BHO

Charles II: October 1672

Pages 1-110

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1672-3. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1901.

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October 1672

Oct. 1.
Worcester.
Joseph Crowther, William Thornburgh, and Nathaniel Tomkins, canons of Worcester, to Williamson. Being informed there are designs for procuring his Majesty's letters to the Dean and Chapter of Worcester for renewing the leases of lives in the rectories of Bromsgrove and Kempsey, in as much as his Majesty has prohibited any grants for leases of lives in their church, and has enjoined the augmentation of vicarages and of the salaries of the members of the choir, and they accordingly desire to reduce the tenure of lives in those two rectories to years for the said purposes, and also in order to increase the revenues of the church, which are insufficient for its expenses, besides the expense of the repairs of the cathedral, amounting that year to 200l. extraordinary, imploring his assistance to prevent their intentions being rendered ineffectual. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 1.]
Oct. 1.
Enham.
Thomas Brathwaite to Williamson. I was informed lately at Winton that Mr. Fabian Philips has got, or will shortly procure, another letter for his son to bring him in at the next election there. They usually take in but one on the King's letters, however many are granted. I must leave it wholly to your care. In Wilts., in the diocese of Sarum, is a living called Dauntsey worth about 140l. per annum, in the King's gift or the Lord Keeper's, at least 20 miles from me. The incumbent is ancient and sickly. I may not get any further intelligence of him till too late, and therefore I request you to endeavour to prevent other suitors. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Oct. 1.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. About 100 light colliers are come in, convoyed by the John and Thomas. Half of the fleet of laden colliers is still in port, unable to get out. The Duke of Lauderdale passes through this the 3rd, and lodges that night at Durham. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Oct. 1.
Stockton.
Samuel Hodgkin to James Hickes. Some vessels from London saw several Holland privateers on their way, but they dared not attempt to do them any harm. They saw several Holland fishing doggers taken, and our frigates were in pursuit of more. Last night a small pink of this town was put ashore near this by stress of weather, but there are hopes of getting her off. Wind W., a strong gale. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Oct. 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. A friend of mine came yesterday evening from Aldeburgh, who came there in the Edgar, but belonged to the Cambridge. He informs me that 14 busses were taken on the Dogger Bank, and three of them released. They had no convoy. He believes these were all that were out fishing. He confirms the story of 40 sail discovered by the Augustine, but believes them to be the East country and Hamburg fleet, homeward bound. This morning our packet-boat came in, by which I hear of the great alarm at the Brill of an intended attempt by our fleet. Three companies of trained bands from Rotterdam, and one from Schiedam and eight troops of horse from Tergoes were sent thither, which are all recalled, except one company of Rotterdam and two troops. At Helvoetsluys is a troop of 40 horse, and a foot company, at Somerdyke a troop of horse, and another at Goree. The master of the packet-boat brought me a Prince's dollar, which I have not sent you because the stamp was double, and the letters not plain. He has brought over with him many men taken in the Barbados ships, which they report to be four with two Mevis men. They condemn some of their company, especially the Admiral, who after they had engaged to assist and defend one another unworthily deserted them. One Master, Terry, who is come over in the packet-boat, fought long and singly with a stout privateer, till he had but one shot left, and was boarded three or four times before he was taken. Some of those taken were brought to, and are at, Helvoetsluys at present. They are reported to be very rich ships. They were taken in sight of the Land's End. The privateers were but two, and had taken three or four others before, and had sunk them all but one, in which they put and released all the men they had taken. The three Barbados ships, some well gunned and manned, surrendered without striking a stroke 19 August, and they being secured they fell on Terry's ship, and after fighting about 24 hours he was forced to yield, and then they took the Mevis ships. When they came in sight of the Brill island the people were so fearful of these 6 or 7 ships, that, notwithstanding the Dutch colours, they turned the water on the land, and would needs drown all, fearing the English. The master says that off Aldeburgh yesterday he saw a skirmish betwixt a ketch and a privateer, the former better gunned, and the latter better manned. The Edgar and another were ahead of them, but the privateer, perceiving he was noticed, ran away before the wind. He saw several in this passage. They swarm. As to your oysters a couple of barrels for a trial will be sent to your house. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 5.]
Oct. 1.
Dover.
John Carlile to [Williamson]. Wind S.W., and blew last night a whole storm. Lady Gray has been here three or four days waiting for fair weather to go to Calais, in one of his Majesty's yachts. Yesterday came into harbour a dogger boat from London for Rouen, which ran against one of the pier heads and sank to the great damage of the goods and vessel, which lay three or four days under water, till she was mended at low water. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Oct. 1.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. From 8 to 12 last night it blew a very great storm from S. The French fleet at St. Helen's had a hard road, but after 12 it came W.S.W. and blew very hard, but they had better riding, the wind being more landerly. We had an extraordinary high tide last night. The French carpenters were most of Sunday taking the dimensions of the Royal Charles, and all without leave. They take no notice of anybody, nor nobody of them. They use pen and ink, and take all within and without board exactly. There's a general order to be kind to that nation, so nobody dares show them the least unkindness outwardly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 7.]
Oct. 1.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to James Hickes. The Newfoundland men are not returned, and nothing is heard of them, which makes us much doubt the Dutch have met with them. The wind blows hard at S., and has done so three or four days. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Oct. 1.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Dutch capers still very much infest our western coast. [Ibid. No. 9.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 9i.]
[Oct. 1. ?] List of captains of the Marine Regiment. (Printed in Dalton, English Army Lists, p. 122.) [In Lord Ranelagh's hand. Ibid. No. 10.]
[Before Oct. 1.] Jasper Duarte, of Antwerp, to the King. Petition for discharge for certain goods belonging to the late King, for which he is sued but which he never had, and for a picture of the King and Queen with a laurel leaf, for which he paid 55l., and a clock in form of a tortoise, 65l., purchased by him from the trustees for sale of his Majesty's goods, and from a creditor of his Majesty, having come over to seek relief for a debt of 2,820l. due to his brother James, by the late King, and assigned to him, and having been arrested in the King's name for 700l. for the said goods. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Oct. 1. Reference thereof to the Lords of the Treasury. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 45.]
Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Sir Robert Holt. I have told the King of your fall, and of your willingness at any inconvenience to appear. His Majesty however excuses your attendance at Council till you can come without prejudice to your health. The King is going to Newmarket for some time. I hope that by then you will be restored and able to wipe off all the aspersions laid upon you. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 69.]
Oct. 1. Caveat in favour of Lord Arlington that nothing pass of the estate of Viscount Baltinglass in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 17.]
Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master of the Ordnance, to pay 100l. a year to Jonas Moore, jun., from 24 June last, he having spent several years in travelling into Italy, France, Ger- many, and the Low Countries, and in studying mathematics, especially the arts of fortification, gunnery, and artillery. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 195.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 12.]
Oct. 1. Warrant from Lord Arlington to John Bradley, messenger, to find Sir Andrew White, require him in the King's name to quit the Kingdom, and see him embarked at Dover or elsewhere. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 195.]
Oct. 1. Warrant from Lord Arlington to Col. Roger Whitley, to order a daily post between London and Newmarket for convenience of the Court while his Majesty remains there. [Ibid.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 13.]
Oct. 1. Warrant from Lord Arlington to Col. R. Whitley, for discontinuing the daily post ordered from London to Portsmouth and Harwich, his Majesty's fleet being now come into harbours. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 195.]
Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
Grant to Sir Rob. Wiseman, appointed 15 June, 1660, Advocate General in ecclesiastical and maritime causes, who is now, by the Archbishop of Canterbury, appointed to succeed the late Sir Giles Sweet as Dean of Arches, of dispensation from attendance in causes ecclesiastical concerning the Crown, that depend in any court before the Dean of Arches, but continuing his service as Advocate General in all other causes, he receiving the whole salary of that office, and reserving to him, notwithstanding his acceptance of the said office, the right to plead and practise in the said courts. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, f. 126.]
Oct. 1. Reference to the Commissioners for Irish affairs of Viscount Conway's petition, showing that Charlemont, of which he is governor, is much decayed and ruined, and some things there belonging to his Majesty might be improved by long leases, and desiring power to make such leases for such terms as he shall find convenient. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 44.]
Oct. 1. On the petition of Col. Richard Grace showing that, in several actions brought against him in the Exchequer of Ireland for lands he enjoys, his attorney was forced to put off the trial at the last Summer Assizes in the King's County, being unprepared to defend them, because the petitioner, without whom the most material evidences and papers could not be had, was in England, and praying an order to the Barons to suspend judgment before his trial next Lent Assizes, Order to the Lord Chief Baron and the Barons to suspend all proceedings to the petitioner's prejudice, if the forms of the Court will admit, his Majesty considering how hard it would be if he should receive any prejudice by reason of his needful attendance on him. [Ibid. p. 45.]
Oct. 1.
Treasury Chambers.
Sir Robert Howard to the Navy Commissioners. Sir W. Warren and Mr. Wood have lately informed the Lords of the Treasury that they were to have received 2,000l. imprest last June, according to their contract with you, and that they have since delivered divers ladings in pursuance thereof, and are daily delivering more, and that yet they have not received any money. The Lords have therefore desired me to inquire why they have not received any money all this time. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 75.] Annexed,
Sketch for the Navy Commissioners' reply. If [their bills] not yet signed were now signed, there are at present bills to the value of13,000l. ready to be assigned, which in course are to be paid before them, whereof some belong to themselves. The reason whereof is our want of money arising:—1, from the disappointment of the money appointed to complete the pay of Deptford and Woolwich yards for Lady quarter last, for the supply whereof we were forced to borrow 6,000l. of the victuallers, and repay them out of our weekly money, though demanded in our paper of 17 Aug. 2, from the late applying of 10,000l. to the last pay of Chatham yard, and afterwards accounting it as part of our weekly money, and from the total failing of one week's money before, besides this last not yet received. 3, from the vast number of tickets of late daily brought to the Office, which if not restrained to a certain weekly sum, or otherwise provided for, will exhaust most of our weekly money, and disable us from answering the other many occasions of the office as bills of exchange, for pilotage, for widows and orphans, for the victualling, &c., which are often very pressing and can't be deferred. [Torn at the beginning. Ibid. No. 75i.]
Oct. 1.
Portsmouth pink, Deptford.
Thomas Binning to the Navy Commissioners. Your Honours have ordered Mr. Ricketts to deliver on board the pink six weeks' victuals for 34 men, but I have received from the Victualling Office two months' provisions, which the pink is not able to contain. I therefore desire your commands. [Ibid. No. 76.]
Oct. 1.
Chatham.
Commissioners Sir T. Allin, Sir J. Smyth and T. Middleton to the same. In our last we gave you account of the receipt of the paybooks and tickets sent by the Bezan. All care shall be taken in issuing them, and we shall take a receipt from every one for what he receives. We shall examine each commander as to what books and tickets formerly sent down have been delivered to him. It will be a great prejudice to the King, and inconvenience to the seamen to be paid by ticket. We find men turned out of the Antelope into the Plymouth, then into the Henry and London, and from the London into the Anne, and some into the Resolution, who as yet have had no tickets at all, and we are assured we shall find many more of the like nature. At our first coming down we ordered each commander to have their books made ready with all possible haste. Those of the Henry and Rainbow are ready, and only wait for the money. If the money were down we desire to know whether we may pay them before Sir T. Osborne comes. The books of the St. George and Unicorn will be ready to-morrow. We have ordered the victuallers' agent to make all the dispatch he can to discharge all the ships that have least in them, and to put the remains on the ships that have stowage for them, and to send the light victuallers to Deptford. Sir T. Allin having an ague which has been very violent to-day, Sir J. Smyth intends to go down to-morrow to see their dispatch effected. We sent our letter of the 26th before 12 at night to the posthouse, and have written to the postmaster to explain why it was not delivered sooner. We have had complaints from several that great quantities of wormwood have been found at the bottom of the beer cask, which they judge has corrupted the beer. We shall victual the Thomas and Edward for a Straits' voyage, if the provisions here be good for such a voyage. We have already given the victuallers' agent an order for putting on board her a proportion of victuals for three months. We informed you yesterday that we had given out a survey, and as soon as it is returned we shall give you an account of what ships are fit to go abroad and victual them, and of what may be for the river. It has blown so hard these two days that no boats could stir, otherwise we hoped it would be returned to-morrow. We desire you to inform us as soon as possible what ships his Royal Highness will have those men turned over into. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 77.]
Oct. 1. Certificate by Capt. George Legge of the time John Morris had served as chaplain on the York. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift of the offices of clerkship of cocquet and searcherie within the burgh of Dundee of all goods and merchandise shipped within the port thereof, to John Maitland, servitor to Charles Maitland of Halton, Treasurer depute for Scotland, for his life. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 110.]
Oct. 1.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. Lord Conway tells me he has lately had some discourse with the Master of the Ordnance here about buying his place, and finds him willing to part with it, but says he cannot take a positive resolution till he hears from a person he has written to in England, who, Lord Conway believes, may be your Lordship. The place requires a more active man than Sir R. Byron, and that office cannot be in so good order as it ought to be till a more diligent and younger man be at the head of it, and I believe Lord Conway would do very well in that employment. Therefore if you please to promote the exchange, I am confident 'twill be much for the King's service, and it will be a convenience to Sir R. Byron, for Lord Conway is willing to give him a good compensation. (The rest of the letter concerning the Corporation of Dundalk, where he mentions he has transmitted Lord Dungannon's petition, and concerning the rules for corporations is printed in Camden, Vol. I., p. 31.) [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 1.] Enclosed,
Lewis, Viscount Dungannon, by his guardian Anne, Viscountess Dungannon, to the Earl of Essex, Lord Lieutenant. Petition, stating, that the town and corporation of Dundalk in the very beginning of the rebellion in 1641 joined with Sir Phelim O'Neil and others in rebellion, and kept the said town against the king's forces, who afterwards took the town by storm, and hanged the bailiff and many of the burgesses and freemen, and therefore all the lands, houses, and commons of the town were seized and sequestered; that by letters patent of 13 Feb., 1660[–1], all the said corporation houses, lands, and commons were granted to the petitioner's father, Marcus, late Viscount Dungannon, in consideration of his many services to his late and his present Majesty, and of arrears of pay due to him and his brothers who died in his Majesty's service, which letters patent were confirmed by the Act of Settlement, and the said lands and commons were further confirmed to the petitioner's said father and his heirs by letters patent of 20 Nov., 1662; that the said letters patents were further confirmed by the Act of Explanation, and further the petitioner's father put in his claim thereto before the Commissioners for executing the said Acts, and had their judgments and certificates that the said lands were seized, sequestered, and set apart on account of the rebellion, and by their said judgments and certificates the same were granted to the petitioner's father and his heirs, who passed letters patent thereon accordingly without any saving to the Corporation, which letters patent were confirmed by the said Acts; that notwithstanding, Sir John Bellew, having petitioned his Majesty that the said houses, lands, and commons granted as aforesaid might be restored to the said corporation, on the reference thereof to the Attorney General in England procured his report that the charter of the corporation should be renewed according to Sir John's desire, and further obtained his Majesty's letters of 20 Aug. last for renewing the said charter accordingly, of which letters some of the petitioner's friends having notice and believing him to be concerned, procured his Majesty's letters of 23 Aug. last to stop the renewing of the said charter; that notwithstanding, 9 Sept., Sir John procured another letter for renewing the said charter, and restoring the said Corporation to the said lands, &c., all which proceedings have been without the knowledge of the petitioner or of any person that understood his case, nor did the petitioner hear of Sir John's said proceedings till Wednesday, the 11th instant, because the crossness of the wind prevented the packets coming over; and, inasmuch Sir John has obtained the said letters by misinformations, and if the said charter be so renewed it would include several lands so granted to and enjoyed by the petitioner's father and himself for the services of himself and his brothers, and confirmed to him as expressed in the annexed case, which would be a precedent tending to the prejudice of the whole settlement of Ireland, as well as ruin to the petitioner and his family, praying that his Excellency would examine the truth of the petitioner's case, and report the same to his Majesty, and that until his further pleasure be known no proceedings be taken on the said letters for renewing the charter. [1¼ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 1i.]Annexed,
State of Lord Dungannon's case, setting forth in more detail the statements of the petition. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 1ii.]
Oct. 1.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. To-day I got the order for your 100l. out of the hands of the Treasury Commissioners, and carried it to the Deputy Vice-Treasurer, Mr. Champante, who will not yet declare when he will pay it, but Mr. Roger Jones, Lord Ranelagh's favourite here, told me his Lordship would pay it in England. I hope to hear in your next that he speaks truth. About my friend's business of the Craner's office I told Sir H. Ford that Lord Arlington had procured a promise of it for a friend here, if his Excellency approved, but said nothing of a letter being signed, and I fear they design to make some benefit of it themselves, for he told me that my Lord was averse to the granting of any reversions, but he would move his Excellency in it. I told him Lord Arlington was so disposed to comply with his Excellency in all things that without his good pleasure nothing would be done. I know not yet what his Excellency will say; however, I beseech you to strike for us in it as far as it will bear without offence to his Excellency, to whom it cannot be worth 50l. Yesterday was sworn a new Lord Mayor, who, when I wrote to you by his son lately, little expected that honour. It is Alderman Deey, our late disbanded Governor of Portarlington. I hope the King will not think him therefore less worthy of his foot company again or of some compensation for it. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Oct. 1. [The King to the Lord Lieutenant]. Directing a grant to the Earl of Arlington of the estate of the late Carew, Viscount Baltinglass, which by his death has fallen to, and is of right vested in, the King. [Draft. Ibid. No. 3.]
Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing him to order the Chief and other Barons of the Exchequer and all other officers it may concern to do all things which can or may be done by due course of law for the speedy recovery of the 14,369l. 16s. 9d., due to the Crown from Sir Richard Bellingham as executor to his father Sir Daniel, and recommending the bearer, Nathaniel Castleton, as a person thoroughly instructed in this business. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 328.]
Oct. 2. Sir Orlando Bridgeman to Williamson. I heard this morning that Dr. Codd, a prebendary of Rochester, is dead. The prebend is in my gift. I have now an opportunity of acknowledging the favour to Mr. Stanford, for whom I interposed, because I knew Lancashire wanted such a one. Pray inform Lord Arlington, that I may dispose of it to whomever he may nominate. I wish him a happy journey and good weather, while in the country. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 14.]
Oct. 2.
Letter Office.
James Hickes to [Williamson]. In reply to your complaint of delay in the delivery of your inland letters, it is caused by the mails being delayed by bad weather and ill ways. Every person concerned here is positively forbidden to deliver any letter, till the King's letters may be at Court. Col. Whitley personally appears at the office every postnight, and never goes to bed till the King's letters are come down, nor does he omit to appear in the morning. He is now out of town for some days, and I am commanded by him to desire you to put in Thursday's Gazette a notice of the posts running from hence every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday night at what hour you please for Newmarket during his Majesty's stay there, and returning in like course, to begin next Friday, if his Majesty be gone there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 15.]
Oct. 2.
Whitehall.
List of the 8 companies and officers of the Royal English regiment named to be reformed, viz., the Lieutenant-Colonel's, and Captains Baggot's, Leake's, Hyllyard's, Savage's, Downes', Dannan's and Throgmorton's, the soldiers of the said companies to be put into the companies continuing in the service. [French. Ibid. No. 17.]
Oct. 2.
Bridkirk.
George Williamson to his brother, Sir Joseph. Acknowledging his letter, giving him an account of his own health being so weak that he is unable to go abroad, and warning him to have nothing to do with one Bewley, who is married and extravagant. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Oct. 2.
Bridkirk.
Thomas Belman to Williamson. Giving a detailed account of his brother's illness and enclosing two sets of Latin verses, one elegiacs and the other hexameters, lauding Williamson's munificence in giving 100l. to augment the stipend of Dovenby School. [Ibid. No. 18.] Enclosed,
The paper containing the said verses. [Ibid. No. 18i.]
Oct. 2.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. Our London fleet of about 20 sail, convoyed by the Barnabas, is still in Humber by reason of contrary winds. We hear from Scarborough last week were seen off the Head two Dutch privateers, a dogger and a pink of about 8 guns each, which had taken two small colliers of Lynn, but were last Friday put off the coast by the Sweepstakes, and have not been seen since. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Oct. 2.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. There was a great storm Monday night, the wind S., but yesterday coming westerly, and towards evening due W., so I hope the outward bound vessels went out of the river that ebb under their convoy, the Barnabas, which Capt. Bridgeman in the Sweepstakes joined. The narrative required by the order of their Lordships of the 20th will be expedited in a post or two, as I want some papers to finish it. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Oct. 2.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. The wind blows hard, a point S. of W. A fleet passed northwards last week. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Oct. 2.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Yesterday and to-day the weather extraordinarily stormy, the wind running backward and forward from S. to W. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Oct. 2.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. This morning Lord Power and his regiment marched towards London. They intend to-day for Nantwich. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 23.]
Oct. [2.]/12.
Paris.
James Lane to Williamson. Acknowledging his letter and the passport, having heard from his father that he would not take the usual fees, which is a favor he cannot recompense till he is able to serve him at the same rate, and desiring to be employed in that country in anything that may be useful to him or Lord Arlington. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Oct. 2. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from 26 September to 1 October, all previously calendared. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 25.]
Oct. 2. Warrant for a pardon to Simon Prichard and Thomas Philips concerned in a quarrel in Carmarthenshire, wherein they hurt the servants of David Morgan, who has brought an information against them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 69.]
Oct. 2. Warrant to the Lord Chamberlain to swear and admit Lowde Cordell one of the Pages of the Bedchamber in extraordinary, in order to his being Page in Ordinary on the first vacancy there. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 196.]
Oct. 2. Warrant for a grant to Benj. Batten of the William and Elizabeth, taken as prize in 1664, found in possession of Sir Wm. Batten, late surveyor of the Navy, at his death, though no warrant appears for its grant to him, the said B. Batten having bought it from his father's widow, and almost rebuilt it since. [Ibid.]
Oct. 2. The King to [the Governors of Winchester College]. Renewing his recommendation of Andrew Philips and Thos. Braithwait to be elected and admitted as scholars at the next election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35B., f. 25.]
Oct. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to Denzil, Lord Holles, and other trustees of the Queen. Directing them to grant to Castilian Morris, in consideration of his family's sufferings for loyalty, his late father, Col. John Morris, having been murdered by the usurpers—a lease of 6,000 acres to be set out in Knaresborough Forest, Yorkshire, at the rent of 4d. per acre, such encroachments as have been made, except such as are applied to poor cottages, and are less than 4 acres to a cottage, to be taken as part of the said quantity. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 123.]
Oct. 2. On the petition of James Enfield, one of his Majesty's watermen, showing that by warrant of 16 April, 1666, his Majesty granted him the first vacant Almsman's place in the Collegiate Church of St. Peter, Westminster, and that another has succeeded to his frustration, and desiring that the said warrant may take course in place, the Bishop of Rochester, Dean of Westminster, is recommended to give order in it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 44.]
Oct. 2.
Chatham.
Commissioners Sir T. Allin, Sir J. Smyth and T. Middleton to the Navy Commissioners. When we ordered the discharge of the soldiers, we gave them a method we thought sufficient, but not having sheets to make it as you desired, we shall endeavour to have them altered. The Mayor of Rochester has desired us to know what must be done with the five men who committed the mutiny and therefore we desire you to know his Royal Highness' pleasure therein as soon as possible. The wind continues S.S.W. and S.W., and blows so hard that a boat cannot go from ship to ship. We enclose a list of the caulkers that appeared and that did not appear. We desire you to dispatch the money for the arrears of board wages as soon as possible, by a yacht if you have no speedier conveniency, we being so importuned for it, whenever we go into the yard. We desire you to send what musterbooks you have received from the muster masters since the last you sent, as also from the Commissioners of the Sick and Wounded, having received none yet, but one imperfect list from Deal. The wind continues so boisterous that nothing has yet been done about the survey mentioned in our former letter, and we therefore pray you to pray his Royal Highness' pleasure if those fireships without may not come into the Swale that they may have a stricter survey. The Warspite, Yarmouth, Dover, Falcon, Sweepstakes, and Success being ordered by his Royal Highness to be revictualled, we desire you to move him to know whether they shall be manned according to the last establishment, or to the former number, which we think will be sufficient for their winter voyage. We desire to have one of the yachts ordered down to tranship soldiers. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 79.] Enclosed,
List by Phineas Pett master shipwright of the caulkers pressed on Friday, 20 September, with particulars about them. [Ibid. No. 79i.]
Oct. 2.
Chatham Ropeyard.
John Owen to the Navy Commissioners. Informing them that the hemp in store would be wrought out in eleven days. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Oct. 2.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to Williamson. I herewith send you by his Excellency's command the rules for regulating corporations, mentioned in his letters to Lord Arlington. I presume you have heard what has been done on his Majesty's reference of the late differences between the Lord Mayor and Sir William Davys, that the ejected Recorder and Aldermen are restored. It took up much of his Excellency's time, who was much more inclined to have made them friends, but, whatever animosities may remain, they seem on all sides to have so perfect a reverence for any of his determinations as to yield him a cheerful obedience. I am very much obliged for your constant remembrance of me and my concerns. Lady Essex has been for a week and still is under a feverish distemper, which has hindered his Excellency of his intended visit of the Earl of Arran at his house at Maddenstone, but we hope the fever declines. I would fain by you request Lord Clifford to speak to the Commissioners for the Sick and Wounded, that in my absence they forget not to send down some money into the western district, where, he knows, I was forced to buy a house for the prisoners, and a great portion of the money sent into my district has been expended therein. [1½ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 4.]
Oct. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to [the Commissioners of the Treasury in Ireland.] Whereas by letters of 8 September, 1670, the then Lord Lieutenant was required to settle some speedy course whereby Patrick Archer, merchant, might be paid his debt of 6,294l. out of the Irish revenue with interest thereon from Michaelmas, 1669, directing that he should be allowed Irish interest, viz., 10 per cent., and that the same be secured to be paid either out of the 80,000l. payable by them in 1675, or any other moneys coming to them and not included in their contract and, all the former failing, out of the first moneys which shall be paid into the Irish Exchequer after the expiration of the said contract. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 323.]
Oct. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas the paternal estate of Nicholas Gernon of Miltown, co. Louth, was by a decree of the Court of Claims restored to him and the heirs male of his body, and by the Act of Settlement the said estate devolves to the Crown in default of such issue, directing a grant and release of such reversion to the said Gernon in fee simple in consideration of his great sufferings during the late usurpation on the King's account. [Ibid. p. 340.]
[Oct.] The Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of Gloucester to the King. Petition praying for his approbation of William Gregory, Councillor at Law, elected their recorder in the room of Sir William Morton, deceased. Signed by H. Norwood, Mayor, and twenty aldermen and common council men. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 26.] Probably annexed,
Oct. 3. Resolution of the Common Council electing William Gregory. [Ibid. No. 26i.]
Certificate by Deputy Lieutenants and Justices of Gloucestershire of the capacity and loyalty of the said Gregory. [Ibid. No. 26ii.]
[Oct. ?] The King to [the Mayor and Aldermen of Gloucester]. Approving of the above election of William Gregory. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 130.]
Oct. 3.
Kendal.
Richard Duckett to Williamson. By anything I can learn your brother is no worse, but I shall be able to give you an account by the next, as I am sending to-day to see him. If you do not command him up you must send him some good cordials and spirits. Aldingham in Furness is now void; 'tis better than 200l. per annum, and is in the King's gift. Lancaster is also void by Mr. Barrow's death. There are two or three titles a foot, but the late vicar came in by the King's title. It is worth 300l. per annum. Sir Thomas Gower, who is dead, was steward of Penrith. I believe the patent was solely in his name. Mr. Hollingshead, collector for the hearthmoney for Lancashire, is dead. I conceive myself capable of either of these employments. I served the King in his exile faithfully, and I will give as good security as any. If you think me worthy of either I beg your assistance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 27.]
Oct. 3.
Beccles.
Major E. Andros to Williamson. Referring to his letter of 28 September, calendared in the last volume of the Calendar, p. 661, and again requesting him to ask his Royal Highness for leave for him. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 28.]
Oct. 3.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. Every day laden colliers pass for London, above 80 on Monday, above 30 yesterday, and many to-day, and on Monday divers light for Sunderland. We expect every moment at least 300 from Newcastle and Sunderland the wind being N.W. The Duke of Lauderdale is expected for certain next Saturday. A messenger came from Sir Hugh Cholmley to bring word. At least 100 horse are expected with him. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Oct. 3.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Tuesday about 100 laden colliers passed, convoyed by the Dover and the Mary and Martha, and about 60 to-day convoyed by the Deptford ketch. The grand fleet is not yet out of Newcastle. We have not seen any capers since Monday. Wind W.N.W. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Oct. 3.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I perceive that the extraordinary port is laid aside, during which I have not missed a day, nor any opportunities of packets, expresses or mails. Now I know not where the power of expresses will lodge if there be occasion. Last night the post did not come to the post office till 11. If no better order be taken in it, it were no great matter if the ordinary post also were laid aside. Whereas with a little ease we might easily have our letters by 4 or 5, we are forced to sit up and break our sleep at the pleasure of a postboy or the carelessness of the postmistress. I received a note this morning like a hue and cry after two doggers lost under Capt. Wetwang's convoy these last storms. These four or five days has been much violence of wind and weather from the West. Sir Charles puts me in hope that my salary bill may be signed by the Lords. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Oct. 3.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. I returned home last night. In the great storm Monday night two Margate fishing boats foundered and five or six men were lost. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Oct. 3.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Wind N. W., fresh. There have been very great storms this long time on this coast. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Oct. 3.
Navy Office.
Order by Commissioners Lord Brouncker, Pepys, and Deane to Thomas Kirke, master carpenter of the thirdrate building at Harwich, to repair thither and constantly to oversee the building of the said ship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 81.]
Oct. 3.
Victualling Office.
Josiah Child, T. Papillon and B. Gauden to the Navy Commissioners. We have ordered all the victuallers to be sent up, except as many as may serve to victual the ships for which you sent warrant. We have likewise ordered our agents to recruit the ships you mention with new beer in lieu of the defective, and to see what is defective cast into the sea. We shall take a strict account from what beerhouses any defective beer has come, both for our own satisfaction and to prevent the like for the future, our bargain with all brewers being to be at the full loss of all that proves defective. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 82.]
[Before Oct. 3.] Lieut. Hugh Fidges and eleven seamen of the Dartmouth to the Duke of York. Petition, praying for such allowance as his Royal Highness may think fit to the petitioners for having at the last engagement against the Dutch in the boat of the said Dartmouth taken the St. Nicholas, a fireship, and brought the same to the fleet. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Oct. 3. Three of the said seamen on behalf of themselves and nine men to the Navy Commissioners. As they are required to repair to the Dartmouth beseeching a dispatch of their above petition, referred by his Royal Highness to the Board. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Oct. 3. R. Mayors to the same. As he has received large demands for timber from Deptford and Woolwich, inquiring if he shall get persons to make tenders for the same. [Ibid. No. 85.]
[Oct. ?] John Wilson alias Harrison, a prisoner in Cambridge gaol, to the King. Petition praying for a pardon or for transportation, the petitioner having served in the Royal Katharine in the late engagement, and having been sentenced to execution at the Cambridge Sessions for stealing a purse and 25s. (his first offence) at the last Sturbridge fair. With certificate at foot in favour of the petitioner signed by the Vice-Chancellor, the Master of Trinity, the Mayor and eight others. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 34.] Annexed,
Oct. 4.
Newmarket.
Warrant for the petitioner's reprieve. [Copy. Ibid. No. 34i.]
Oct. 4.
Euston.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. Lord Arlington desires you to buy him the fellow of a cabinet he bought for Monsieur Louvois; he intends it for Monsieur Pompone. He had it either from the cabinet maker next door to the French Ambassador, or from Traherne, almost opposite to the new Exchange in the Strand. The price was 10l. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Oct. 4.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. It was believed the Duke of Lauderdale would have passed this way yesterday, but he is not expected till to-morrow. All the laden coal fleet have sailed. Wind N. The Scotch fleet passed this bar southward last night convoyed by the Newcastle, which is reported to have taken a caper of 10 guns. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Oct. 4.
Whitby.
Thomas Waade to James Hickes. A laden fleet of nigh 300 sail passed this yesterday evening. The wind being then W., they made small way, but about 11 it came W.N.W. and to N. and by W., and grew stormy, and the sea rose suddenly, so deep laden vessels may miscarry. I give you notice, that if you have any relations or concerns therein, they may insure. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 37.]
Oct. 4.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. About 30 colliers arrived to-day which left Tynemouth Wednesday, convoyed by the Deptford ketch. They saw two Dutch capers off Flamborough Head, but did not offer to come in with them; also a small Dutch caper off Ingoldmills, close in to the shore, so that they could not come at him, else some would have attacked him. A small collier of this town which ventured without convoy, was taken near the Spurne, having first run ashore, but was carried off by the capers before the country had notice to rescue him. Wind yesterday W., to-day N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Oct. 4.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. The Fairfax is reported to have taken a privateer of 8 guns and 60 men. Yesterday a dogger, one of his prizes, was brought in here, and to-day a scoot taken by the Bristol. The three Scotch companies marched out of town to-day. The laden colliers are coming up; some have already passed through this road, and some gone on the back of our sands. A great ship of London, coal laden, is run on the Newwork Sands, and is like to be lost. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Oct. 4.
