to Sir Wm. Balfour urging the necessity of his stay until additional forces be sent to Sir W. Waller, whereof some are already on their march. 6. That Waller and Balfour be informed that there are two regiments on their march and that more are coming. That they be careful to prevent the enemy from taking possession of the town of Romsey, Hants. 7. Upon letters produced by the Scotts' Commissioners with several informations from Scotland and the northern coasts that vessels carrying victuals and necessaries from those parts are [often] taken by pirates, those seas being without any guard, to the great prejudice of both kingdoms and particularly of the Scottish army in England; and that preparations are making in Ireland to invade Scotland; for prevention of all which inconveniences there is agreed by the treaty between the two kingdoms, that six ships be appointed for guard of the Scottish coasts and northern parts and two ships between the coast of Scotland and Carrickfergus. All which this Committee taking into consideration do order accordingly to be performed by the Lord Admiral, and that the names of the ships [selected for this service] be delivered to this Committee. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 44, 45.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Basil Earl of Denbigh. We received your letters, by which we are sensible of what obstructions you have met with in your present employment and also of the present condition of the town of Wem, which we have taken into consideration and conceive its present necessities to be such that unless you relieve it it will be lost, having no readier means to secure it than by your endeavours. And for enabling you thereunto we have sent orders to the county of Lancaster to send unto such rendezvous as you shall appoint 2,000 foot complete; to the county of Chester to furnish you with 600 foot and all their horse; to the Committee of Coventry to furnish you with 300 foot and 200 horse; and to the Committee of Stafford to furnish you with all their foot and horse, which being drawn into a body, with God's blessing and your prudent conduct, will be able to do the work. The eminent danger this town is in we hope will satisfy you wherefore we have not entered into agitation of the other matters mentioned in your letters, assuring you that when the exigency of this service is over we shall not be wanting to manifest our respect to you. Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland. [Interregnum 18 E., pp 61, 62. Copy. ¾ p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to the Deputy Lieutenants in Lancashire. The present condition of the town of Wem, co. Salop, being a place of strength and much conducing to the settling of that county, as also to securing the adjacent countries from the like misery it groans under, engages us by all speedy means to endeavour its relief and security; also you, whose peace and interest are so much concerned in preserving that town [ought] to be ready and willing to contribute your best and speedy assistance for its relief, which we presume you would have readily undertaken though you had received no orders from us. Notwithstanding, that you may know of what importance we judge that town, we desire you that Colonels Holland and John Booth do draw out their regiments for this service, and what you may want of the number of 2,000 the Deputy Lieutenants of the county are desired, out of the other forces in the county, to make up those regiments 2,000 musketeers complete, with all speed (if with the safety of your county so many can be spared), the necessity of the present service admitting of no delay, and to march to such rendezvous as the Earl of Denbigh, who is to command in chief, shall appoint. The speedy execution of these our orders will manifest your good affections to the service, which if neglected will not only be the loss of that town, but hazard your own ruin and the loss of the adjacent counties. Signed as above. Underwritten,
A similar letter was sent to the Committee in Lancashire. [Ibid., p. 61. Copy. ¾ p.]
April 12. Note that a letter of the same tenor as the above was sent from the Committee to Cols. Holland and Booth, but instead of the clause "making them up two thousand," read "We desire you to march with two full regiments." Postscript added, "We have written to the Deputy Lieutenants [of Lancashire] to make up your regiments 2,000 complete, if with safety to your county so many can be spared, but we desire you with your regiments to observe these our directions, though the occasions of your county should not permit the making of them up 2,000 strong." [Ibid., p. 62 =¼p.]
April 12. The like to [the Committee at] Nantwich, only read, "We do desire you to send forth 600 foot and all your horse with all speed, the necessity of the present service admitting of no delay, &c." [Ibid. 4 lines.]
April 12. The like to [the Committee at] Stafford, for all their horse and foot. [Ibid. 1 line.]
April 12. The like to [the Committee at] Coventry for 300 foot and 200 horse, with a postscript, " That Col. Purefoy must not be employed in this present service." Underwritten,
All these letters were sent by Capt. Ralph Castlon, on 12th April in the forenoon, between 10 and 11 a.m. He carried two letters to Coventry, one to Lord Denbigh from Lord Wharton and another to Mr. Macworth from Mr. Corbett. [Ibid. = ¼ p.]
April 12.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee in Kent. In your many letters we have received clear demonstrations of your good affections to the public cause, and your readiness to satisfy their desires has very readily appeared therein which they acknowledge with thanks, and shall be ready to return all the satisfaction they can to your desires. For your request concerning ordnance mentioned in yours of the 5th inst., the Lord General will grant a warrant, and with as great readiness we should have satisfied the other about the sequestrations, had it not been by Ordinance of Parliament already engaged towards the payment of 60,000l. for the armies in Ireland, and for the Scots' army here. But when you shall offer any way wherein they may give you their assistance and furtherance, it shall appear they duly value both the cheerful alacrity of your affections and the fruit thereof, and also the worth and merit of those you employed abroad, whose behaviour has honoured their country, and whose good service and your present readiness now notwithstanding your presures, which we are sensible of, to send out this Regiment of Horse, is so acceptable to this Committee and shall be represented as such by them to the Houses with all advantage, as they doubt not but they will be very ready in everything, both to manifest their acceptance of and give all encouragement to your good affections and the effects of them. Signed by Phil. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland, and sent by Sir Henry Heyman the same day. [Ibid., pp. 62, 63. Copy = 1 p.]
April 13.
Coventry.
71. Basil Earl of Denbigh to the Committee for Safety of both kingdoms. Upon Lord Viscount Conway's arrival from Oxford hither, I sent expressly to give you notice thereof and of the manner and end of his coming to the Parliament. It is about two months since he sent to Major Bridges by a secret messenger, a tenant of his own, to know if he might have a party of horse to secure him if [Bridges] should pass near these parts, and he would advertise him of the time, which his Lordship was forced to defer till now, when the King's forces were called away from before Gloucester and from the ways of his passage to their rendezvous at Marlborough. Though he hath not been so punctual in point of time, yet having had the intention two months before, which I have seen attested under Major Bridges' hand, and the putting of that in execution diverted only by impossibilities of passing both for the impediments formerly expressed as also the strictness and jealousies he lay under at Oxford, he conceives he may justly lay claim to the benefits and privileges which belong to the ordinance lately passed by both Houses, wherein a favourable reception and pardon is promised to such as shall come in to the Parliament at the time limited. He hath likewise informed me he believes there are other Lords and persons of quality who would have willingly embraced the same occasion of making their peace were they not detained with an apprehension of neglect from the Parliament. This you will have shortly a more perfect relation of from himself, who intends after some days' rest to wait upon you and confirm what he hath said in my hearing, that he would not have made this return but with a firm resolution to engage his life and fortunes in this cause and the service of the Parliament. I understand that upon orders from his Majesty to Prince Rupert to advance with his forces to Oxford, answer was returned that there was a greater opinion of his strength than there was cause for; that the body he had lately drawn together for the design of Newark had been taken out of the garrisons of those parts, the which could not now be removed to so great a distance without endangering those garrisons, and without these he could be of little use to his Majesty. Yet it is probable that when he has raised all the strength he can in Shropshire and Wales, which he is endeavouring with all industry, he will then march to reinforce the King's army if there be occasion; and to that purpose I have good intelligence that the horse and foot which are left in Worcestershire and those parts expect his coming and are to join with him. Mr. Floyd and Mr. Charleton with others are come from Lancashire, Cheshire, Shropshire, and other parts adjoining to assure me of their unanimous consent to join in a body for their mutual defence, and for that purpose do want only orders and a commander-in-chief to lead them into the field. [3 pp.]
April 13. 72. Order of the Commons' House. That the Committee for the Navy do give order for payment of 3,000 and odd hundred pounds in arrear, due to the several persons who furnished the last year's stores for the Navy, out of the first money accruing from the prize goods brought into Portsmouth. Dorso,
Two orders of the 5th and 13th April for 3,292l. 7s. 8½d. to Sir Walter Erle, Lieut.-General of the Ordnance for the Artificers. [Certified copy. ½ p.]