Southwold.
John Wickens to James Hickes. To-day nine or ten of his Majesty's ships sailed by southward, one with a flag at the maintop, and also about 80 laden colliers. Yesterday a Dutch caper was in this bay, which stood off E.S.E. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Oct. 4.
Dartmouth.
[William Hurt] to James Hickes. Last Wednesday se'nnight Capt. Chamberlain in the Dragon of 44 guns fought a Dutch caper of 24 off Torbay, and very fairly left after two or three hours' dispute. The captain believed the caper sank two hours afterwards, but she is risen up again since about Plymouth, and has taken a Frenchman, two Yarmouth men, and an Englishman coming from Ireland. Four or five of our Newfoundland men are arrived, with news of three of our ships being cast away there by the great drifts of ice that came upon them, and that our shipping generally have made very bad voyages. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Oct. 4.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. That from Newfoundland gives account of very bad voyages generally, not above 100 to 120 quintals of fish being taken by each boat. Three Dartmouth ships were cast away on the ice going there. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 42.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 42i.]
Oct. 4. Warrant from Secretary Coventry for the release of Edmund Salter, prisoner in the Gatehouse. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 70.]
Oct. 4.
The Assistance, in the Downs.
Capt. William Beeston to B. St. Michel. Explaining that he cannot receive on board the two anchors to be carried to Woolwich according to the command of the Commissioners, as his pilot assures him that if he does not sail this tide he will be constrained to stay there three or four more days. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 86.]
Oct. 4./14.
Leghorn.
Sir J. B. Duteil to [the Navy Commissioners]. Since my last letter to you I have received one from my brother at Malta, informing me that he is only waiting for the return of the galleys to Malta to send back the ketch with the slaves which private persons at Malta have promised him to sell, which are on the said galleys, and that there is there a French commander who is also buying for the French galleys, which would have raised the price by their bidding one against the other, had not my brother and he, by their friends' advice, made an agreement, of which an English translation is enclosed, of which I do not disapprove. He also informs me that for a long time past there have not been so few slaves at Malta as at present, though 40 corsairs are out, whereof 14 are of Leghorn, which have done nothing hitherto. This will not prevent my hoping to put the King's two galleys in a condition to go to Tangier in the spring, if I am taken out of the hands of Sir T. Clutterbuck. Only too long ago have he and I come to such a pass from his way of proceeding, as you may presently know, that we can do no good together. I leave it to your prudence to judge thereof. I requested you in my last to send to Mr. Legat at Genoa 12,000 piastres, which would almost serve to pay for the hull of the galley and to put her in a condition to sail, or else to send him only 6,000, if you wish to wait and let me pay myself for the hull on my return, but as an accommodation is talked of between Genoa and the Duke of Savoy, who after a peace will disband their troops, from whose remains we may profit, especially from those of the Genoese troops, this makes me request you to send him the 12,000, that he may make use of them on that opportunity, which if let slip will be difficult to regain; which will much facilitate the equipment of the said galley. I have written to him to apply himself to pushing on her equipment, to which he has replied that he would, but that I too must apply myself to put money in his hands, which depends upon you. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 87.] Enclosed,
Agreement, dated 8 Aug., Malta, between the Chevalier de Prencourt and Monsr. Bardou, commissioned by the King of Great Britain and the Most Christian King to buy slaves at Malta for their galleys, to buy all slaves in common at a price agreed between them, and then to draw lots which Commissioner is to have the first choice, and he who wins is to choose a slave first, and then the other is to choose and so alternately to the end, and having made such division each Commissioner is to pay the price the slaves he has chosen cost originally. [Ibid. No. 87i.]
Oct. 5.
Wayhill.
Dr. Randall Sanderson to Williamson. If our petition be not presented pray keep it, because on better consideration we shall except against nothing in theirs except the last clause, the removal of our fair from Wayhill. I have written to Mr. Prest to excite Dr. Hyde and Mr. Drake to join me in procuring a commission to examine witnesses, because they two cannot administer an oath. This should be hastened, because the time is so short, and it may much avail me or my successor to have on record the testimony of ancient men. Please learn what may be had from Mr. Dugdale or any such likely person. I left some papers with Francis Benson, who will give me notice what to do and when to come. I suppose a week before term will be convenient. [S.P. Dom., Car. II., 316, No. 43.]
[Oct. ?] Note of request that the warrant on the petition from Andover may pass for a grant of the weekly market and new fair only, without the other clauses mentioned in the petition. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Oct. 5. Robert Brent to Thomas Raban, Deputy Auditor of the Revenues in Cheshire, the Talbot, Chester. On business matters. The King being at Newmarket, much alteration is now discoursed of at Court, that is, in places, every place being now exposed, as is said, to the best procurer. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Oct. 5.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The Duke of Lauderdale lodges here to-night; I cannot say if he will stay to-morrow, though it be Sunday. Near 100 more laden colliers will be ready to sail in two days. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Oct. 5.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. The ships bound for London and Rouen with their convoy sailed yesterday, the wind then and since W., N.N.W., and N.W,. but S.E. this morning, so, if they reached Yarmouth Roads before it changed, I hope they may be in the River ere this arrive. A fleet of colliers passed southwards Wednesday. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Oct. 5.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wind S.S.W., getting westerly. Yesterday 13 laden colliers arrived, to the great joy of the town and country. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Oct. 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About four yesterday afternoon Sir E. Spragg's squadron with several dogger boats passed by to the Gunfleet. Part of the collier fleet was also seen. I saw 30 or 40 in Hollesley Bay and the Sledway. To-day is so dark and rainy that we have no prospect to sea. About five this morning Capt. Pibus in the Fanfan came in here, convoying four laden vessels from Lynn. Wednesday's storm scattered the collier fleet very much, so that Capt. Pibus believes they will hardly get together, till the Thames. Now at noon we can just discover some of them. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Oct. 5. Major N. Darell to Williamson. I doubt not you have heard of Sir E. Spragg's success, who daily expects the rest of his fleet, dispersed last Tuesday. Twenty or 30 doggers and busses are their prize, with a small privateer. They chased 200 home, and have left several frigates cruising among them, the Bristol in chase of a privateer of 18 guns. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Oct. 5.
4 P.M. Sheerness.
The same to the same. Last night the Argier brought in a privateer, and at four this afternoon we can make Sir E. Spragg's flag and fleet turning up about the Swin, and I believe they may get up to-night, it being flood, as far as his Royal Highness anchored.
Postscript. — As I was going to close this, I had a letter from Sir E. Spragg that he has had a troublesome but lucky little voyage. The Advice and some others are not come in yet. He has routed the poor Zerick Zee men and some others, taken above 30 doggers and destroyed many of the nets of those that escaped. Pickle herring will be very dear in Holland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 51.]
Oct. 5.
Southampton.
W. Stanley, Mayor, to Williamson. Acknowledging his letter with the enclosure for Major Manley, which he has given to the master of a bark, bound the first fair wind to Jersey. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Oct. 5.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to James Hickes. The Adventure and the other ships in Portland Road went out yesterday, and some were in the West Bay, but the wind being S.W. they put back again. Three Newfoundland men are come into Poole. Fish at Bonavista was worth 23 riels per quintal. It is said they took a great deal of fish, but had not weather to dry and cure it. They bring news that two Dartmouth ships that went towards Newfoundland never came to the land. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Oct. 5.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to James Hickes. Yesterday the Morning Star came here as convoy to our merchantmen for Morlaix and St. Malo, the Dragon being also in Torbay to receive them, which so encouraged our merchants that they laded their drapery and other merchandise, the ships coming likewise into the road to proceed on their voyage, but, the wind coming S.W. and blowing hard, they were forced to go into the Cobb again. In the evening the frigate went to sea, leaving them till an opportunity of wind and weather. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Oct. 5.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to James Hickes. Yesterday came news of the loss of two small vessels of this city from Nevis, taken by a Dutch privateer and carried into Amsterdam. To-day arrived a small vessel from Jamaica, which met no privateers, and reports the health and good condition of the island. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Oct. 5. Sir Robert Howard to the Navy Commissioners. The Victuallers of the Navy having acquainted the Lords of the Treasury that of late the 1,000l. per week which they should receive out of the weekly proportion of what the Navy receives has been detained from them, their Lordships have commanded you to take order for the payment of such arrears, and for payment of the said 1,000l. to them in future. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 88.]
Oct. 5.
Wapping.
Sir W. Warren to the same. Informing them that the St. Jacob, laden with masts upon the contract of 19 June last, is arrived at Yarmouth bound for Portsmouth, and desiring that she may be ordered instead to Harwich, Chatham, Woolwich, or Deptford, or else may have convoy, on account of the danger from privateers. With a list of the masts and spars on board. Note at foot by Commissioner Tippetts that the goods mentioned are wanting at Portsmouth, and that they would do well to order them thither, if they can have convoy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 89.]
Oct. 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. On your orders to Lieut. Temple to come up to London I helped him to a little tallow, &c., to fit up his pinnace; since which there has not been one snatch of good weather to encourage his attempt, and yesterday (it is so concluded by our most experienced optic men) Sir E. Spragg with his squadron and several doggerboats passed by us to the Gunfleet, and Lieut. Temple intends the first good weather to make away for his ship the Princess. Robert Foxe, master of the Mary and Hannah ketch, whose musterbook only remained in my hands, which I enclose, desires your order for another two months provision, for he is quite out. Our extraordinary post is laid aside since last Tuesday, so now you have only Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays to send as formerly. Other news as in his other letter of the same date. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Oct. 5.
The Jersey, in the Downs.
Capt. Luke Walsh to the same. In my letter of 30 Sept. I sent a list of the 38 watermen I had of the 100 appointed me by Prince Rupert. The persons named in the enclosed list being my boat's crew, and men I most confided in, being sent ashore to Deal on the ship's business, deserted. Having made diligent search I cannot hear of them. I acquaint you herewith that a corporal punishment might be inflicted on them, for they are gone back to London. I received orders yesterday to remain here till further orders, and to take in a month's provisions at Dover, for which an order from you will be requisite, and I ask that a course may be taken to supply me with seamen, which are not to be got here, without violating the protections of his Royal Highness and the Prince to outward-bound ships. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 89.] Enclosed,
The said list of 10 names. [Ibid. No. 89i.]
Oct. 5.
The Ruby, in the Downs.
Capt. Stephen Pyend to the same. I received yours of the 1st and another from Wm. Blackbourne by order from the victuallers, intimating that they had received an order from you concerning the stinking beer on board and that they had written to their agent at Dover to survey it, and, if defective, to turn it out. He as yet having received no order from the contractors to himself will not meddle with turning it out, but for the present has supplied us with 12 tuns. Therefore pray quicken them to perform the same. In the interim I will go to my station with what I have, which may last us 16 days. A couple of East India men-of-war, bound to Plymouth, are here, and it is reported that they are discharged the Company's service, as well as Capt. Highway of Dover is. If we were certain of it, the Jersey and we that want men might man ourselves very well out of them. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Oct. 5. Certificate by Lieut. John Hazellwood that Ralph Foster, chirurgeon of the Henry, supplied her with medicaments the whole time of the voyage from 9 March to 5 Oct., 1672. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Oct. 5.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to Williamson. The cross winds keep us in expectation of your three last packets. I enclose the rules for the Corporation of Dublin; his Excellency bids me tell you you shall have the rules for the other corporations. The sickness of the Countess has discomposed him so that he has not written to Lord Arlington. We trust she is on recovery, but I very much fear the fair Mrs. Hammon, who waited on her hither, is on her death bed. Pray remind Lord Arlington of what I have written to his Lordship by his Excellency's command. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 5.]
Oct. 5.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to the Earl of Orrery. (Sic, but from internal evidence it must be the Earl of Arlington.) I am commanded by his Excellency to inform your Lordship that the office of craneage at Dublin by the death of Mr. Hill is, or ought to be, in his Excellency's disposal, but a patent passed about five years ago is produced granting the same in reversion to Mr. Tilson, and his Excellency finds the like patents in reversion for all or most offices in the gift of the Chief Governor, both judicial and others, which may cause inconvenience, if such patents stand good, but his Excellency will take no example of his predecessors in this point that his successors may have wherewith to gratify those that deserve well in his Majesty's service, but if by law, or sufficient reason of state all such patents in reversion may be revoked or laid aside, he is of opinion it would be for his Majesty's service to do so, to which he believes you will not be adverse, but rather assistant in your advice to his Majesty. He desires your pardon for not writing by this packet. The sickness of his lady is much apprehended, though we trust she is past danger. The winds have been cross of late, and no less than three packets are due. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 6.]
Oct. 6.
Letter Office.
James Hickes to Williamson. Complaining of the delay and uncivil answer of Charles, the messenger, in bringing down Williamson's letters on Friday night. Williamson's letters for the Court to-night are expected at the appointed hour, or else advice to the contrary. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 56.]
Oct. 6. Sir Heneage Finch to the King. Sending the patent creating Henry, Lord Howard of Castle Rising, Earl of Norwich, with remainder to the heirs male of his body, and also creating him Earl Marshal of England, with remainder to the heirs male of his body, with remainder to the heirs male of the body of Thomas, late Earl of Arundel, Surrey and Norfolk, grandfather of the said Henry, Lord Howard, with remainder to the heirs male of the body of Thomas, Earl of Suffolk, with remainder to the heirs male of the body of Lord William Howard, late of Naworth, youngest son of Thomas, late Duke of Norfolk, with remainder to Charles, Earl of Nottingham, and the heirs male of his body. Prefixed to the letter is the said patent in Latin. [16 pages. Ibid. No. 57.]
Oct. 6.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. Last Thursday night passed by at least 300 colliers for London with a good wind. The weather is strange, not a day without rain. To-day came an express from York for the Duke of Lauderdale, but he is not here, and we now hear he is at Durham, and expect him here Tuesday, if this wind and rain hinder him not. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 58.]
Oct. 6.
Noon. Dover.
John Carlile to [Williamson]. I received the enclosed just now from Mr. Lynch. He cannot find out who cut open that letter, at which he is very much troubled. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Oct. 6.
Portsmouth.
Sir P. Honywood to Williamson. Fearing that Lord Arlington may be with his Majesty at Newmarket I direct this to you. Comte d'Estreés with the French fleet weighed and sailed from St. Helen's Road Friday morning, and was clear of the point by four p.m. That night proved ill weather, and the wind was contrary, so they anchored in the sea, and about two yesterday anchored near St. Helen's Road again, where they now ride. I shall take all opportunities to be serviceable to the Count, and have offered him wines here in port, if they may be serviceable to his fleet. Now at ten the wind is S. and by E., yet some of the fleet are under sail, and the rest have their foretopsails loose. What they intend I know not, and the post is just going. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Oct. 6.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. News of the French fleet, as in the last letter. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Oct. 6.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The best convoys of these ships from the southward have been the almost continual storms. The Nightingale sailed hence yesterday for her station off Cape Clear. She had so bitter a night that she must be now in Falmouth. The Dragon and Morning Star came in to-day. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 62.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 62i.]
Oct. 7.
London.
Sir J. Barckman Lyonbergh to [Lord Arlington]. Being informed by the Comte de la Gardie that the Most Christian King had most readily accepted the King my master's mediation at his first audience, and that my Lord Tott had arrived there the 28th, and had desired the next day to be admitted to the King, pressing very much to know the place for the treaty, and that the opinion of some of the Court had been that the Most Christian King intended Dunkirk for it, as the fittest place for a sudden correspondence of all three parties concerned, and whereas I was charged by the King, my master, after the departure of M. de la Gardie to inform myself of the King of Great Britain's resolution concerning the place of treaty, I cannot forbear to inform your Lordship of what passed in France, and to desire his Majesty's declaration concerning the same point, that I may be able to give my Master an account by Friday's post, and make the negotiation of our ambassadors that embarked at Gottenburg the 20th easier. Being informed by other letters that the Duke of Lorraine had engaged to enter Lorraine by way of Burgundy with 16,000 men, to make a diversion in the French King's designs, of whom the Dutch were to pay and entertain 10,000, I thought it fit to impart this news to your Lordship, perceiving that neither the French ambassador nor Monsieur Williamson had any notice of it. [3¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 63.]
Oct. 7.
Late at night. Euston Hall.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. I received all yours since my arrival, and your last of the 6th late this evening, just as Mr. Bridgeman was gone to Newmarket with your former with letters from the Prince of Orange. Lord Crofts and Monsieur de Schomberg arrived here to-night, the first of our guests we have seen. The rest of the week will not, I fear, pass so quietly. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Oct. 7. Dr. Fell to Williamson. Our partner, Sir Leoline Jenkins, being here, I take the opportunity of making you a present of what now comes off the Press, which, under your auspices, will, I hope, daily produce things more worthy of your acceptance. We are in some expectation of having some of the Stationers with us to treat concerning their privileged books. Whether they will bring terms decent for us to accept I cannot guess. I shall send you an account of their proposals. The delay in the promised visit of the Duke of Ormonde makes us now doubt he has laid aside his intention, and that we shall thereby lose the satisfaction of seeing you here. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Oct. 7.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Thursday night the rest of the laden fleet passed southward with their convoy, and to-day passed northwards four or five great colliers, light from Yarmouth Roads, and four or five more of this place out of Humber, with several boats from the Yarmouth fishing. Last Saturday a vessel was seen at sea, supposed to be a caper. Wind now S.S.E. Much rain for at least the last three weeks, constantly night or day. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Oct. 7.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. I hope I shall have no occasion to contradict my information of the 5th of the fleet sailing hence for London, though the wind changing so uncertainly, and having since their departure been much at S. and at all points between that and E. made us very suspicious that if they reached not Yarmouth Roads while it stood at W. they might have been driven back into the Humber, till by a Whitby collier that came yesternight we understood this river was clear and no fleet therein. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Oct. 7.
Southwold.
John Wickens to James Hickes. Yesterday upwards of 200 laden colliers, convoyed by four frigates, anchored in this bay, but by bad weather, wind S., were forced back again into Yarmouth Roads. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Oct. 7.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. Last Saturday came in the Greenwich with a prize, a dogger boat. Great part of the laden colliers are in Sole Bay. Wind S. and by W. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Oct. 7.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. I received yours of the 5th and in Saturday's list gave an account of the packets, and have enclosed the receipt for that of New York, but as to that for Sir Thomas Lynch, I expect your further order, no ships being in the Downs bound for Jamaica. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 70.]
Oct. 7.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to James Hickes. The Happy Return came yesterday from the Isle of Wight into Portland Road to convoy several merchant ships of this place and Lyme for St. Malo and Morlaix, but the Lyme ships for Morlaix are unwilling to go to St. Malo first. They bring news of a Dutch privateer of 18 guns driven ashore in Freshwater Bay, and her prize being a Frenchman chased into the Isle of Wight by a French man-of-war. The Morning Star came into Portland Road Saturday morning and went into Lyme Bay for ships bound westward, but they were forced into the road by foul weather. A French man-of-war of about 28 guns is now come into Portland Road. The Adventure is still detained by cross winds. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Oct. 7.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Wind S.S.W. and very bad weather, of which we have had very little better this long time. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Oct. 7.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Yesterday in a great storm came in the Nightingale which has been cruising several days. Wind now and since Saturday S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Oct. 7.
Bristol.
Thomas Moore to James Hickes. This evening we hear from our Road of the arrival of our Nevis fleet about eight in number, convoyed from Ireland by the Reserve and the Pearl, till they came near Lundy. Two that lost company at sea before they came to Ireland, are concluded to have been met by a Dutch caper, and some say they are in Holland. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Oct. 7. Inland advices received that day being extracts from letters from the 3rd to the 5th all previously calendared. [Nearly 3 pages. Ibid. No. 75.]
Oct. 7.
Star Chamber.
John Evelyn to S. Pepys. I received the letter, which was your reiterated exception that the lists transmitted to your Board from several of our districts were not subscribed by the respective deputies. In your first instructions to us that particular was not, as I remember, mentioned, and as soon as you were pleased to renew your directions I took care that the officers within my circle should not omit it. It is true they have not as yet, all of them, dispatched what you desire, but it has not been for want of all imaginable incitement, which I have again renewed. You may please to call to mind that you rejected that of Chatham and Feversham (which were the most considerable in my circle) upon account of another omission which they are now rectifying, and I every moment expect it, together with that of Gravesend. In the mean time as to those which came lately to you from Sir W. D'Oyley's district, I am very well assured that they are authentic, being accompanied with the letters of his agents in those parts, whose hands we are acquainted withal. If your commands be positive that I should return them back again for their subscription only, it will require time, but if you shall be pleased to dis- pense with that omission (upon my presumption that Sir W. D'Oyley does own them) there need be no interruption in your proceeding to pay off the men. In all events I am writing to Sir William, and shall advertise him of it. I am obliged to write to you in the singular number, there being only myself in town of the rest of my colleagues to my very great trouble. I had else made a journey myself to have set all this right in my quarters long before this time, and my solicitude for money (being indebted at Chatham alone near 4,000l., besides what is owing in five or six other places) keeps me in perpetual drudgery. But I hope you will receive all satisfaction as to what you require about the lists in a very few days. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 94.]
Oct. 7.
Sheerness.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the same. Arriving here to-day Capt. Gunman, of the Prince Royal, has complained of the want of Capt. Shales from his duty as purser of her, in making out tickets, as also to the giving us an account of the provisions on board her to prevent as far as possible any loss in delivering them into other ships. We could instance more of the want of a purser on a ship coming in to be laid up, in making up the paybooks and getting the ship cleared of empty cask while men are on board, which otherwise must be done at great charge by labourers afterwards. We therefore pray your sending down Capt. Shales and any other pursers at London, whose ships are ordered to be laid up, to prevent the clamours of poor people, who attend here for tickets and certificates for their relations slain at sea, while the officers are together. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Oct. 7.
The Emsworth, at Yarmouth.
Capt. Joseph Harris to the same. Last Friday, the 4th, about 4 a.m., we met a privateer of 8 guns well manned off by the Newark. The weather being very bad we could not board him as we intended, and I think they intended nothing less. The weather being so boisterous and the sea so high, neither we nor they could use our great guns, but we were forced to fight them with our small arms about an hour and a half, when the privateer ran away. She killed one of our men and wounded seven, and I chased her till we lost sight of her. We took and brought into Yarmouth haven a dogger and delivered her to the Prize masters here. I came into Yarmouth last Sunday the 6th and moored near the piers. A collier there ran into me and did some damage. She might very well have got clear of me, I laying so out of her way. I have got the carpenters at work and will make the collier make good the damage. I beseech you to promise ten soldiers for me as soon as you think fit. I intend to sea as soon as possible. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Oct. 7.
The Dreadnought, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Capt. Richard Trevanion to W. Hayter. Requesting him to send down by bearer 100 tickets and some paybooks. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Oct. 8.
London.
James Hickes to Williamson. I received yours at 12 last night, and am much troubled that any of your letters or packets by foreign mails or others failed to come to your hand. I was in the Foreign Office Sunday afternoon and desired the officers and Dorrislaus to be careful to send you all the packets for my Lord or you. They shall surely hear fully of their oversight or neglect. Though I inquired two or three times yesterday morning for this letter from Newcastle I could not hear of it, but it was brought down after dinner to my lodgings, of which also I shall have something to say to our officers. John Rowlands, Mr. Ellis' man, affirms before his lady, now here, that Dorrislaus looked over the Paris bag for the state letters, and overlooked that sent you on yesterday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 76.]
Oct. 8.
Newmarket.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. Acknowledging some letters and packets. The King says he will go to Euston next Saturday, when his Lordship intends to divert him and his Royal Highness with hunting a couple of hinds he has kept on purpose. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Oct. 8.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. Weather bad since the last great coal fleet sailed, wind much S.S. and S.W., as it now is. The Duke of Lauderdale with a noble retinue left yesterday for Durham, whence he intends for Yarm, and the next day for Guisebrough, and on Thursday to Sir H. Cholmley's house at Whitby. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Oct. 8.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. A vessel arrived here from Stockholm says several English vessels lie in the Sound ready to come home, but dare not stir without a convoy. Several vessels here are preparing for France. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Oct. 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I thank you most humbly for your favourable expressions concerning me, of which I heard from Sir C. Lyttelton. No packet-boat has come from Holland, since my last account of one. Col. Whitley came here from Newmarket Saturday, and went Sunday. I hope by him we shall have a rectification in the road. Several colliers are passing. One ran aground near the fort. Several are come in here, and several light ones expecting a convoy. There are rumours here of the Emsworth sloop having miscarried. The Fanfan with a small convoy came on Saturday, and yesterday the small privateer called the Katharine taken by Sir E. Spragg's squadron. Weather bad. Wind S.W. Concerning the oysters from Colchester for Williamson. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Oct. 8.
Harwich.
The same to the same. Before 8 this evening one of our packet-boats arrived from the Briell. The Master's news is:— The Prince of Orange looks upon himself as so unsafe amongst his countrymen, that he often goes abroad disguised. They have lost many men before a town held by the French, which the Prince attacked. At the Briell are about 4,000 men, and they are fortifying betwixt the Water and the Town Gate, and are making a new drawbridge on the causeway, and sluices to drown all before the town. They are as high as ever and yet full of fears, for Sunday sennight, seeing three or four ships at sea they fired all their beacons, and with tumult and noise, railing against the English, manned their posts about the town. A privateer pursued them from the Briell to our own coasts. The Briell is guarded with several ships and fireships, and also the island of Goree. De Ruyter is at Helvoet Sluice paying off the ships, only reserving about a month's pay for an engagement of their returning to the service, when called. Several English seamen paid off from the Dutch fleet spoke to the master about coming home, but they are afraid of being hanged when they get home. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 81.]
Oct. 8.
Sheerness.
Major N. Darell to Williamson. Requesting him to procure through Lord Arlington an order empowering him to turn out any of the ferry men of Sheppey Island, who shall ferry over any soldiers belonging to the fort of Sheerness or quartered elsewhere in the island, for, though he keeps guard at three ferries to prevent runaways, by bribes and otherwise they often escape, which may be prevented if he has power to turn these ferrymen out, and in the order a caution and command must be given to all masters of vessels not to transport from Sheerness or any other part of the island any soldiers belonging to the island or garrison without his tickets, for lately, the passage of the ferries having been intercepted, they have had recourse to boats and hoys. Seamen as well as soldiers might be inserted in the order. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Oct. 8.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Henry Ball. Though the breach of the sea is not three rods from my door I have not seen it till to-day, being miserably tormented with my teeth since I came home. About 7 last night suddenly happened such a mighty gust that I scarce ever heard a bigger. It lasted not a quarter of an hour, but the wind very high ever since. Yet I hear of no harm in the Downs, though there be above 60 sail there outward bound. Wind S.S.W., high. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Oct. 8.
Portsmouth.
Sir P. Honywood to Williamson. I received Lord Arlington's of the 2nd, and have let M. d'Estrees know I have his Majesty's special command to be serviceable to him here, and that if he wanted wines for beverage all in port were at his command. He accepted the Vigo wines, which are now making ready to ship on board. If they stay any time here their occasions will grow very great for beverage, wherefore I desire to know whether I should offer them the Spanish wines also, which I have not showed them hitherto, as the Vigo wines will supply them at present. With note there were about 50 pipes of Vigo. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Oct. 8.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The French fleet remains at St. Helen's Road, and have very boisterous weather, and a hard road of it, the wind varying between S.S.E. and S.S.W. Great numbers of them are here every day, and are used with all imaginable civilities by everybody, and they are kind to others, and have everything they want as cheap as our own people. The Admiral has accepted his Majesty's present of certain French wines that were prize here. They met a Dutch ship laden with piece goods outward bound, the last time they went to sea. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 85.]
Oct. 8.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to James Hickes. We hear of the daily losings of our ships in the Straits, and those very considerable ones. Wind S., blowing hard. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Oct. 8.
Plymouth.
List of ships arrived sent by Capt. Lanyon. Wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Oct. 8.
Barnstaple.
William Wakeman to James Hickes. Yesterday arrived at Ilfordcombe the Torrington Merchant from Newfoundland with train oil and passengers. They separated last Thursday from a merchant vessel also from Newfoundland, where they fished without any interruption. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Oct. 8. Thomas Lewis to the Navy Commissioners. Giving the state of the victualling account of Robert Dumpter, formerly purser of the Expedition. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 329, No. 98.]
[Oct.] 8.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the same. We received yours of the 5th at our going down to Sheerness to pay certain men turned over from the Rainbow and the Henry to the Warspite and Yarmouth, which we have done. The Algier came into Sheerness, having lost her mainmast, and wanting other repairs. We hope she will sail Thursday. The wind continuing S.S.W. and S.W., and blowing so hard we could not get up to Chatham the ships of least draught of water which we intended. We thought it convenient to order the men of the St. George and Unicorn to be brought up to Chatham and paid off, leaving only the ordinary and the boat's crew of twelve for assisting the ordinary to clear the house (hawse), and doing other necessaries, and when wind and weather permit we shall give them our best assistance to transport them to their moorings within the Medway and the Nore. The survey of the fireships came to hand late last night, but was so imperfect that we could not send it till we had discoursed those that surveyed them, but we shall send it up tomorrow for the Surveyor, who is the proper judge. As for the lists of the soldiers, we shall send those already come to hand. Several sent were imperfect, which we have returned with orders for their amendment. The five men committed by us to prison we take no notice who set up the whipping post, but complaint being made to us by the master shipwright of a mutiny in the yard, and having laid it before his Royal Highness and yourselves, we dare not act further in it without his order or your positive directions. The bill of imprest for board wages is come and the money paid by Sir T. Osborne, and the men paid to their satisfaction. We received the rolls you mention of the sick and wounded, and wish we had the rest, otherwise the service will be much prejudiced. As the yachts were not to be had, we used the tenders of the three flagships for transporting the soldiers and seamen. Forty men apiece were in our judgment sufficient for the Elizabeth and Essex ketches, if employed as men-of-war. [2½ pages. Dated 8 Sept., but noted as read 10 Oct., which must be the right month. Ibid. No. 99.]
Oct. 8.
The Warspite, Sheerness.
Capt. Robert Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. The weather has been very violent and has put us back, yet we are ready for provisions and think of going forth in two or three days. As to the vessel to accompany us we shall leave it to his Royal Highness. Better pilots than formerly would do well, but I thank you for your care of them. I request you to order the passing of the enclosed bill, that the imprest bill may be taken out, and to direct that a bill may be found in the office for about 900 dollars paid to the purser of the Greenwich for short allowance money. It is signed and entered, and Mr. Pointer ought to know what it is, but I cannot procure it. Little is doing here without a captain. I request that clothes be sent for our men. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 100.]
Oct. 8.
The Hampshire, Portsmouth.
Capt. Richard Griffith to the same. You had an order from the Prince for a ketch for pressing men in the River for the Hampshire and bringing them to Portsmouth. You ordered me to put my pressed men in the Tower, and promised me a ketch for their passage. Notwithstanding the negligence of those in the Tower, who have let above 60 run away, I have still 20 at London, and 40 watermen are ordered me, which, with what my lieutenant can press by the way, will be enough to bring me to Spithead, and there I will quickly find so many more as to man the ship. If you will not allow me some vessel with some small arms for their defence I shall lose most of those at London, and not half the watermen will come down as they did not for the Jersey, and I shall be here without men to secure the ship at Spithead. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Oct. 8. Anne Timbrell to Commissioner Tippetts. My brother Greenaway died this morning under and in whose name I worked in my employment. My humble request is that it be not now disposed of from me, as there is due to me from the Navy Office above 1,600l., besides the great loss I sustained. [Ibid. No. 102.]
Oct. 8.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to [the Earl of Arlington]. I acknowledge yours of 28 Sept. and 1 Oct., and return you many thanks for your assurance that my endeavours to serve his Majesty here are so well accepted by him. Mr. Solicitor is preparing the letters of resignation of the Presidency of Connaught, which shall be sent by next post. (Concerning the Nonconformists and seditious preachers in the North, printed in Camden, Vol, 1, p. 34.) I am very glad his Majesty will reserve the money for the sea regiment for the supply of emergencies here. I fear the defalcations to the farmers on account of the war will rise very high. I presume you have seen the letters to the Commissioners of the Treasury on that subject, of which we attend an answer before we can proceed. In the meantime we are dealing with the farmers to lay down some of the money they detain on account of the Customs, but I fear they have but little money, so that I much doubt we shall do very little good on them. Lord Orrery sent to me some time since concerning a pardon to some men condemned at Cork about a year ago for piracy. A letter of 24 Oct., 1671 was procured from his Majesty requiring the Lord Lieutenant to pass a pardon for two of them, Henry Jackson and John Gallagher, which Lord Orrery has sent me, but I have suspended proceedings on it, as the crimes they committed were very enormous, and I have also heard Lord Berkeley received (?) some check, because their sentence was not executed. If you will learn from Lord Berkeley what he knows concerning them, I shall execute any direction I receive about them. There is only this hardship, that they should lie above a year reprieved, and then be executed, which seems to me like exercising the rigour of the law in cold blood. The corporations here seem to be influenced with some ill stars, which make them disorderly and tumultuous in their election of magistrates. I have lately had complaints of that nature from Kinsale and Limerick, which I have offered to the Privy Council to be examined. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 7.] Enclosed,
Robert [Mossom], Bishop of Derry, to the Lord Lieutenant. Concerning his agreement with the chiefs of the Presbyterians there that they should not meet within the walls. Printed in Camden, Vol. I., p. 33. 5 Oct. Londonderry. [Ibid. No. 7i.]