April 13. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Say, Wharton, and Warristone, the two Vanes, Sir Philip Stapleton, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Crew, and Barclay. Ordered [at the morning sitting], 1. That the report to be made by Mr. Pierpont about the reasons preventing this Committee from procuring intelligence from the King's quarters be deferred for the present. 2. Report was made to this Committee by Mr. Pierpont of what was done at the Sub-Committee at Essex House yesterday. And Mr. Pierpont was appointed to report to the House [of Commons] these particulars following, viz. 3. That one regiment of the trained bands of the [Tower] Hamlets and one of the Auxiliaries of Southwark are on their march to Sir Wm. Waller with a regiment of Kentish horse, and that the regiment of Auxiliaries of Westminster are ready to follow. [4.] To report two letters from the Earl of Manchester. [5.] To report a desire that the Committee appointed to take order for the City regiments to be at the rendezvous may give account thereof to the House [of Commons]. [6.] To report the two papers from the Lord General [Essex] [signifying] the wants of horse and foot for recruits and of money delivered for arms, horses, &c., by him given out. [7.] To report that 500 horses or mares, for the train of artillery and carriage of victuals, at an average cost of 7l., may be provided in Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk, Cambridge, Hunts., and Herts., likewise 150 from Middlesex, Bucks., Beds., and Northampton, and 150 from Kent, Sussex, and Surrey, to be at St. Albans the 17th inst., and if not all as many as may be. The gentlemen of the several counties to take order for present supply of money to buy them, and the Commons to make them assignment to be paid in 14 days. [8.] To report the desire of this Committee that a month's pay be forthwith provided for the garrison at Windsor, the like for the garrison at Aylesbury and for Col. Harvey's regiment, so that these may be ready to march according to the orders. [9.] To report that this Committee did write to the Committee at Leicester to provide a month's pay for Lord Grey's horse to enable them to march to the general rendezvous, and the letter of the Committee in answer. [10.] To report that a regiment of foot of Herts. are ready at Hitchin. [11.] To report that the 1,500l. formerly assigned by the House [of Commons is] to be made up 3,200l. according to the notes given in by Mr. Deane and Capt. Cannon. [12.] To report the desire [of this Committee] that a month's pay may be provided for the officers of the train of artillery to enable them presently to march. [13.] To report a desire that an account of the state of the excise may be made to the House [of Commons] to know what money is ready for the Lord General's march. [14.] To report the answer of the Lord Admiral [Warwick] for 8 ships for the north and west coasts of Scotland. [15.] To report a desire that the Turkey merchants may pay in the 8,000l. they promised for the Navy. 16. That the Committee of Grocers' Hall do send a certificate to this Committee of the ammunition and arms intended for Ireland which is in their power, or which they know to be in the hands of private men, that the same may be collected together and sent away. 17. That some of the Committee for Accounts and the Treasurers for the Committee of Sequestrations be desired to come to this Committee in the afternoon. To consider of the ways for providing money in the afternoon. In the afternoon the same were present, with the exception of Sir Philip Stapleton, whose place was filled by Sir Arthur Haselrigg, and Lord Maitland and Mr. Recorder were also present. Ordered, 1. That a letter be written to the Militia to know where their two regiments are, and that they may be made to advance to Sir Wm. Waller. 2. That the business about Sir Miles Hobart and Sir John Palgrave be taken into consideration on Monday next. 3. That Waller and Balfour be informed that it is the opinion of this Committee that it is dangerous to the design for Waller to retreat towards Farnham for many reasons. It would lose the country lately gained, which will presently again declare for the other side, the enemy will recruit there, the counties on this side will receive great discouragement, and so will the forces that are marching towards him, besides his army will melt away being so near to London. 4. To write to the Earl of Manchester approving of his march to the rendezvous, and desiring him so to dispose of his forces that there may be a considerable appearance at the rendezvous, and yet care taken for the relief of Boston and security of the Association. 5. That Mr. Recorder do report to the House [of Commons] on Monday morning that the business of the Spanish ship at Arundel may be returned to the Admiralty to have a trial according to law. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 45–47.]
April 13.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Sir Wm. Waller and Sir Wm. Balfour. We understand by your letter to his Excellency of the 12th inst. your resolution to march to Farnham, which we marvel at, as you have not informed us of the reasons, nor are we able to apprehend them. It does not appear by the best intelligence we can get that the King's forces are in any such condition as to draw near you unless your retreat gives them courage, for upon that good success that God gave you against Sir R. Hopton, the next counties were in such great fear that they would not contribute their bodies to those recruits that the enemy was endeavouring at Marlborough and the parts adjacent, and we are certainly informed that they at Oxford are not much satisfied with the present posture of their own affairs. This retreat we conceive will again give them the possession of all that country you had but lately won, and they will be able now to recruit themselves there, that might otherwise have served the Parliament to that purpose, and besides this will give a great discouragement to the Association in suffering the danger to return near to their doors, and also be a great means to diminish and melt away your army when it shall be so near to London. We do also conceive that your quarters in Hampshire, having the ports there open to you and the Isle of Wight at your back to befriend, you will be more plentifully and better accommodated in them than at Farnham. We desire to be certified of the state of your army Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland, and sent by John Priestley at 8 p.m. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 63, 64 Copy = 1 p.]
April 13.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of the Militia. We desire to be certified whether your two regiments are marched beyond Kingston, and where they are, also we desire you will with all expedition hasten their march to Sir Wm. Waller, and send word by this bearer what you know of their march. Signed as above. [Ibid., pp. 64, 65. Copy = ¼ p.]
April 13.
Derby House.
The same to the Earl of Manchester. We have received your letters whereby we perceive you intend to be at Bedford speedily in order to come to the rendezvous appointed, which resolution we conceive will not only much satisfy the general expectation of the kingdom, but is the most probable means to put an end to the present distractions. The enemy drawing his forces into a body near Boston with an intention to make some attempts on those parts (of whose preservation we are very tender) has made us take into consideration how these Associated Counties may be defended during your absence, and thereupon we have thought fit to recommend it to your care, so to dispose of your forces that there may be a considerable appearance at the general rendezvous, and yet such order taken for opposing the enemy in Lincolnshire as may be for the present relief of Boston, and the security of the Association, whereby you will keep those parts from danger and not be hindered from coming to the rendezvous, which diversion perhaps was their main design. Concerning this we desire your answer by Monday morning. Signed as above, and sent by my Lord's own courier, 7 p.m. [Ibid., p. 65. [Copy. ¾ p.]
April 14. 73. Sir Edw. Nicholas to the Earl of Forth, Lord General of the King's forces. This bearer, Edmund Parker, late a lieutenant in Sir Jacob Astley's regiment, was taken prison at Alton, and hath procured liberty to solicit for his exchange for one John Johnson, now prisoner in the castle here, to obtain which he comes recommended from Sir Jacob Astley. Though his Majesty is not willing to grant this, resolving not to hearken to any exchange till Sir Edward Stradling and Colonel Lunsford be released, yet when those two gentlemen shall be exchanged it is his Majesty's pleasure the said Johnson be released for Lieutenant Parker and no other person. [Seal with arms and crest broken. 1 p.]
April 14.
Oxon.
74. The same to the same. His Majesty having present occasion for Captain Stephens the Waggon-Master General's attendance here, is pleased that you immediately send him hither; he leaving a sufficient deputy to discharge his duties. P.S.—I have this day received certain advertisement from several hands of very good credit that the rebels of London are resolved to levy all the forces they can possibly and fall on this city or Reading; and that they are now actually and vigorously in hand with their levies and preparations to this purpose. Their rendezvous is Aylesbury, where they say they will be next Friday, and the Earl of Manchester is also to join with the Earl of Essex in this rebellious design. There are between 2,000 and 3,000 foot of the [Tower] Hamlets and auxiliaries at Kingston, whence they are to march towards Waller to-morrow. Waller's two regiments of Londoners are returned back to that rebellious city. [1 p.]
April 14.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the commanding officers of the City regiments on their march towards Sir Wm. Waller. By reason of Major-General Browne's return to London with the City regiments Sir Wm. Waller is in great want of your supplies, we therefore earnestly desire you forthwith to march to Farnham, and Sir Wm. Waller, to whom we have written, we assure ourselves will send some troops of horse to convoy you to him. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 66. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 14.
Derby House.
The same to the Commanders-in-Chief of the Kentish horse at Croydon. We desire you forthwith, with your regiment of Kentish horse, to march to Farnham to Sir Wm. Waller. [Ibid., p. 66. ¼ p.]
April 14.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller. We understand by Sir Wm. Balfour that you are on your way to Farnham, the most dangerous consequence whereof is apparent to us, not only to the loss of all those parts by you so lately gained, but that which will retard, and in probability may break all the forces with you and those on their way coming to you. We have therefore sent Sir Arthur Heselrigg to you, who will more fully acquaint you therewith by whom we desire to understand the grounds and reasons of your return with your forces. [Ibid., p. 66. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 14.
Derby House.
The same to the same. By letters which Mr. Trenchard produced to us from Col. Sydenham and the Governor of Poole, we perceive that Wareham is very unfortunately possessed by the enemy, and that thereby Poole is in great danger. The desires of the Governor of Poole we understand have been communicated to you, and in regard we have not heard from you concerning this business we presume you have taken care thereof, so that all we shall add is to recommand the safety of that place to your speedy care, and to let us hear from you as frequently as you can. We desire you forthwith to send some troops of horse to convoy to you the City regiments of foot now on their march towards Farnham. [Ibid., p. 67. Copy. ½ p.]
April 15.
Coventry.