Oct. 8.
Dublin.
Michael [Boyle], Archbishop of Dublin, to [Viscount Conway]. I was surprised to hear yesterday your Lordship had left Dublin, of which I had not been ignorant had I not been confined to my house for two or three days by a little distemper. The enclosed will give you an account of most of the news in our Gazettes. It is likewise written that Lord Henry Howard's son is to marry Charlotte, the Duchess of Cleveland's daughter, and that it shall shortly be consummated: that Don Carlos is to have the command of the Queen's Guards, now commanded by Sir Philip Howard, and that his Majesty is to give him 10,000l. for that employment; that his Royal Highness' marriage with Clauda Felice, daughter and heir to the Archduchess of Innsbruck, is gone on so far, that it lacks nothing for completion but the approbation of his Majesty and the Queen of Spain, of which the last is daily expected; that the Emperor buys her principality of her, and, with what the Duke of Florence, her uncle, and the King of Spain, her cousin german, will add to her portion, she is like to bring with her a considerable sum; that the Earl of Peterborough is gone to fetch her with an ambassador from his Majesty; that there is little assurance of a hasty treaty with Holland, though all believe there will certainly be one this winter, and that it is privately whispered his Majesty intends to let his Customs to farm again. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 8.]
Oct. 8.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. I acknowledge yours of the 24th and 28th, which came yesterday with three packets from England. The weather still continues very stormy on our coasts, and since the news of the loss of one of the ships that carried Lord Power's regiment, we have heard of other shipwrecks, and were told this morning of a merchantman cast away in this bay. Lady Essex is on the mend, and that is all, but her kinswoman, Mrs. Hammon, is dead, and is to be buried at Christchurch tonight privately. The Treasury Commissioners here build on Lord Ranelagh's paying your 100l. in England. I have passed the order through all the offices, and have it by me till I hear from you. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 9.]
Oct. 8.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to the Earl of Arlington. In Mr. Richards' letter of the 1st came a King's letter, granting your Lordship the estate of Lord Baltinglass, lately deceased. Whoever put your Lordship on this business was either very ignorant of Lord Baltinglass' case or designed it as a mere compliment, for neither he nor his brother that was lord before him had 100l. a year clear these 20 years past, and that was on account of mortgages and other estate that they might bequeath as they pleased, and I am told the last lord made his kinsman, Mr. Denny, his heir, who about a month ago is gone to take possession of what little is left. To be certain I have examined the records of the late Court of Claims, and find the case to be set out in the enclosed, so that I see no title in the King to anything except the honour, which is extinct in him. However I delivered the letter to the Lord Lieutenant, who promised that nothing should be done to your prejudice till we found whether it was worth your pains or not, which it is not in my opinion though you had a good title to it, for the concern is very small, and much entangled, and it lies in three provinces, Connaught, Munster, and Leinster. Lord Ossory's late promotion to the Garter is received and talked of with much joy by the generality of all sorts here. Other news given in his letter to Williamson. Postscript. Lord Arran designs for England in about ten days hence. I hope you received my late bill for 400l. [2 pages. Ibid No. 10.] Enclosed.
Particulars of the lands claimed by Thomas Viscount Baltinglass, as heir and executor of his father, Sir Thomas Roper, having been adjudged an innocent Protestant in the late Court of Claims. The said Lord Baltinglass died two years ago, leaving as his heirRoper, an ensign in a foot company, who died last July or August, making Mr. Denny, brother of Sir Arthur Denny, his heir. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 10i.]
Oct. 8. Viscount Ranelagh to Viscount Conway at Dublin. I have received yours of the 28th. I have not been idle in looking after your affair of Charlemont, for some time ago I spoke both to the King and Lord Arlington. He told me he would be the readiest man in the world to serve you. I answered the thing desired concerned the King's service and not you. He advised me for form's sake to draw up a petition in your name, and thereupon he would move the King, which I did, and the order on it is, that a letter be written to the Lord Lieutenant to inquire into the condition of the place, and so to issue a commission to yourself and others to make leases, with such qualifications as his Excellency shall think necessary. I thought to have sent you this a week ago, but the hurry of the Newmarket journey has delayed it, but that over, which I hope will be in seven or eight days, you shall have it dispatched, and in all your commands I will be most faithful and punctual. We have long expected a letter from his Excellency and the Council concerning the pretended defalcations of the farmers. Till it comes, we cannot properly move in the affair. However I have been with your brother [-in-law] and my good friend, Mr. Attorney, who seem to be of opinion that the words "foreign war" were designedly left out. But there is a clause in the very demise of the Customs which [he supposes] will reasonably entitle them to a defalcation. But his positive [opinion] he reserves, till the Lords Commissioners call upon him first, which they [are unable to] do, till the receipt of your letter. In the meantime we [consider the] detainer both unwarranted and unreasonable. I am very glad that my Lord Lieutenant has some intention of employing me in looking after your public concerns here. I much desire it, not out of any design of an advantage to myself, but it would please me to be trusted by one that I have so great an ambition to serve. On the receipt of the petition you sent me [I waited upon] Lord Clifford, who promised me he will befriend this particular, but an order cannot, I am afraid, be got till his Majesty's return, Lord Shaftesbury being amongst the rest gone away, but you may be sure it will be done as desired. And the [rein let] me offer it to you [wheth]er it would not be convenient to m[ake out] an estimate there of wh[at quanti]ties of sugar and tobacco and other commodities from the West Indies are ordinarily consumed in a year in Ireland, and how many ships are commonly employed in bringing them, and therefore we may peradventure prevail that the same grace which is like to be shown to your petitioner may be yearly allowed to such a number of ships, they paying, besides the ordinary custom of Ireland, what the duties would amount to here, and the money arising thereby may be applied for building a citadel at Dublin. Pray consider of this, and let me have your opinion, as also a direction from the Lord Lieutenant to stir in it. The fewer the number of ships, the easier the request will be, and therefore let none but great vessels be employed, which may carry as much as many little ones. We have no news, only we expect to hear every hour of some engagement between the French and the Imperialists. Some of Spragg's ships are come in, and the King has promised to bestow most of the doggers taken for setting up the fishing [of] Ireland. This I solicit with great earnestness. [Conway Papers. Damaged. 2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 11.]
Oct. 9.
Euston Hall.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. Yours of the 8th just arrived. Mr. Bridgeman is at Newmarket to acquaint the King with the news, so you had better order your packet so that he may open it going by that place. If the King keeps in the same mind, he will be here Saturday to pass Sunday. Then we shall know how long our stay here is like to be. I hope this leisure will give you time to finish the French treaty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 89.]
Oct. 9.
Windsor.
Dr. Gregory Hascard to Williamson. Thanking him for his trouble in consulting his friends about the settlement of Lady Rachel's money and informing him that in accordance with his advice he has given into her possession all her bonds, that there might be no obstruction on his part. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 90.]
Oct. 9.
Coventry.
Ralph Hope to Williamson. Yesterday came here Lord Power's regiment. One of more gallant fellows we have not seen. They stayed here to-day, and set forward to-morrow morning for Daventry. As the town has been courteous to them, few or none taking anything for their quarters, but treating them with all imaginable respect, so have they so obliged all by their civil carriage and demeanour that we seem unwilling to part with them. Though at their first coming some private houses seemed to scruple their reception according to Act of Parliament, which prohibits their quartering in private houses, which somewhat disgusted the officers, they have since found so much kindness as to expiate that neglect. Yesterday according to custom were elected our Mayor for the ensuing year, Mr. Thomas Bewley, a plumber, a very honest and sober man, the sheriffs and the other officers. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Oct. 9.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. No news of the London fleet, since it left this river. The winds have been since altogether at S. and E. with some storms. A free English Swede of this town coming in ten days a northerly course from the Sound, met nothing but a Scotch privateer, who pillaged him and his men, a bad but common complaint of Swedes, Danes, and other allies, coming to this port. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Oct. 9.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wind S.S.W. We are now plentifully supplied with coals, 20 sail being now delivering, and hope that by convoys we shall begin again to trade safely. [Ibid. No. 93.]
Oct. 9.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. No ships have come in or gone out since my last, nor do we hear of any privateers in this bay. The Deptford ketch is in harbour to convoy our ships for Newcastle, which may be ready in three or four days. The weather the last three or four days very stormy. Wind yesterday S. and by E. and S., to-day S. and S. and by W. and S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Oct. 9.
Yarmouth.
Sir Thomas Medowes to Williamson. On behalf of the bearer, John Spendlove, a person of great loyalty and conformity to the Church, whose father was and whose brother is a clergyman and minister of that place, who desires to be entertained into his Majesty's Guards, or into any other place you may judge him capable of. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Oct. 9.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. There are now anchored between two and three hundred laden colliers bound for the River but detained by contrary winds. The Dunkirk, York, Newcastle, and about a dozen more frigates are here. In our haven is a dogger taken by the Newcastle, a caper of 8 guns and about 90 men, so handsome and fit for his Majesty's service it is a pity she should be otherwise employed. Four doggers and a scoote are brought in here and put in our custody, all vessels on the fishing trade. Last Saturday came here five companies belonging to Col. Fitzgerald, who came himself the next day. Recommending John Spendlove mentioned in the last letter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 96.]
Oct. 9.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. To-day Capt. Ball with his prize went out of this bay for the River. Here are a dogger and a buss, prizes, which must continue here till the wind changes, which is at present S. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Oct. 9.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in the Geometry, a French man-of-war of 14 guns, from St. Malo, which has been cruising in the Channel, but gives no account of Dutch capers on this coast. There came in with him a French merchantman of 18 guns of St. Malo, bound for Morlaix and thence for Cadiz. They say the King is continually raising more men. The James of Penryn from Morlaix says so much rain has fallen that all about Brittany have had a very bad harvest, much of the corn sprouting on the ground, they not being able to save it. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Oct. 9.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News same as in the last. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Oct. 9.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. We are paying off the St. George to-day, and intend to pay off the Unicorn to-morrow, though the ships still continue at Sheerhess. We have continued on each of them a boat's crew of 11 or 12 men to help the ordinary in clearing the hawse and drying the sails, and to help to secure them in case of bad weather. Let us have your directions how they must be paid, the ship being paid off by book, whether by bill or otherwise. Several of the men of the Mary Rose, Success, Holmes, and Foresight are here, who were of the Straits fleet, whose books are not yet come to us. Pray let them be dispatched as speedily as possible, for several men that are paid are staying here for want of the books, who clamour on us daily. We enclose the original survey of the fireships at Sheerness and the Buoy of the Nore, and shall leave it to the Surveyor to report to you which are the most convenient to ride abroad this stormy weather. Last Monday we sent up the Leopard and a flyboat called the Prize, both fireships, to Woolwich, with orders to their commanders on their arrival to attend you for orders. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 103.] Enclosed,
Two copies of the said survey and list of the men-of-war in the Swale. [Ibid. No. 103i.-iii.]
Oct. 9.
The Newcastle, Yarmouth Roads.
Capt. John Pearce to the Navy Commissioners. I am safely arrived here with 33 sail under my convoy and shall with all speed, wind and weather permitting, hasten with them to the Thames. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Oct. 10. Extract from the Register of the Court of Admiralty of the proceedings that day in Elizabeth Greene alias Birstall, relict of Edmond Greene, late captain of the Mary Bonadventure, v. the City and Senate of Hamburg. The judge having assessed her costs at 50l., and the order of the 26 March, 1672 (calendared in Calendar, S.P. Dom., 1671–1672, p. 237), having been read, the judge required Mr. Francklin, the proctor, to intimate to his principals, the public Ministers of Hamburg, that if they did not cause the said 1,789l. to be paid into the Court of Admiralty, and also give security for interest and costs before the 17th instant, he, the judge, would certify to his Majesty that letters of reprisal and marque might issue to the said Elizabeth Greene against Hamburg, if she, after the said day, for default of bringing the said sum of 1,789l. into Court and giving such security, shall petition him for such a certificate. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 100.]
Oct. 10.
Whitehall.
The Commissioners for Prizes to Lord Arlington. Requesting him to move his Majesty that the doggers, herring busses and nets taken by Sir E. Spragg, and any that may thereafter be taken, be reserved for the use of the public fishery, as they will not yield much if sold. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Oct. 10.
Noon. Newmarket.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. Acknowledging two letters of his, the latter accompanied by a packet for Lord Arlington and a bill to be signed. Yesterday Mr. Bernard Howard lost a horse match of 225l., and this morning all the Cheshire men are undone by a foot match of one of that county against a servant of the Duke of Buckingham, the latter remaining conqueror. [Ibid. No. 102.]
Oct. 10. Richard Duckett to Williamson. Giving an account of his brother's health, who is rather better than worse, and ventured on Tuesday to Cockermouth in Sir Wilfrid Lawson's coach, but the great dread is he will end in a consumption. The weather has been so unseasonable there was no looking out of doors. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Oct. 10.
Mogan (Mawgan), near Helston.
Thomas Sheppard to Williamson. Last Midsummer a sinecure at Ermington, near Modbury, in Devon, became void by the death of Mr. Rous, said to have been presented by Cromwell. I am informed the donation belongs to his Majesty, but one Rovel or Rule, who was a most severe persecutor and sequestrator of the King's party in Oliver's time, and gained much of their means by an unjust usurpation, last month presented his son, who was inducted by the Bishop. My request is to know whether that presentation may be made null, and the donation from his Majesty by the mediation of yourself, my Lord of Worcester, and Dr. Lamplugh may be obtained for me. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Oct. 10.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. We hear the late storms have done much damage to the laden fleet, and the winds continuing S. and S. and by E. hinder about 100 sail now in harbour from going out. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Oct. 10.
10 P.M. Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. The Duke and Duchess of Lauderdale, Lord Athes (Atholl), and the Lord of Duningale are come to Sir Hugh Cholmley's, and stay till next Monday. 30 of the best horse in Whitby met his Grace three miles from the town and waited on him to his lodging. This has been the only fair day for three weeks or more, but now it blows hard S.W. Pray send this letter to Lord Fauconberg, for I fear my letters miscarry. I hear the Customs are likely to be farmed if not so already. Pray if so, let me know by whom in your next. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 106.]
Oct. 10.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. This evening came in the Crown, which has been cruising. They left Sir E. Spragg with nine or ten frigates at anchor off Alford (Orford), the rest of the squadron being cruising and separated from him. The Crown was ordered by Sir Edward to chase a caper that appeared at night, but they missed her the next morning. The following Wednesday, the 2nd, they had so violent a storm that they had never seen the like, for without sail it forced the frigate's side and gunwale under water. They have two companies on board, which they took up at sea, belonging to laden colliers that foundered. They retook two more ships which had been taken by capers, one of which foundered afterwards, but they saved all the men. It is feared there is great loss in the fleet, which passed us, convoyed by the Dover. The Crown is not all damaged. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Oct. 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last night our other packetboat, that came out with the former and was stopped by a privateer for six hours off Orford, arrived. They received no prejudice by him but the loss of half a cwt. of quinces, which I had sent for for my wife. Yesterday died on board a passenger that came sick out of the Briell, Mr. Ralph Trevor, whose residence was in Dordrecht, said to have been related to Mr. Secretary Trevor. Care is taken for his decent burial. Mr. Reeves was a prisoner in the Hague about ten days ago. The occasion is said to be some miscarriage concerning seamen. I find from the Briell by letter that the Grave of Nassau was made Governor of the Briell, which was lately reinforced by many horse and some trained bands for fear of the English landing there, which, after putting them to great charge, all returned home except 200 horse, who are still at Oost Vooren, a village near, and are for some time to keep guard on the strand. The 14th (N.S.), several seamen were paid off at Helvoetsluis. Six English prizes lie there, reported to have come from the Caribbees. On the contrary, they say the English have taken one dogger boat belonging to Maesland Sluis, and six belonging to Zerickzee, with three capers belonging to Zealand. The Dutch ships, which lately lay before the Maes, are called in, supposing now the English will not land this year. Some of our Dutch Huffs say the French will not be able to keep much of their new conquests during the winter for want of provisions, and also report that they have plundered Worden, and left it to the inhabitants, but the truth of it is much questioned. What I complained of to Col. Whitley often proves true between the postmistresses of this road and the postmasters. Our letters were expected between 5 and 6 yesterday afternoon, but I did not receive mine till 10 this morning. Among them I had an order from the Navy Commissioners to discharge the ketch Sir Charles took up, but I could not do so, for I had also orders from Mr. Werden to send off a letter to a man-of-war in the Gunfleet, and I had no other to dispatch it by. About 30 light colliers went into the Rolling Grounds yesterday, and sailed to-day for Newcastle without convoy. They are an unruly generation. Since noon the third packet-boat came in, but brought no news except the enclosed Gazette. If his Majesty stays long at Newmarket, you may contrive sending the foreign letters thither without going about by London. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 108.]
Oct. 10.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The French fleet continues at St. Helen's Road, and now they are victualling their ships with fresh provisions to be ready for the next good wind. Wind W.S.W., weather indifferent good. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Oct. 10.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. No news. Weather stormy. Wind S.S.E. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Oct. 10.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. Desiring their advice as soon as possible as to the following particulars. 1. Part of the Henry's men being turned over to the Resolution, whether they must be paid off by the Henry's books, and so of all the rest turned over formerly from the great ships into Sir E. Spragg's division, and the ships paid and to be paid. 2. Whether several ships, being presently to go to sea and wanting men, may be supplied out of the great ships, before they come up to Chatham, and whether such turnovers may be paid on the ships to which they are turned over before the great ships are paid. 3. Whether tickets belonging to any part of the Straits fleet in the hands of seamen now bound forth in the ships ordered to sea are to be paid, when the ships to which they now belong are not ordered for payment, and also desiring some more sea books and tickets to be sent, those previously sent having only supplied the ships there before the arrival of Sir E. Spragg. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 105.]
Oct. 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. I could not observe your commands about the Mary and Hannah ketch to-day, because I received orders by this post from Secretary Werden to send a letter to Capt. Pile of the hired ship William and Thomas, at the Buoy of the Gunfleet, and to use my care in sending it. This ketch was the only vessel I had here except the Fanfan, which is now in all haste with this appearance of fair weather with four days' provisions only making out with the four ships under her convoy, but intends to return as soon as she has seen them into the River. On her return I will give the master notice of your pleasure, and I have done so to Sir C. Lyttelton, that he may not be surprised, because the orders concerning the ketch came to him from Lord Arlington. We lie here very naked without some vessels; three or four this winter will be few enough. The Fanfan, built in a manner for these sands, may, if you please, do more service here than anywhere else. [Ibid, No. 106.]
Oct. 10.
The Jersey, in the Downs.
Capt. Luke Walsh to the Navy Commissioners. As his letter of the 30th has not reached them, enclosing a list of the watermen that were on board the Jersey, and of those who had deserted, adding that he would use all imaginable care to man his ship, but no ships appearing but those he formerly offered, has given him cause for application, and begging that such of the watermen as may be found may be sent him. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 107.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 107i.]
Oct. 10.
The Downs.
Capt. Richard Le Neve to the same. According to your orders I have spoken to my men that have tickets about assigning their wages to their friends. They all seem very much dissatisfied, most of them saying they have no friends near London, and that if they are not paid on board they shall reap but little benefit for their service. I have sent you up the Welcome's tickets and request you would take care the poor men be paid aboard, for they are in great want of clothes, and some of their wives and children want bread. The Duke promised both to me and the men they should be certainly paid on board. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Oct. 10.
Navy Office.
Certificate by Commissioner Deane that the bearer, William Symonds, now Master of the Dolphin prize, is qualified as a pilot for any part of the Thames, and also as boatswain for any of his Majesty's ships. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Oct. [10.]/20.
Leghorn.
Sir T. Clutterbuck to Sir J. B. Duteil. I have laden on the St. Joseph 1,000 pieces of eight, and given the captain an additional credit for 3,000 more, and if he meet with a greater number of slaves than can be purchased with this money and credit, I have ordered him to take up what sums may be requisite and to pass his bills on me for the same. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Oct. 11.
Suffolk Street.
Sir Philip Howard to Williamson. Requesting an order that the bearer, Margaret Bowes, lately in his service, be put into St. Bartholomew's Hospital, having been seized with a lameness in one of her arms. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 111.]
Oct. 11.
Euston Hall.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. I forgot to tell you or Lord Clifford in my last, how cold a letter the King had received from the Prince of Orange, not one word to the point. Therefore the King has nothing to do but provide himself as well as he can for the war next year, unless the auxiliary troops meet with some blow, or the invasion of the Turk prospers so as to call home the Emperor's. The King will be here to-morrow. They say he purposes that day sennight to return to London. I thank you for buying me a second strong box. Pray let them both be put up in flannel first, in a tin box next, and next a cere cloth carefully put over, and be sent to Lord Sunderland, to whom I write to present them in my name to M. de Louvoy and M. de Pompone. If no occasion offer sooner, Lord Sunderland may carry them when he goes. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 112.]
Oct. 11.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. Yesterday sailed northward about 40 light colliers, and to-day were seen four or five leagues off at sea about four of his Majesty's frigates. Wind S. and by W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 113.]
Oct. 11. Major N. Darell to Williamson. Sir E. Spragg's squadron are almost all come up to the Buoy of the Nore. Seven frigates and two fireships under Capt. Robinson are to go for Gottenburg. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Oct. 11.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. We hear to-day from Weymouth that the Happy Return has taken one of the capers the Dragon fought with near Torbay. [Ibid. No. 115.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 115 i.]
Oct. 11.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. We have not yet heard of Capt. Shales or several other pursers whose books we want. We have as yet had no answer to our inquiry whether the men left on board the St. George and Unicorn should be paid by bill or otherwise. The survey of the fireships we sent last Wednesday. According to your directions we shall pay off the Lenox yacht, as soon as her commander brings in the books. To-day, there being little wind at S.W., we have towed up the French Ruby from Bishopness to the moorings at Upnor Castle. The Old James, Charles, and Victory we have cadged and towed up to Bishopness to take the first opportunity to bring them to their moorings at Chatham. We got the St. Michael up near O[a]k[h]amness to be ready likewise, and shall use all diligence for their getting up to their moorings in order to lessen the charge. We again entreat you to dispatch as speedily as possible the books of the Mary Rose, Success, and Falcon for paying the men that were in them in the Straits. The several men turned over into the ships under Capt. Robinson's command at Sheerness have got away since they had their pay. Sir J. Smyth observing it, has ordered them to the Buoy of the Nore, which Capt. Robinson approved of. The want of ironbound casks is so great a hindrance that we cannot victual the ships till that be aboard. The time of year spends fast for them to go to that country, and, if they get not away this light moon, it may be of great prejudice to the service. We have orders for victualling several fireships out of provisions of the great ships that are to be laid up, but much of the beer proves stinking and the bread very bad, and several quantities of pork very bad and stinking. We have given orders for surveying it, that it may not be thrown on the King. There are several men turned over into the Falcon that were in the Welcome in Jamaica, very stout seamen and the greatest objects of pity that can be, to see such good men ready to starve, and complaining that their families go starving in the streets. Between 30 and 40 of them go into the fleet with Capt. Robinson, so we beg you to move the Lords of the Treasury for some speedy remedy for them. We got the Triumph's books at 8 tonight, and will put them out of pay, though we work till midnight. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 111.]
Oct. 11.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin to the Navy Commissioners. The Edgar and Montague being ordered to be paid off, we shall want books and tickets, if their pursers have not had them in London. We have paid off the Rainbow, Henry, St. George, and Unicorn, and hope to get the Triumph's books to put her out of pay to-morrow, she being got up as far as Upnor Castle. We are afraid we shall lose this spring for the great ships, the wind holding S.W., and blowing hard so that the pilots will not venture to unmoor them. We hope to get up the French Ruby. She came up part of the way but grounding lost her tide, but yesterday got off and rides in deep water. Pray advise his Royal Highness not to send more ships in here than can be refitted by next March, many shaken ships being here that will take longer repairing than we can yet judge. As Mr. Pett informs me, the Henry for one proves so bad that he reckons already two springs after this will be little enough to put her out of dock. He desires that the lacquer demanded be hastened down, and instruments to lay it on, and that diligence may be used for clearing the double dock next spring. Sir J. Smyth is gone to Sheerness to pay off men turned out of the Unicorn into the Yarmouth and her short allowances, and to hasten victualling Capt. Robinson's division. Other matter as in the last letter. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 112.]
Oct. 11.
The Warspite, Sheerness.
Capt. Robert Robinson to the same. We have been ready for provisions these six days, which came to-day. We are taking them in as fast as we can. I advise that we and the rest go to the Nore, where the men are kept safe, and provisions are got on board with more dispatch, and that able pilots may be provided, if possible, some belonging to those places. The Monck, Mary Rose, and Katharine fireship yet want orders for provisions. The time of year, and this light moon coming on call for expedition. I request that brandy and vinegar be allowed, and 200l. for contingencies. The Monck is now at the Nore ready for provisions, and wants only a cable. I request that the two third-rates be allowed a spare cable apiece, and that one of the prize doggers may attend us instead of a ketch. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Oct. 12.
9 P.M. Euston Hall.
W. Bridgeman to Williamson. My Lord commands me to send you the enclosed, to be transmitted immediately to the Lord Keeper. The substance of it is that if the Irish commission be not passed the Great Seal, the King would have the Duke of Ormonde's name put on. I had yours of yesterday this morning by express, but could not acknowledge it by the post because of my coming here, where the King also arrived this morning and intends to stay till Monday night. He has resolved to change the quarters of the regiment of dragoons, but I do not yet hear where. Meanwhile they are ordered to Bury and on Monday to be drawn near this. With postlabel showing the date of its passing through the various post towns on the way. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 116.]
Oct. 12. Thomas Bland to [Williamson]. in Sir Thomas Clutterbuck, plaintiff, v. John Canham and Slaughter Lee, defts., the plaintiff took out a commission to examine witnesses at Leghorn. Application has been made to the Grand Duke of Tuscany for his direction to the Governor of Leghorn to permit and assist the Commissioners in the execution of the commission, but denied, alleging that it was usual to have a letter written to the Governor by the Lord Keeper to permit and assist the Commissioners—a thing not known to have been required before. The Lord Keeper directs that Lord Arlington should be attended with it, it being matter of state. Sir Thomas wrote to his lordship and acquainted him with the business. I will attend you on Monday. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 117.]
Oct. 12.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The Kent frigate has sent in a small laden collier, retaken after being 14 hours in the enemy's possession. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Oct. 12.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. By some vessels of this arrived the 10th, convoyed by the Golden Phœnix, we understand that at their coming without the sands off Yarmouth they saw a great fleet riding there, which we conceive was that bound hence for London. Last night was brought in the Hercules of Yarmouth, a laden collier from Newcastle, taken by a Dutch caper of 8 guns on the 3rd, and retaken next day by the Crown. To-day we shall take the examinations of the men, and of four Dutch prisoners on board. I enclose this from the Sub-Commissioners to the Lords Commissioners and desire to have their resolutions about the prisoners as soon as possible. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Oct. 12.
Boston.
El. Jackson for Col. Butler to Williamson. Wind S.S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Oct. 12.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I hear the two ships which lay at the lower end of the Gunfleet sailed thence yesterday morning, which lays us very open here. Notwithstanding them the small picaroons would come near them to show themselves, and, if pursued, would betake themselves over the sands, where the others dared not follow. Thursday evening a small Dutch privateer lay frisking up and down about the Wellet and before Walton on the Naze. Whether she got any purchase or no we cannot tell. This morning a very great fleet of colliers from Newcastle are passing by for the River. 'Tis said that of all the number lately there not above four were left behind. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Oct. 12.
Weymouth.
Nath. Osborne to James Hickes. The French ship I wrote of last Monday was one of about 38 guns, commanded by Capt. de la Barre, homeward bound for St. Martin's. She went hence Thursday morning, the wind coming S.E. A small vessel of our town, bound for Bordeaux, went with her. She promised to take care of another, and of one of Lyme here, bound also thither, but they could not get out of the harbour in time. Thursday night, wind S.E., went our Virginia ships and others with the Adventure towards Plymouth, only the Topsham men that came so long since from St. Malo could not get out to go with them. The Morning Star, which went with the Adventure, came back yesterday to Portland Road, I suppose to convoy the Topsham vessels. The Happy Return, which came here, as was supposed, to convoy ours and the Lyme ships to St. Malo and Morlaix, went back again Thursday to the Isle of Wight. The captain pretended he had some ships there to convoy westward which did not follow him hither, and so he went to look after them. He offered to convoy over our ships for St. Malo and Morlaix, but would have them go with him first to Plymouth, which they refused. The captain is blamed here and at Lyme for it, and at Lyme for pressing two men out of a Lyme ship that came with him from the Isle of Wight, bound directly for Virginia, and not clearing them when he had pressed 60 out of the Poole Newfoundland ships, and had thereby supernumeraries, and could well have spared them, and not let that ship, which brought 800l. to the Customs last year, go so rawly manned for this voyage. The Comte d'Estrées was yesterday afternoon in the offing off Portland, homeward bound. A small French man of war, belonging to them, came last night into Portland Road and is gone again. None or very few of the Newfoundland ships can brag of a good voyage. Many have made miserable ones, not making 40s. a share. Wind S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 122.]
Oct. 12.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to James Hickes. About 3 yesterday afternoon a fleet of about 20 sail was south of this, most of them great ships, making westward, the wind then something west of south. The wind being easterly the night before we supposed it might be the French squadron homeward bound. Wind is now and has long continued S. W. I desire the constancy of my Gazettes, which have of late failed coming. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Oct. 12.
Newmarket.
Grant of the remainder of the Dukedom of Cleveland to the Earl of Euston, after the decease without heirs male of their bodies of the Earl of Southampton and Lord George Palmer. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 196.]
Oct. 12.
Newmarket.
Grant in reversion to Wm. Bridgeman after Sir Robert Henley, in trust for the Earl of Arlington, the Earl of Euston and his lady, of the office of Chief Clerk or Prothonotary of the King's Bench. Minute. [Ibid.]
Oct. 12.
The Savoy.
Col. Bullen Reymes to the Navy Commissioners. My long and tedious illness and present great weakness with Sir W. D'Oyley's and Mr. Evelyn's being much in the country have prevented our constant meeting as formerly, and so your receiving all our answers at once to yours of 19 Sept. However the enclosed are the lists and copies of our books of all the ships sent on shore in my district at Godsport (Gosport) and adjacent places since the beginning of the war to last Michaelmas. Finding my deputy has not subscribed his name to them, I have supplied his room, being assured they are a true transcript of our ledger, and you may depend upon the contents, and so you have all my concern at once, receiving no returns from any other part of any other set on shore there, or of any slops or necessaries furnished in this. But as for your alphabetting, we have it not in our instructions, so we suppose it is not in yours to require us, nor is it possible to be done without neglecting some more material thing for the service. For who in the meantime shall quarter sick and wounded when they come in, sometimes by hundreds, day and night? Who shall transcribe our foul books into the ledger? Who shall pay quarters when there is money? Who shall enter tickets and discharges? Who shall give passes? Who shall make inquiries after runaways? Who shall pacify mutinies, which is not seldom with me, where there is so great a want of money? Who have we to do all this and much more but one poor deputy, and he without a clerk, or we without allowance for one? Besides the thing required is more than is possible in the time appointed. It is true that the last war I, in my district, and I only, having little to do, and being then on the place in person in the time of the Plague, did with my own hand make you the return in that form, but I found the labour so Herculean, and so little thanks for it, that I must beg your pardon for the future, unless there may be some allowance to some to do it, or your clerks prove more kind than they have been on my own concern. Moreover had you complied with our request by causing the pursers and stewards of each ship to insert in the certificate sent on shore the number in which each man stood entered in the sea-book, as Mr. Pearse likewise desired, what you now desire had been done ready to hand, a column being left for the purpose in the printed certificate. If you will furnish us with money, you may have what you will from us, but without it we cannot serve you as we would, nor keep off sudden clamours from his Majesty's ears. [1½ page. S.P., Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 114.]
Oct. 12. Sir W. Warren to the Navy Commissioners. According to your letter I ordered the St. Jacob, in order to go to Portsmouth with her lading of masts, to come from Yarmouth to the Buoy of the Nore, where I presume she is by this time. I desire you to order her convoy thence as soon as you can, and also to order the officers of the yard at Portsmouth to dispatch her without loss of time, for if she lose time we must pay the master so much a day. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Oct. 12.
Bristol.