75. [Basil Earl of Denbigh to the Committee of both kingdoms]. I have acquainted this Committee [of Coventry] with your orders, unto which I declared my obedience thus far, that if they would furnish me with the 200 horse and 300 foot assigned me by your Lordships I would forthwith march with them to join the other forces for the relief of Wem. But in regard a postscript—which in your letter to this Committee made an exception to those horse that belong to Colonel Purefoy's regiment, which besides those I am now raising are all the horse in this county—hath deprived me of that horse, unless I take with me those imperfect troops I am now raising, and which in my absence will with difficulty be made complete, by reason of the oppositions I find here; it will be necessary that you send me either 200 of Colonel Purefoy's regiment, which is now marching to their rendezvous at Aylesbury, or supply their places some other way as far as may enable me to undertake this service. As for the 300 foot I find them here very backward, and to quicken them your Lordships will further me much in specifying Captain Colmar's and Captain Willoughbye's companies to be part of the 300, belonging to the garrison of this city; and Colonel Bosvile may spare another company out of Warwick. If it be pretended their companies are weak, I shall be able to justify thus much to your Lordships, that their pay by assignments is no way defective, though the raising and maintaining of 10 troops of horse and some companies of foot are left wholly to my charge, and the expense of other counties in my Association. Notwithstanding all these discouragements I think myself happy in the trust you still repose in me; and as long as I have life or anything else that may be made use of for the public service, neither Wem nor any other part of this Association shall suffer for want of timely prevention. [3 pp.]
April 15. 76. Minute of a warrant granting the dignity of a baronet to Sir John Awbrey, of Llantrithyd, co. Glamorgan, Knt., with a discharge for the sum of 109l. usually paid in respect of that dignity. [¼ p.]
April 15. 77. Power of attorney by the undersigned parishioners of Finchley, Middlesex, deputing Edward Rolfe and Christopher Sutton to ask for and receive for them such moneys as are due for quartering a troop belonging to his Excellence [the Lord General] under the command of Capt. Matthew Draper, in the winter of 1643, according to a book of particulars delivered to Captain Draper. [1 p.]
April 15. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, the Lord Admiral [Warwick], Lords Say and Warristone, the two Vanes, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Browne and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the Committee of Accounts be desired to be at this Committee at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, to report the state of the business, when Mr. Avery is also required to be here. 2. That the Committee of Grocers' Hall do send a particular of what arms and provisions they have for Ireland and what are in private hands for that purpose. 3. That the business of [fortifying the hundreds of East and West] Flegg [in Norfolk] and Lothingland be taken into consideration this afternoon. 4. That it be reported to the House [of Commons] by Mr. Browne, that upon information from the Scotts' Commissioners, this Committee has found that since the order of that House of 13 May 1643, by which the sequestrations were assigned for payment of 30,000l. of the arrears due to the Scotts' army in Ireland there has been a sum amounting to above 30,000l. directed to other uses by subsequent orders of the House; and therefore to desire an express order for the prevention of the like in time coming; and that some course [may] be taken for payment of the 4,000l. per mensem to the army there. 5. [This Committee] to meet in the afternoon at 2 p.m., and to warn all the [members of the] Committee. In the afternoon the same were present with the exception of Mr. Recorder; and besides the Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Wharton and Maitland, Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir Philip Stapleton, and Messrs. Pierpont and Crew. Ordered, 6. That an order be sent to the Excisemen to be at this Committee to-morrow morning to know what money they have or are like to have. 7. That an order be sent to the City to have an account of the 8,000l. per mensem and of the 20,000l. to be borrowed upon the ordinance presented here by the militia, and to know what forces are ready to go with the Lord General. 8. Some of the Committee of Haberdashers' Hall to be at this Committee at 8 a.m. to-morrow to give an account whether the 2,000l. for this month's pay for the Lord General's army be ready. 9. That Mr. Pury, M.P., and some of the Militia be here to-morrow at 7 or 8 a.m. 10. That the business of Newark signed by Col. King be reported to the Houses [of Parliament]. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 47, 48.]
April 15.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edw. Earl of Manchester. We are now informed by Mr. Wincop and Mr. Coney that the enemy with about 2,600 horse and dragooners is come before Boston and has driven the horses and cattle out of Holland. We exceedingly apprehend the loss of that town (which we hear has not above 500 men in it), and that Marshland must then in all probability be lost, and the enemy will break into Norfolk, where, and in other parts a great army may be speedily raised against the Parliament and this place much straitened for provisions, and your whole Association be much shaken. We desire you therefore to send forthwith such supplies as may relieve [it] and secure the Association and [so] prevent these inconveniences, and with the rest to proceed in your intentions for the rendezvous. Signed by Algernon Earl of Northumberland and John Lord Maitland and sent by my Lord's courier 6.30 p.m. [Interregnum 18 E., pp. 67 and 68. Copy = 2/3 p.]
April 16. 78. Petition of Richard Vickris of Bristol, merchant, to the Committee for the Navy. There is due to petitioner from the State for part of the freight for the service of the Fellowship and Mary of Bristol, upon the Irish coasts, about 480l. There having at present come over 9½ tuns of French wines, the impost whereof is 40l., he prays, the rather in regard of his former great losses by the enemy, that you will allow the impost for his wine [to be deducted] out of the money due to him. [½ p.] Underwritten,
78. i. Order of the Committee for the Navy. Whereas there remains due to petitioner for his part of the freight of the Fellowship and Mary employed last year in the service of the King and Parliament about 480 l., for payment whereof this Committee have signed orders to the Treasurer of the Navy, and for that petitioner is well affected to the Parliament; ordered that Sir Henry Vane, junr., Treasurer of the Navy, do imprest to petitioner 40 l. in part of the aforesaid sum. Treasury Chamber, Westminster, April 16, 1644. [½ p.]
78. ii. Mem. "Ordered that the Commissioners of the Navy do use especial care that this ordinance of Parliament entitled an Ordinance for felling of timber trees in the woods of several delinquents for the use of his Majesty's navy royal be forthwith put in execution." [3 lines.]
April 16.
Coventry.
79. Basil Earl of Denbigh to [the Committee of both kingdoms]. I informed you of the backwardness of this Committee [at Coventry] to satisfy your commands, which since by their enclosed order have been complied with as far as my forces may enable them; but to give their assistance according to your order—their forces being likewise by ordinance of Parliament subordinate to my command—and, as I believe, your intention is in no way assented unto. For I am confident it will not be thought convenient that the forces I am raising and which are to be maintained in other counties should be subject to this Committee and sent out of this county before they are perfected; and the assigning those companies of foot which belong to the garrison of Tamworth is intended to no other purpose but to have occasion to place others in their room who may express the same disobedience to me which the Governor of Mackstock Castle bath already offered to my orders, with the approbation of this Committee. By my former I desired your Lordships' particular order for the companies of Captain William Colmar and Captain Willoughby, those agreed on by this Committee being broken companies and of little use; and I shall further desire your order for Captain Hume's troop of horse at Tamworth, and Colonel Barker's which is going with Colonel Purefoy, and is no part of his regiment. If the ordinances of Parliament were punctually observed, your Lordships would find a quicker observance of all your commands and not be put to an explanation. [2 pp.]
April 16.
Oxon.
80. Sir Edw. Nicholas to the Earl of Forth, Lord General of his Majesty's army. His Majesty is informed from London that Sir Gervase Scroope's extreme indisposition of body, occasioned by his wounds, is such, as according to the physicians, in probability nothing but the present use of the Bath can relieve him. His Majesty's pleasure is that you forthwith despatch a trumpet to the Earl of Essex to desire that Sir Gervase Scroop may have liberty to repair upon your parole to take the benefit of the Bath. If that assurance will not satisfy, offer his son Mr. Scroope to be sent to London as hostage for him till his return; with this caution, that if Sir Gervase die in this course, it shall be free for his said hostage as well then to repair back into his Majesty's quarters as if Sir Gervase had returned a true prisoner, as is really intended. [Portion of seal with arms. 1 p.]
April 16.
Oxon.
81. The same to the same. This night I received the enclosed from the Marquis of Winchester, which will inform you as much as I hear of Sir Wm. Waller's forces; himself I hear is for certain at London, where he demands more horse and foot. The Earl of Essex, according to my intelligence, hath not visibly any considerable forces, but it is true that in London they have many thousands upon list, for they have listed all men servants from 16 to 60 in every family in that city and suburbs, which makes a great noise, and that I hear is all it is like to do. Lord Robartes is come to St. Alban's, where he has some broken forces. The Earl of Manchester is, I hear, also at Newport Pagnell, with 2,000 or 3,000 horse and foot. We believe the news of Colonel Bellasis being beaten by Lord Fairfax is either altogether or in good part false, for yesterday there was no news of it at London, and we have not yet had it seconded. If we had now in Buckinghamshire a reasonably strong party of horse with some dragoons it would spoil the rebels drawing together in those parts, which they begin to do in small numbers. [1 p.]