John Hickes to the same. I enclose a list making up 724 pressed men I have sent to Portsmouth with a note of my whole disbursements, but the pressmasters expect something for their extraordinary pains, which I leave to you. Many after receiving their press money, before the pressmasters could bring them to me to receive their conduct money, ran away, which advanced the charge of the press money. I desire that the bills I charged you with may be returned to me that they may not lie in the Exchequer against me hereafter. The balance due to me is 107l. 16s. 8d., which I desire you to return, with what you think fit for their extraordinary pains. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Oct. 12.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. I thank you for your dispatch of Mr. Brenn's letter. He has not yet called for it, but I will place the fees to account. The Lord Lieutenant's letter for Mr. Fitzgerald to be of the Council was enclosed in mine of the 28th to Lord Arlington, but he might have got to Euston before it came to him, which may be the reason you received it not. I am sorry I do not hear of your receiving your 100l. from Lord Ranelagh, for the Treasury Commissioners here depend on his payment of it there, having agreed to answer his bill for so much. The Lord Lieutenant has kept his chamber these three or four days, being somewhat distempered by a cold. Sir H. Ford desired me to thank you for your kindness to him, and has sent the letter which was wanting in some concerns of his. The wind is still mighty high and uncertain hereabouts, which is now the only thing hindering my setting forward to London. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 12.]
Oct. 12. Sir William Davys to Williamson. Your sudden departure from Court a little before I left it, deprived me not only of paying you my acknowledgments for your many favours there, but of your advice in the management of the residue of that concern you so generously countenanced. However I assured myself that the close of that matter, favoured in its inception by your good opinion, could not easily miscarry, nor was I frustrated, for after many days of grace and favour given by the Lord Lieutenant and Council to my adversaries it appeared that I was abused and unjustly turned out of my employment, and, thereupon, I was by their Lordships' order restored. [Ibid. No. 13.]
[Oct. ?] John Roche Fitz-Patrick, and Patrick Roche Fitz-Philip, to the King. Petition, stating that the town and lands therein named (being those mentioned in the next letter), with several houses &c., in and near Kinsale, late in the possession of Philip Roche Fitz-Richard deceased, belong of right to the lawful heirs of the said Richard Roche or to the petitioner John Roche, as well in right of his father as of his uncle Philip deceased, who by his will and other acts, left them to the petitioner, and thereby rendered a former feoffment by him to Robert Meagh and his children invalid; that Patrick Roche and the petitioner by advice permitted the said Robert Meagh, without opposition, to recover the premises at the late Court of Claims and to have a decree accordingly, the said Robert having first perfected a bond for 5,000l. sterling to make no use of anything obtained by virtue of his decree to the prejudice of the right title or interest of the said petitioner or of John Roche to the premises, but that the same should be as valid as before the decree and that he would give to the said John and Patrick Roche the award of Sir Nicholas Plunkett and John Baggott; that the said Robert Meagh or his children without any manner of right are now labouring to procure a grant of the premises so decreed to him and therefore praying that no letters or grant of the premises, or any part thereof, be given to any person till the said John and Patrick Roche be heard, or, if the said decree be confirmed, that there be in the grant a proviso saving the right title and interest of the petitioners or of any claiming under them. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 14.]
Oct. 12.
Newmarket.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas it appears by the decree of the Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement, dated 10 Oct., 1663, that Philip Roche being seised in fee of two houses near the old Market place or Cross of Kinsale, of the plow lands therein named in the baronies of Kinsale and Kerrycurrihy co. Cork, and of other lands therein described near Kinsale, by deed of 16 Nov., 1643, settled the same on himself in tail male, with remainder to Robert Meade for life, with remainder to the heirs male of his body by Margaret his wife, sister and heir apparent to the said Philip Roche with remainders over, and the said Roche being dead without heirs male of his body, it was decreed by the said Commissioners that the said Roche was all his life, and till his death, an innocent Papist, and that the said Meade was also an innocent Papist, and he was, therefore, by the said decree, adjudged to be restored to the said premises to hold to him and to the heirs male of his body by the said Margaret, and whereas the said estate by the death of the said Robert Meade is descended to Richard Meade as heir male of the body of the said Robert Meade by the said Margaret, who has by his petition prayed, in regard the said Robert Meade died before he passed any letters patent on his said decree, and that he himself being only tenant in tail of the said premises cannot dispose of the same, in consideration of the services to the late King and ourselves of the said Robert Meade and Philip Roche, a grant and confirmation to himself and the heirs male of the body of the said Robert Meade by the said Margaret of all the said premises, and also a grant to him in fee simple of the reversion thereof at the present rents and services:—directing letters patent to be passed containing a grant and confirmation as prayed by the said petition. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 332.]
Oct. 13.
Euston Hall.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. Mr. Bridgeman tells me he has acknowledged your last but one of the 12th with an account of the Flanders letters. The Duke dining here to-day told me how dissatisfied he was with the delay of the merchants' ships expecting convoy to the Straits. It is now more than a month ago since their petition for it was carried to the fleet, and the convoy presently promised. After that at the debate at my lodgings a day was pitched upon, viz., the 10th, which is now past, and yet his Royal Highness says not one of their ships is ready in the Downs. He hears instead the merchants are formalising on the strength of the convoy, the youth of the commanders, &c., which displeases him. He would have you go the first day on the Exchange to reprove them for their delay, as well as dissatisfaction at their convoy. He promises himself to be in London Wednesday night, the King at the end of the week. Postscript by W. Bridgeman, that Lord Arlington desires Williamson would take care of the enclosed, being for the Prince of Orange. [2¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II., 316, No. 124.]
Oct. 13.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning our seamen spied a ship aground at the back of the Goodwin. About 10 hookers and lesser boats went off and brought her into the Downs this afternoon. She is a Hamburger for Cadiz, a new ship, and in the last storms lost her company, some of which are now in the Downs. Her damage is inconsiderable. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 125.]
Oct. 13.
Portsmouth.
Sir P. Honywood to Williamson. I formerly acquainted you that I offered M. d'Estrées the prize wines here for beverage, which he had accepted. Monday morning he sent his victuallers ashore for them and other provisions he bought here, and I was serviceable to him in everything, but the weather proved so bad that no boats could get on board till Wednesday night. Thursday morning the wind was something easterly, so he immediately weighed, and stood out to sea, and left many of his provisions behind, both wines and others which he had contracted for. He had but six tuns of beverage wines. It was all on the quay to be shipped but they would not stay to take it. By night they were out of sight. I have not heard from them since. The wind has been S. ever since, but the weather fair. Please inform the Lords Commissioners that the Count had but 6 tuns of the wines. I hope they will dispose of the rest suddenly. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Oct. 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. News 'of the departure of the French fleet, as in the last. They left two victualling ships behind, which were not ready to sail, and which are still at Spithead. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Oct. 13.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Nothing has presented here since my last. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Oct. 13.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. We do not hear of the Straits books you mention in yours of yesterday belonging to the Mary Rose, Success, Holmes, and Foresight. Today we have got up to Upnor Castle the Royal Katharine, Victory, and Old James, to the Sovereign moorings at Gillingham the Charles and Montague. The Prince is above the Mussel Bank, and the St. Michael and Edgar are at the lower part of it. This has been done with extraordinary care and pains against the pilots' judgment by warping, towing and cadging, but they are all well, and what we can't do to-morrow we must leave to the next spring. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 117.]
Oct. 13.
Chatham.
Phineas Pett to the same. The sheathing of the Henrietta and Lyon is at a stand for want of lacquer, which I am informed was sent into Deptford stores some days ago to be sent hither. 18 cwt. of nails will likewise be wanted for the lead sheathing, it being advisable to drive them somewhat thicker than formerly, and two dozen large round brushes for laying the lacquer, all which I desire may be hastened hither with all possible speed. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Oct. 13.
The Warspite, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Capt. Robert Robinson to the same. We anchored here safely, and ordered the rest of the ships to follow, and they would do well to do it, for I fear an easterly wind, and there they cannot keep men on board. Most of our provisions and all our stores are in, but pray consider of the particulars I advised for as my other voyage. I beg I may have one day at London. It's of great concernment to me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 119.]
Oct. 13.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Richard Griffith to the Navy Commissioners. The Hampshire is ready to sail. I desire you to order me some men out of the Gloucester, while she is refitting, to carry us to Spithead, where I will use my utmost diligence to get men. Unless you order me a ketch or small vessel to bring down the watermen and other pressed men, I shall expect very few of them, and when the Gloucester comes out and has her men again, I may be forced to go in again for want of men to secure the ship at Spithead. If you will allow a vessel for the purpose and afterwards to go to Poole to press out of the Newfoundland men there, I hope to be manned shortly. [Ibid. No. 120.]
[Oct. ?] Clara Bolton, widow, and Dame Clara Wood, wife of Sir Edward Wood, to the King. Petition praying for direction to the Lords of the Treasury for the Petitioners' relief, a pension of 200l. a year, granted to the said Clara Bolton, being 1,000l. in arrear, in consequence of differences between her and the said Sir Edward Wood, which have long been composed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 129.] Annexed,
Oct. 14. Certificate by Sir Robert Long that the arrears to Michaelmas last, 1672, of the said pension amount to 1,000l. [Ibid. No. 129 i.]
Oct. 14. Certificate by John Willoughby, Mayor, that the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of Northampton had that day unanimously chosen James, Earl of Northampton, as their Recorder. With seal of the Corporation. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Oct. 14.
Burlington.
Surgeon J. Knight to Williamson at Newmarket. Friday afternoon the Crown came into this road. Saturday 40 light colliers, mostly great ships, were chased in here by three Dutch men-ofwar, of 22, 14, and 10 guns each, but the Crown luckily secured them all, several shots having been made by the enemy to no purpose. The wind being southerly, he is gone with them to the Bar. I am returning towards you to-day, leaving things here in as good condition as want of moneys will allow. With note by Hickes that this came the 21st in the Bury bag. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Oct. 14.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. The sum of the depositions of the Dutch prisoners taken on board the Yarmouth collier is that they belonged to the Maria Virgin Mother, of Amsterdam, of 6 guns and about 80 tons, set forth thence with a commission from the Prince of Orange. She sailed from the Vly, 27 Sept. O.S., and on the 3rd, off the Dogger Bank, met with three colliers, beating there through stress of weather, and took them all that afternoon. The next day, chase being given by the Crown to the caper and his prizes, he escaped with one of them for Holland, and the other two were retaken that morning by the frigate within ten leagues of the Brill. One foundered afterwards with fourteen of the frigate's men, which was unable through storm to come to their relief. The other was the vessel brought in here, the Hercules of Yarmouth. The master and two of his company were put on board the caper and carried into Holland. At the retaking of the Hercules, eight Dutchmen on board were taken prisoners, four of whom are brought in here by eight of the Crown's men, the others being kept on board the frigate, having with them the copy of the caper's commission. The Hercules having, after her retaking, beaten many days at sea, and being through hard weather very leaky, they were forced to heave overboard several chaldrons of coals, and making for the first English port they could, arrived in Humber the 10th, and next day came into Hull Road, whence she was brought last night into this haven, and with the Dutch prisoners secured by the Sub-Commissioners till further orders from the Principal Commissioners of Prizes. The Crown herself is also driven in through weather into Bridlington Bay, whence, being foul, she intends for the Buoy of the Nore. Our merchants hear from Holland that a Flanders billander, that sailed hence lately with butter and lead is brought to Horn, and thence condemned and made prize of. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 132.]
Oct. 14.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. Last week arrived the Phoenix convoying our London fleet, which are all safely in harbour. We do not hear of late of any privateers on this coast. News of the Crown and her prize to the same effect as the last. [Ibid. No. 133.]
Oct. 14.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. This bay is clear of any enemy. The Deptford ketch is to-day gone down this channel to convoy about 30 ships bound for London from this, Wisbech, and Boston as far as Yarmouth Roads. Then she returns to convoy our ships northward. Wind these three days S., S. and by E., and S.S.E. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Oct. 14.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Yesterday a Dutch caper fell among our fishery to the northward of this, and took five or six, plundered them of some clothes, and set them free. This evening a ketch of this town, taken and carried into Holland some time ago, and bought by the owners, arrived here. The master confirms the news of the defeat of the Prince of Orange with the loss of 4,000 men. The best of his men were lost, and the people were in great fear of their country being lost. We miss four colliers of this town, that came out of Newcastle with the laden fleet, and now have news that three were carried into Holland and one sunk. A buss, a prize, is brought into Aldeburgh, besides the dogger mentioned in the last Gazette. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Oct. 14.
Southwold.
John Wickens to James Hickes. No Dutch capers have been lately on this coast, it being well guarded by our men-of-war. Some of our fisher-boats, that came in yesterday, say they saw some of the enemy, but we hear of no hurt. The fleet of colliers I wrote were put back by contrary winds to Yarmouth Roads, is passed southward. Last Friday came into this bay a Swedish vessel with an ambassador on board. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 136.]
Oct. 14.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. Yesterday sailed by the laden colliers, about 200 sail. Wind S. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Oct. 14.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to James Hickes. Yesterday afternoon came in a small vessel of this town from Croisic. She left that about five weeks ago with others with Capt. de la Barre, but being leaky put into Port Louis. Coming thence last Saturday, nine leagues S.W. of the Start, he was taken by a Flushinger of 10 guns and 90 men, which had also taken a vessel of Dieppe from Newfoundland, having 35,000 wet fish and 35 men, which fished at Canada. As the master came on board the caper one of the men told him that, as there were so many Frenchmen, and they had but little provisions, the captain would offer him the sale of his vessel, and told him to refuse to buy. The captain accordingly offered to sell him his vessel for 40l., 30l., 20l., and to take his own bond, and showed him a bond to sign, but the master, being forewarned, refused, saying she was old. Whereupon the captain, after his company had plundered all the brandy and other things besides the salt, gave the master his vessel, on condition that he should put 24 of the Frenchmen ashore in England, which accordingly he did. The other nine he kept. The master of the Frenchman is one of those put ashore. The man-of-war had been out three weeks and had taken only these two. The Happy Return came into Portland Road last night to convoy the Topsham men so long here. With her came two ships of our town from Portsmouth, one a prize bought by Col. Strangwayes. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Oct. 14.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. No news. Wind S.S.E. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Oct. 14.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Tuesday came in two French vessels from St. Malo, bound for Morlaix, one a small frigate belonging to the Marquis Carjohn's squadron, the other a merchantman, and on Friday a French man-of-war from Brest, but last from Weymouth, of 40 guns, commanded by Capt. de la Barre. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Oct. 14.
Chatham.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Fletcher, the carver, desires you would imprest him some money to enable him to carry on the carved works of the Henrietta and Lyon, which are very considerable, and also those of other ships which are also very great, he having considerable sums still due to him for the Royal Prince and other ships. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 121.]
Oct. 14.
Weymouth.
George Pley, sen., to the same. I hope by this time the officers at Portsmouth have, according to your order, surveyed the sailcloth and cordage so long in dispute, and have given you their opinion. I desire that it may for this time be received on such moderate abatements as you shall think fit, that I may at last see an end of the business. A bolt of sailcloth was lately delivered into the office by Mr. John Knight. I desire you will peruse it, and that, if approved of, it may be appointed a pattern to serve in a quantity at Portsmouth. The pattern of hemp sailcloth I have delivered to some of the workmen, to try if they can make a price to answer it, but I suppose any quantity cannot be made this year, because hemp has generally failed in all these parts. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 122.]
Oct. 15.
Custom Houses London.
Sir Richard Temple, Sir William Thomson, Francis Millington and John Upton to —. With regard to the letter to us from the three waiters of your port craving an allowance of 8l. per annum for riding charges, Curson, as we are informed, has frequently absented himself and deserves little consideration. As to Curwen and Hodgson, if one shall settle at Busted Hill, and the other at Babing Bush, we shall think of adding 5l. each to their salaries. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 141.]
Oct. 15. Dr. Fell to [Williamson]. Last Saturday several of the Stationers' Company came here, and yesterday produced to us a paper empowering them to treat and conclude concerning the privilege of the University. The Principal and myself told them we were but part of those concerned, and could not determine anything without your notice and consent and Sir Leoline's. Mr. Mearn then assured us he had waited on you before he left London, and that you told him you had left the disposal of the affair to us. We replied we were not to be so rude or so unjust to you as to proceed on such a verbal commission; if they pleased, we would hear their proposals, and signify our opinion on them, with the caution it should be only our opinion, and only be so far valid, as it was ratified by you and Sir Leoline. This being admitted, the first debate was, whether they would treat about the Bible and Grammars, or that which was immediately their own, but it appearing they were empowered only by the Company, and not by the King's printers or Mr. Norton, and, it being evident that, if they dealt for the Grammars, Mr. Norton would be utterly undone, the Company's agents desired to be heard in their particular concern. After a long debate they offered us 120l. for their privilege part, 30l. advance on their former rent. We demanded 180l., and are to meet again at noon to-day, when, if they come up to 150l., we shall not be unwilling to close with them, provided the terms be approved by you and Sir Leoline. Their very Almanacs are worth more than that sum, but the avoiding trouble is a valuable consideration to us, especially since whatever disquiet we meet with will extend to you. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 142.]
Oct. 15.
Dovenby.
John Sadler to Williamson. I cannot express my thankfulness for your noble favour towards Dovenby School, though Mr. Thomas Lamplugh's unworthiness at present impedes, and may in time totally divert that clear demonstration of your bounty. The 6l. due 25 March last not being paid, I demanded it from Mr. Lamplugh's father and brother John. The old gentleman said he had nothing to do with it, the other told me it being his brother's concern I should address myself to him, which I knew would be fruitless. The millstone quarry will give about 4l. 10s. per annum, but no rent will be payable before Lady Day next, and then this year's 6l. is clearly lost. If you would order what course should be taken, Mr. Williamson himself, if health permit, or some gentleman of the parish would take care in it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 143.]
[Oct. ?] Abstract of the case between Mr. Bulstrode and Mr. John Dawtrey. Mr. Bulstrode having obtained a grant from the Bishop of Chichester of two-thirds of a pew in Petworth Church, where he had dwelt almost four years, repaired it by order of the incumbent. Though Mr. Dawtrey had given his consent, yet 20th Sept. last, he broke down the pew in Mr. Bulstrode's presence, who gave him not an ill word, but showed him the Bishop's grant. He replied he cared not, but would down with it as often as it should be repaired. But Mr. Bulstrode set it up again, which he beat down again next day, and abused Mr. Bulstrode, his wife and relations, by scurrilous and infamous libels all over the town, calling him coward everywhere and saying he dared not fight. The 23rd he sent Mr. Bulstrode a very abusive letter, on which some letters passed between them, and on Monday, 30 Sept., they met and fought. Mr. Bulstrode received seven wounds, and knows not how many Mr. Dawtrey had, but he is since dead. Mr. Bulstrode more than once refused to fight longer with him, but the other swore to kill him before he stirred, so they were forced to fight again, and Mr. Bulstrode let him take up his sword when he had dropped it, and at the last pass disarmed him, but did him no harm, but left him walking home. Mr. Bulstrode was always one that never sought a quarrel, and can produce testimony of his behaviour under the hands of almost the whole parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster, where he dwelt several years. Mr. Dawtrey was ever given to quarrelling and debauchery, having attempted to kill his own mother, for which he was committed to prison by the Earl of Northumberland, and since threatened to kill his own brother. Mr. Bulstrode's estate is only by his wife. Her jointure of 100l. per annum after her death goes to her daughter by her former husband. [Nearly 3 pages. Ibid. No. 144.] Probably annexed,
Oct. 15. Certificate by Drs. William Outram and Robert Twisse and 36 other inhabitants of St. Margaret's, Westminster, of the good and peaceable life and conversation of Mr. Bulstrode. [Ibid. No. 144.]
[Oct. ?] The true state of Mr. Henry Bulstrode's case concerning the death of Mr. John Dawtrey. Statement to the effect of the above "abstract of the case," but adding that whereas his Majesty has been graciously pleased to promise the Earl of Castlehaven that nothing should be done to Mr. Bulstrode's prejudice, and that he would give to the said Earl all that might be forfeited to him, it is prayed that no other grant may pass thereof, but that this may stand as a caveat. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Oct. 15.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. Two days ago came in about 30 light colliers, which had been in great danger had they not met the Crown in Bridlington Bay accidentally, three capers being then in view off Flamborough Head. Wind S., blowing hard. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 146.]
Oct. 15.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to James Hickes. Yesterday six great vessels were seen off the Tees, supposed to be part of Sir E. Spragg's squadron, driven northwards by the many southerly winds which still continue. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Oct. 15.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Friday morning we spied near Flamborough Head three Dutch capers of 12, 16, and 24 guns each. A Yarmouth dogger coming from the Iceland fishing, seeing them with English colours out and taking them to be colliers, came towards them. When he came within reach they put out Dutch colours and fired a gun at him, and sent their boats off, and took what fish they liked from him, and all the best of their clothes, but spying about 35 light colliers from the southward, they released the dogger, expecting a better purchase, and made what sail they could to cut them off. The Crown, then anchored in this bay, loosed to meet them, and the dogger coming under his stern, let him know what they were, and that they told him they saw one of our frigates in the bay and would fight him if he came up with them. They fired several times after the colliers, several of which returned the fire, and got close in shore, all safely under the Crown's stern, she making what sail she could to come up with the capers, who, seeing they could do no good, tacked and stood back northward, the Crown still trying to come up with them, but having the wind and night fast coming on they stood off to sea. Next morning we saw the fleet with the Crown standing northward. Saturday a vessel came out of the sea and stood close under the Head, but spying a billander coming from the South, she stood to and spoke to him; and with the English jack and colours out tried to cut off a Scarborough ketch from the South that stood for our pier, but the fort firing against him he stood off to sea. Yesterday we spied the same caper plying too and again off the Head. Wind now S. The master of the dogger says he came over the Dogger Bank but saw not a vessel, nor indeed any in all his passage from Iceland. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 148.]
Oct. 15.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. The wind is S., which makes our colliers hasten again to sea for one more voyage before they lie up for the winter. The privateers took on this coast three colliers lately, but two were retaken by a frigate cruising on the coast, which pursued the privateer out of sight. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Oct. 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I gave last Saturday an account of the coal fleet sailing by us. On Sunday we saw about 100 more, and yesterday some judged as many were seen again, and with them four men-of-war, believed to be convoys. It is reported that yesterday sennight about 300 great and small were in Yarmouth Roads. A boat that came yesterday from Aldeburgh, met but with two or three straggling colliers, one a great ship, and reports that the Adventure was seen at sea last Sunday plying up and down. Our packet-boat came in this morning, but is very barren of news. My letter from my friend at the Briell says the Prince of Orange lost 3,000 of his best men at Woerden, and though the place itself is inconsiderable, it is of great consequence, if it can be taken, to prevent the French making any further attempt in the frost, for which 6,000 men are gone from Amsterdam, 2,000 from Leyden, and a good number from Haarlem and other places, to join the Orange forces to make a second attempt, and all the force is called from the Briell except about 300 men, besides burghers, to assist them. About Wednesday next they intend to make the assault. Admiral De Ruyter is going to join, having, some say, 10,000 marines. It is reported Capt. Fletcher, of the French Victory, goes for England in this packet-boat. The master of our packet-boat saw yesterday a brave great collier taken on our coasts, carrying away by a picaroon for Holland. The latter part of yours of the 12th took wet, so that neither Capt. Langley nor I could make anything of it. I expect your further orders if the enclosed serves not. We could not order the oysters this week, but hope to do it the next. Capt. Langley has sent up his account himself. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 150.]
Oct. 15.
The America.
Receipt by Roger Paxton, for a packet of letters received from Richard Sladden, Master of the Deal packet-boat, directed to Col. Lovelace, Governor of New York. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Oct. 15.
Dover.
John Carlile to [Williamson]. I received a packet to-day from Mr. Jan Jansen from Sluys, directed to Sir John Frederick for Mr. Herne, who says in his to me that the Spanish Plate fleet is arrived at Cadiz, and hints that the Prince of Orange is worsted before Worden. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Oct. 15.
Dartmouth.
W[illiam] H[urt] to James Hickes. Yesterdav the French fleet sailed out of Torbay, wind S.S.E., plying westward. We saw many of them about 4 or 5 in the afternoon off this harbour, but the wind not overblowing, and they plying all the night, we judge they weathered the Start, and got to Plymouth Sound, except two which put back into Torbay, the wind continuing a point or two E. of S. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Oct. 15.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 154.] Enclosed.
The said list. [Ibid. No. 154i.]
Oct. 15. Post label of a packet dispatched from Euston on that day by W. Bridgeman. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Oct. 15. Walter White to the Navy Commissioners. Beseeching them to have his tickets for not above six months' pay in the Dover and Resolution, in which he served as midshipman, examined, listed, and assigned for speedy payment among other wounded and maimed men's tickets, having been discharged 3 July last, by reason of his wounds in the last engagement, having lost his right leg and the use of one arm, and now lying in St. Bartholomew's under care in a very necessitous condition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 123.]
Oct. 15. Capt. John Kelsey to the Navy Commissioners. The Rachel [..]reship, under my command, has received all her provisions except bread, of which I have none, though I have often solicited the victuallers' instrument. Being ready to sail I request you to direct the victuallers to supply it speedily. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Oct. 15. Seth Thurston and Edward Robinson to the same. Stating what was required by their ketches, the Essex and Elizabeth, now fitting as men-of-war. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Oct. 15.
The Guinea, Yarmouth Roads.
Capt. Thomas Trafford to the same. As he has but ten days' victuals left, desiring to know what place they will assign him to, and what he is to take in, and requesting that the ship may be cleaned, as she is very foul. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Oct. 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. According to your commands on his return after the delivery of the letter to Capt. Pile in the Gunfleet, I showed Mr. Foxe your order for the discharge of the Mary and Hannah ketch on the 11th instant, and he is hastening up for London. Lieut. Temple went hence in his pinnace last Saturday, and yesterday came in a pinnace of the Dunkirk with 8 or 9 men from Yarmouth in quest of that frigate. They lacked quarters and provisions, but I could not help them, having not received your orders in Lieut. Temple's similar case. Now about noon she is also gone hence. The same day also came in a ketch, a tender with mainmast broken and boltsprit gone. I had no conveniences to refurnish her, nor can I hear of any here or at Ipswich. Most of last Thursday afternoon a small picaroon lay about the Wellet, shifting up and down betwixt that and before Walton in the Naze. Six men of the Princess are also here, who brought in a Dutch buss prize. I know not what to do with them, nor can they tell which way to get to their ship again. As to the latter part of your letter concerning the care for our security I with all readiness submit to my superiors, and if it be not thought fit to send any of the small vessels hither to be always ready to send off with orders, I have no other convenience. Other news as in his other letter of the same date. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Oct. 15.
The Phœnix, in the Downs.
Capt. Edward Russell to the same. Requesting an order to Mr. Mitchell (St. Michel) to deliver him an anchor of 18 cwt., which lies ashore, in lieu of one of 15 cwt. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Oct. 15.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Richard Griffith to the same. Requesting an order to Mr. Steventon for payment of conduct money to the watermen and others pressed for the Hampshire. [Ibid. No. 129.]
Oct. 15. Capt. George Cannynge to Thomas Edwards. Requesting the delivery of 90 blank tickets to Mr. Curtis. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Oct. 15.
London.
Capt. William Beeston to W. Hewer. Requesting the delivery to Peter Southerne of 100 tickets. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Oct. 15. Capt. J. Perriman to W. Hewer. The Rachel and Ann and Christopher want orders to Woolwich for supplies of carpenter's and boatswain's stores for the Straits voyage. An order is required for taking off the provisions on board the Employment, as without one the victualler refuses to receive them. The victuallers have sent a lighter to receive the remainder of her provisions from the Fame watership. The seamen being all paid off there are no hands to heave it out. I desire what way to get it out. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 132.]
Oct. 15.
Kinsale.
Extract in the hand of one of Williamson's clerks from a letter. This instant a post is come to me out of Kerry giving notice of a Dutch privateer of about 9 guns beat in there by the late storms and riding in Ventry harbour, but they have seized their boat and six of the men, being all Dutch, and have committed them to prison. She rides there with our colours and jack. I have sent this letter with one from myself to Capt. Ashby, commander of the Pearl, that rides at this harbour's mouth, waiting for a wind to carry him out, and have earnestly desired him to hasten to Ventry with all possible speed, in hopes of overtaking the caper. I know he will do so, for he is a diligent man, and besides his Majesty's bounty to the seamen in these cases will further prompt him. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 15.]
Oct. 16. List of prisoners for judgment at the gaol delivery for London and Middlesex held that day. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 156.]
Oct. 16.
London.
Sir John Banckes to Williamson. Enclosing several letters and duplicates over Flanders, the last of the 10–20th current, and also a note of what he has paid in Holland to 18 August, amounting to 23l. 10s. If war continue, Monsieur Timeus will be your right man. Mr. Hallis is also come over; his expense note is enclosed, on which is coming to him 35l. 14s. 3d. He says he laid out 7l. more, of which he kept no particulars. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Oct. 16.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. News of the colliers attacked by the three Holland privateers at Bridlington, but saved by the Crown, as in Aslaby's letter of the 15th calendared ante p. 51. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Oct. 16.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Yesterday was brought in here by the Emsworth, as prize, the Griffin of Stockholm. The master complained to me of the hindrance of his voyage, and informed me he had some things on board for Lord Arlington. I immediately went down and locked up her hatches, and put a man on board to prevent embezzlement, and then went to the captain of the Emsworth, who had taken all the master's papers, which I required of him according to our instructions, that if she be suspected a prize, we may the better secure her condemnation, but instead of delivering them he would have kicked the master out of the room, though he was satisfied the vessel was free by some gentlemen he got to interpret the papers. We finally found Capt. Guy, who was willing to release her, if we would do the same, so I got her discharged this afternoon, and she will take the first opportunity of a wind. To-day arrived from Rotterdam the master of one of the vessels taken out of the loaden fleet of colliers, who saw two of them retaken by one of our frigates. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 159.]
Oct. 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. It is reported that the Duke of Lorraine has entered his late lost territories with a considerable army, and has retaken much of his Dukedom from the French, and that the French King marched out of Paris about 14 days ago towards Lorraine, and that all the soldiery, as far as Boulogne in Picardy, were marching after him. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Oct. 16.
Weymouth.
N[athaniel] O[sborne] to James Hickes. Yesterday two Frenchmen came into Portland Road, one for Rouen, the other for Newhaven (Havre). The Happy Return is yet here, the wind being S., not having been good to carry her and the Topsham vessels to their port. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Oct. 16.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 12th came in the Elizabeth of Penryn, who sailed five or six days ago for Bordeaux, and got as far as Ushant, but was chased in again by a Dutch caper. The 15th came in the Lesina of and from Bilboa for Topsham. The master says about four days before they sailed two English vessels were brought in there by a Dutch caper, one a Topsham man, the other of Plymouth, both from Newfoundland, carried into St. Sebastian. Several other prizes are there, both English and French, but no ones dares to sell either ships or goods. There is a report here that the Spanish Plate fleet being safely arrived, the Queen Regent has ordered that all the effects of the English shall be seized, but the vessel from Bilboa cannot speak of any such thing. [Ibid. No. 162.]
Oct. 16.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. All the news is given in the last. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Oct. 16. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from the 10th to the 15th, all previously calendared. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 164.]
Oct. 16.
Victualling Office, London.
Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child, and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. The Rachel's bread went down in the same hoy as that for the Ann and Christopher, and each was expressed severally in the bill of lading. Notwithstanding, the captain of the Ann and Christopher must have it all, of which the captain of the Rachel was informed on Monday, and we suppose he has taken out his portion by this time. We have as yet had no notice of the readiness of the Moncke, nor of where she is. As soon as we hear, she shall be immediately dispatched. Our agent below writes as if he had orders from Sir J. Smyth to victual her, but we expect to hear every tide what is done therein. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 133.]
Oct. 16. Thomas Lewsley to the same. Reporting the condition of 30 elms at Wickham, Kent, belonging to Squire Leonard, and also the price asked for them. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Oct. 16.
Yarmouth Roads.
Capt. T. Guy to the Navy Commissioners. Of our squadron the Constant Warwick is in pretty good condition, has about a month's victual, and will convoy the West country fishers to Brighthelmstone and Hastings; the Guinea is in good condition, but has but ten days' victuals; the Holmes is so leaky that she keeps two pumps constantly going and cannot keep the sea, she being the only clean ship among us; the Portland has barely ten days' provisions, is much weather beaten and foul enough, for she was graved about 23 months ago, and last February washed and tallowed two-thirds at Deptford, and at this time she is barnacled; the Drake has damnified her rudder head, and has now kept the sea so long she must be sent for to have her rudder fixed. Pray let care be taken to call us in or send us victuals, for we are all much out of repair. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 135.]
Oct. 16.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to [the Earl of Arlington]. My present indisposition not permitting me to use my own hand, and having newly received information of an estate tail determined for want of issue, the reversion being in the Crown, I give your Lordship this early notice of it that you may secure it for yourself, before any other ask for it. It is above 200l. a year, and was enjoyed by Richard Ashe, merchant, of Dublin, who died three days ago. It consists of houses in this city and at the Nesse (Naas) in Kildare. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 16.]
Oct. 16.
Dublin.
William Croftes to the Earl of Arlington. Requesting him to recommend him to the Lord Lieutenant for the first company vacant in the regiment of Guards. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Oct. 17. List of the prisoners in the Tower, viz., Richard Kingston, Edward Purcell, Sir T. Modyford, Christian Ruthen, William Howard, Francis Witherborne and John Waltendonck. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 165.]
Oct. 17.
Newmarket.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. Returning the enclosed bill signed. The King will be in town on Saturday, but Lord Arlington not before next Tuesday. Postscript. As I was going to seal this I received yours of yesterday, and Mr. Hamilton not being in town I opened Mademoiselle Querouelle's letter to him, and delivered the enclosed to the King. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Oct. 17. Dr. Fell to Williamson. I now give you my promised account of our treaty with the Stationers. After we came to some terms about the raising of rent, the Stationers started an objection that this might prove an ill precedent, if hereafter they should treat with the University, and therefore offered to buy the books we had already printed, at such a rate as to advance such a present sum as might satisfy us, and add only 10l. per annum to the accustomed rent. This we had no reason to refuse, being concerned to avoid the envy of having more money paid us for our bargain than we pay the University, for our masters here are so kind as to overlook our having laid out above 1,500l. already in our trade, and would clamour at the least advantage we take to reimburse ourselves, and, besides, I think it no harm at any time to prefer ready money to a distant payment. The Stationers, for shortening trouble, desire to have the terms engrossed before they go home, and that we would seal a counterpart as a scroll to be valid only by your approbation and concurrence, without which we neither would nor could do anything. Mr. Norton is likewise here, whom, I presume, we shall return back to you not displeased. The Bible interest we are likely to retain. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 167.]
Oct. 17.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. Last Monday the Duke of Lauderdale, his Duchess, the Earl of Atholl, the Earl of Kinghorn and the Duke's brother, Lord Halton, left this and lay that night at Ma[l]ton and at York, Tuesday. About 10 Monday morning appeared 10 sail near this, four of which were the Antelope, Guernsey, and two more frigates, which left Hamburg the previous Tuesday, convoying six merchantmen. To-day came in sight three vessels, which we hope are some of those appointed to guard the North coasts. We do not hear of any of the Dutch on these coasts, but we fear we have lost by the storm 15 days ago divers of our vessels. Our fears will increase unless this post brings news of them. One master of this town is come home, who lost his vessel, and he fears divers of his neighbours are lost. The post we expect comes to-morrow night, which left London last Tuesday. No good news came by last Saturday's. Our post now comes but once a week. We have no trade at all at present. [Ibid. No. 168.]
Oct. 17.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Holland capers appear before this every day. A hoy chased four or five vessels into Humber, and took one of them. A small frigate is now passing northward, which we take to be a caper, and we hear of four northward of Flamborough Head, which we suppose are the three formerly there and another. The Crown went down to Newcastle with the light colliers. Wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Oct. 17.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday morning was heard here from the sea much shooting, and some say it resembled broadsides. I have once more taken care by a letter for oysters for you next week. [Ibid. No. 170.]
Oct. 17.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Thomas Payne at the Letter Office. As to your desiring me to come to London, it cannot be expected, as I was there so lately, nor am I very well, or willing to spend money for every needless occasion. I am shamefully abused by being kept out of my money so long, and being plundered under the Dutch protection. I have now found the names of the owners of the caper that did me damage, and have Mr. John Payne's promise to see me satisfied, but, if not, it is no reason that I should bear the injuries of all the Dutch capers. I wish the printed passes were fixed, else we shall have more disputes. I am weary of needless journeys and charges, and will rather lay my vessels by than lose daily as I do. If you intend me to continue the employment, make even, else I will have no more to say in the business, nor do I believe myself concerned to any, but Mr. Ellis and his successors, whose warrant I have for my salary. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Thursday.
[Oct. 17.]
Major N. Darell to Williamson. Begging him not to think of any excuses unless he were so much at leisure as he is, and then the honour of his visit shall be most welcome. The Buoy of the Nore affords no news but what Sir E. Spragg will have told him before this reaches him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 172.]
Oct. 17.
Portsmouth.
Charles Collier for Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Roebuck remains at Spithead, and yesterday came there a French privateer carrying between 30 and 40 guns, bringing with her a galliot hoy, a prize. Both have sailed eastward to-day. The Gloucester is now on the careen, and the Hampshire is to go to Spithead to-day, and the Tiger will follow shortly. The Rupert is in dock, and may be fitted to go out thence in a month. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Oct. 17.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. No news. Wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 174.]
Oct. 17.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. The enclosed from his Royal Highness came this morning, and, being in no way capacitated to comply with his commands, we recommend them to your care to be paid by bill or otherwise. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 136.]
Oct. 17.
Chatham.
The same to the same. Sir J. Smyth intends to go down tomorrow for giving the ships that go with Capt. Robinson all possible dispatch. He is of opinion that whole-bound cask may serve for their ground tier in such a cold country as they are designed for, being but for three months, but fears much of the beer is in quarter casks, having observed it in the victuallers sent to Sheerness. Just now we were brought by a hackney coachman the books of the Mary Rose, Success, and Falcon, but know not where they have been since they came from the Navy Office. The Eagle fireship is come into Sheerness, we have ordered her to be surveyed. We hear she wants most of her standing rigging. All the ships are got up very well, only the Sovereign rides between O[a]k[h]am Ness and Bishop's Ness in a very good berth, and the London is passed all danger and come up into Gillingham reach. We are still daily troubled with the complaints of the poor men that were in the Welcome. We shall endeavour to get others out of the ships that are to be paid off, and will order their tickets to be made out and they discharged from the ships that are to go to Gottenburg. We desire you to move his Royal Highness what must be done with the five mutineers we committed to prison. An order from Sir E. Spragg intimates one from his Royal Highness for commanding the Mary up to Chatham, and docking her in order for her speedy fitting out again. We intend to bring the Rainbow and Triumph into the double dock this spring, and shall reserve the single dock for the Mary. The captains of the ships in the margin desire to know where they must go to be refitted, complaining their ships are not fit for sea, but especially the Dunkirk, whose captain says the old work is like to part from the new, as well she may, for he has brought her twice aground. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 137.]
Oct. 17.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. The master shipwright has made very great complaint to us to-day that the lacquer and sheathing nails are not yet come aown. If they be not here within two days we must lose the spring for those two ships, and all the men in the yard must stand still. We leave you to judge what prejudice it will be to the service. For expediting this business, we have caused them to work Sabbath day and all. We suppose it better to grave them and turn them out of the dock to make way for bringing in the Old James and the Rainbow, otherwise there will be no work to set the men on. We beg you to know his Royal Highness' pleasure in this. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 138.]
Oct. 17.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett, master shipwright, to the same. Concerning the business mentioned in the last letter. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Oct. 17.
The Levant Merchant, in the Hope.
Capt. William Hobbs to the same. I have brought our ship safe to an anchor here, and understanding there are orders for me to go to sea, I desire you to procure me 30 tons of ballast, a pinnace, and two topsails. I lent the Newcastle on our voyage to Scotland 12 tuns and 2 puncheons of beer. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Oct. 17.
Harwich.
Thomas Kirke to the same. Giving the results of his survey of the new ship building there. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Oct. 17. Capt. William Humble to the same. Certifying that the bearer, Anthony Woodson, has been appointed by Chirurgeons' Hall chirurgeon of the Ann and Christopher fireship, instead of Alexander Heatly discharged from illness, and requesting them to give him bills for such things as appertain to his place. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Oct. 17.
The Roebuck, Spithead.
Capt. Richard New to the same. Informing them that the month's provisions he had received would be expended next Monday, and that he had 50 of the Gloucester's men on board by Capt. Coleman's request, he going into harbour to clean. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Oct. 17.
Dublin Castle.
Francis Godolphin to [the Earl of Arlington]. I thank your Lordship for the favour you lately did me with the Lord Keeper, though the cross winds make the success still doubtful to me. About nine days since the Lord Lieutenant found himself ill with great pains in the head, want of appetite, and restlessness, which continued with violence four or five days. The day before yesterday it seemed to change into the disease of the country, but accompanied with great trembling and violent sweating, which makes the physicians suspect it may end in a tertian ague. He is much better to-day, and we trust the worst is over. The escheat, whereof you will receive an account from his Excellency, I thought too mean for you to aim at, but, if you have these services agreeable, I may hope to be instrumental in discovering concealments to a better value, with this further prospect that, when greater turns are served, by your Lordship's favour we may procure our own privy seal to be allowed on some such fund. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 18.]
Oct. 18.
Euston Hall.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. I have just received yours of yesterday with the enclosed, which I do not return to Newmarket, imagining the King will be gone before the letters arrive. The Duchess of Cleveland goes away to-morrow, and the Ambassadors and we set out Monday morning to be at London Tuesday evening. Pray make my excuses to Lord Clifford, Secretary Coventry, and my brother Charles, for not answering their letters. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 175.]
Oct. 18. Dr. Fell to Williamson. I must take the opportunity of the return of the gentlemen employed by the Stationers' Company to present you with my services, especially since the whole effect of their journey lies with you and Sir Leoline, for we entirely remit them to your determination. What is prepared for an agreement they will show you in the counterpart of an indenture prepared for the purpose. If you approve of it, we will seal the other part, which is left here, and transmit it to you, otherwise there is nothing at all done. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Oct. 18.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The Hamburg ships convoyed by the Guernsey, bound for Hull, are put in here by southerly winds, which keep in the laden colliers, now increased to near 200 sail. [Ibid. No. 177.]
Oct. 18.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Yesterday came here Capt. John Wood, commander of the Kent, one of Sir E. Spragg's squadron, which, cruising, had the misfortune about 10 on Tuesday morning, the weather being thick, to sail on a sand called the Leoman and Ore. The captain and ten of his company got into the pinnace and were driven ashore on the Lincolnshire coast. Near 200 hundred men were left on board. The water was come into the gundeck when he left. The Mayor immediately sent an express to the Deptford ketch, supposed to be on the coast about Wells, and also to Yarmouth to Sir T. Medowes, that care may be taken for the preservation of the men and ship. Wind yesterday N.W. and N.N.W., and in the evening S.W., and to-day S. Postscript by Richard Harwicke, Bodham's servant. It is said the Kent is still firing guns for help. The Deptford ketch off Wells has been in chase of two Holland privateers, but was stopped by night coming on. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Oct. 18.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Nightingale came in yesterday with her retaken prize. [Ibid. No. 179.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 179i.]
Oct. 18. Inland advices received that day being extracts from letters from the 14th to the 17th, all previously calendared. [2¾ pages. Ibid. No. 180.]
Oct. 18.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. You desire us to take care to clean the Portland at Queenborough Swale or Chatham, and such others that come under Sir E. Spragg's command that are very foul. We are so busy here at the pay that we cannot possibly attend it, and, therefore, desire that the Surveyor or his assistant may be sent down. The master shipwright here is so employed that he must not be spared for getting the ships out of dock and bringing in those mentioned in our last. His assistant has been sick for four or five days, and Mr. Shish being come to Deptford, we have discharged the workmen he brought from Deptford and Woolwich. Sheerness is not a convenient place at this time of year for their cleaning, several ships having received much damage there. It is impossible to clean their bottoms if they are laid ashore on this west side. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 144.]
Before Oct. 19. Alterations in the grant to Lord Henry Howard [of the dignities of Earl of Norwich and Earl Marshal], describing him as descended from Thomas of Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk and Earl Marshal, son of Edward I. by Margaret, daughter of Philip, King of France. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 181.]
Before Oct. 19. Note of the dignity of Henry Lord Howard, Baron of Castle Rising, brother and heir of the Duke of Norfolk, prime Duke of England after the blood royal, and Earl of Arundel, prime Earl of England, &c. [Ibid. No. 182.]
Oct. 19. Monsieur Juste (?) to [Williamson?] I have given a genealogy of the house of Aubusson to Mr. Forbes, who should deliver it to you. I find that he who made it carries it very far back. A genealogy of such antiquity cannot be proved, because neither surnames, nor arms, nor seals were in use in the year 800. This was not practised till the year 1100 or thereabouts, so it is impossible to prove a descent absolutely before that time. Most of the ancient charters and documents are supposititious. I would have given the history of the Chancery of our kings under the first, second, and third race, if I had not found insurmountable difficulties on account of doubtful, false, or supposititious documents, on which it must have been based, most of them dated by the year of our Lord, though that did not become common till at the end of the second race. Seals in that time were not pendant but impressed. However as your Excellency is interested in genealogy, I hope you will be pleased to have that of Aubusson, which is good and ancient. [French. 2 pages. No. 183.]
Oct. 19. Sir Robert Moray to Williamson. Reminding him of what he desired him to do for their poor friend Mr. Oldenburg in his and Mr. Boyle's names, as he is going out of town that morning for three or four days. The enclosed will show how much his favour imports to the gentleman, and how much it will please Mr. Boyle. [Ibid. 316, No. 184.] Enclosed,
[Robert Boyle] to Sir Robert Moray. Being unable to wait on you to remind you that the affair of our threatened friend will grow more difficult the longer it remains undispatched, I beg you to renew your solicitations to Sir J. Williamson, who is so great a friend to the Society in general, and has been so kind to the party in particular. I rather press expedition, because the menaced person is by sickness confined to his house. Thursday [17 Oct.]. Pall Mall. Endorsed "Sept. 17, R. 19," but Sept. 17 was a Tuesday and Oct. 17 was a Thursday. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 184 i.]
Oct. 19.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. Most of the coal fleet of near 200 are got out, and I believe will not stay for the remainder. The wind is come about E., which may force them in again. [Ibid. No. 185.]
Oct. 19.
Stockton.
Samuel Hodgkin to James Hickes. To-day arrived a small Ostender, which met a Dutch privateer of 20 guns off Cromer, who said he had been in danger of striking on the sands about Yarmouth the night before, and off Humber met another of about 10 guns, and two lesser about Huntclifffoot near this, and about the open of the Tees a small fleet of loaden colliers with a strong convoy. Wind easterly, but little. [Ibid. No. 186.]
Oct. 19.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. About 9 yesterday came by this port a small privateer of 10 guns with English colours, which was taken for a English coaster, but about 2 he discovered what he was by taking a small keel belonging to the Humber, and about 4 he chased a small sloop of this port, and would have taken her but that he was becalmed, so he manned his boat with 16 or 17 men, who made up to the sloop, intending to board her. The sloop, having but two men and a boy and a passenger on board, fired two muskets and a blunderbuss at them, which caused them to forbear, but they made a second attempt, and fired at least 12 muskets, which were answered as before, which forced the boat to make to their vessel. Last night passed by about 50 colliers for London. You may put this in print. I hope our stout acts will encourage others to be as valiant as Whitby. [Ibid. No. 187.]
Oct. 19.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. The principal concern of the merchants here at present is the fitting out several ships hence for France to go to the Downs under convoy of Capt. Whiting in the Golden Phœnix, with whom a few also are bound for the Thames, all intending to sail in a day or two at furthest. The Crown is gone out from Bridlington for the Bar of Newcastle, convoying some 36 light colliers, but stopped about the Head on notice of three Holland men-of-war cruising between that and Scarborough, which chased a dogger that escaped and gave this advice. About the 12th came into Newcastle the Susan of Wells, with about 30 chaldrons of coal, having been retaken on the 4th by the Kent from a Flushing sloop of two guns and 30 men, which had taken her the day before. She was put into Newcastle by stress of weather, and is by order of the captain of the Kent to be carried to Sir E. Spragg, his Admiral, or to London. Capt. Gollop, of the John and Francis, arrived at Newcastle the 11th, having been parted from the Kent by storm, whom they left off Whitby, who intended for London with the first fair wind, with near 100 sail. [Ibid. No. 188.]
Oct. 19.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wednesday night came in here Capt. Wood of the Kent, which was the day before cast away on the Leamonore Sands. The captain, master, and nine or ten men got off in the pinnace and landed at East Eapsum, 28 miles northward of this. They left the ship full of water, her rudder off and her keel broken. The poor men were making floats with masts and planks to save their lives. He desired us to send a vessel to see if we could find them. Leaving the master behind, he posted to Lynn to get a vessel there also. The next morning tide we sent away a vessel with the master, our best pilot, and 14 seamen, and with bread, beef, and beer for the poor men, if they be found. The Mayor, myself, and four more are bound in 80l. bond to the owner to see his vessel safe in again, or else we could not have procured her, because of the danger of being taken by the Dutch privateers. We hope his Majesty will pay the 80l. if the vessel should be taken. I beg you to procure an order for sending for the pinnace to this port, whence she may be easily convoyed to the Thames or elsewhere, for she is now in no harbour, but left in the custody of Francis Whiting of Trusttrop (Trustthorpe), who demanded of me to-day 40s. for two horses he lent the captain and master, for 20 men's labour to draw the pinnace ashore, and for his charges coming hither, and for provisions for the seamen. I told him I could not pay it without an order from the Treasury. I took note of what was left with the pinnace. Wind N. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 189.]
Oct. 19.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I cannot give you any certainty of the news I gave concerning a fight at sea, but there is a report that the Leopard, off the North Foreland, engaged five or six Dutch frigates so long till she lost her masts, and yet they dared not board her. At last the Diamond, whether hearing the guns, or by chance, came to her assistance, and renewed the encounter with so much briskness that she sank two or three of them and the rest fled. This news came from Ipswich, whence we seldom hear any truth. Yesterday came in one of our packet-boats that left the Brill Tuesday, which says there are many capers out but saw none on the passage. All the skouts (schuits?), horsemen, landsmen, mariners and all are gone to make up an army to retake Utrecht, and none are left at the Brill but burghers and boys. About 20 or 30 vessels are passing out and by this port this morning for London; one is run aground by Landguard Fort. Wind N. I dictated a letter as effectually as I could, concerning your oysters next week. [Ibid. No. 190.]
Oct. 19.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday the wind coming fair, some ships sailed, and some this morning. The Plymouth and Phœnix and two more small King's ships are in the Downs, and five merchant ships, waiting for the Plymouth and Phœnix, which are bound for the Straits. Wind N., fresh. Postscript. 3 p.m. Six or eight ships are now in sight, coming about the North Foreland into the Downs. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Oct. 19.
Weymouth.
N. O[sborne] to James Hickes. The Happy Return is gone at last with the Topsham ships. The two French ships bound for the other side are yet in harbour. Wind N.E., fresh. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Oct. 19.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Last Wednesday the Earl of Roscommon and Col. Talbot arrived here. The Earl went to Neston to take shipping for Dublin, but the wind being W., took boat for Wales, and may meet Col. Talbot at Holyhead. The Norwich is in our river to convoy two ships for the Straits as far as Plymouth. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 193.]
[Oct. 19.] Reasons humbly offered [by John Cressett] for suppressing all hackney stage coaches and caravans and for inducing gentlemen to live upon their estates in the country and wear the manufactures of England and to restrain servants from wearing any other. 1. They spoil the roads, and often do mischief to travellers on horseback by forcing them into dangerous holes and ruts. 2. They spoil all the inns. 3. They occasion the fall of rents. 4. They occasion the breeding of horses to be neglected, and make men lazy and indifferent to good horsemanship. 5. They are highly prejudicial to the watermen. 6. They greatly hinder the woollen and leather manufactures. 7. They occasion many great robberies, as the travellers being shut up in coaches and caravans cannot resist as they would do on horseback. 8. They prevent the consumption of ale on the roads, thereby lessening the Excise, and by carrying multitudes of letters abate the value of the Post-office, to the prejudice of the Duke of York. With detailed demonstrations of the above reasons. [Printed paper. 4 pages. Ibid. No. 194.]
[Oct. 19?] Divers Innholders to the Parliament. Petition stating that all trade is utterly taken away by the multitude of hackney coaches in all parts of the kingdom, which prevent travelling on horseback, so that many are not only made incapable of paying taxes, but are made servile to hackney coachmen's servants, and praying that the hackney coachmen may be made to bear a like burden with others. [Ibid. No. 195.] (fn. 1)
Oct. 19.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett, master shipwright, to the Navy Commissioners. Again complaining of the lack of lacquer and sheathing nails, and requesting them to be sent by the bearer so that he may be back by the following night, or else the spring will be irretrievably lost. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 145.]
Oct. 19. Capt. Isaac Gelding to the same. Requesting a supply of victuals for the Swallow sloop, of which he is commander, being in great want of them. [Ibid. No. 146.]
Oct. 19. Capt. Thomas Gardiner to W. Ewers [Hewer]. Requesting him to deliver to his purser, Mr. Brighouse, the books and tickets necessary for the Barnaby. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Oct. 19. Col. J. Fitzpatrick to the Earl of Arlington. Being advertised from thence that some pretended wellwishers of the Catholics of this kingdom had complained there that the rules lately made for regulating Corporations were directly in opposition to the freedom his Majesty had formerly granted to them, I thought myself obliged to give you a true account of that matter. When the rules were under debate his Excellency sent for Sir Nicholas Plunket and me to acquaint us with them, and to let us know of the plan he had to dispense with the oath of supremacy for such of the Catholics as should be thought fit for employment in the Corporations, and desired us to procure him a list of such men, which we did from the agents of those Corporations, he assuring us, both then and often before, that, while he was in the Government, he would readily on complaint made, see we had the benefit of all the grace and favour his Majesty should think fit to give us. True that some busybodies of this city, and some of your acquaintances have been carping at the words of those rules, because they would seem to have more concern than any others. [1½ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 19.]
Oct. 19.
Dublin.
Lord Aungier to [Williamson]. I acknowledge yours of 24 and 28 Sept., which I received but three days ago. Mr. Leigh went hence yesterday, and I doubt not has had a good passage. Your account of Lord Ossory's having the Garter is most welcome. The delay of the Treasury Commissioners in the payment of my compensation will not permit my repair to England as soon as I intended, but, if I am not complied with by Christmas, I shall then be necessitated to make a journey and complain. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Oct. 20. Edward Picks to Williamson. Requesting him to procure for him the company of Capt. Tounge who is dangerously ill, in case of his death, and mentioning Churchill's promotion to be captain. (Printed in full in Hamilton, History of the Grenadier Guards, Vol I., p. 166.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 196.]
Oct. 20. Dr. Fell to Williamson. Before you receive this, you will have had a full account of our transaction with the Stationers, and will be pleased to communicate your determination. We have also treated with poor Mr. Norton, who departs to-morrow, and will attend you and Sir Leoline with our draft agreement, which only your assent can convert into a deed. [Ibid. No. 197.]
Oct. 20.
Queen's College, Oxford.
Henry Smith to Williamson. This is to acquaint you with Dr. Beeby's death yesterday. The Jesuits' powder he had taken cast him into a violent fever, and his ague had weakened him so much before, he had not strength to bear it. We fear Mr. Halton will accept his parsonage, and then all our College affairs will return to their former confusion and disorder. Methinks, he might forego his present interest for the good of the College, otherwise in a short time ignorance and ingratitude will be the best titles to preferment. [Ibid. No. 198.]
Oct. 20.
Portsmouth.
Charles Collier for Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Yesterday came to Spithead the Mermaid convoying about 60 sail. She remains there, but they are gone to Cowes, and intend to sail today, being mostly outward bound, and the wind N.E. The Gloucester is careened, and intends to sail to-morrow with the Hampshire to Spithead; the Tiger will soon follow. The Rupert is fitting with all possible expedition; the Roebuckremains at Spithead. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 199.]
Oct. 20.
Dartmouth.
[W. Hurt] to James Hickes. No news. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 200.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the Royal assent to and confirmation of the election of Dr. John Pritchett as Bishop of Gloucester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 39.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Michael Brighouse of the office of clerk of the Privy Seal, in reversion after the four present clerks, and John Richards, a former reversioner. With note from [Secretary Coventry] to the Lord Keeper, Nov. 7, 1672, requesting his dispatch of the said grant under the great seal. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 129.]
Oct. 20.
[Read.]
Lieut. Peter Edwards to the Navy Commissioners. Petition stating as his reasons for pressing Stockwell (see last volume of the Calendar, p. 643) that he was credibly informed of several able seamen concealed by him in his house, that coming into the said house with his ordinary crew of 16 or 17 he found hid one seaman, but by Stockwell's crying out "Pressmasters, knock them down," and other his misdemeanours, the said seaman escaped, but no sword was drawn, as alleged, that the petitioner upon advice of their Honours' order brought up Stockwell, expecting to see the said order and then clear him, but he peremptorily ran away with three other pressed men, wherefore your petitioner ordered him again to be taken to give account of the other three that ran away with him, that the petitioner never injured Stockwell otherwise, and refers the matter to the law, to which he is willing to submit, and therefore praying he may still have the favour of the Board. Noted as read 20 Oct., and that the matter was referred to law or otherwise as Stockwell shall think fit. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 148.]
Oct. 20.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the same. We intend to discharge the Welcome's men, having sent other seamen to supply their room. We have written to the Mayor of Rochester to send us to-morrow the five mutineers in his custody, and shall settle the matter as Sir T. Osborne, Col. Seymour, and we shall judge most convenient. The Mary. is come up, and the wind being easterly there is no possibility of getting her down again, and besides all her guns are out and she lying before the dock is ready to be hauled in the next spring, according to Sir E. Spragg's order. We desire you to send us down the cheque's muster roll of Kinsale, wherein Capt. Rooth's men are mustered, and a copy of the Duke's order to the Board. Sir J. Smyth intending to go to-morrow to Sheerness and the Buoy of the Nore to pay off some men turned over into the ships under Capt. Robinson's command, will endeavour to get a list of the ships at the Buoy of the Nore. The Lenox yacht being heaved up into Chatham yard to be lengthened, we have pricked her men out of pay and victuals, and desire you to send us down her muster books and likewise his Royal Highness' pleasure for paying her off. The Anne, commanded by Capt. Elliott, came out of dock here about three months since. We have put six weeks' of returned provisions on board her, and if she is designed for a foreign voyage, we desire you to take care for her supply, and if to the Channel, how much returned provisions we must put on board. The lacquer and nails are not yet arrived, so that the spring must be now unavoidably lost. We leave you to judge what prejudice it will be to the service. We desire you to move his Royal Highness for a yacht to be sent to us, the want of which puts us to very great inconvenience. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 149.]
Oct. 20.
The Gloucester, Portsmouth.
Capt. W. Coleman to the Navy Commissioners. I received yours two days ago from John Daniell, who sent it me, being himself in irons for attempting to run away, which he has done several times, else he might have been cleared some time ago, Mr. Pearse writing to me he would get him preferred, being his wife's kinsman. He has several times said he would run away if he had ten months' pay due, and hid himself three days since we came here, watching an opportunity, besides being a very mutinous fellow, yet in order to your commands, if I have nothing to the contrary next post, I will clear him. I intend to sail to Spithead to-morrow, having guns, ballast, and part of our beer in, for it is hard keeping men here so near the shore. The Mermaid, with a fleet of merchantmen, sailed westward this morning. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Oct. 20.
The Hampshire, Portsmouth.
Capt. Richard Griffith to the same. By his Royal Highness' order 20 men were turned over to me from the Holmes, most of whom I left at London to impress for me. I desire your order for entering them on the Hampshire from 29 Aug., the day they were discharged from the Holmes. An unusual victualling is offered us here, of flour and suet instead of pork and pease, which was never usual in home voyages. and will be very dissatisfactory to the ship's company. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Oct. 20.
Weymouth.
George Pley, senior, to the same. I take notice you have received the patterns from Portsmouth, and find them fall short of those heretofore received of me. I have sent up a whole bolt for a pattern, by which you may judge better than you can by such small patterns. If you like it, you may let me hear further from you. Better than this cannot be made in these parts, so I cannot promise to better this pattern, nor do I believe Mr. Waith's pattern, now at Portsmouth, exceeds this for strength and serviceableness, nor is better to the eye. I do not find what I have sent into the store for some years past has fallen short in goodness of the first and ancient pattern of this country cloth sent to Portsmouth. Most of our great vessels that use the Newfoundland and the Straits will use no other cloth, if they can get it, esteeming the best French cloth far short in goodness to it, for a sail of this English cloth will last two voyages to the Newfoundland, and the other but one. I received a small pattern of hemp sailcloth, which I shall show our workmen. I showed the pattern to very able and knowing shipmasters, who all agree that this sort will never be so good for service for these amongst other reasons, that sails made of it will be too stiff, and will fret out, for hard to hard will never agree together, whereas in the former sailcloth the chain is made of the best hemp, which is the main strength of the sail, and the cob, being of flax and somewhat softer, fills up the sailcloth, and yields when it comes to any stress, and agrees best together. It will also be of a higher price than the former, and will require much more stuff for making a yard. I notice you have lately written to Portsmouth to take a second survey of the sailcloth and cordage, being inclinable for this once to receive it upon some reasonable abatements. You judge my demand of 37s. per cwt. for the four tons of Riga cordage, lately refused at Portsmouth, to be out of the way, for Commissioner Deane has lately bought some at 33s., but this will be no rule for our ropers, who, if they sell at that rate, could never replace it with Riga hemp for 5s. per cwt. more, but this is the way for this rope merchant to do, to buy and sell, and live by the loss, as the proverb is. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 152.]
Oct. 20. Capt. J. Perriman to W. Hewer. The lacquer and nails for Chatham were brought to Deptford but Thursday morning, and were shipped on a hoy that afternoon. The hoy left that evening. Friday there was but little wind, and Saturday it was contrary. I judge she might get up to Chatham Saturday evening. The lacquer men are to blame for its not being sent to Deptford sooner. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Oct. 20.
Portsmouth.
Robert Orrin to Lieut. John Godwin. Complaining of the victuallers issuing flour and suet instead of pork and pease. [Ibid. No. 154.]
Sunday.
[Oct. 20.]
R. Mayors to Commissioner Tippetts. Reporting from the storekeeper's books at Deptford what sheathing lead, lacquer, and nails had been sent to Chatham. [Ibid. No. 155.]
[21]/Oct. 31. Extract from a letter from a Professor of Divinity at Sedan to Monsieur Herault, minister of the French Church in London. A public officer goes from church to church to find our ministers, with letters of credit signed by "Louis" and "Colbert," empowering the bearer to see the ministers of the pretended reformed religion in France, and to declare, on the King's behalf, his design to re-unite the Christians of his kingdom in one and the same religion, yet so as not in the interim to do any prejudice to the edicts and declarations he made in favour of those of the said religion. The messenger invites the ministers to give their signatures that they are willing to consent to a re-union (their consciences being safe), and tells them verbally that 42 bishops have told the King that for the good of this design a retrenchment be made of:— The service of images, the Invocation of Saints, the Doctrine of Purgatory, Prayers for the Dead, and that Divine Service be established in the vulgar tongue, and Communion in both species, and that for the Real Presence it be determined as divines of either side shall agree, and that if the Pope should oppose, he should be over-ruled therein, and that a patriarch in France should be consequently made. [Two translations from the French with slight differences. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, Nos. 201, 202.]
Oct. 21. Extract from the register of the Admiralty Court in Elizabeth Greene, administratrix of Edmund Greene, deceased, v. the Senate and City of Hamburg, that Francklyn deposited with the Registrar that day 811l. 2s. in satisfaction of the said Elizabeth Greene, on condition that it should not be paid out to her till she had produced a certified copy of the letters of administration to her, and till Suckley, her proctor, had renounced all further claims against Hamburg for the said principal sum. [Latin. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 203.] Perhaps annexed,
Copy of Sir Leoline Jenkins' report on the case, calendared in the Calendar of State Papers Domestic, 1671–1672, p. 135. [Ibid. No. 203 i.]
Oct. 21.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Friday came in the Crown from Newcastle, and next morning stood off southward, and a Holland caper being in sight of him, stood off to sea. About 12 came about the Head from the northward about 30 laden colliers, we suppose with a convoy. The Crown espying them stood with them southwards. The wind being contrary, they may be gone into Humber. We hear by a fisher-boat of and from Whitby, that a caper, a dogger with two masts and seven guns, took off that town a small vessel of Scarborough laden with coals. [Ibid. No. 204.]
Oct. 21.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. On Saturday night and with yesterday's flood arrived in this road the ships of this port from Hamburg, having been seen safe into Humber by the Guernsey, the Antelope sailing with the rest of the homeward bound fleet for the Thames. The masters tell us that the prizes their convoy took are left in the Elbe with Sir William Swan, and that the Hamburgers will permit neither English, French, nor Dutch to bring any prizes nearer in. Their convoys missed but little of retaking our East Indiaman, which the Hollanders, bringing from Bergen, had put in with into that river and unladed just before their coming at a town belonging to the Duke of Lunenburg. On their return last Friday morning, Capt. Page in the Portsmouth, their other convoy, gave chase to a Dutch man-of-war of about 20 guns, which he made off Dimlington, somewhat northward of the Spurn, and gained so much on him before noon, that they perceived him put to his stern chase, and the frigate still in pursuit, but both were out of sight before they could discern the issue. The fleet I mentioned to be bound hence for France and the Thames, is fallen down to White Booth Road, four miles below this, where their convoy, the Golden Phœnix, lies, with whom they intend to sail the first wind. The sick seamen, being near 1,500, put ashore on these coasts when the fleet was here, being since recovered (very few having died), and returned to their ships, Surgeon Knight went hence last Saturday on his return to Court. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Oct. 21.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. (News all given in the last.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 206.]
Oct. 21.
Weymouth.