April 16. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, the Lord Admiral, Lord General, Lords Say, Maitland, Wharton, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir H. Vane, junr., Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir Philip Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpoint, Crew, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Col. Browne do attend this Committee in the afternoon. 2. That the Earl of Manchester be desired to retain some forces in Newport Pagnell for its security until further order. 3. That Mr. Crew do report to the House [of Commons] concerning the Committee for money that it may sit and use all means for raising money. 4. That Col. Purefoy be instructed to go to Gloucester according to his former order. 5. That the officers of the Windsor regiment, viz., the minister, chirurgeons, quarter-master, marshal, and commissary, do accompany that regiment to the field. In the afternoon the same were present except the Lord Admiral and Sir P. Stapleton, who were replaced by the Earl of Northumberland, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, and Mr. Recorder. Ordered, 6. That Sir Arthur Haselrigg and Mr. Crew do desire, in the name of this Committee, the gentlemen of the Western Committee to furnish Sir Wm. Waller with 5,000l. to enable his march towards the west. 7. That the business of Sir Wm. Waller's retreat be again taken into consideration tomorrow. 8. That Major Pottley be sent for to this Committee to-morrow morning. 9. That the business of the Excise be reported to the House [of Commons] to-morrow by Mr. Recorder. 10. That the letters from Lord Denbigh be taken into consideration tomorrow morning. 11. Whereas it is ordained by Parliament that the Committee of both kingdoms shall be enabled to prepare propositions for a safe and well grounded peace, and the same to be brought into one or both Houses on Friday the 26th present, or sooner if the Houses be ready to receive and consider of them. It is therefore ordered that a sub-committee be appointed to prepare propositions to be brought into this Committee concerning a peace according to the reference from both Houses, and to bring in so far as they have proceeded on Friday next. The sub-committee named are as follow:—Earl of Northumberland, Lord Wharton, Sir Henry Vane, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, Mr. Pierpont, Mr. Crew, or any three of these, together with the Scotts' Commissioners or any one of them. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 48, 49.]
April 16.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Committee at Northampton. We perceive by your letter of the 13th inst. your readiness to march according to order. Your care therein we much approve of, but receiving notice that some horse from Leicester that should have marched with you cannot be so soon ready, and we being unwilling that you should march in campaniâ without those horse, if this letter shall find you still at Northampton we would have you stay there until further order. But if you be upon your march then we would have you march to Oulney or thereabouts until you receive orders to advance further. Signed by the Earl of Northumberland and Lord Maitland, and sent by Mr. Crew. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 68. Copy. ½ p.]
April 16.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edward Earl of Manchester. We, taking into consideration the great consequence of the town of Newport Pagnel, the dangerous effects the loss thereof might produce as barring all intercourse with the north-west, besides the danger to the Eastern Association thereby, do therefore desire you will leave such forces in Newport as may serve that place until you receive further order, and the rather as that place is so near to the place of the rendezvous that they may speedily be there when the order shall be given. Signed as above and sent by Thos. Pidcock, 8 p.m. [Ibid., pp. 70, 71. Copyp.]
April 17. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland, Warwick, and Essex, Lords Wharton, Warristone, and Maitland, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Philip Stapleton, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpont, Crew, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. To write to Lord Denbigh about the business of Wem. 2. To write to Lancashire for four troops of horse to be sent to Shropshire. 3. To write to the Committee of Coventry that Col. Barker's troop may be sent as a part of the Earl of Denbigh's army for Shropshire. 4. That letters be written to all places of correspondence of the victory at Selby. 5. That the paper given in by the Lord General [Essex] be reported to the House [of Commons] by Sir Philip Stapleton, with the distinction of what is necessary for the present and what for the future. 6. That Mr. Crew do report to the House [of Commons] this morning that such of the Lord General's forces as are ready and can be provided for with money may march to the rendezvous appointed. And that Lord Wharton do report the same to the Lords' House. 7. That Mr. Crew do also report that the messenger from Hull affirms that he came by Boston and that there was no forces there about it. In the afternoon the Committee met again, when the same were present, except Warwick, Essex, and Mr. Solicitor, who were replaced by Lord Say and Sir Gilbert Gerard. Ordered, 8. That letters be sent to the several Committees and Commanders abroad to give notice of the success and victory of Lord Fairfax at Selby. 9. That the Commissioners of Excise be warned to be at this Committee to-morrow morning at 8 o'clock. 10. That copies be made of all the letters written to Sir W. Waller since the fight at Cheriton, and to look out all his letters to the Committee. And that Sir Arthur Haselrigg do report the whole business to the House [of Commons] which he reported here to the Committee. 11. That a letter be written to the Earl of Manchester that he appoint his Commissary to make provision of victuals for his army, it being the course that the Lord General takes for those under his immediate command. 12. That a Sub-Committee be appointed to take into consideration the propositions offered by the Committee of Accounts, and what further they shall think fit to offer to this Committee for the speedy bringing in of the sequestrations, and hasten the payment of the 60,000l. assigned by ordinance of the Houses for payment of the Scotts' army in Ireland. The sub-committee named were Lord Wharton, Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor, and the Scotts' Commissioners. 13. That the Committee at Grocers' Hall be desired to send a particular to the sub-committee at Goldsmiths' Hall on Friday next of all such artillery, arms, ammunition, victuals, cloths, or other provisions as have been made for Ireland and not yet sent. And they shall have power in the meantime to examine any persons whom they shall conceive to have any such provisions in their hands. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 50, 51.]
April 17.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Basil Earl of Denbigh. Thanks for your readiness in this necessary service for Shropshire. Col. Purefoy's regiment of horse is appointed for a great design, so that you cannot expect them. We have appointed Col. Barker's troop if it be within the county of Warwick to attend you, but if it be marched out we desire you not to stay for it, for we know not how prejudicial it may then be to recall them. We have written to the Committee of Warwickshire to supply you with 300 foot, and that they may be of such companies as may best effect this service. We have sent to the Deputy Lieutenants of Lancaster for four troops of horse to be at such rendezvous as you shall appoint. You will receive information concerning the Governor of Wem, which we leave to your especial care. Signed by Algernon Earl of Northumberland and John Lord Maitland, and sent by Lord Denbigh's messenger. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 68, 69. Copy = 2/3 p.]
April 17.
Derby House.
The same to the deputy-lieutenants of the county of Lancaster. We hear you are most sensible of the danger wherein the county of Salop now is and of the great importance thereof to the whole kingdom, and of your willingness to further this service with four troops of horse, which we very much approve of, and desire you forthwith besides the foot formerly appointed to send those four troops of horse to such rendezvous as the Earl of Denbigh shall appoint to serve under his Lordship's command. Signed and sent as above. [Ibid., p. 69. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 17.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee at Coventry. We are informed that Colonel Barker's troop of horse is intended by you to go with Col. Purefoy's regiment. We wrote only for Col. Purefoy's regiment, which we conceive sufficient for the design intended. If that troop be marched out of Warwickshire we would not have it recalled without further order, but if it be in the county we desire that troop may attend the Earl of Denbigh in this service for Shropshire, and that you will forthwith supply the Earl of Denbigh with 300 foot according to our former directions, which we desire may be of such companies as may best effect this service. Signed and sent as above. [Ibid., pp. 69, 70. Copy = ½ p.]
April 17.
Derby House.
The same to Colonel Purefoy. We wrote you the 6th instant to be with your regiment at the general rendezvous towards Aylesbury on Friday the 19th instant, and of the same date that, notwithstanding that letter, if you found the way open to Gloucester so that you might safely march thither you should do so with your regiment and join yourself to Col. Massie, and take the opportunity to do the best service you can in those parts, since which time we have heard nothing from you, and therefore know not which way you have determined your motion. We desire, therefore, that you will speedily march to Gloucester according to former order. Signed as above, and sent by Mr. Pury's care. [Ibid., p. 70. Copy. ½ p.]
April 17.
Derby House.
The same to Edw. Earl of Manchester. Upon consideration taken of the provision of victuals for your army, it is held the best course that you furnish your commissary with a proportion of money, a part of the soldiers' pay, who may therewith make provisions, and upon the issuing thereof to defalk it again out of your soldiers' pay. This is the course which my Lord General takes for those under his immediate command, and will also be taken for the other forces from other parts. You will also receive herewith a copy of what was written to you yesterday to Cambridge, which we thought fit again to send lest that should have miscarried. You shall receive further order to-morrow concerning your march. Signed as above, and sent by John Wellin, a courier of the Earl of Manchester. [Ibid., p. 71. Copy. 1/8 p.]
April 17.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller. We have received intelligence from Lord Fairfax of that good success that God has been pleased to give him and his son with their joined forces against the town of Selby, which, upon the 11th instant, they stormed in three several places at once, and after two hours took it. The prisoners and ammunition there taken are contained in the list underwritten, the names of the officers we have forborne to transcribe for brevity but would not omit to give you this notice of it that God may have the praise. The list:—
Col. Sir John Bellassis.
Col. Sir John Ramsden.
Sir Thos. Strickland.
2 Lieut.-Colonels.
4 Majors.
5 Horse Captains.
12 foot companies.
26 Lieutenants.
6 Cornets.
11 Ensigns.
9 Quartermasters.
1,600 common soldiers.
500 horse and more.
4 brass pieces of ordnance.
7 barrels of powder.
16 bundles of match.
2,000 arms.
17 ensigns brought in.
1 pinnace taken at Gains-borough.
Many ships and boats in theriver.
Many marshals, trumpeters, corporals, drummers, and otherofficers.