N. Osb[orne] to James Hickes. A small Bilboa vessel, that came hence a fortnight ago, bound for London, put in here last Saturday afternoon. He was as high as the Isle of Wight, where he met Friday with a Dutch caper of two guns and about 30 men, who boarded him but took away only some oranges, lemons, and chestnuts. Saturday morning the Morning Star chased the same caper on this side the Island about two hours, but not being able to fetch her returned to her convoys from the Island, being 26 sail, whereof six are here bound for Jersey, Guernsey, and St. Malo, waiting for convoy. The rest go westward with the Morning Star. The Bilboa man tells of several prizes brought into the Coronne, and a vessel laden with New England fish into Bilboa. About 9 last night the Mermaid passed by Portland Road with about 40 sail for Bordeaux, Virginia, Malaga, and elsewhere, among them Capt. Paxton for New England, wind then as now, N.N.E. A London ketch arrived last night bound for St. Malo, and the Hatton ketch from Portsmouth for Guernsey. Whether the St. Malo fleet will go with him or wait for another convoy is a question. The Happy Return took no caper near Portland, as the Plymouth advices in the Gazette informed. [Ibid. No. 207.]
Oct. 21. Anthony Thorold to [James Hickes]. This morning arrived the Concord of this place, in six weeks from Rotterdam, being kept back by contrary winds. She had the company of 20 merchantmen, convoyed by the Mermaid. The master says the people there are very desirous of peace, and do not now blame so much our King for beginning the war as their own governors for causing it. De Ruyter with the Rotterdam squadron was then come in. Last Friday the Happy Return came into our bay, and gave notice by firing a gun, on which ten sail, bound for Morlaix and elsewhere, went under her convoy. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 208.]
Oct. 21.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Several coasters from the Isle of Wight, Plymouth, &c., are coming up the river, which were convoyed by the Mermaid. Wind N., a brisk gale; weather fair. [Ibid. No. 209.]
Oct. 21.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last week came in to lade pilchards two vessels from London for Leghorn and the Straits, and one from Bilboa for Topsham, laden with wool and iron. The Nightingale came in late last night. Last evening several vessels passed this harbour. The Virginia men continue here with some other small ships. Wind E.N.E. [Ibid. No. 210.]
Oct. 21.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. This morning your friend Mr. Robert Leigh, who arrived here from Holyhead last night, went towards London. Col. Vere Cromwell is here, going for Ireland. Lord Arran is expected thence very suddenly. The Bishop of Chester is likewise gone this morning for London. Wind N E. [Ibid. No. 211.]
Oct. 21. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from the 16th to the 20th, all previously calendared. [2 copies. 3¾ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, Nos. 212, 213.]
Oct. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Dr. John Tillotson, chaplain in ordinary to the King, of the place of Dean of Canterbury, void by the death of Dr. Thos. Turner. [S. P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 40.]
Copy thereof. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 214.]
[Oct. ?] The said grant under the Great Seal. [Copy. Latin. Ibid. No. 215.]
Oct. 21.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin to the Navy Commissioners. I enclose copies of the surveys of the Sweepstakes and Francis fireship. The lacquer and nails arrived to-day. This evening we have paid off the Charles, and begun the Victory, but cannot go further, till Sir John Kempthorne is here, not knowing what tickets he has made out, and therefore desire he may be hastened down as soon as possible. Sir J. Smyth is gone to-day to pay the men turned over into the Mary Rose and Falcon. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 156.]
Oct. 21.
The Diamond, at the None.
Capt. George Cannynge to the same. According to Sir E. Spragg's order enclosing four books of the entries and discharges of the soldiers under his command. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Oct. 21.
Dublin.
The Lord Lieutenant and Council. Proclamation, reciting the King's letter to the Lord Lieutenant dated 28 Sept. last (calendared in the last volume of the Calendar, p. 665), which directed that all should forbear prosecuting any indictments or actions for anything done in the time of the late rebellion and war before the restoration, and in pursuance of the said letter ordering that it be enrolled accordingly and publishing the same, and requiring all persons to observe his Majesty's pleasure therein signified. [Printed. 3 pages. 2 copies. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, Nos. 21, 22.]
Another copy thereof. [S. P. Ireland, Car. II. 309, p. 347.]
Oct. 22.
The Custom House.
Guy Molesworth to Williamson. Informing him of the arrival that evening of a case directed to Lord Arlington from Bruges. Noted by Williamson "pictures at Custom-house." [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 216.]
Oct. 22.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The John and Elizabeth of Ipswich, one of the fleet of colliers that went out the 19th, struck on the Bar, and lay there about 11 hours before he got off, in which time the fleet and their convoy had got much ahead. However he stood after them, but by daybreak on the 20th a privateer of 10 guns, that lay skulking under the shore, came up with him, but the Ipswich man kept the weather gauge, and after two hours warm dispute, the privateer very fairly stood off to sea, and the Ipswich man returned into harbour, having lost not a man, but received many shot in his sails and hull. A privateer of about 30 guns have been cruising near Holy Island about a week. Wind S. W. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 217.]
Oct. 22.
Stockton.
Samuel Hodgkin to James Hickes. Yesterday lay becalmed off this a great fleet or colliers. Wind now S., which will endanger the putting of them back to Tynemouth. [Ibid. No. 218.]
Oct. 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About 10 a.m. last Sunday came in one of our packet-boats, which left the Brill but Saturday afternoon. I have an account from a friend that the Prince of Orange, to get together his present force, amused the French with a report of re-attempting Worden, or attempting Crevecour, but in the meantime got all the skeuts (schuits?) he could, and so with an army of 35,000 men, horse and foot, with artillery proportionable, landed first at Wilhelmstadt, and, it is said, intends to the Sas of Ghent. Many are the opinions and great are the expectations of this affair. It is given out as if they intended Dunkirk, but others suppose it is to intercept the French army that are to march to Marshal Turenne. Their whole strength is now put out, and if in this they should receive a baffle, it would go hard with them. But 50 men are left for the guard of Flushing. It is very improbable they should intend Dunkirk, because they could not relieve it, for, I believe, they are not at all masters at sea. Charleroi is mentioned, but how that lies (as also Maestricht) I cannot say. By their march it should seem that they expect some assistance from the Spanish Netherlands. I think it convenient to send the letter I received. Pray pardon my friend's projects. This letter might easily have been in your hands Monday forenoon, for the packet-boat came in about 10 Sunday morning, and I being at church received it not till after 12. Several opportunities as well as this have been lost. There is a latent spirit of envy in some people, showing itself in these little obstructions of my correspondence. If you think my intelligence serviceable, it will be convenient that Lord Arlington order the postmaster here not to suffer any post or expresses to pass, before I have a quarter of an hour's notice, while the horse is making ready. [Ibid. No. 219.]
Oct. 22.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter, and giving part of the same news about the Prince of Orange as in the last. [Ibid. No. 220.]
Oct. 22.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Reports here speak of great probabilities of peace, and wagers of 5 to 1 are offered. Wind N. E. very high. The Plymouth and Phœnix are yet here, staying for the ship they are to convoy to the Straits. [Ibid. No. 221.]
Oct. 22.
Portsmouth.
Charles Collier for Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. To-day the Gloucester went out of the harbour, and to-morrow the Tiger and Hampshire follow to Spithead. [Ibid. No. 222.]
Oct. 22.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind N.E. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 223.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 223i.]
Oct. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Dr. Samuel Parker of the place of canon of Canterbury, void by promotion of Dr. John Tillotson to the deanery. [S. P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 39.]
Oct. 22. Warrant for corroboration of presentation of Dr. Fras. Nath. Gregory to the rectory of Hambledon, co. Bucks. Minute. [Ibid. f. 40.]
Oct. 22. Capt. John Kellsy to the Navy Commissioners. The Rachel taking in provisions at Erith sprang a leak, on which I had the master caulker of Woolwich and others to view her, and it will be stopped to-day. I have all provisions on board and ready to sail, and have acquainted his Royal Highness' secretary therewith. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 158.]
Oct. 22.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett, master shipwright, to the same. On acquainting Sir T. Osborne at the Hill House that we were surveying all the ships here in order to make estimates of the charge of their repairs and demands for provisions wanting to fit them to sea against the spring of the year, his opinion was that estimates of their repairs be made both for fitting them for a voyage and giving them a full repair and likewise demands for each, which will require some time, but I will hasten it all I can. In the meanwhile I thought it necessary to lay before you our great want of ordinary deals, having none in stores, and large fir timber for sheathing the Rainbow and the Mary, whose old sheathing must be taken off, she requiring to be sheathed, if she should go southward, either with lead or board. I desire to know your pleasure speedily, as both are appointed to come into dock the next spring tides. I shall want for them and other works speedily coming on at least 400 loads of large Dram fir timber, which I desire may be speedily hastened down. I have since received your letters and the surveyor's relating to this work of the survey. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Oct. 22. Sir R. Southwell to Lord Brouncker. In a letter from my father he tells me that of the old beer provided by order of March 1668 about 26 hogsheads still remain in his cellars, which is so decayed that he lately gave the poor who drink water, a parcel of his own, which was in the same condition. He desires that you would move that this may be disposed of the same way, as it spoils the casks, takes up cellarage, &c. When the rest of the decayed provisions were sold, the beer would not go off, for none but small vessels coming thither they could not receive it, the cask being too big. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Oct. 22.
Chatham Dock.
Theo. Curtis to Sir John Ernle. The general survey of the stores in this yard being finished, I desire your commands as to the present and conclusion of the former ledger. It will be necessary to balance the ledger to 30 Sept. last, as several species are now taken very different, both as to number, weight, and measure, from what they were the former survey. My journal and ledger swell to a prodigious thickness, the former amounting to near 1,200 pages, and the latter to upwards of 400. I request the like encouragement for my instruments that other officers have for theirs. If increase of business has been the ground of the requests of others, I have reason to do the like, for my instruments have and will have treble the business others have here. I am informed that extra time has not been denied to my brethren at Deptford and Woolwich. Though I have lately had an allowance for instruments on the increase of business, so have others here. who have had extra time from the first. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 161.]
Oct. 22.
Dublin.
Richard Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to [Lord Arlington]. By letters from England I am advertised there are strange representations made by some upon the rules lately published for regulating Corporations, as if they were designed for the disappointment of his Majesty's favourable intentions towards his Roman Catholic subjects here, and that they were my particular contrivance, contrary to his late proclamation of grace and favour towards them. Though I doubt not but on the perusal of the rules themselves, your Lordship will find them so agreeable to his Majesty's sense, that I need say nothing in their defence, yet I cannot but lament my own unhappiness that I am looked upon as a Papist by very many here for my punctual observance of his Majesty's commands relating to those gentlemen, and at the same time am condemned there for my contrivances against them. This, I presume, is somewhat hard, yet I cannot expect to be secured against it, while there are malice and evil tongues amongst us. My great assurance depends on his Majesty's impartial justice, which, I presume, will not suffer an old servant to be talked out of his good opinion, while I have your protection to represent me to him as I really am, not as I am represented by my enemies. Lord Berkeley, I am informed, has very zealously endeavoured to do me much wrong in this. Certainly, if he could accuse me of any particulars in this I should soon hear of them, but I must stand on my defiance to all the world in this, and must not so far impeach my own integrity as to suspect the power of my enemy to hurt me. Lord Ranelagh writes he has made some applications to you on my behalf for the 200l. retrenched of my salary by the last establishment. My predecessor, Sir Maurice Eustace, had near 1,900l. a year for his employment, and his Majesty granted me the like till the establishment sent over in Lord Robartes' time, and then I was retrenched a third part, as others of the judges were, and by the last establishment 200l. more, while all the rest of the judges were left as formerly. I requested Lord Ranelagh that I might not be more signally retrenched than any other of the judges, if it stood with his Majesty's conveniency to repair me, and reminded him of some pensioners on the establishment that were dead, to which he answers he heard his Majesty intended those pensions as they fell to gratify some of the poor natives of this kingdom. I did not and do not press for any favour in this that might shock with his Majesty's purposes to anybody else, who perhaps may stand more in need of such a sum than I do. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 22.]
[Oct. ?] [Viscount Conway to Viscount Ranelagh.] In the first place the Lord-Lieutenant transmitted all the rules for the King's perusal and directions, before making one step here. Being referred then to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, they were returned with several alterations and additions. The Lord Lieutenant passed them afterwards without altering a tittle, and received great thanks from his Majesty for doing so. Before the Lord Lieutenant passed them he sent for Sir Nicholas Plunket, Peter Talbot, and Col. Fitzpatrick, and acquainted them with the rules and the King's letters, and desired them to inform him of all persons in any Corporation whom they thought fit to be dispensed with, and it would be done, with which they seemed most contented and pleased, but after the rules were passed, they came again, and said they were undone. Whereas you say it is objected, that the King's proclamation is destroyed, we were so tender of it that, I think, we have not made the least encroachment on it, for it extends only to freedom in Corporations and immunities for trade. Our rules are only for magistrates. If we had made no rules the Catholics could not be magistrates till they were elected, and we have not debarred that. The whole tenor of the King's letter expressly declared his intention was not to admit them into magistracy in Corporations, yet we left it as we found it, and made it neither better nor worse for them. As to making the Council here co-ordinate with the Lord Lieutenant in the approbation of those magistracies, this was first approved in England, next we did not think it unreasonable that those whom an Act of Parliament had made co-ordinate for regulation should be continued so for approbation, thirdly we of the Council must take this wholly on ourselves, for we were tenacious upon an odd accident. It happened at that instant debate, there came in the horridest complaints against Lord Berkeley and Sir E. Leighton, about the election, alteration, and compulsion of men to sheriffs that ever were heard, and if the approbation had rested solely in the Lord Lieutenant we thought all the Corporations in Ireland might be sold at the pleasure of another Sir E. Leighton. [Endorsed, " Copy of Lord Conway's letter." In Lord Ranelagh's hand. 1½ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 23.]
Oct. 23.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. The vessel sent to try to save the men of the Kent returned, after cruising three days amongst the sands she was said to be cast away upon, without any knowledge of the poor creatures, so we conclude the vessel is gone to pieces and all the men lost, for by the report of the seamen that came ashore she had fresh way when she struck, so the very first stroke took off her false keel and rudder. Our seamen here wonder that, being daylight, they did not see the sea break on the sands, but the pilot was doubtless most to blame, and is punished for his folly. Wind E. At the mouth of this harbour ride 30 light colliers, waiting for the return of the convoy that is gone southward. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 224.]
Oct. 23.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. The Deptford ketch, on her passage to Yarmouth Roads, chased a sloop, which stood into shoal water and so escaped. The said ketch sailed from Yarmouth Roads to look for the Kent, of which we have no intelligence what is become of her. Wind yesterday and to-day E. and E. and by N., and E.N.E. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 225.]
Oct. 23.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. This coast has been clear of privateers of late. [Ibid. No. 226.]
Oct. 23.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. This comes by a small messenger, my son, who hopes you will be pleased to put him into some small employ, for he is so small a built timber youth that I am unwilling to put him to a trade. He writes and ciphers very well. If you will be pleased to take him as your servant and employ him as you please, I am sure he has wit enough for his age, and for clothes he shall not want. [Ibid. No. 227.]
Oct. 23.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Giving particulars of ships arrived. Wind N.E. We hear to-day from the West that three small capers were this week in Mount's Bay and at the Land's End. They took a ship of this town bound for Wales, and three or four others. Some small nimble frigates are wanted to secure the coast, and in particular one to convoy the colliers to and from Wales. Otherwise these parts will be undone for want of coals and culm. Culm is to burn lime to dress the land, without which we shall have no corn. [Ibid. No. 228.]
Oct. 23.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 21st came in here about 20 English merchantmen from several parts bound for Bordeaux and elsewhere in France, but the report of so many capers to the westward makes them afraid to venture out without convoy, so they have desired me to advise you of it, that you may give orders that one may be here speedily, that they may not lose the vintage. The merchants complain much of the want of convoy, there being some laden with pilchards for the Straits, and the Canaries, and some for Virginia also in this port, that will not go out without convoy. The 22nd the Nightingale put out from this, convoying five or six merchantmen bound for New England and the Barbados. A Swede from France laden with salt, homeward bound, the day before she came in met three capers, which took from her some sails and other goods. Some Plymouth seamen that came here to-day report that two of that town bound for Wales were taken the 21st in Mount's Bay by two Dutch capers, and also that the Dutch have granted 250 private commissions, and that they are all at sea, save about 20. To-day is come in a French merchantman of 150 tons and 16 guns, laden with fish from Canada, which on the 20th met two Dutch capers of 8 guns and 10 guns each, which boarded her several times, but at length the Frenchman cleared them both, having lost two killed and seven wounded. [Ibid. No. 229.]
Oct. 23.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News the same as in the last. [Ibid. No. 230.]
Oct. 23.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. The Katharine of London bound for Leghorn, has long been ready to proceed on her voyage, but now the Norwich is ready to convoy her. The Lion of Liverpool puts in for the same port. As soon as she is ready, they will proceed on their voyage. Wind E. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 231.]
Oct. 23. Capt. Thomas Foulis to W. Ewers (Hewer). Requesting him to let him have 24 tickets by the bearer. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 162.]
Oct. 23. [The King to the Lord Lieutenant.] Directing him to take care that the money due from time to time to the portions of the Irish Army serving out of Ireland, be punctually paid into the Exchequer by the farmers of the great branches of the revenue on the quarter days on which their rent is payable, and not to allow any pretence of defalcation or days of grace to obstruct the punctual payment of so much of their rent, and particularly to send to them for what will pay the three months due to 30 Sept. last, the said moneys to be remitted by bills of exchange, towards answering the charge of which only 6d. in the pound is to be deducted, the rest of the charge to be defrayed out of any money not comprehended in the contract with Lord Ranelagh and his partners, the Lord Lieutenant to sign warrants of full pay for the said forces, and also warrants for the King's part of the charge of exchange. [1¼ page. Draft. S. P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 24.]
Before
Oct. 24.
Printed invitation to the Earl of Arlington from the Stewards of the Artillery Company to dine at Drapers' Hall on the 24th. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 232.]
Oct. 24.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Arlington to the Bishop of Rochester. Renewing the King's pleasure that Humphrey Swinfield be forthwith admitted to the almsman's place in Westminster Church now or lately vacant, who has been twice recommended for the same, and notwithstanding has not been thus provided for, though his Majesty by an order in Council expressly signified that those maimed in his service should have the preference in those places. [Ibid. No. 233.]
Oct. 24.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. Nothing has passed by this since my last. Two small vessels of this town are come in with coals. All trading at this port is quite given over, this being the only time in the whole year the butter that went beyond the sea is now for London, which forced a trade here. These three days a fleet of 80 colliers for London from Sunderland has been seen, but they could not get so far as this, the wind E. and by S., and now blowing hard at sea, so they will be forced either for Sandhope, near Sunderland, or for Holy Island. We hear this afternoon a small vessel was chased into Hartlepool by a Dutchman, and now I have advice that two more were seen a little before night betwixt this and Scarborough. [Ibid. No. 234.]
Oct. 24.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Yesterday two small vessels were passing by northwards, but spying a vessel off the Head they stood into this bay, and afterwards into this harbour. The vessel came immediately about the Head, which we suppose to be a caper. Wind S.S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 235.]
Oct. 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boat, attempting to go out this morning, was forced to return by the strong easterly wind. The occasion of the guns firing was six or seven of our menof-war saluting two or three more, which they found below the Gunfleet, and this at Ipswich was a sea fight. [Ibid. No. 236.]
Oct. 24.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Giving another account of the taking of vessels by Dutch capers near the Land's End, mentioned in Lanvon's and Holden's letters, calendared ante, p. 76. Wind S.E. [Ibid. No. 337.]
Oct. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of pardon to Joseph Ring of Yeovil, Somerset, convicted for a forgery committed in 1651, the King having been pleased to grant him his coronation pardon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 71.]
Oct. 24. Warrant for the son of Jane Hartnoll to be discharged from the Gatehouse. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 196.]
Oct. 24. Pass for John Favel to Amsterdam. Minute. [Ibid.]
Oct. 24.
Victualling Office.
Josiah Child and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. We make all possible haste in discharging the returned victuallers. but so many ships cannot be unladen and their provisions housed in as short time as a lesser number. As to the delay of the masters in taking in their loadings we gave you frequent information when they were loading, to which we pray your reference. As to delays in their discharge, we cannot give you a particular account till our agent's return, who is daily expected, but we have ordered Mr. Hayter to present you a list of their burden and what they carried and how many trips they made. Touching the refusal of the Gloucester and Hampshire to take flour and suet instead of half their pork and pease, their commanders were the first that ever misliked the change, and are the last we shall propound it to at Portsmouth, having long forborne to save any suet for that purpose, what is there having been provided on the order, before the season came for hogs, but none since. If that should not be issued it would be some needless loss to the King. we having never heard that that sort of provision ever occasioned discontent, but that it was always very acceptable to the seamen. However we have ordered our agents to deliver half of what was intended, reserving the remainder for others that will be desirous of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 163.]
Oct. 24. Thomas Lewsley to the same. Requesting five or six days' leave from Monday next to settle affairs with Mr. Gibbons about the oak timber bought from him and sent to Chatham, and some other accounts. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Oct. 24.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the same. We again desire you to send down the Surveyor or his assistant to look after cleaning the ships that are to come in that were of Sir E. Spragg's fleet, for it is impossible for us to do it, for one of us is constantly attending the pay here, and the other is at the Buoy of the Nore, paying the men turned over into the ships commanded by Capt. Robinson and the Straits tickets, besides much other business. As to those that came voluntary into the service we have turned none over into the ships going out, but pay them off according to his Royal Highness' order. The men of the Welcome, turned over into the ships bound for the East, we shall discharge, and endeavour to supply the ships with others fitter for the voyage. We have discharged the five men on their submission and promise of good behaviour for the future. The muster roll from the Clerk of the Cheque at Kinsale, by which Capt. Rooth's men were mustered, is not yet come. We desire you to hasten it to us as speedily as possible, for we intend to pay off the ship on Saturday, and if it is not here. we must order the men up to the Board to be paid by the list. We shall do all we can to satisfy ourselves as to the entry and the discharge of every man of the Lenox vacht, but have nothing to check them by. We desire you to know his Royal Highness' pleasure what must be done with the Dutch man-of-war now at Black Stakes. We understand by Mr. Pett that she has been surveyed, and may be made a very serviceable good ship. She rides there in a great deal of danger, having but two men on board, and much water in her hold, and none to pump her. We commanded Capt. Page to get men to go on board to pump her and clear her hawses. Of one of her cables but one strand was left, and if care had not been taken by us she must have gone ashore this bad weather. We would also gladly know his pleasure as to what must be done with several doggers taken when Sir E. Spragg was last out, they not being able to ride at the Buoy of the Nore this weather. Capt. Narborough complains that some are gone into the Swale, and others up to London without his leave, so he can give no account of them. If intended for his Majesty's service next year we suppose Ham Creek would be the fittest place for them to lie in. We understand the Dover is not to go with Capt. Robinson. We have provided her with all fitting provisions. The Greenwich, appointed to go in her stead, wants both the men and victuals. Sir J. Smyth yesterday, at the Buoy of the Nore, gave orders for her victualling. The captain wants above 140 men of his complement. We fear the change may be prejudicial to the proceeding of the ships. The lieutenant of the Mary Rose showed a letter from his captain, saying that his Royal Highness gives order for another ship in her stead. [2½ pages. S. P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 165.]
Oct. 24.
Spithead.
Capt. John Berry to the Navy Commissioners. The Resolution came here to-day. I enquired at the Buoy of the Nore and in the Downs for the ships with masts and other stores that were to go under my convoy, but could not find any. I have sent you four books of the soldiers who were borne in the Resolution. The Castle and Supply fireships came with me. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Oct. 24. Nine receipts brought in that day by Surgeon - General James Pearse from the surgeons of the Sovereign, Gloucester, Drake, St. George, Mermaid, Antelope, and Cambridge, and Katherine and John's Advice, hospital ships, for medicines supplied to them at various dates from 3 June to 1 Sept., with note at the foot of each by Pearse of the cost of the medicines mentioned in each. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 167–175.]
[Oct. ?] Joseph Trevers, late surveyor of the port of Rochester, to the King. Petition stating that the petitioner, endeavouring to prevent the frauds of Alexander Dawes and his confederates in stealing customs there, had by their false and malicious actions and informations, been imprisoned for 12 months, and put to above 500l. expenses, besides other great damages almost to his ruin, and when in prison was dismissed from his place and has obtained no relief, notwithstanding his many addresses to his Majesty and the Privy Council, and praying a reference to Sir Edward Turner, the Lord Chief Baron, to report his knowledge of the petitioner's sufferings, and that, if it shall appear that he was faithful in his employment, and suffered for his diligence, and that the present holder complied with the said Dawes in cheating his Majesty, the petitioner may be restored to his employment and for further relief. Original and copy. At foot of the latter,
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Chief Baron. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, Nos. 238, 239.]
Another reference thereof to the same, but dated 17 Nov. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 84.]
Oct. 25.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The wind having been S. E. and sometimes E., these three or four days, has caused several of the fleet, that sailed the 19th, to return, and the main fleet is not far off. Capt. Tooley, in a vessel laden here for Prince Rupert, was the headmost of those that returned, and was engaged off Sunderland for two or three hours with a privateer, which attempting to board him broke his bowsprit, and afterwards sheered off to sea. Capt. Tooley has his chin broken with a small shot, but is come safe with his ship into harbour. One man-of-war cannot secure such fleets from privateers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 316, No. 240.]
Oct. 25.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. The Deptford ketch is arrived from Yarmouth Roads. On her return that coast is clear of privateers, though going out she chased a sloop into shoal water, and had to leave her. We hear the men of the Kent came ashore from her in two floats, some about Mundesley, and some at Winterton Ness, but most of them perished before they could get ashore. Wind yesterday E. S. E., to-day S. S. E. [Ibid. No. 240.]
Oct. 25. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from the 19th to the 23rd, all previously calendared. [3 pages. [Ibid. No. 242.]
Oct. 25.
London.
Thomas Skevington to the Navy Commissioners. Praying them to order a survey of some defective provisions on board the Augustine. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 176.]
Oct. 25.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. We received a letter from Mr. Werden informing us that the Dover is to be cleaned on the Isle of Grain. Sir J. Smyth formerly ordered the victuallers' agent to victual her according to his Royal Highness' commands. He informs us that all her provisions ordered for the voyage to Gottenburg are now in. If she come aground they must be all taken out, which will be very prejudicial in regard of the damage they must sustain, besides the loss of time. The Sovereign and London came up to their moorings thwart the dock yesterday, so now all the great ships are at their moorings except the St. George, which rides at the Sovereign's moorings at Gillingham. To-night we have ordered 100 men to go down to bring her up in the morning. We enclose a list of the men-of-war and fireships at the Buoy of the Nore. The George fireship, having received some damage by anchors coming home in a storm, fell foul of the Phœnix. We hoped the muster roll by which Capt. Rooth's men were mustered, would have been with us ere this, but the ship is paid off, so we have ordered them to London to be paid by the list. We have ordered a survey of the provisions of all the ships paid and paying off. We think it very convenient that Lieut. Godwin be sent down for perfecting it, that right may be done between the King and the victuallers, we not having time to attend it as exactly as we would. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 177.]
Oct. 25.
The Antelope.
Capt. Richard White to the same. I am now riding off the Rolling Grounds near Harwich with the Portsmouth, Samuel and Anne, and a small privateer of eight guns the Portsmouth took off the Lemon and Nowre, having ordered the Guernsey from Hartlepool to Tvnemouth Bar to convoy three Hull ships to Humber mouth. The 19th about 4 a.m., I took up the pilot and seven more men belonging to the Kent, on a stage swimming in the sea. We met several privateers but could not fetch any of them up. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Oct. 25.
The Antelope. riding off Harwich.
Thomas Wheeler, pilot, to the same. Being ordered to bring the Kent from Woolwich to the Hope and there to be discharged, Captain Wood by violence brought me to sea with him, and then slighted me and the master, and took away the charge from us both, and, like a madman, ran the ship what way his fancy pleased him. If I but advised him to take in the topsails, or we should carry our mast by the board, he answered let the topmast and sail go to the devil. [Ibid. No. 179.]
Oct. 25.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the same. Repeating his request that the accounts of disbursements made there by their order be dispatched and the money due thereon appointed him, which the tradesmen are pressing him for, enclosing accounts of 13l. 1s. 3d., supplied the Happy Return, and saying he would send in his next the like for about 7l. for the Adventure's furnaces. [Ibid. No. 180.]
Oct. 25./Nov. 4.
Leghorn.
Sir J. B. Duteil to the same. I have been very glad to be here at the arrival of your two letters to Sir T. Clutterbuck and myself, assuring you that, had I believed I should have stayed here so long after deciding to go to London, I would have written to you, and waited for your consent, but, as I did not believe the ketch would have been so long in returning, what I intended to do was only to gain time, my design having always been not to depart hence before I had put the King's affairs in the way of advancement, and in a condition not to receive any prejudice, believing that Sir T. Clutterbuck and I would come to an agreement on the subject, being determined to agree to everything he wishes, as I have done, since I got the King's galley to sea, having since only waited for the return of the ketch to start on my journey. I have had news she was to leave Malta eight days ago laden with slaves, on her return hither, where I am expecting her with greater impatience than I did before since the orders you sent us, being the greatest favour I could have expected, and that you were judges of the disagreements between Sir T. Clutterbuck and myself, hoping to make you sensible, after you have heard both of us, that if I have troubled you with several complaints I was compelled to do so, that I might not be blamed if the King's service did not advance as much as it might, and to come to the point where you have placed us, which was the only way to determine who was in the wrong. I believe that ought not to hinder you from sending some remittance to Mr. Legat, as I have already desired in two of my previous letters, as well for paying what we have ordered together, as also for making "bonnes-voies" (buonavogli), who are people that sell themselves. winter being the best season to make them, besides the unusual opportunity there will be for making them, when the Genoese disband their troops, they being the persons most necessary to make a good crew of rowers and of most service in the galley. Had Sir Thomas been as reasonable as Mr. Legat, you would not have been so troubled as you have been. I will not speak of an agreement I have made with Sir Thomas to send a little vessel of his to look for Turks who were for sale at Cagliari, waiting till I have the honour of seeing you, besides being uncertain how it will succeed. [French. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 181.]
English translation of the above. [Ibid. No. 182.]
Oct. 25.
Newmarket.
Surgeon-General J. Pearse to S. Pepys. Before I left town several of the chirurgeons of the ships of the winter guard and the Straits convoy informed me that their stores for sick and wounded were expended. I intended to have waited on you to ask you to give directions therein but was prevented. The stores for the Gloucester, Reserve, Falcon, and Nightingale, which, with the rest, were given into my charge, were not delivered for these reasons. The Reserve and Nightingale were never near the flag. When the Gloucester and Falcon were with us, either the hospital ship wherein they were was absent, or they neglected to fetch them, so the boxes have been tosssd about till they are of little value. I therefore advise that these provisions may be timely provided and put on board ere the ships are out of harbour. We have had a beastly journey, and the weather continues bad, confining all within doors, which makes this a dismal place. [Ibid. No. 183.]
Oct. 25.
Greenwich.
Capt. Naphthali Ball to W. Youres (Hewer). I formerly desired 100 tickets and some books, to which you answered some were sent to Chatham, of which I can get none. I therefore repeat my former desire. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 184.]
Oct. 25. Warrant from Sir J. Smyth to Capt. John Marshall, commander of the George fireship, to sail for Woolwich, and thence to repair to the Navy Board, his ship having been damaged by the Phœnix fouling her. [Ibid. No. 185.]
Oct. 25. Account by Capt. J. Perriman of the condition of certain King's ships and merchantmen hired as men-of-war between the Hope and Deptford inclusive. [Ibid. No. 186.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Isaac Colfe, setting forth that he had undertaken the work of removing the sandbanks in Kinsale Harbour and to erect a quay there for 500l., but that several letters and orders to Lord Ranelagh concerning the said sum had been without effect, and praying that he might be reimbursed the 100l. he had already expended, or that effectual orders might be issued for advancing the 500l., that, his Royal Highness pressing the necessity of the work, and proposing that the 500l. might be paid out of duties now payable in Cork out of a certain ship, as appears by the orders annexed, the Commissioners of the Treasury examine whether this 500l. can be otherwise supplied from Ireland for the immediate carrying on of that work, and that, if not, payment thereof be ordered out of the said duties. On the back,
Memorandum dated 17 Dec. that Sir Robert Howard brought this order with direction from the Lord Treasurer for 500l. to be paid for this use out of the concordatum moneys. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 25.] Annexed,
Order in Council on the petition of Matthew Deane, setting forth that his ship, the Hopewell of Bristol, was laden at Antigua with tobacco and sugar, where security was given she should come into England and unlade according to law, that she was obliged from leakiness to put into Cork Harbour, where she remains so old and rotten that no one will venture to sail her over, and that the tobacco is fit only for use in Ireland, and would have been sent there had the ship arrived in England, and praying for permission to unlade the ship at Cork, that the petitioner be licensed to unlade her at Cork, and that the farmers of the Irish Customs, receiving from the petitioner and the other freighters for the goods on board only such duties as by the Act of Tonnage and Poundage are allowed, in the same manner as if they had brought a certificate of her having been unladen in England, and that the Commissioners of the Customs here deliver to the petitioner such certificates as are usual in cases of exportation, he first giving them security to be answerable for the English duties, as if the said goods were actually unladen in England and reladen for Ireland. 18 Oct., Whitehall. [Copy. 1½ page. Ibid. No. 25i.]