Underwritten,
Note, that copies of the above were sent by a messenger of the Earl of Denbigh to Colonels Massie and Bridges, also to [the Committees at] Coventry, Stafford, Lancashire, and Northampton, and to the Earl of Denbigh. [Ibid., pp. 72, 73. Copy=1 p.]
April 18. 82. [Robert Earl of Warwick, Lord Admiral of the Fleet] to Richard Panton, gent., servant of the Countess of Sussex. Warrant to enable him to prevent the abuses done about the river of Burnham alias Walfleet in Essex, by dredging and taking of oysters, encroaching on the commons and lanes, and damaging the roads and banks belonging to the marshes, and to bring up offenders before him, the Admiral, his Vice-Admiral, or justices of the peace for Essex. [Draft. 1 p.]
April 18. 83. Order of the Commons' House. That Sir Thos. Soame, and nine others named, who have offered 50l. each to enable the train of artillery to march to-morrow, do pay their money to Sir Walter Erle, Lieutenant of the Ordnance, for which they are to receive warrants for repayment out of the money coming in at Haberdashers' Hall. Underwritten,
83. i. This was carried up to the Lords by Sir Walter Erle and assented unto. [Printed in Commons' Journals iii., 464. Copy. ¾ p.]
April 18.
Lathom.
84. Alexander Rigby to Sir Wm. Brereton, Bart., or in his absence, for the officer in command at Nantwich. We here have already presumed upon the confidence we have of our interest in you and your affections to the public, and now we having your mortar, it cannot be so useful to us as you desire, unless you please to furnish us with half-a-dozen or more shells for granadoes for the mortar piece, which I earnestly entreat from you to be delivered to this bearer for the more expedition in the work which now detains us from other services, and what satisfaction you shall desire for them you shall receive, if not from the rest of the deputy-lieutenants then from me. If any shells shall be left at the end of the work they shall be returned with the mortar by me. [2/3 p.]
April 18. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl of Northumberland, Lords Say, Wharton, and Maitland, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, and Messrs. Crew and Browne. Ordered, 1. That the Earl of Manchester shall draw one of his regiments out of Newport Pagnell, leaving the other there until the ordinance for the garrison of that place can be put in execution, which shall be speedily done, or in case he thinks it safe for the Northamptonshire men to go thither, in respect of the sickness that has been there, then to take out both his regiments. To leave it to his Lordship to appoint such a proportion of horse and foot as he shall think sufficient to dissipate the enemy's forces now in Lincolnshire, leaving the rest where they are till further order. 2. That Mr. Browne do report to the House [of Commons] for the speedy putting in execution of the ordinance for raising and maintaining the garrison of Newport [Pagnell]. 3. That the Excise men do in person attend the House of Commons in the afternoon according to the order of that House. 4. That the petition of Viscount Claneboy be transmitted to the House [of Commons]. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 51.]
April 18.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edward Earl of Manchester. We have received yours of the 17th instant, and however it was here reported to the Committee that the garrison was to march out as this day, yet we had no reason to believe that you would wholly take out that garrison, but would have left a strength to secure it. Though we have been silent we yet thought it fit, having that information, to write something by way of caution only. We know it is necessary you should have your forces with you, and therefore you may draw out one of your regiments there and leave the other for the securing of that place until the ordinance for the garrison there can be put in execution, which shall be with all speed. But if you think it may be safe for the 500 Northamptonshire men that are appointed to come to the rendezvous to go into Newport which hath had much sickness (they being fresh men), then those men shall be put in there for the present until the said ordinance can be executed, and they being once there you may take out both the regiments to join with the rest of your body. Concerning the growing of those forces in Lincolnshire we think it necessary that you take or appoint such a proportion of horse and foot as to your judgment shall be sufficient to dissipate those forces, and the rest of your horse and foot where they are or thereabouts, in order to the rendezvous, until we shall send further order. Signed by Algernon Earl of Northumberland and John Lord Maitland, and sent by Capt. Robert and Capt. John Lilburn. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 71, 72. Copy = 1 p.]
April 19. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl of Northumberland, Lords Say, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir H. Vane, senr., Sir Phil. Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, Crew, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Mr. Solicitor do report to the House of [Commons] the desire of this Committee for the amendment of the ordinance of both Houses of the 11th April, touching the propositions for peace. 2. That advice be sent to the Earl of Manchester to go with all his forces towards Lincolnshire, because Prince Rupert is coming that way with a great force. 3. That two letters be dispatched to the Committee of both kingdoms residing in the Scotts' army concerning the provisions now going away for supply of that army in the ships "Ralph" of Newcastle, and "Unity" of London. In the afternoon the Committee met again, when the same were present, except Warristone, Stapleton, Haselrigg, and Mr. Solicitor and Mr. Recorder. 4. That a letter be written to Lord Denbigh to desire him with all speed to relieve Salop, and that it be further considered at another time. To meet to-morrow morning at 7 o'clock. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 52.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edward Earl of Manchester. We wrote to you yesterday to take or appoint such forces of horse and foot as in your judgment would be sufficient to dissipate the forces in Lincolnshire, and to leave the rest in the places whereabouts they now are, in order to the rendezvous. Upon present advice that there is a greater force under the conduct of Prince Rupert coming into those parts we think fit to add this further advice, that if you think fit you may appoint your whole force to march that way, and with them to do what shall be best for the service as it still appears to your judgment, and let us hear what resolution you take herein. Signed by the Earl of Northumberland and John Maitland, and sent by Rowland Fawkerd at 12 o'clock [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 73. Copy. ½ p.]
April 19.
Derby House.
The same to Basil Earl of Denbigh. The relief of the county of Salop requires speed, and to effect that service is our desire, and we assure ourselves it is also yours for the present to lay aside all things that may occasion delay. The business contained in your letter of the 16th we conceive more fit to be further considered of at another time, and then we shall be ready to do you such service as may in justice give you satisfaction. Signed as above, and sent by Col. Mitton at 8 p.m. [Ibid., p. 74. Copy. ½ p.]
April 20. 85. Order of the House of Commons. Referring the petitions of John Lovering and Samuel Clerk, merchants, on behalf of Christopher Clerk the elder, Richard Crossing and others, and all petitions of the like nature, to a Committee of the House, whose names are specified. The said Committee is to prepare an ordinance directing the Court of Admiralty for petitioners' relief; they are likewise empowered to order that the goods of such persons as they find fit to be relieved may not be disposed of till the Houses give further order; and have power to examine into the reported embezzling of divers goods to a great value taken out of the said ships. [Printed more fully in Commons' Journals iii., 465. 1¼ p.]
April 20.
Oxon., 12 at night.
86. Sir Edw. Nicholas to Sir Jacob Astley, Governor of Reading, or to his Deputy Governor. I have private notice from a very good hand that 3,000 men are sent out from London who march in the night and have marched already two nights, their design being for Reading, which they hope by surprisal and a party within the town to carry suddenly. Wherefore his Majesty commands that you keep good scouts abroad night and day to watch these rebels' motions, and that you be vigilant to discover what intelligence they hold or what party is affected to them in Reading; that so, by your timely discoveries of both, and securing of such as you find treacherous within, so great a mischief to his Majesty's affairs may be prevented. What is further to be done upon this information for the safety of Reading is left to your circumspection. P.S.—I pray send notice hereof to my Lord General [the Earl of Forth]. [Seal with arms and crest. 1 p.]
April 20. 87. Warrant by the Committee for Safety of the kingdom to Sir Walter Erle, Lieutenant of the Ordnance. To deliver to John Berisford the 10 tons of saltpetre which you shall receive from Mr. Courteene by our order, the same to be reckoned as satisfaction from us for one third part of 2,700l. due to Mr. Beresford for 600 barrels of powder which he has delivered unto you for the service of the State, at 4l. 10s. the barrel. [¾ p.]
April 20. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lord Warristone, Sir H. Vane, Sir Phil. Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Crew, Wallop, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That it be reported to the House [of Commons] by Mr. Crew, that if the whole month's pay be provided his Excellency's whole army will speedily march; that if the 20,000l. be paid then he believes to draw presently into the field 2,000 horse and betwixt three and four thousand foot. 2. That it be likewise reported to the House by Mr. Crew; that if money can be provided the regiments of Aylesbury and Windsor may also be presently drawn forth. 3. That notice be sent to the Earl of Manchester of the advertisements received from the north and west. That a letter be written to Lord Fairfax noticing his good service and congratulating him on his success against the enemy. Also that he keep correspondence with the Scottish army; and if occasion offer [then to] join his forces and make use of all advantages against the Earl of Newcastle's forces. To intimate that 100 barrels of gunpowder are already sent to Hull for his use, and that care shall be taken for arms. In the afternoon the Committee met again when the same were present, except the Lord General Essex, Vane, Stapleton, Browne, and Mr. Recorder, besides Lord Maitland, who was absent in the morning. Ordered, 4. That Lord Grey attend this Committee on Monday afternoon, when Sir Arthur Haselrigg be also present. 5. That those who certified the things provided for Ireland do demand the same to be delivered up or certify the names of such as refuse. Upon reading the certificate of the Committee of Citizens Adventurers in London, now produced according to the order of the 19th of this instant April, it is now further ordered, that they be desired to collect and take into their hands whatsoever of the arms, artillery, ammunition, victuals, and provisions which they can receive from any of the persons named in the certificate, or from other persons, formerly provided for Ireland and not sent away. Also to send for and examine all persons therein concerned, and to take care and provide for shipping them away soon. And to make return of their doings to this Committee occasionally, so that they may receive such further order and direction as shall be fit. It is further ordered, and the said Committee is desired to hold such intelligence and correspondence with the Treasurers and Commissioners in the Low Countries employed about the collection of benevolencies for the poor Protestants of Ireland as formerly they have done, and to enform this Committee occasionally that such orders may be given them for disposing of the said provisions as shall be fit. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 53–4 and 63–4.]
April 20.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Ferdinando Lord Fairfax. Your welcome letter bringing the good news of that good success and victory which it pleased the Lord of Hosts to give your forces against the enemy at Selby found here such acceptation as the merit of an action so readily undertaken and so valiantly and successfully performed may justly challenge. For which victory the Houses have ordered that solemn thanks be given to God the giver of it on Tuesday next in London and the parts adjacent, and for which service we return you thanks and with all ready acknowledgment congratulate with you that honour God has done you in making you so signally instrumental in the promotion of this cause. We know you have always in these affairs showed so sound a judgment and so quick a motion that we should wrong both if we should either counsel or persuade. We leave all to you, who being upon the place will as occasion offers either by conjuncture or correspondence with the Scots' army take such resolutions and so act [upon] them as shall become you, and we doubt not but God will yet go on to do more by you and in His strength let you go on and prosper. It is written hither from Derby, Nottingham, and Leicester that Prince Rupert was about Burton-upon-Trent the 17th instant, and that he is arraying men in great numbers. That great store are forced to come in to serve him in Lincolnshire; that his intention is to visit you, or to break into the Eastern Association, but of this we doubt not you are before this advertised; and by your joining with or nearness to the Scots' army [will] be without the danger of him. Upon this advertisement we have also written to the Earl of Manchester to make use of all or what part of his force he shall think fit that way, so that if Prince Rupert comes towards you we trust he will be so well waited on as he shall give but a mean account of that action. By intelligence from the north we hear that the Scots' army was at Darlington on Sunday night, so as you being now also master of the field in Yorkshire we doubt not but we may receive a speedy and constant intelligence by your means from the Scots' army. Concerning the arms and ammunition you wrote for, care is taken of it and the ammunition is already aboard, and in all other things in our power we shall show how much your merit is valued in the Committee of both kingdoms. Signed by Algernon Earl of Northumberland and John Lord Maitland, and sent by the care of Col. White. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., pp. 74, 75. Copy. 1½ pp.]
April 21. 88. Propositions prepared by the Committee of both kingdoms for a safe and well grounded peace; to be presented to both Houses of Parliament of England and to the Convention of the Estates of Scotland, or their Committees, to be by them reviewed and considered, and then by the mutual advice and consent of both king. doms to be perfected. [Printed in Lord's Journals vi., 531. Copy. 3⅓ pp.]
April 21. 89. Another copy of the same. [This copy is dated April 29, that being the day on which the propositions were reported and read in the two Houses. See above reference. 8pp.]
April 21.
Oxon.
90. Sir Edw. Nicholas to [the Earl of Forth, Lord General of his Majesty's Army]. That 3,000 men are marching by night against Reading as above [see April 20]. I cannot learn which way they come towards Reading, neither will your Excellency learn but by some scouts that must travel in the night. I have herein sent you the copy of an advertisement that came last night to me from London, from another hand than wrote what I read to you yesterday at Wallingford; which confirms what the other certified. I have news from Lady Jane Cavendish, daughter to the Marquis of Newcastle, that the Marquis is retired to York and his forces are drawing thither, and that the Scots endeavour to join with Lord Fairfax, which is a sad condition that noble Lord is in. [1½ p.]
April 21. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Maitland and Warristone, Sir Phil. Stapleton, Sir H. Vane, junr., Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. To write to the Committee of Militia reminding them of speeding away Col. Harvey's regiment of horse, the Mayden troop, and Col. Turner's, for the assistance of Sir Wm. Waller. 2. That Col. Harvey attend this Committee at 8 a.m. to-morrow. 3. That the Lord General [Essex] be desired to send the party of horse about to be dispatched to such place as may be useful for the assistance of Sir W. Waller, or to go to Aylesbury and acquaint Waller therewith. 4. To inform Sir W. Waller of what is done for speeding away Col. Harvey's regiment of horse, the Mayden troop, and Col. Turner's for his supply, and to refer him to the Lord General's letter concerning the readiness of his Excellency's horse to give him assistance, and to desire him that he speedily acquaint the Committee of the certainty of the enemy's advance and of their strength. 5. To certify the Earl of Manchester the news from the north, and to desire him so to dispose of his forces that he may succour the north if there be occasion, or prevent Prince Rupert's coming southward if he shall take any such resolution; that he prevent the enemy's recruits in Lincolnshire; and send hither the gentlemen of Bedfordshire who offer the raising of a regiment there. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 53, 54.]
April 21.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edw. Earl of Manchester. We hear by letters from Hull of the 18th inst. that the Scotch army is about Wetherby, eight miles from York, and my Lord Fairfax with his forces are about Selby, and will speedily join at Bramham Moor, and that the Earl of Newcastle's forces are in and about York. We also hear that Prince Rupert with his army will be at Lichfield to-night. Whether he will go northward or southward we know not, but we earnestly desire you to take order for the best intelligence which way he marches, and that your forces may be at such places as may most conveniently succour in the north if there be occasion, or if Prince Rupert shall march southward that he may not get between your army and these parts. We doubt not but you will forthwith send such succour into Lincolnshire as may suppress the enemy in their recruiting and secure your Association. We desire you to send some of the Bedfordshire gentlemen hither who offer the raising of a regiment in that county, that we may understand the probability of their effecting it. Signed by Algernon Earl of Northumberland and John Lord Maitland, and sent by Mr. Jennings at 8 p.m. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 76. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 21.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller. Understanding by your letter of the 20th inst. of the enemy's advance to Basingstoke, we have written to the Committee of the Militia to quicken their care for speeding away Col. Harvey's regiment of horse, the Mayden troop, and Col. Turner's for your supply, and likewise given order for Col. Harvey to attend this Committee to-morrow for the same effect. My Lord General's letter will acquaint you in what readiness his forces are to give you assistance, and we desire to hear speedily from you of the certainty of the enemy's advance and of their strength, that we may frame our resolutions accordingly. Signed as above, and sent by Mr. Pidcocke at 7 p.m. [Ibid., pp. 76, 77. Copyp.]
April 21.
Derby House.
The same to the Committee of the Militia in London. Having received letters from Sir Wm. Waller informing us of the enemy's advance to Basingstoke with a considerable strength, and representing the necessity of sending to him speedily some strength of horse, have thought it necessary to put you in mind of speeding away Col. Harvey's regiment of horse, the Mayden troop, and Col. Turner for his supply. The necessity hereof will sufficiently appear if you consider how ready the enemy will be to revenge their late defeat and regain their former reputation by a retribution of the like kind whereunto we will add no further arguments, hoping you will lose no time in a matter which so much concerns the good of the public service. Signed as above. [Ibid., p. 77. Copy. ½ p.]
April 22.
Oxon.
91. Sir Edw. Nicholas to [the Earl of Forth, Lord General of the King's army]. I have acquainted his Majesty with the necessity of your marching on Wednesday next from Newbury, and he approves very well of your opinion to quarter between Reading and Wallingford. I have spoken with Mr. Ashbournham touching payment of the men which were pressed for recruiting your Excellency's regiment. He saith he did not hear that they were come to Reading, only Sir Jacob Astley sent him word they would be there; and now he knows it, he will take a course for payment of them. As for the men of Donnington Castle which are at Reading Mr. Ashbournham sent their pay, as he saith, to the officers at Donnington for them. I hear that the Earl of Essex's forces will not be ready to march for Aylesbury these 8 or 10 days. There are some here of opinion that it would be no great difficulty to cut off Waller's forces in their march towards Aylesbury, since neither Essex nor the Earl of Manchester's forces are near to help him, but it is out of my element. P.S.—A party from Banbury hath killed and taken this day about 50 of the rebels that were making a garrison in Canons Ashby in Northamptonshire. I sent you this evening a packet from the King. [1 p.]
April 22.
Paris.
News from Paris. It is very certain and most true that the Queen [Henrietta Maria] of England has permission to come to France if she will. Mr. [Wm.] Crofts passed this week by me and is gone for England by Cherbourg for to fetch her if she will come, as he told me; he leaves his coach which he bought for that purpose at 200 pistoles at Caen to have it there ready to receive her at her landing, which must be thereabouts as most commodious; our four ships of war that keep the coasts of France have order to be ready to receive her at Weymouth if she will come. [Extract. Foreign Series. French Correspondence, 1644, April 22.]