Order in Council on the petition of Matthew Deane, reciting the above order, and that the Commissioners have taken security of 1,000l. from him for paying the English duty next January, and that other persons, besides himself, are concerned in the goods on board, and praying he might be appointed to collect what will become due, appointing him accordingly to collect the proportion due from the other freighters. 25 Oct., Whitehall. [Copy. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 25 ii.]
Oct 25.
Dublin.
The Lord Lieutenant and Council. Proclamation forbidding the exacting of any other duties on any goods imported or exported into or out of any cities or towns corporate in Ireland than such as are really due, and were received and paid there in 1641, or have since that year been granted to them by any new charter, and ordering the chief officers of such towns to send a perfect schedule or certificate of all the customs, tolls, and other duties usually received in their Corporations before 24 Sept. next. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 309, p. 351.]
[Oct. ?] David Macklier to [Lord Arlington?]. Entreating him to recommend to the King his just cause, relating to the repayment of monies lent by his late father to his Majesty, and thus prevent the ruin of the family. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 1.] Annexed,
Oct. 26.
London.
Account by David Macklier of monies disbursed for the King by his father John Macklier being for ammunition to the value of 4,357l. 10s., supplied to the Earl of Newburgh and Mr. David Wemyss in 1651, and of his losses by seizure of his ships and confiscation of his goods in England by the late usurping powers. [See S.P. For. Sweden, 16, April 6, 1672. Ibid. No. 1 i.] Perhaps annexed,
[Oct. ?] Sir John Macklier and his co-heirs to the King. Petition for appointment of persons to consider the disbursements made by his father for his Majesty's service and for help, having to depart with the ambassadors from Sweden. [Ibid. No. 1 ii.]
[Oct. ?] The Sergeants-at-Arms to the King. Petition stating that his Majesty's late father by letters patent granted to the petitioners and their successors exemption from paying all manner of Parliamentary taxes, and they hold themselves bound in duty not to plead their patent in law, because his Majesty has enlarged their privileges and immunities, and therefore praying a reference to the Lord Chief Baron that he may put them in a way to receive their right to the said letters patent. At the side,
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Chief Baron and his report that the best way for the discharge of the petitioners is to obtain his Majesty's privy seal. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Oct. 26.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The coal fleet which sailed this day se'nnight, are all or most of them come back again, driven in by contrary winds, and 'tis feared one great ship is lost. Wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Oct. 26.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wind S.E., weather rainy. There is a report that some of the seamen cast away in the Kent are saved in Norfolk, about Cromer. I informed you where Capt. Wood left his pinnace at Huttoft. It being no harbour she will be spoiled if she is not already, by being drawn by wains over the sea bank. Even if I have no order, I think I will send for her, and secure her here, till I can send her to the storeyard, for, as she lies, she will be suddenly spoiled and perhaps pulled to pieces by the poor people and burnt. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 4.]
Oct. 26.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. Wind E.S.E. The coast is clear of privateers. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Oct. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Thursday an Ipswich fisher boat was sunk near the Rolling Grounds, and her men, I hear, lost. Yesterday the Antelope and Portsmouth, with Capt. Haddock's fireship, came into the Rolling Grounds, and a small Dutch privateer taken thus by the Portsmouth. Tuesday se'nnight the Kent ran on the Leman or Eury and was lost there. The captain and a few others saved themselves in the pinnace. The rest under great straits and shifts stayed on her without fresh water or victuals, killing their dogs, till Monday following, when this privateer, with much kindness, took them in, and was exceeding kind and careful of them, laying beds in the cook room, and refreshing them with warm drinks, and resolved to have gone to Yarmouth, and with a white flag to have got off boats and so set them ashore. Hastening thither he spied the Portsmouth, which he thought was a collier, and made at her, but when it was passed recovery perceived his mistake, just as the Portsmouth was going to pour a broadside on him, so he yielded with his 52 men. They are brought here, and the captain of the Portsmouth assured me he will use him with all kindness for his extraordinary civility to our men, confessed by several of them. One of the Duke of Richmond's gentlemen came ashore here yesterday, but hastened to London. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Oct. 26.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to James Hickes. Two days ago came into our road an Ostender, bound for Ostend from Nantes. He was as high as the Isle of Wight, where he met three Dutch privateers of 14, 12, and 10 guns apiece. There is a strong report of the taking of three English ships lately between Plymouth and the Start, said to have been in the Dragon's company, by two Dutch privateers. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Oct. 26. Thomas Lewsley to the Navy Commissioners. Praying an order to the officers at Deptford to receive the plank and treenails he has purchased of Christopher Coles at Kingston. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 187.]
Oct. 26.
Trinity House.
Henry Sheeres and six others to the same. Giving their opinion that each of the eight pilots named in the margin for the intended voyage to the Eastward deserves 17l. for it, to which each pilot agrees. [Ibid. No. 188.]
Oct. 26.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. Most of the pursers of the great ships paid off are come up to London, and their having made out tickets and not ticked in the book prevents us from paying many sick and wounded for fear of double payment. Capt. Shales especially, we are informed, has made out tickets for most of the discharged men, being near 500. Besides if they be not here presently, the poor people will come clamouring after us to the Navy Office, which we desire you to prevent by ordering their speedy repair here, both for easing us of a great deal of trouble, and doing the poor men right. We enclose the original survey of the Assurance, repaired last summer at Deptford. You will perceive she is unfit for sea. It is a very great prejudice to have the ships so slighted over when they come in to be repaired. If she come up the River, we advise that 50 or 60 of her men be put into those of the ships under Capt. Robinson that are most in want. We are heartly glad that all the ships are got to their moorings, for the wind is now westerly, blowing very hard. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 189.] Enclosed,
The said survey, dated the 25th. [Ibid. No 189 i.]
Oct. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. I sent last week for a pinnace of Capt. Haddock's fireship, left ashore at Woodbridge, when she was bound for Hamburg, but was denied by a servant of Sir Henry Felton. I gave Capt. Haddock notice of it this morning, and he intends this afternoon for Woodbridge. Other news as in his other letter of the same date. [Ibid. No. 190.]
Oct. 26.
The Castle fireship, Portsmouth.
Capt. Thomas Willshaw to the same. Announcing his safe arrival there, where he is ready to sail, except that he wants some provisions, for which he requests an order. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Oct. 26.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to the Earl of Arlington. Printed in Camden, Vol. I., p. 35. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 26.]
Oct. 26.
Dublin Castle.
Sir Henry Ford to Williamson. His Excellency, after a fortnight's sickness, is now pretty well recovered, and so, we hope, is the Countess, who has been sick near a month. We are glad to hear his Majesty and Lord Arlington are returned from Newmarket. We have advice from Kinsale that about a fortnight since, by the late storms, a Dutch merchant ship was driven into Ventry Bay, which sent a boat ashore with six men to buy victuals, who, being discovered, were seized, and they confessed themselves to be Dutch and outward bound for Tobago. They were committed to the county gaol, where they remain prisoners. I shall direct that the same care be had of them as of the like prisoners in England, till I have order how to dispose of them. I hope, now Lord Arlington is in town, you will finish the patent for Kilmore. I sent you the original letter of Mr. Gorges about three weeks since. The Earl of Roscommon and Col. Talbot arrived here last Sunday. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Oct. 26. Col. J. Fitzpatrick to the Earl of Arlington. As he hears his Majesty has some intention of taking into his own hands, not only Lord Ranelagh's farm, but that of Sir W. Bucknall and his partners, and managing his revenues in future by Commissioners, if so, requesting his Lordship's favour, if he thinks him fit to serve in the capacity. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 28.]
Oct. 27. Paper stating that five companies of the Guards and three of the Coldstreams, of 80 soldiers established in each, first sent to sea 20 soldiers apiece, and, after being recruited again, were sent to sea, where there were 100 in each company; that three companies of the Admiral's regiment, two of the Holland regiment, and Capt. Harry FitzJames' and Capt. Charles Honywood's companies of Portsmouth, of 60 established in each, first sent 40 a piece, and being recruited, were sent to sea, where there were 100 in each; that Capt. Henry Sydney's company of 60 established soldiers sent 40 men on board, and were ordered to recruit again; that commanded parties were sent to sea out of the Tower companies and other companies, and were ordered to recruit again; that afterwards the King ordered the several regiments and garrisons to keep up their companies at sea to be 100 each, and they accordingly sent soldiers aboard in lieu of sick and wounded sent ashore, before the companies were discharged from sea service, which caused many of them to exceed 100 apiece; that the land soldiers of the said companies will be paid for their time at sea according to their tickets from aboard, but for the time since they landed, the supernumeraries above the established numbers lie on the charges of their officers, till there be orders for establishing or discharging them and for mustering them, so that the officers will crave pay for them for the time they were discharged from their ships until further order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 8.]
Oct. 27. Sir A. Apsley to Williamson. Requesting him to keep Lord Arlington in mind of this good woman Mr. Nipho's wife, on whose behalf he had moved his Royal Highness and Lord Arlington. [Ibid. No. 9.]
[Oct. ?] Jerome Nipho to the Duke of York. Petition praying, since the petitioner is informed that a marriage is concluded between his Royal Highness and the Duchess of Insburgh (Innsbruck), that his wife, Mary Nipho, be received into his family to attend on the Duchess as starcher or seamstress, the petitioner having served his Royal Highness for many years, and being now employed in his Majesty's and his Royal Highness' service. [Ibid. No. 9a.]
Oct. 27.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to James Hickes. The master of a billander hoy, that came in here last Friday, says he met several Dutch capers of 6, 8, and 10 guns, betwixt the Tees and Humber. Wind E. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Oct. 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The only news by the packet-boat that came in this evening is there is a great ship and a dogger fitted out for the East Indies, the first like a man-of-war. They lie at anchor before the Brill and intend out speedily. I have much ado to get the convenience of these extraordinary mails from Holland, of which I wrote to you before. If you please to take order therein, with the enclosed is all at present. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Oct. 27.
Portsmouth.
Charles Collier for Capt. Salesbury to Williamson. Last Friday the Resolution came to Spithead with two fireships, and yesterday came into harbour to be refitted. The Gloucester, Hampshire, Tiger, and Roebuck are still at Spithead. The Rupert is still in dock. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 12.]
Oct. 27.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Since my last no ships have arrived here. I am told to-day a master of a Swedish ships has received a letter from his owners to sell his ship here and come home, because the French King has proclaimed a war with the Swedes. We have still news of very many Dutch capers on our western coasts. A Hamburger coming into Falmouth reports that every six leagues he met with one or two. Some sixth-rate frigates would be very necessary to see into every bay where they frequently are. Sir J. Williamson may do much to procure such frigates to secure our coasts. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Oct. 27.
The Hampshire, Spithead.
Capt. Griffith to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting an order to the Clerk of the Cheque at Portsmouth to pay conduct money to the seamen coming to him by land as well as to the watermen, who alone were mentioned in their previous order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 192.]
Oct. 27.
The Tiger, Spithead.
Capt. Thomas Harman to the same. I brought into Portsmouth at my arrival 175 men, whereof 13 were put ashore sick, 30 soldiers were discharged, and of 46 men pressed out of colliers before my arrival here all or most are run, so I now want 60 seamen. Our ship being 28 days in dock gave them an opportunity of going. His Royal Highness has ordered me to sail for the Straits. Provisions and officers' stores are all on board; I want nothing but men. I therefore request a vessel to go with me to Southampton and Poole, or that I be otherwise provided for. The Resolution arrived here with a ketch very fit for the purpose. Pray also send an order for necessaries for the sick and wounded. [Ibid. No. 193.]
Oct. 27.
The Supply fireship.
Capt. Henry Williams to the same. Announcing his safe arrival there with the Resolution and Castle, and requesting an order for searching his ship's bottom and graving her, as she sprang a leak on the way. [Ibid. No. 194.]
Oct. 27. Note of licence to Richard Baxter, a Nonconforming minister, to teach in any licensed or allowed place. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book, 38a., p. 272.]
Oct. 28. C. Frowde, Clerk of the Council for Trade and Plantations, to the Earl of Arlington. Desiring his company at a meeting of the Council at Lady Villiers' house at 9 the next morning. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 14.]
Oct. 28.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. We hear of three capers seen northward of the Head, but have not heard of any damage done lately by them. Wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Oct. 28.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. Since my last the imports here have been as inconsiderable with a fair easterly wind as the wind itself has been contrary to the passing out of Humber of our outward-bound Bordeaux and London ships. The letters from our member ports only give the sad account of the Kent's disaster on the sands off Yarmouth Roads. We hear not yet whether any of her men are saved besides the captain and about 11 officers, and the six put on board the Susan, of Wells, a collier retaken on the 4th from a Flushing privateer, which being separated by storm on the 10th from the Kent off Whitby, put into Newcastle, where she is detained till further order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 16.]
Oct. 28.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. To-day sailed about 50 colliers, convoyed by the Deptford ketch, having appointed several others from Wells and Corton to go in company with them. We are in a healthful good condition hereabouts, only the small-pox in this town is very much among children, but very few die. Wind Saturday S.S.E., yesterday morning N.E., afternoon S.E., and today S. and by W. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Oct. 28.
Southwold.
John Wickens to James Hickes. The wind was easterly all last week, and the weather very bad. Last Saturday two billanders for Yarmouth, one from Ostend, the other from Nieuport, were forced ashore here by stress of weather, but are expected to be launched the first westerly wind. Four of his Majesty's frigates, bound southward, are now anchored in the bay, thought to have been convoys to the fishers. Wind S. We hear of no Dutch privateers. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Oct. 28.
Aldeburgh.
Robert Camborne to Williamson. Yesterday wind S.E. and S.S.E., to-day E. and by S. About 12 to-day a small shallop stood in here, and stood off again at 3. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Oct. 28.
Dover.
Lawson Carlile for his father to Williamson. About 10 this morning the Ruby came into our road, having both topmasts sprung at once, when chasing a Dutch privateer of about 16 guns off Shoreham, which, but for this accident, he had taken or driven ashore, but she escaped. About 30 sail bound for the West of France are here, waiting for a convoy. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Oct. 28.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. There is a report of several English and French vessels taken near the Lizard by two Dutch capers, which much annoy these coasts. Wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Oct. 28.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. About noon last Monday came before this harbour the Adventure, with some 12 sail, bound for the West Indies. The Nightingale being here, went likewise with him, with three or four bound for Virginia, that had been here, with a good easterly wind. That evening came in 14 or 15 from Lynn, Ramsgate, &c., for Bordeaux. Last week came in 8 or 9 foreigners. One from Canada laden with fish, that came in last Thursday, on Monday betwixt this and the Isle of Basse met two Dutch capers of 9 and 10 guns. She had 16 guns, and many small shot, and 60 men. They boarded him four times, but were repulsed with much loss, and had to leave him. He had only two killed and five wounded, but his ship was much shattered. Two small vessels were taken out of Mount's Bay on Monday by a Dutch caper. This week, the wind being E., many ships were seen off here, making westward. Wind now S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 22.]
Oct. 28.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Wind S.S.E. The 26th the Katherine and the Lion, bound for Leghorn, sailed, convoyed by the Norwich, to Plymouth, and thence to sail with the Straits fleet. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Oct. 28. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from the 23rd to the 27th, all previously calendared. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 24.]
[Oct. ?] Request by James Aire, pilot of the St. Michael, for the King's letter to the town of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, to make him free of that Corporation. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Oct. 28. The King to the Corporation of Newcastle. Desiring them to elect and admit the said James Aire as a freeman of their Corporation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 95.]
Oct. 28. Warrant to John Dawson, messenger, to apprehend Mr. Ellis, dwelling near the Three Tuns, Longacre, and bring him before the Earl of Arlington, for holding correspondence with the King's enemies. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 196.]
Oct. 28. Warrant to John Somner, messenger, to search — Paine's house, a Coffee House, near the Temple Bar, for papers, and bring them carefully sealed to the Earl of Arlington. Minute. [Ibid.]
Oct. 28. Warrant to Sir John Robinson to apprehend — Paine, and to keep him close prisoner, for holding correspondence with the King's enemies, being charged to be a spy, and not to permit any access to him. Minute. [Ibid. f. 197.]
Oct. 28. Warrant to Richard Carter, messenger, to apprehend Mrs. Dawson, dwelling in Mr. Van Overskelt's house, in St. Michael's Lane, Eastcheap, to seal and bring to Lord Arlington all their letters and papers, and to carry Overskelt prisoner to the Tower, for holding correspondence with the King's enemies. Minute. [Ibid.]
Oct. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Henry Coventry, Secretary of State, of the office of Secretary and Keeper of the Signet in the northern parts of the kingdom during his own life, and the lives of Sir William Coventry and Francis, son of Francis Coventry, of Ca[r]shalton, Surrey, granted because the late King, on May 30, 1632, conferred the said office on Sir Wm. Moreton and Sir Edm. Hoskins, both now dead, in trust for Francis, and the said Henry, and William, now Sir William Coventry, younger sons of Thomas, Lord Coventry, then Lord Keeper. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 132.]
Oct. 28.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. Having received your warrant for cleaning the Dover and Bristol on the Isle of Grain, and being very sensible of the great danger there is in hauling ships ashore there, especially at this time of the year, and the great sea on that place when the wind is E. or E.N.E., and blowing hard, besides the former experience of the Plymouth straining, though we had then very still weather, I think myself bound to lay the danger before you, but notwithstanding I shall put your orders in execution, unless I receive orders to the contrary speedily. It would be more advantageous both as regards the charge and safety to heave the ships down five or six strakes with the hulk, so that they may with their scrubbers reach to their keels, and clean them better than if laid ashore, for if laid ashore they sink so low in the ooze that they cannot clean their bilges. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 195.]
Oct. 28.
Chatham Ropeyard.
John Owen to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting a further supply of hemp, as that there would be wrought out in 12 days. [Ibid. No. 196.]
Oct. 28.
The Downs.
Capt. Richard Le Neve to the same. Repeating his request for payment of the tickets he had sent them, the poor men being in very great distress. [Ibid. No. 197.]
Oct. 28.
The Ruby, in the Downs.
Capt. Stephen Pyend to the same. Since my last I have been cruising in my station, and have met several chases. The 20th I met one, which towed us to the westward of Beachy, but outsailed us much. The wind being then E.N.E., blowing very hard, we could not beat up eastward, and stood into Newhaven Road and anchored two days, and got water and ballast, which we wanted, the wind all the time E.N.E., blowing hard. The 23rd we went to weigh, but anchored again, having broken our best bower anchor, and got our buoy rope into our hawse, thinking to weigh our flukes, but that broke also, and we afterwards swept, but could not find him. The 27th at break of day between Fairlee and the Ness, we made a Dutch privateer and chased him westward about Beachy Head, between Arundel and Shoreham, till 3 in the afternoon, the wind S.S.E., a hard gale, with several gusts which forced us to lower our topsails, but still keeping him in shot for about two hours, and about 3 we came within half gunshot. Having the wind of him, we endeavoured to cut him off from weathering Arundel, he being embayed between that and Shoreham, or else to have forced him ashore, he being then close to the shore, so that he was forced to spring his luff to keep clear of the surf. We did the same, for fear he should get to windward of us, being then in 4½ fathoms, it blowing very fresh, and our topsail being one third of the mast down, but a sudden gust laid our ship along, so that before we could hand our sail both the fore and mam topmasts came by the board, and our mizen topsail yard broke, so we tacked and anchored to clear our ship and save what we could. The privateer all this while seeing our disaster, tacked, weathered, and got away from us, then heaving out his Dutch colours, having in the morning shown nothing but English. Had we been clean, I had taken him long before he came to that shoal water. I judge him to be about 16 or 18 guns. About an hour and a half afterwards the wind came S.S.W., and having cleared our ship, we weighed and stood for the Downs, where we anchored this afternoon. We have saved both the topsails and yards and most of the rigging, but were forced to cut a great part of it, or our masts and yards had torn our courses. We have a spare topmast left at Deal, which will make a very good maintopmast, and have to-day fitted the remainder of our maintopmast for a jury foretopmast, and shall try to splice our rigging so as to make it serve. We have just a month's victuals except beer, with which we shall be supplied from Dover in lieu of the stinking beer we have. I shall remain here till further orders and fit the ship as well as I can. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 198.]
Oct. 28./Nov. 7.
Leghorn.
Sir J. B. Duteil to the same. Two days after my last letter the ketch arrived here with only 27 slaves. When I shall see you I shall give you an exact account of their voyage. I will only say that the money I sent, in addition to that of Sir T. Clutterbuck, was of great use at Malta, his credit having failed, which the captain of the ketch seeing, for fear the King's interest might be concerned therein, said immediately that he had money of the King on board to pay for the slaves, that had been bought, and even to leave some for others, as he did. When I received your orders, I asked Sir T. Clutterbuck to put his affairs in order, that we might set out together, if he wished, eight days after the arrival of the ketch. He answered what he since repeated, since the arrival of the ketch, that he could not be ready in as many weeks. In eight days I shall be ready to start, after leaving everything here in the best condition I can. [French. Ibid. No. 199.]
Oct. 28.
3 A.M.
Capt. Robert Robinson to W. Hewer. Even now taking boat I have an account that the Moncke and the rest want, some of them, half their provisions. Pray make all dispatch in it, and send away the ketch with those things, and also the pilots. Let Squire Peeps (Pepys) see this. The enclosed is the Moncke's account. [Ibid. No. 200.]
Account of the provisions wanting on the Moncke. [Ibid. No. 200 i.]
Oct. 28.
The John, of Dover.
Capt. John Steele to T. Hayter. Requesting him to send about a score blank tickets to Mr. St. Michel at Deal for him, having occasion to discharge and enter several men from the beginning of his victualling till that day. [Ibid. No. 201.]
Oct. 28. Notes of licences to the following persons for the following places:
S.P., Dom., En. Bk., 38A. Page. Name. Place. Denomination.
261 William Jones His house, Plas Teake (Teg), Denbighshire Congregational
" William Winn His house, Ruabon, Denbighshire Congregational
" Richard Jones Ruabon Congregational
262 and 269 Richard Price His house, Gwynly, Montgomeryshire Congregational
262 Thomas Perkins Kettering, Northants Presbyterian
262 William Floyd House of William Wells, Woodford, Northants. Congregational
" Thomas Martin House of Richard Spencer, Mountfield, Sussex. Baptist
" Henry Peene House of Thomas Barnes, Isle of Oxney, Kent. Baptist
" Samuel Blower Sudbury, Suffolk Congregational
" Samuel Burne Derby Presbyterian
" John Stanley House of William Ash, Tideswell, Derbyshire Presbyterian
263 Arthur Squibb His house, Chertsey Baptist
" Thomas Strickland House of William Wilkinson, Effingham, Surrey Baptist
" Thomas Sayer Southampton Presbyterian
" Thomas Whitehorne His house, Wolfsworthy (Woolfardisworthy) Devon Presbyterian
" Timothy Sacheverell Enford, Wilts. Presbyterian
" Thomas Smith House of Frank Thomasman, Castle Donington, Leicestershire Presbyterian
" Richard Adams His house, Mountsorrel, Leicestershire Congregational
264 John Harrison His house, Handon (? Horndon), Essex Presbyterian
" Philip Hunton His house, Westbury, Wilts. Congregational
" Peter Atkinson His house, El[l]el, Lancashire Presbyterian
" Twyford Worthing-ton His house, Higham Ferrers Presbyterian
" Josias Collier House of Sarah Grimshaw, Guis[e]ley, Yorkshire Independent
" James Hartley House of John Hardaker, Guis[e]ley, Yorkshire Independent
" James Sutton His house, Stockport, Cheshire Presbyterian
264 and 270 John Seaton House of William Forliss, Limpsfield, Surrey Presbyterian
265 John Haw His house, Wierell, Lincolnshire Baptist
" John Skerret His house, Mounthorpe (Manthorpe), Lincolnshire Baptist
" Henry Hitchcock His house, Ingoldsby, Lincolnshire Baptist
" John Allen His house, Easton, Lincolnshire Baptist
" Gabriel Major His house of Robert Erick, Leicester Presbyterian
266 Samuel Doughty His house, Ashby de la Zouch Presbyterian
" Martin Sparrow His house, Lammas, Norfolk Congregational
" Morgan Howell House of John James, Lambadarne-odyn (Llanbadarn Odwyn), Cardiganshire Congregational
" David Jones Pencarreg, and his house, L[l] and [d]ewi Brevy (Brefi), Cardiganshire Congregational
" Evan Hughes House of David Hughes, Kellan (Cellan), Cardiganshire Congregational
" Thomas Egbeare House of Gregory Millard, Ashburton, Devon Congregational
267 John Chrispin House of Samuel Trist, Brent, Devon Congregational
" Francis Fuller Bristol Presbyterian
267 Clement Jackson Brent, Devon Congregational
267 and 261 Thomas Holborough His house, Battisford, Suffolk Congregational
267 Francis Smith Cornhill, London Baptist
" John Thorp His house, Frampton, Lincolnshire Baptist
" Charles Price His house, Hammersmith Congregational
268 Stephen Tory House of William Potter, Bell Lane, Stepney Baptist
" John Ashwell His house, Boston Baptist
" John Sarjant Eye, Northants Baptist
" Thomas Evans House of widow Pegler, Nimpsfield (Nymphsfield), Gloucestershire Baptist
Oct. 28. Notes of licences for places mentioned in the last entry, and also for the following:—
S.P., Dom., En. Bk., 38A. Page. Place. Denomination.
261 House of Jonathan Peake, Stowmarket, Suffolk
261 and 263 House of Sidwell Hammond, East Down, Devon Presbyterian
261 House of Henry Prier, Hutton, Essex
262 House of John Whiteakers, Macclesfield
" Barn of Robert Sewell, Sudbury, Suffolk Congregational
" House of Francis Gilbert and Anne Burne, Derby Presbyterian
" House of Jane Ingram, Stoke Gommer (Stogumber), Somersetshire Presbyterian
" House of Thomas Lambert, Ramsey, Cambridgeshire (Hunts.)
House of William Pease, Triplow, Cambridgeshire Congregational
" House of Thomas Maulden, Soham, Cambridgeshire
262 and 268 House of Warwick Ledgingham, called Flexton, Ottery St. Mary. Presbyterian
263 House of Robert Sanger, Beckington, Somerset Presbyterian
Houses of Matthew Pinchbeck and John Pettite and Thomas Burges, Great Dunmow, Essex Presbyterian
House of Thomas Holden, Appleby, Derbyshire Presbyterian
" New-built meeting-house, Rainford, Lancashire Presbyterian
" Houses of John Bridgman and Richard Cutts, Clare, Suffolk Presbyterian
" House of Thomas Soper, Westminster Presbyterian
" House of James Charleton, Holcom[b]e, Lancashire Presbyterian
" House of Robert Lambert, St. James' House, Blith (Blyth), Notts. Presbyterian
" House of Richard Smith, Salcombe, Devon Presbyterian
" House of Evers Armyn, Kenton, Rutland Presbyterian
264 House of John Thornton, Mellon (Mellor), Lancashire Presbyterian
" House of Cuthbert Harrison, Lancaster Presbyterian
" House of Gabriel Sangar, Westminster Presbyterian
" House of Michael Old, Sheriff Hales, Shropshire Presbyterian
264 and 269 House of Elizabeth Owen, Bragington, Shropshire Presbyterian
264 House of John Perry, Chenstock, Somerset Presbyterian
264 House of Richard Parker, Westerby, Gloucestershire Presbyterian
" House of Elizabeth Skrimpshire, Presbury, Shropshire (sic) Presbyterian
265 House of John Thornton, Berks, Lancashire Presbyterian
" House of John Finch, Wil[le]sden, Middlesex Presbyterian
" House of John Ayer, Arthrington (Artington), Devon Presbyterian
" House of Richard Forsey, Netherbury, Dorset Presbyterian
" House of widow Lisle, Bagshot Park, Hants. Presbyterian
" House of Thomas Millington, Hodnet, Shropshire Presbyterian
" House of Andrew Bornet, Ashbury (Astbury), Cheshire Presbyterian
" House of Christopher Marshall, West Ardsley, Yorkshire Congregational
" House of John Hird, Eckelsell (Ecclesall), Bradford, Yorkshire
" Barn of John Pickops, Dedminclough, Lancashire Independent
" Houses of John Hinde and Edward Bridges, Heversham, Westmoreland Presbyterian
" House of Edward Gardiner, Barrell Hightown, Cambridgeshire Congregational
" House of John Reynolds, Coppersall (Coopersale), Essex Presbyterian
" House of Daniel Watts, Great Dunmore (Dunmow), Essex Presbyterian
266 House of Tristram Cop, Axminster Presbyterian
" House of David Thomas, L[l]andysilio, Cardiganshire Congregational
" House of David Ree, Llanvayer Trelygen (Llanfair Treflygen), Cardiganshire Congregational
" House of Philip David, Dickewede (? Dihewid) Cardiganshire Congregational
" House of widow Gwyn, Cardigan Congregational
" House of Thomas Therkeld, Kirk Oswald, Cumberland
" House of Samuel Stephenson, Sutton Coldfield, Warwickshire Presbyterian
" House of Evan David, Lambeder (Lampeter), Cardiganshire Congregational
" House of Lady Stanley of Bickerstaffe, Ormschurch (Ormskirk), Lancashire Presbyterian
267 House of Richard Galpine, Newcastle-on-Tyne Congregational
67 and 273 New meeting-house, Hindley, Lancashire Presbyterian
267 House of Nathaniel Mitchell, Norwich Presbyterian
" House of Joseph Ireland, Southwold, Suffolk Presbyterian
" House of Henry Browne, Alborough (Aldeburgh), Suffolk Presbyterian
" House of Thomas Knight, Westerham, Kent Presbyterian
" House of William Cornish, Henley, Bucks. (Oxfordshire) Presbyterian
" House of John Medowse, Stowmarket, Suffolk Presbyterian
" House of Robert Hemson, Haughley, Suffolk Presbyterian
" House of George Carter, Cadeby, Leicestershire Presbyterian
" House of John Clerke, Scirbeck (Skirbeck), Lincolnshire
" House of Samuel Sleigh, Ashover, Derbyshire Presbyterian
268 House of Thomas Collins, Thornbury, Herefordshire Presbyterian
" House of widow Perk, Thirleby (Thurlby), Lincolnshire Baptist
" House of John Gates, Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire Baptist
" House of John Worrell, Croydon Presbyterian
" House of Elizabeth Cooth, Sherborne, Dorset
Oct. 29. Fragment apparently of a post label, with note of the hour it was received at the Letter Office. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 26.]
Oct. 29.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. We hear of two or three colliers lost to the northward, and one Swede from the East, laden with hemp, &c. Weather very bad. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Oct. 29.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to James Hickes. Wind E. by N. A rainy, tempestuous day. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Oct. 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About 20 light colliers came in here Sunday, and some on Saturday. The Antelope, Portsmouth, and Capt. Haddock's fireship are here still. The captain of the Dutch caper taken by Capt. Page was exceedingly kind to the distressed English left on the wreck of the Kent, which struck on the Limber, or, as some call it, the Lemman. Capt. Page keeps him very kindly on his frigate, having sent to Ipswich about 50 prisoners taken in the caper, and intends, I hear, to present him to his Royal Highness. Capt. Page says the sea is very full of privateers. While he was chasing one, three chased him. These three ships and the prize are ready to sail. Wind N.E., weather various. I heard nothing of what success you had with your oysters last week. The Fanfan is just come from the Buoy of the Nore, where he left about 14 or 15 sail. The captain says it lightened much last night. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Oct. 29.
Portsmouth.
Charles Collier for Capt. Salesbury to Williamson. The Gloucester, Hampshire, Tiger, and Roebuck remain at Spithead. The Resolution and Rupert are in harbour fitting. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Oct. 29.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 31.] Enclosed,
The said list, with note there is very much rain, though the wind is N.E. [Ibid. No. 31i.]
Oct. 29.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Sir Robert Holt. Informing him that the Commissioners of the Treasury are very well satisfied with the certificate he sent, and that he need not take the trouble of coming up till he thinks fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 70.]
Oct. 29.
Victualling Office.
Josiah Child to the Navy Commissioners. There has not been a minute lost in the dispatch of the Moncke that I know of. She had warrant for all her provisions Saturday se'nnight, and they were then all down by her. I cannot imagine why they were not received on board, except the weather prevented or the seamen were otherwise employed. The purser has not yet been here to make up his account and sign his indent. I am informed the Sweepstakes and Anne are victualled out of the great ships at Chatham. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 327, No. 202].
Oct. 29.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the same. We desire your speedy advice as to what month the Mary must be paid. We think to fall in hand with her Friday or Saturday. We delivered the warrant to the master shipwright, and shall order his demands to be made, that no opportunity be lost. The Dover is come to Sheerness. We hope you have received the shipwright's opinion as to laying her ashore on the Isle of Grain. We enclose the musterbook you sent us, by which Capt. Rooth's men were mustered. The pursers not coming down before we end the pay, will, as we hinted, cause a great clamour on the Navy Office. We desire you to hasten down Col. Middleton, as his being here now when the great ships are come in and to be repaired is so necessary for giving directions which we have not time to do. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 203.]
Oct. 29.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. The remains of the provisions of the ships paid and paying off having been disposed of to the ships at the Nore and in the Swale that wanted them, so that little remains fit to be issued, we are satisfied with Mr. Gibson's reasons for sending the residue to the Red House, at Deptford, where his Majesty may either secure and issue what is good or dispose of it to the victuallers by survey, as shall be thought most expedient. We rather incline to this, as the victuallers' agent here has not conveniences to secure it, and to prevent those clamours heretofore in the Navy from spending sea remains for harbour victualling. We have sent Mr. Gibson with this, in case you might have anything to object against this proposal. [Ibid. No. 204.]
Oct. 29. Capt. John Pearce to the same. I have sent my carpenter and boatswain with an account of the stores wanting on the Newcastle, which I desire may be supplied, being ordered immediately for the Downs, and also that my purser may be speedily dispatched with the provisions ordered to be shipped. I have sent the poop lantern, which I desire may be mended and sent back. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Oct. 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. Capt. Haddock returned from Woodbridge yesterday, having got his pinnace, and arranged to have her sent after him. The Guernsey is still behind to the Northward. I want deals, tar, &c., very much. The blockmakers here are ready to work for the new ship. I have finished the timber work of the new wharf, betwixt the King's house and a neighbour. (The rest of the news is given in his other letter of the same date.) Noted to propose the price, as the blockmaker offered 5l. cheaper for the whole suit, being 34 doz. Let Mr. Munk send his price of every size, when the Board will give further order. [Ibid. No. 206.]
[Oct. 29.]/Nov. 8.
Leghorn.
Attested copy by Giovanni Alessandro Francesco Catclani, notary public, of a declaration on oath, dated [15]–25 Oct., Valletta, before Pietro Fiore, notary public, by Jean Bardou and Nicolao de Bencini, concerning pieces of eight received by them for the purchase of slaves at Malta and the purposes for which they had expended them. [2½ pages. Latin. Ibid. No. 207.]
Oct. 29.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to [the Earl of Arlington]. By the last post I received two letters from his Majesty, one concerning obliging the farmers to pay in their moneys, the other concerning a debt due to his Majesty from the executor of Sir Daniel Belling- ham, which I shall be careful to see put in execution. Before my sickness I had framed a list for putting the Army here into regiments, and was preparing to issue commissions accordingly, but being informed that his Majesty intends a foot regiment for Lord Roscommon, I have suspended the delivery out of any till I know his Majesty's pleasure herein, and enclose a list of the troops and companies as I then designed to regiment them, that his Majesty may appoint what regiment Lord Roscommon shall have. Though Sir Francis Gore served on the wrong side, and is a person I have never seen, I am told from all hands he is the best foot officer now in this army. You may observe by the list I have neither troop nor company of my own, nor am I willing to displace any poor gentleman, but will rather stay till some of them shall fall. [1¼ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 29.]
Oct. 29.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to [the Earl of Arlington]. The first part, complaining that petitions from Ireland were admitted in England before any complaint or address was made to himself, is printed in Camden, Vol. I., p. 40, where Groome or Grim should be Groome o Quin.—I am informed there is a commission now issuing, giving several of the Lords of the Council powers in relation to the affairs of Ireland. I know not what these powers may be, but you would do me a very great kindness if you would get that Committee wholly empowered in relation to all matters relating to the revenue here, that I may have no more of that put upon me save signing warrants for the payments according to the establishment, for the Commissioners of the Treasury here are such subtle men, that it will be impossible for me to deal with them on matters of account and the like, but they will overreach me. I should therefore be glad that the whole matter of the revenue might be transacted with you in England, yet, if the King shall think fit to command me, I will do him the best service I can. I am now preparing, with the assistance of the Lord Chancellor and others, to take the accounts of Lord Ranelagh and his partners, according to his Majesty's letters of 13 Aug. last. I am told of a letter come hither in behalf of the Duchess of Cleveland, but not yet delivered. If I am rightly informed, it will be of no advantage to her, for there wants a clause of non obstante to the Commission to Prince Rupert concerning lands in Ireland such as that inserted in the letter in behalf of Viscount Iveagh of 14 July last, and another in behalf of Col. Richard Grace, and others that have come to me. I give you early notice of it, that, if anything of real advantage was intended for her, a new one might be timely drawn, with such a clause inserted. I am not yet well enough to mind business. [3¼ pages. Ibid. No. 30.]
Oct. 29.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to Williamson. His Excellency and the Countess are, we trust, pretty well recovered. By his command I enclose a copy or two of the late proclamations on his Majesty's letters. I shall be glad to hear that Mr. Gorges' letter to me, which I enclosed in a letter of mine to you, came safe to your hands. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Peter Herringhooke, Richard Jemmings, and other merchants, and Thomas Blake, master, showing that in observance of Article 32 of the Treaty of Breda, his Majesty in Council ordered all ships, goods, &c., seized before the declaration of war, or which voluntarily came in, to be discharged, it being declared by the said order that the States had consented to set at liberty all his Majesty's subjects with their ships and goods, to return when they should think fit, that the petitioners, having estates in Holland, pursuant to the said order entered several goods at the Custom House at Amsterdam for England and paid the duty, and by permission shipped them in an English ship, the Flying Hare, Thomas Blake, master, that the said ship last July was stopped at Harlingen, where the goods were unladen, confiscated, and sold, the Admiralty there giving as occasion that they were laden contrary to the placart of the said States, prohibiting any goods to be sent for England or France, though the said agreement for withdrawing their estates was made since the said placart, and praying for relief: That, when a treaty shall be made between his Majesty and the States-General, the petitioners' complaint be taken into consideration, in order to their relief. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 32.]
Oct. 30. Request by the Earl of Ailesbury for his Majesty's approbation of Sir Anthony Chester and John Osborne of Chicksand as Deputy Lieutenants for Bedfordshire. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Oct. 30.
Weston on the Green. [Oxon.]
Sir Edward Norreys to Williamson. Desiring his favour in procuring his exemption from serving as Sheriff, as such a charge would do him a perpetual prejudice, for he has a many children of both genders, and within a few weeks expects one at least more, that is yet of the doubtful gender, and all living, besides his brother, and in legacies he pays 200l. per annum, and all his sisters are with him. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Oct. 30.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wind E., veering a little southerly. Last Thursday went hence 30 light colliers, which met 40 more from Lynn, convoyed by two of his Majesty's small vessels, and sailed for Newcastle and Sunderland with a fair gale, but that night arose a violent storm from the East and held that night, all Friday, and till four this morning, so we fear many of them are cast away, unless they recovered Humber the first night. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Oct. 30.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. There is a general complaint and cry of our seamen that, being paid off, they were paid but 18s. a month, instead of 23s. (also the officers are paid short), which makes the seamen speak desperate words, and swear to strange resolutions, as never to enter into the service—to die first. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Oct. 30.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. There are several vessels outward bound for France and elsewhere, but the continual news of capers on this coast makes them so timorous, that they will not venture without convoy. Last week a small vessel of St. Ives, laden with coals from Wales, was taken by a Dutch caper. The captain, knowing some of her owners, gave her back with her lading, saying he had no mind to have war with England, and wished they had peace with her, but for France they did not care. They speak of several others in that Channel and about the Land's End. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 37.]
Oct. 30.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News identical with the last. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Oct. 30.
[Referred.]
George Hayles, Consul at Venice, to the King. Petition, stating that hitherto the consulage or duty received by English consuls at Venice has been levied on the English ships trading there and not on the goods they carry, which is a great prejudice to the owners, as it is the same on all ships great and small, laden or empty, and that the duties received by all other consuls there are levied on goods, not ships, and that the goods brought there by English ships mostly belong to foreigners, and praying that therefore the duty on ships be discontinued, and in lieu thereof a duty of 10s. per cent. be imposed on goods imported in the said ships. [Referred that day. See Privy Council Register X., p. 328. Ibid. No. 39.] Annexed,
Arguments in support of the proposed change, most of which appear by the petition. [Ibid. No. 39i.]
[Oct. ?] George Tresham to the King. Petition for a letter for admission of his son Maurice to the Charterhouse, having been compelled to sell his estate to pay his debts contracted during the late troubles. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Governors of the Charterhouse. Recommending Maurice Tresham for a scholarship at the next election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 95.]
[Oct. ?] Thomas Dalton, D.D., Prebendary of Durham Cathedral, to the King. Petition praying him to confer his prebend on Thomas Cartwright, his Majesty's chaplain, son to his ancient chamberfellow, he being now too old to do the duty of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II., No. 41.]
Oct. 30. Warrant for a grant to Dr. Thos. Cartwright, chaplain in ordinary, of the prebend in Durham Cathedral, in the King's gift by voluntary surrender of Dr. Thos. Dalton. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b., f. 26.]
Docquet thereof, dated Nov. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 279.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Renewal of the warrant of 22 Aug. for Wachtendoncke to be kept close prisoner in the Tower for having held communication with the late deputies from the States-General, and for other dangerous correspondencies with the King's enemies. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 197.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners for sick and wounded and prisoners of war to discharge Edw. Dawtrey, M.D., paying him his salary as chief physician to the ports of Aldborough, Southwold, and Yarmouth, by a commission from Prince Rupert. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 197.]
Oct. 30. Grant to Edward Lee of a patent, for 14 years, of his invention for cutting or deepening rivers and clearing and removing sand from those choked up, and making them navigable. Minute. [Ibid.]
Docquet thereof, dated 11 Feb. 1673. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 305.]
Oct. 30. Warrant to the Commissioners for sick and wounded and prisoners of war to discharge all Dutch prisoners now in custody, or who shall from time to time be brought in by ships of war, till the King's further pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 197.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Lord Keeper Bridgeman to affix the Great Seal to an instrument empowering the Commissioners for Prizes to appoint sub-commissioners in such foreign ports as they shall think fit. [Ibid. f. 198.]
Oct. 30. Commission for Edward Rous to be ensign of Capt. Philip Howard's company in Col. Russell's regiment of the Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 45.]
Oct. 30. Approbation of Sir Anthony Chester and John Osborue as Deputy Lieutenants for Bedfordshire. [Ibid.]
Oct. 30. The like for Lord Coleraine, Sir Walter St. John, Sir E. Hungerford, Sir R. Grubham How, Sir G. Grubham How, Sir F. Popham, Sir T. Mompession, Sir W. Ernly, Sir G. Hungerford, Sir J. Ernly, Sir E. Poole, and Richard Lewis of Edington, for Wiltshire. [Ibid.]
Oct. 30. The like for the Mayor of Bristol pro tempore, Sir Humphrey Hooke, Sir John Knight, Sir T. Langton, Sir R. Yeomans, Col. T. Piggot, Nathaniel Cale, Wm. Collson, John Hicks, Ric. Streamer, Jos. Cheswicke, John Knight, and Henry Bridges, for the city and county of Bristol. [Ibid.]
Oct. 30. The like for the Earl of Rochester, Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, Francis, Lord Hawley, Sir Wm. Portman, Sir Hugh Smyth, Sir Wm. Wyndham, Sir Henry Berkley, Sir Thos. Bridges, Sir George Horner, Sir John Sydenham, Sir Edmund Wyndham, Edward Phillips, Thomas Chester, Robert Hunt, Peregrine Palmer, Francis Wyndham, Ralph Stawell, Humphrey Sydenham of Chelworthy, Edward Gorge, Holswell Tint, and Thomas Ware, for Somerset. [Ibid.]
[Oct. ?] Lists of the Deputy Lieutenants commissionated by the Duke of Ormonde in Somerset, and in Wiltshire by the Earl of Essex, intended to be confirmed by the Duke of Somerset, if his Majesty pleases, and a list of the Deputy Lieutenants for the county and city of Bristol. Identical with the above three lists, with the omission of Thomas Ware from that for Somerset. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 42.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners for Prizes. Having authorised them to give commissions to sub-commissioners for prizes in the ports of London, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Bristol, Hull, and other places, instructing them to appoint Sir Wm. Swan sub-commissioner at Hamburg, to take care of prizes that may be brought into the Elbe. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 131.]
Oct. 30.
Victualling Office.
Josiah Child and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. In answer to yours touching the balance of pursers' accounts, we do not take any other usage or liberty in relation to that or anything else than we found our predecessors unquestionably exercising and uninterruptedly possessed of, nor have we ever refused to give our obligations to pay 7d. per diem on the balance of any such account, as soon as the same should be paid us by his Majesty on making up our yearly account, and if we have paid any after the rate of 6d. a man per diem, it has been with present money, and at their own instances, who have thought it more for their advantage to receive at that rate immediately than to stay longer for a penny more, and that this is not less, but much more advantage to those concerned than what was formerly done, we hope will not be denied by any that remember that our predecessors' notes for the balances of such accounts were frequently sold for less than 4d. per diem. We might speak of a lesser rate, and those notes which are yet wholly unpaid, but that we would avoid reflecting, our desire being only to vindicate ourselves, not to prejudice others. It having been his Majesty's declared pleasure in your own hearing formerly, and we think often desired by yourselves, that the victualling account should be kept distinct and not confounded with the rest of the payments of the Navy, that he might always readily see the entire charge of the victualling at once, we hope he and his Royal Highness may approve the continuance of this practice under our management as it was under our predecessors during the whole time of their acting, upon this as well as former contracts, which was as aforesaid, save only when the persons concerned, despairing of payment to content from the victuallers, have made their intercession to yourselves, to be satisfied by the Treasurer of the Navy, which, with other payments relating to the victualling made by the Treasurers of the Navy in the time of our predecessors, we find has amounted in all to above 200,000l. by which the annual account of the charge of victualling, which we were commanded to prepare for his Majesty, is rendered much more difficult and uncertain. [1¾ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 208.]
Oct. 30.
Wapping.
Sir W. Warren to the same. The 16th I informed you of the arrival of the Patience from Gottenburg, with masts, which are now delivered into the stores at Deptford. We hope that according to the contract you will order us 600l. to pay the freight. I then informed you of what masts were delivered on the contract of 19 June last, which, with those daily expected, will fully, answer all the masts comprised therein. If you think you shall want any more to be supplied next spring, we have a parcel of very cheap ones at Gottenburg, 130 in number, of the dimensions herein specified, which we hereby tender. They are already come out of the Venner See, and are over the danger of the Falls of Trullett (Trollhatten). Your resolution herein is desired, that, if they shall not be wanted, we may dispose of them elsewhere. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 209.]
Oct. 30.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I send the dimensions of the Queenborough, built for Major Darell at Sheerness. Capt. Robinson and the captain of the Sweepstakes have just shown me a lisc, in which the Sweepstakes was one of his squadron. She has been at Sheerness to be repaired 14 days, but I have received no orders for her refitting. I am informed her rudder is to be unhung, and her pintles upset, but I do not see how that can be done at Sheerness. Sir J. Smyth is of the same opinion. [Ibid. No. 210.]
Oct. 30.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett, T. Wilson, and Theo. Curtis to the same. Sending an estimate of the lead and copper nails required for sheathing the Mary and the bread-rooms of the Lyon and Henrietta, and asking if the crumpled lead in stores which is unfit for sheathing should be employed for the latter. [Ibid. No. 211.]
Oct. 30.
The Warspite, at the Nore.
Capt. Robert Robinson to the same. We have no news yet of the Essex ketch. The Augustine cannot come out of the Hope yet, because all her beer stinks, and must be hoisted out again. The Hopewell fireship will be down here to-morrow. The Sweepstakes is in the Swale, and nothing done to her, but the Bristol and Dover will be clean to-morrow, and may be ready in a few days. The Commissioners here have assured our squadron men in a few days. Neither myself nor the Yarmouth will trouble you for many, let but the rest have their complement. [Ibid. No. 212.]
Oct. 30.
Belligally. [Ballygawley.]
Hugh, Viscount Glenawley, to Major Sidney Fotherby at Charlemont. You write that my officers inform you not above 20 of my troop are left at Charlemont, and that they are too few to do duty. Lord Conway consented that 16 of my troop, with a corporal and trumpet, should return with me. More I have not taken. I understand some more are here who are removing their family and baggage to return to Charlemont. One desired my leave to go to Dublin, which I granted. If you conceive I have too many here, and there is a necessity for some returning, you shall have not only some but all. The reason of my desiring some to remain here was that I am informed several robberies have been lately committed, and that one of the Neils is the head. I have sent to inquire if this be true. I send a list of the troopers here. [Conway Papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 32.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting a grant of 3 Dec. 1670, to John Gorges, of the office of Governor of the Fort of Culmore in co. Londonderry, and that the said grant was surreptitiously obtained, and that the said Gorges being a minor is incapable of holding the said office, directing letters patent to be passed containing a revocation of the said grant and a grant of the said office to Henry Roe Ford, son of Sir Henry Ford, to hold the same during pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 334.]
Draft thereof, dated September. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 33.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas the borough, town, and manor of Charlemont is much decayed, directing him to issue a commission to Viscount Conway, Sir Arthur Chichester, Sir George Rawdon, Major Sidney Fotherby, and Capt. John Chichester, authorising them to grant Crown leases of houses, lands, &c., lying within the said borough, town, and manor, according to such rules as he shall think fit to prescribe. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 338.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 34.]
[Oct. ?] Peter Berkenhead, chaplain to his Majesty, to the King. Petition, praying for the small place of one of the King's preachers for Lancashire, in place of Mr. Barrow, lately dead, his father having raised a foot company at his own charge, and served from Edgehill to the end of that war, suffering many imprisonments, plunderings, and sequestrations, and dying at last of wounds received at Worcester, leaving five sons, most of whom are since slain, serving at sea. At the foot,
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
Order granting the petition, and directing that a warrant be prepared to the Receiver of the County Palatine of Lancaster to pay the petitioner the salary usually paid to the said preachers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 43.]
Oct. 31.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. We hear these three days of losses by storm. The laden fleet of between 70 and 80 twice put back. There are great fears of divers being lost. We hear to-day of a light vessel of this town from the south being lost at Bridlington, but the men all safe. The last three days the wind has blown very hard, and great storms at E. and by S., and E.S.E. This small port has lost 20 sail the last 14 months, but mostly by storms. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Oct. 31.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Tuesday came into the bay 25 light colliers, separated by bad weather from the rest of the fleet, being in all between 80 and 100. On Wednesday the storm continuing, the wind being E.N.E., forced four of them ashore to the southward of these piers. One of them is staved to pieces, and another, it is feared, will not be got off, being old. It is hoped the others, being laden with grain and little injured, will be saved. We hear of another ashore at Flamborough Head. Most of the fleet belong to Boston, Lynn, Wells, Blakeney, &c. The wind continues E.N.E. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Oct. 31.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon the Antelope and Portsmouth, and the fireship sailed for the Buoy of the Nore, and it is said the Guernsey sailed by that way a day or two before. Some light colliers are here, expecting a convoy for Newcastle. It is a very bad day, blowing, rainy, and dark; wind E. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Oct. 31.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Acknowledging his letter. Wind S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 47.]
[Oct. ?] Lewis Williams to the King. Petition, praying that he may be inserted in the next general pardon for convicts of Monmouthshire, having been convicted at the last Assizes there for horse stealing, and respited by the Lord Chief Baron on an address by the Sheriff and several justices of the county. [Ibid. No. 48.] Annexed,
The said address, praying for a reprieve, and testifying to the sober and honest carriage of Williams, till this unfortunate accident, committed by him in his drunkenness. Signed by the Sheriff and seven justices. At foot,
Order by the Chief Baron for Williams' respite for a month. [Ibid. No. 48i.]
Oct. 31. Warrant to Sir E. Turner, Lord Chief Baron, to cause Lewis Williams to be inserted in the above-mentioned pardon, in consideration of his former good conduct, and of his wife and young children. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 198.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
John Cooke to James Nailer, Alderman of Coventry. You lately obtained a grant of about 45l. formerly collected for relief of Protestants in Poland, to be laid out for repair of the Drapery, or Woman's Market-place, but the city has now petitioned, stating that the Drapery is not to be the Market-place, and requested that the money be appropriated to the repair of the two decayed churches in the city. Secretary Coventry wishes to know whether you have any objection thereto. Should you comply, which it would be better for you to do, I will give up your bond obliging you to apply the money to the end specified in the former order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 71.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the denization of Diego de Medina, Antonio Gomez Lena, Francisco de Lix, and Jeronimo Fernandez de Miranda, merchants, who have come to London before or upon the declaration of 12 June last. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 136.]
Oct. 31.
African House.
The Governor and Assistants of the Royal African Company to the Navy Commissioners. Informing them that they had appointed Benjamin Skutt to appraise his Majesty's ship the Friezland, and to give a receipt for the same for the company's use. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 213.]
Oct. 31.
Chatham Dock.
Theo. Curtis to the same. I shall lose no time in finishing my ledger to 30 Sept. last. To enable me to carry on the growing work I have desired a copy of the late survey from Mr. Homewood, but the book has been sent up to the surveyor, and he has no copy. Thereby I pray that a copy of the survey book be sent me down. You assured me of all encouragement when my aforesaid ledger should be delivered finished. Pray consider that while the work is doing the quarter books will be made up, and so not retrievable. [Ibid. No. 214.]
Oct. 31.
The White Fox, Sheerness.
John Rudd to the same. I have got the Dover ashore on the Isle of Grain, to be cleaned, and to-day have got her afloat again. She is now going to take in her guns, and is ready to take in her provisions, and may be ready to sail in two or three days. [Ibid. No. 215.]
Oct. 31.
The Antelope.
Capt. Richard White to the Navy Commissioners. I arrived today at the Buoy of the Nore, with the Portsmouth and Samuel and Ann fireship, having but one week's provisions on board. Capt. Page has disposed of the privateer he took. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 216.]
Oct. 31. Edward Robinson to Lord Brouncker. The Elizabeth ketch, whereof I am master, is ready to fall down the River. The charge of her fitting being great, I request you to order me a bill of freight for her service as a tender last summer, or a supply of money otherwise. [Ibid. No. 217.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas Sir W. Bucknall advanced to us 10,000l., and paid the same to William Chiffinch, keeper of our Closet, and whereas by letters patent of 25 Nov. 1669 we commanded that out of the 50,000l. reserved by certain Acts of Parliament in Ireland to our use the said sum of 10,000l. English should be repaid to the said Bucknall, with interest at 10 per cent., being the common Irish interest, from the dates of payment thereof to the said Chiffinch, till its repayment, and declared that, in case the said 10,000l. and interest and allowance for exchange should not be paid out of those moneys within one year from the said dates of payment, the said Bucknall, his executors and partners, might detain in their hands the said sum of 10,000l. and interest and allowance for exchange, or so much thereof as should remain unpaid, out of the rent of the then farm of the Irish revenue, and whereas the said sum was not repaid out of the 50,000l. within one year from the date of payment, and the said Sir W. Bucknall and partners have accordingly detained the said principal sum of 10,000l. with interest thereon for one year and 151 days, from 26 Oct. 1669 to 25 March 1671, amounting to 1,413l. 14s. and exchange for the same at 5 per cent., amounting to 500l., lest any doubt should arise concerning the said principal, interest, and allowance for exchange, the rate of exchange not being particularly mentioned in the said letters patent, we direct you to give order for the allowance of the said principal, interest, and allowance for exchange, amounting in all to 11,913l. 14s. to the said Sir W. Bucknall and his partners out of the rent of the farm of the revenue of Ireland on their two years' account ending 25 Dec. 1670. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 335.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 35.]
Oct. Table showing the direction of the wind at the different ports from which advices had been received during the month and at Whitehall. [2 copies, the names being in alphabetical order in one and not in the other. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, Nos. 49, 50.]
Oct. [The King] to Lord Baltimore, Governor of Maryland. Desiring him to release and discharge William Thatcher, a young man, who by some extravagancies of his first youth was forced to pass into those parts, and is now in the service of the Governor or his son, that he may be embarked for England, according to what his parents and relations have desired. With note by Christopher Gibbons that Thatcher is to be delivered to Mr. Henry Courie in Maryland. [Draft, in Williamson's hand. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 51.]
Oct. Statement, perhaps for the Gazette, by Williamson, that his Majesty continuing to desire a speedy and honourable peace with Holland, and to that end having fallen as low as possible in his conditions, is every day hoping for a better disposition in the Dutch to come to a treaty, for they have hitherto neglected all his offers, and not doubting that in two or three months he shall know certainly whether he is to rely on peace or war, has thought proper to defer the meeting of Parliament till he can be certain either of bringing an honourable and advantageous peace, or, if he be forced to continue the war, to show them and the world it was against his will and contrary to all his endeavours, and so know how to apply to them for aids proportionable. The day appointed for the Parliament to be prorogued to is 4 Feb. next. With note on the same paper that Dr. Prichard, minister of St. Giles', Cripplegate, is to be Bishop of Gloucester. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Oct. Warrant for a Privy Seal for payment to Henry Savile, appointed envoy extraordinary to the Most Christian King, of 5l. per day for his ordinary entertainment and allowance. [Draft. Ibid. No. 53.]
Oct. Discharge and release to Charles, Lord St. John, and others, from all agreements and covenants in letters patent of 1671 for granting the Customs, with pardon to them for all corrupt and usurious contracts. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 270.]
Oct. Estimate, by Capt. Deane, of the charge of building, completing, and fitting to sea two new frigates, each of 84 feet length by the keel, 24 breadth from side to side, and 9 depth in hold, which would measure 257 tons, which, at 6l. 10s. a ton, as offered by Mr. Barham, amounts to 1,670l. (sic). The rigging, anchors, cables, and sails and stores for six months will amount to 786l.—total, 2,456l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 218.]
Oct. Several instructions for drawing the contract for the new ship at Harwich. [Ibid. No. 219.]
Oct. List of the masters and men of the Ann and Mary ketch, of South Yarmouth, and the Clare, of Poole, laden with hemp for his Majesty's service. [Ibid. No. 220.]
Oct. Account of the bills due to Mr. Helbore (Helby) and Mr. Kingsbury. [Ibid. No. 221.]
[Oct.] Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth to the Navy Commissioners. We have received from Capt. Fitz-James' officer several lists of soldiers you desire should be cast here, but no directions how to cast the officers, and therefore return them by the same messenger, and beg you will not put anything more on us, as we are perpetually employed. [Ibid. No. 222.]
[Oct. ?] List of muster books sent to the Navy Office by Mr. Billop, Mr. Yardley, Mr. Stanley, and Mr. Delavall, at various dates in Sept. and Oct, the latest being 15 Oct. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 329, No. 223.]
[Oct. ?] List of provisions delivered by William Markham to several ships, the only date given being 11 Oct. 1672, of the delivery of provisions to the Golden Hand. [Ibid. No. 224.]
[Oct. ?] Thomas Sell, Francis Marshall, and John Dabbs, of London, to the King. Petition for a patent to examine and mark all felt hats made in his Majesty's kingdom, and for payment by the makers of 1d. on each hat under the value of 10s., and 2d. on those above that value, the trade being much injured and brought into disrepute abroad by felts and hats not truly and substantially made. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 54.] Annexed,
Certificate by 48 feltmakers of London of their wish for some person to be appointed to examine and mark hats, and of their willingness to pay the tax proposed. [Ibid. No. 54i.]
Oct. Another copy of the said certificate. [Ibid. No. 55.]
[Oct. ?] Arguments in favour of a request made about hats, that it will not hinder the importation of French hats, but is only to take care that English hats may be made good ware, and thus encourage home trade. [Ibid. No. 56.]
[Oct. ?] [Lord Arlington] to the Duke of Somerset. The King is surprised at the omission of Thomas Thynne's name from the list of Deputy Lieutenants of Wiltshire given in for continuance, and desires that he may be added thereto. Endorsed with a note directing examinations of a captain and all persons concerned to be taken that the King may punish such insolencies offered to his commands. [Draft, in Williamson's hand. Ibid. No. 57.]
[Oct. ?] John Wheldon to the King. Petition for the reversion after Thomas Blinkorne of the surveyorship of the King's waiters in the port of London, which exceeds not 40l. a year, the place to be valued by the Treasury Commissioners, and the amount deducted from a debt of 1,800l. due to him for arrears on two annuities of 120l. each, which he purchased in 1667, the petitioner having been banished 11 years during the usurpation, and the receiver's place for Shropshire granted him, for which he lately petitioned (reference thereon, 14 May 1672, see Calendar 1671–1672, p. 564), having been found to be otherwise disposed of. [Ibid. No. 58.] Probably annexed,
Note of grant to John Wheldon of the reversions of Collectors' or Comptrollers' places in Bristol, Newcastle (granted 23 July 1672, see Calendar 1672, May-September, p. 383), and London. [Ibid. No. 58i.]
[Oct. ?] Twenty-seven merchants, laders of the Constantinople merchant and Zante frigate, bound for Leghorn and Turkey, and of the John and Thomas and Friendship, bound from Smyrna to Leghorn and London, to the King. Petition, stating that the first two ships were laden with goods of great value, and are now ready to depart with the first wind, and, as they understand that many Dutch men-of-war are abroad, and others coming out, so that the seas are much more hazardous than when they began to lade, praying that convoy be appointed for the said ships to Leghorn, and also for all others as shall be ready here or in the Downs, which shall touch at Plymouth for any ships there bound that way. If they go hence in a few days they may be at the Straits' mouth when the Newfoundland fleet passes in, to be a guard to them, as they have but one man-of-war to accompany them, and this convoy will be in time to convoy back the John and Thomas and Friendship, which are worth upwards of 130,000l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 59.]
[Oct. ?] Two similar petitions, signed by 18 and 7 merchants respectively, who are interested in the Constantinople merchant and Zante frigate only, praying that two fourth-rate frigates be appointed for their convoy. [Ibid. Nos. 60, 61.]
[Oct. ?] Note of the prayer of the last two petitions. [The Constantinople and Zante were in the Downs 17 Nov. following. Ibid. No. 62.]
[Oct. ?] Accounts of the number of passengers that came and went from Harwich to the Briell from January to 5–15 Oct. [Ibid. Nos. 63, 64.]
[Oct. ?] Paper in the same handwriting as the above. Memorandum for a pass for a boat to go between Colchester and the Briell with oysters. Touching my brother's coming over in the place of Baron van Reede. Sir J. Williamson touching the many prisoners which have gone over with our boats and received not a farthing profit, whereas Mr. Reeves and Mr. Tucker have such great advantages, being more indebted to us. To account what sums have been paid Capt. Langley from 5–15 Jan. last per Mr. Ellis, and since per Col. Whitley. The reasons why Flanders is, in the said Colonel's opinion, more for their advantage— first, to save two boats; second, the profits of all the passengers; and thirdly, the whole FrancoHamburg letters. My answer— that he might save the two boats on Flanders, and that we were obliged to carry them; second, the advantage to have a third part in the boat; and fourthly, that he could turn merchant, or any of his friends for them having opportunity to put any goods in the boat without paying for freight; and in case the Colonel would not discount with Langley, then to turn him over to those of Amsterdam, and keep him a month or two in hand, to keep him close to his contract. Memorandum to remind Mr. Carr at Harwich about a case in which is tapestry, which should be sent from the Briell per the packetboat to you for Lord Arlington, if there is no conveniency, to hire a cart to carry it to Colchester, and Carr's charges shall be repaid by Lord Arlington, and that you will take care it be sent forward to the said Lady by the carrier at Colchester. These tapestries are to come from the Countess of Horn at the Hague. [1¼ page. Partly in Dutch. Probably by Thomas Payne. Ibid. No. 65.]
[Oct. ?] Memorandum to [Lord Arlington], that Walter Underhill and Samuel Walton, purveyors of fresh water fish to his Majesty, had licence by an Order of Council dated 29 Oct. 1669 to import eels for the supply of his Majesty's Household, and their ship called the Hopewell was made free for that trade. At the beginning of the war their ship was seized in Holland, and although afterwards set at liberty, was not suffered to come away with eels without licence from the Prince of Orange, whereupon the owner's agent, Bernd. Capell, applied to Mons. Zuyleistein for it, and, as he refuses it, they pray his lordship's favour in a few lines being referred to it by Lord Clifford and Sir Stephen Fox. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 66.]
Oct. Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.:—
Vol. 319 No. Date. King's Outward. Inward. Wind. Remarks.
67 1 7 11 0 S.W.
68 4 7 12 0 S.W.
69 5 7 13 0 S.W. I delivered one of your packets to a New England man that is for the New Netherlands. As for the other to Sir T. Lynch, there is no ship for Jamaica.
70 6 6 12 0 S.W.
71 7 8 12 0 S.W.
72 8 7 12 0 S.W.
73 9 8 12 0 S.
74 11 3 11 0 S.W.
75 12 3 11 0 S.W.
76 13 3 11 0 S.W.
77 14 4 12 0 S.
78 15 4 12 1 S.W.
79 16 4 13 0 S.
80 17 4 14 0 S.W.
81 19 6 1 0 N.E.
82 20 6 1 0 N.E.
83 21 6 1 0 N.E.
84 22 6 1 0 E.
85 23 6 1 0 E.
86 24 6 1 0 E. The list shall be writ according to your order.
87 25 6 1 0 E.
88 27 6 3 0 S.
89 28 7 3 0 S.W. The Ruby and 3 French men-ofwar are come into the Downs from the Southward.
90 29 8 2 0 S.E.
91 30 7 2 0 S.E.
92 31 6 3 0 E.

Footnotes

  • 1. The first of these papers was certainly, and perhaps the second was, enclosed in John Cressett's circular letter to the postmasters, of which there is a copy in the British Museum. Press-mark, 816 m 12, no. 163.