April 22. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl of Northumberland, Lords Maitland and Warristone, Sir Phil. Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, the two Vanes, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpont, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the business of the Propositions of Peace be taken into consideration at 3 p.m. In the afternoon when the Committee met again the same were present except Haselrigg, and in addition the Lord General [Essex], Mr. Crew, and Mr. Wallop. Ordered, 2. That the desire of this Committee for amendment of the ordinance of the 16th inst., as it is now passed by the House of Commons, and for enlargement of the time limited in the aforesaid ordinance, be reported to the House of Lords upon Thursday morning. To meet to-morrow at 5, afternoon. 3. That it be intimated to Lord Willoughby and his officers, that whereas a paper given in by Col. King to this Committee, wherein are some things concerning his Lordship and officers, is to be reported to the Houses on Thursday next, if he will know anything concerning it or will offer anything concerning it before it be reported, that then he will please to come to this Committee to-morrow night. 4. That Mr. Recorder do report at the next sitting of the House the business of the ship at Arundel, and to desire speed in it. 5. That Mr. Solicitor do report to the House the ordinance about Sequestrations. And that intimation may be given to the Treasurers that there may be no diversion of the money to other uses until the 60,000l. for the Scotts' army in Ireland be paid. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 54, 55.]
April 23.
Leicester.
92. The Committee of Leicester to Zouch Tate. We received your letter with the warrants to send up the witnesses against Sir Edward Hartopp and Major Bingley, whereof one warrant we sent to Nottingham, and the witnesses are served therewith and go forwards to appear to be examined accordingly; the second we have served on the witnesses here, who will be ready at the time appointed; and the third we sent to Derby to Major [Robert] Sanders the captains and other witnesses there, who answer that they are so necessitated for the defence of that county, being in continual engagements with the enemy, that they being in command and daily employment there cannot be spared to attend to be examined before you in this cause; and therefore they humbly desire that the Committee who have the hearing of this cause would either give credit to what they formerly certified under their hands, or appoint the Committee at Derby, or such other as shall be thought fit, to take and transmit their examinations which they will justify upon oath there whensoever they shall be required. [1 p.] Enclosed,
92. i. List of 11 papers relating to the above-mentioned cause, noted as delivered to Mr. Peter Temple to extract the several articles out of those informations. April 25. Underwritten,
92. ii. These 11 papers mentioned above were delivered to the Committee by Mr. Peter Temple, 27 April. [1 p.]
April 23. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Nothing was this day voted. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 55.]
April 24.
Oxon.
93. Sir Edw. Nicholas to [the Earl of Forth, Lord General of the King's army]. His Majesty hath herein sent you his answer to yours which he received this day. There are no new forces as yet come to Aylesbury, as I am well informed by a letter from thence this day. Some of Manchester's forces are drawn into Lincolnshire, as I am advertised, and others are at Cambridge. Cromwell's forces are at Bedford and Newport Pagnell. I hear nothing of Waller but what you sent to the King. I hear not of any forces marched as yet this week from London, but they are very busy there with their levies. I have sent you some of our printed news. [1 p.]
April 24.
Newbury.
94. [The Earl of Forth, Lord General] to Sir Edw. Nicholas. I shall entreat you to let his Majesty know, that first two captains, my own officers, were according to his Majesty's warrant sent from my regiment to Abingdon to receive the 334 soldiers to be imprest out of Berks to recruit my regiment, whereof they received but 121, and of those 51 are since run away in two days for want of pay. Next the Commissioners appointed my officers to attend them at Abingdon to receive the rest upon Monday and Tuesday last, which my officers did accordingly but received not one man, the Commissioners being very negligent of his Majesty's service in this particular, Major Tooker only excepted, who will give his Majesty full information of the particulars. I beseech you represent unto his Majesty that unless greater care be taken, as well for the recruiting of my regiment and others as for due paying of them, his service will suffer much in this time of danger and so great need of men. P.S.—Be pleased to let his Majesty know we have received intelligence this day from good hands out of Waller's army; that Waller has order from London to fight with us and to draw towards this place. Lord Hopton, Lord Wilmott, and I have been viewing the ground, and have given order to cut down some hedges. We desire also that his Majesty may be pleased to send us 1,000 musketeers if he miss Reading, for we shall need them. [1 p.]
April 24. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Being Fast day no meeting was held. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 55.]
April 25.
Oxon.
95. Sir Edw. Nicholas to the Earl of Forth, Lord General of the King's army. Since my letter to you last night [see above, No. 93], I have received yours of the 24th [see above, No. 94], which I have shewn to his Majesty, who hath given order to the Governor of Reading to have in readiness 1,000 musketeers to march to the army when you shall send for them, which the King wishes may not be till your Excellency is sure the rebels will fight. Mr. Ashbournham hath order to take care for payment of your recruits and all the rest of the soldiers at Reading as fast as he can get money; and his Majesty will again send to quicken the Commissioners in pressing their men. I have herein sent you the copy of an advertisement I this morning received from Aylesbury from a very good hand, which your Excellency may rely upon. We hear nothing of Waller's motion, strength, or designs other than what you sent hither. [1 p.]
April 25. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Wharton and Warristone, Sir Phil. Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, the two Vanes, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Mr. Solicitor make report to the House of Commons of the paper given in against Lord Willoughby and others in the business of Newark and Lincoln. And because Lord Willoughby is a member of the House of Lords that what concerns him be reported to it. 2. That the Earl of Manchester's letter of 22 April be reported to the Commons by Mr. Solicitor. 3. That Mr. Pierpont do report to the Commons that it is needful that money be brought in for the last fortnight's pay. 4. That Mr. Wallop and Col. Norton do recommend the projected instructions from this Committee to the Earl of Pembroke concerning the business of the Isle of Wight. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 55.]
April 25.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to Edward Earl of Manchester. We received your letter of the 23rd inst., and ordered that the same be reported to the House of Commons, who have this day resolved to renew your ordinance for three months longer. The Lord General has acquainted us that he has received intelligence from several parts that Prince Rupert is marching again to Oxford, which we thought fit to acquaint you with, that you may steer your course according as you shall think best to conduce to the public. Signed by Northumberland and John Lord Maitland, and sent by Mr. Butler at 6 p.m. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 77. Copy. ⅓ p.]
April 26. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl of Northumberland, Lords Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir Philip Stapleton, the two Vanes, Mr. Solicitor, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Browne, Barclay, and Crew. Ordered, 1. That Messrs. Wallop and Browne do go to the House of Lords to let them know, That this day being appointed for debate of the Propositions [of Peace], and for that the Scotts' Commissioners cannot sit in the afternoon, this Committee desires that the Lords upon this Committee may have leave to attend this Committee. 2. That a letter be written to Sir W. Waller to let him know that Major-General Browne is to have the command of that brigade of the three regiments of foot sent out by the Committee of Militia, and to desire that Col. Thompson's regiment of horse may in some more particular manner attend and be assisting to that brigade in regard of the relation which those horse have to the City. 3. That Col. Harvey do attend this Committee to-morrow. 4. That a sub-committee be appointed to expedite the business of Sir W. Waller and recommend it to the Western Committee, [nominated] Sir Henry Vane, senr., Sir Gilbert Gerard, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, and Mr. Wallop. 5. That the business of Col. Norton be likewise recommended by this sub-committee to the Committee of Hampshire. 6. That the Propositions of Peace prepared by the sub-committee be kept secret till such time as they be offered to the Houses of Parliament. That copies may be given by Mr. Pierpont to such of the Committee present as shall desire the same; these to be written out only by the Secretaries to the Committee. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 56.]
April 26.
At our Court at Oxford.
96. Letter from the King "To our trusty and well beloved." This is a duplicate of the King's letter made by Sir Edward Nicholas to be kept as a copy. [It is all in cipher, and no clue has been found to aid in deciphering it; should one subsequently be met with, the letter will be deciphered and printed at full in the Appendix at the end of the reign.]
April 27. 97. Order of the House of Commons. That 500l. out of Haberdashers' Hall, payable at the end of three months, and 500l. out of the King's revenue, payable likewise at three months' end, shall be allowed to the county of Pembroke for buying arms and ammunition for the service of that county, the same to be paid to [Giles] Thelwall, M.P., upon account for that service, and Mr. Thelwall and Mr. White are added to the Committee for Gloucester and are to consider of the furnishing of these arms upon the credit of this 1,000l. payable as aforesaid. [2/3 p.]
April 27. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earl of Northumberland, Lords Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Ph. Stapleton, Sir Gilbert Gerard, the two Vanes, Messrs. Pierpont, Crew, Browne, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the letter from the Committee of Estates of Scotland now in Yorkshire with the army and the letter to this Committee from Lord Fairfax, be reported to the House [of Commons] by Sir H. Vane, junr. 2. That the desire of the Commissioners of Scotland for answer to their papers of the 3rd and 6th of this inst. concerning sending money to the army speedily be likewise reported to the House by Sir. H. Vane, junr. 3. That the letter of 6 April from the Committee of Estates and the five papers concerning Irish affairs be reported to the House [of Commons] by Sir H. Vane, junr. 4. That Sir H. Vane, senr., and Mr. Wallop report to the Committee of the West the petition of the western gentlemen about a Governor for Plymouth. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 57.]
April 27.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Lord Admiral. By the enclosed extracts of letters from the Governors of Lyme and Poole you will see the distress that the town of Lyme is in, and you well know what consequence the town is of to shipping in the west. By a clause of the letter of the Governor of Poole it seems he has caused three of the Parliament's ships to go thither, but whether they be gone or not we have no assurance, we therefore desire you if they be not gone that you will speed them away and order them to have such supply as they need and you can afford them, that the town may be preserved. Signed by Ph. Lord Wharton and John Lord Maitland, and sent by Mr. Butler, 7 p.m. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E., p. 78. Copy. ½ p.]
April 27.
Derby House.
The same to Sir Wm. Waller. We doubt not before this time you have, by Col. Sidenham, heard of the distress of the town of Lyme, and you well know of what consequence it is to the west, and how long it has held out without any help. We commend it to your care and desire you will give them all the assistance you can. From the Scots' army we are advised that the Earl of Newcastle, upon the news of the taking of Selby by Lord Fairfax, made a flying retreat towards York, whither he came on Thursday week with 5,000 horse and 6,000 foot as they write, and the Scots' army to Wetherby on the Thursday following, where they joined with Lord Fairfax and are near York, and when they shall have fitted a bridge to the Ouse they intend to straiten those in York, and hope to give a good account of those parts. Signed as above, and sent by John Priestley, 8 p.m. [Ibid., p. 78. Copy. ½ p.]
April 27.
Derby House.
The same to Edward Earl of Manchester. We have received your letter from Stamford and desire you still to keep a vigilant eye upon the motions of the enemies, that you may dispose of your affairs as they shall march northward or come southward. We understand by letters from Scotland of the 17th instant to the Committee here, that the Earl of Callender, Lieutenant-General, has marched towards the South Border of that kingdom with 10,000 foot and horse, and the Marquis of Argyle, with four or five regiments to the north against the Marquis of Huntley, wherewith we thought fit to acquaint you, the rather because of the mention made in Lord Fairfax's letter of Montrose marching to Dumfries, whereof we have sent you a copy and desire you to hold constant intelligence with the Scottish army. Signed as above, and sent by Mr. Jennings, 8 p.m. [Ibid., p. 79. Copy. 2/3 p.]
April 28.
Coventry.
98. Basil Earl of Denbigh to [the Committee for Safety of both kingdoms]. I received just now from Stafford the ill news of the rendering up of Tong Castle. This, and what other losses shall happen must fall upon those who, for private ends, have thus long retarded and obstructed my proceedings. Colonel Barker's troop, contrary to your order and my summons, is gone the second time with Colonel Purefoy to Gloucester, and with him another troop of Major Bridges' without my privity or consent; and if whole counties must be thus exposed to ruin, and your orders neglected, to maintain persons—who have no great interest in this county and less in their affection—in that power and authority which is conferred upon me by Ordinance of Parliament, I know not what can be expected but ruin to these parts. Yet such is the respect I bear to the public service and your commands that, within six days, I intend with God's assistance to begin my march for Stafford, though my troops are but half armed and those raw and inexperienced soldiers, and the proportion not completed which I am to have out of this county. I am put in great hopes of raising considerable numbers of horse and foot in Staffordshire, but want arms; the enemy I hear will be much the stronger in horse, and therefore Gloucester being now relieved in all respects your Lordships will be pleased to order that Colonel Purefoy's regiment of horse may follow me into Staffordshire, or supply their defect some way as may seem most convenient and agreeable to your wisdom. Prince Rupert is gone to Oxford to clear some points in his instructions which left it too much to his arbitriment either to march to Oxford or into the north; and he would have orders more peremptory to free himself from the blame of any ill success that might happen. [2½ pp.]
April 28. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present [not stated]. Two letters were written and sent to the Lord Admiral [Warwick] and Sir W. Waller. The former to desire his Lordship to send some shipping to relieve Lyme [Regis.] The second to Sir Wm. Waller to take care of Lyme [Regis]. Also a letter to Edw. Earl of Manchester. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 57.]
April 29.
Holborn.
99. E. Keeling to Robert Coytmore, secretary to the Earl of Warwick. I was in expectation you would have put a hand to my business ere this. I must confess for the public service—which I account this corporation of shipwrights to relate to—there is need enough to cherish this infant government; but for any comfort or benefit of mine in the further life of it, I shall willingly disclaim it. Do me the favour by your next to Mr. Jessop to signify the Lord Admiral's pleasure that I may address myself either to attend this or to disengage myself of my burden. [Much damaged by damp. 1 p.]
April 29.
Blackfriars.
100. Commissary Lionel Copley to the Committee for Accounts at Alderman Freeman's house. Your directions concerning accounts and muster rolls I received yesternight, to which I must return this answer for the present. His Excellency has unexpectedly commanded me away about business, which I think will keep me beyond the ten days you mentioned. You know I am his officer, and so far know my own duty as not to dispute commands from him. I hope the want of the rolls will be of no real prejudice, being confident you intend not to call such officers as are going out to fight in the Parliament's service to account, for the other accounts I know there will be none. [2/3 p.]
April 29. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lords Wharton, Maitland, and Warristone, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, Sir Philip Stapleton, Sir Gilbert Gerard, the two Vanes, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Recorder, and Messrs. Pierpont, Wallop, Crew, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That Sir Arthur Haselrigg and Mr. Wallop carry Sir W. Waller's letter to the Committee of the West, and acquaint them with the extreme necessity his army stands in, [likewise that they] do report their answer thereupon this afternoon. 2. That such copies of the pro positions as are to be presented to the Houses [of Parliament] and delivered to the Commissioners shall be subscribed by the sitters in the chair. 3. That the said propositions be this day reported to the House of Commons by Mr. Pierpont, and to the House of Lords by the Earl of Northumberland or by Lord Wharton. 4. That withal both Houses be informed that the Scotts' Commissioners have retarded [in] nothing the said propositions, but that to advance the same they are resolved that one of them shall go himself with them into Scotland to bring the sooner an answer back again with all diligence. In the afternoon.—Ordered, 5. That it be reported to the Houses by the Earl of Northumberland and Mr. Solicitor [St. John] respectively, that the officers of the Lord General [Essex] will march toward their rendezvous upon Friday next or Saturday at the furthest, and that the Committee has assured the officers that the rest of the money shall be ready on Saturday or within three days after. 6. That Henley be appointed for the place of rendezvous. 7. That letters be written to the Northampton Committee to send presently 500 foot and 200 horse to the rendezvous of his Excellency [Essex] with all possible speed. 8. That Mr. Recorder [Glynn] be desired to go to London to cause the City regiments to be speedily completed and to march to the rendezvous of his Excellency [Essex]. 9. That Mr. Recorder do report to the House of Commons from this Committee that it is needful to provide money for the garrison of Aylesbury. 10. That a letter be written to the Committee to send Lord Grey's horse up with all speed to the rendezvous. 11. That Mr. Solicitor [St. John] do report to the House [of Commons] that the ordinance for the establishment may be passed. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, pp. 58, 59.]
April 29.
Derby House.
The Committee of both kingdoms to the Committee at Northampton. My Lord General having to go immediately to his rendezvous we desire you will, according to our former letters of 7 April, cause that proportion of your forces we then desired, viz., 200 horse and 500 foot, to march forthwith to Aylesbury with all speed, and that you furnish them with convenient ammunition as we then intimated. [Interregnum, vol. 18 E, p. 80. Copy. ¼ p.]
April 30. Proceedings at the Committee of both kingdoms this day. Present, Earls of Northumberland and Essex, Lord Wharton, Sir Arthur Haselrigg, and Messrs. Pierpont, Crew, Wallop, and Barclay. Ordered, 1. That the propositions offered to this Committee by the gents. of Berks. be reported to the Houses by Lord Wharton and Sir Arthur Haselrigg respectively. After[wards] Mr. Pierpont was desired to report it. 2. That the petition of the Scottish Reformadoes be reported to the House of Commons with the desire of this Committee that they may be speeded away to their native kingdom where they are to be employed in service. 3. That Lord Grey be desired to be at this Committee to-morrow. 4. That Mr. Wallop do report to the House of Commons that the Lord General [Essex] may have two troops of dragoons added to his army and 100 firelocks for the train of artillery. 5. That the petition of the officers of his Excellency [the Lord General's] army concerning the oath for their account be reported to the Houses [of Lords and Commons] respectively. [Interregnum 7 E. Day Book of Orders, p. 59.]
April. Grant of the office of Garter Principal King-at-Arms to Sir Henry St. George, Norroy, vice Sir John Borough, deceased, with the fee of 50l. per annum from Michaelmas last, and all other profits during his good behaviour; subscribed upon signification of his Majesty's pleasure by Henry Lord Mowbray. [Docquet.]
April. A like grant of the office of Norroy King-at-Arms to Edward Walker, Esq. [Docquet.]
April. A like of the office of Chester Herald to Wm. Dugdale. [Docquet.]