Charles II: November 1672

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1672-3. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1901.

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'Charles II: November 1672', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1672-3, (London, 1901) pp. 110-233. British History Online https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/domestic/chas2/1672-3/pp110-233 [accessed 18 April 2024]

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November 1672

Nov. 1.
Letter Office.
Col. Roger Whitley to Williamson. Sending an enclosure for Mr. Payne, to be disposed of as he sees good, and six for Overscheld, and adding that his letters were carefully sent away the night before. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 93.]
Nov. 1. Col. T. Blood to Lord Arlington. I brought the gentleman to the King, according to your direction. The King was satisfied in him, and bade me take care about his pardon, in order to which I request your order for a warrant. Hardly anyone that has been pardoned will turn to a better account, for he is a man of parts and esteem in that party in Ireland, and is so passionately taken with the King's condescending grace that I am persuaded nothing there shall stir to his Majesty's prejudice that he can hinder. His name is William Low, of Dublin, a major in the old army of the Parliament. He shall wait on you, if you think it necessary. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 94.]
Nov. 1.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to James Hickes. No news. Wind E. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Nov. 1.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. No news. Wind these four days E. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Nov. 1.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. Wind E. The coast clear at present of privateers. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Nov. 1.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. These western coasts are still very much infested with Dutch capers, some coming even into Plymouth Sound. Two are now between Looe and Fowey, and about the Land's End and between Scilly and Mount's Bay, as is credible, 10, so that we cannot have any sea coals from Wales, nor can any small vessel go from port to port. Some small frigates, with bigger guns, would quickly clear these seas and convoy merchantmen. I desire you to recommend this to Sir J. Williamson. Coal is so scarce here, that those who furnish his Majesty's ships with beer will not be able to brew. [Ibid. No. 98.] Enclosed,
The said list, with note that the wind was N.E. [Ibid. No. 98I.]
Nov. 1. Warrant from the Earl of Arlington to Major Darell to go to Feversham to apprehend certain Dutchmen lurking there under pretence of driving a trade in oysters, though without licence. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 197.]
Nov. 1.
Chatham.
Sir T. Allin to the Navy Commissioners. I have begun the Mary's pay ending 31 Dec. 1671, and find the men very well satisfied with the time his Royal Highness decreed it, and the Treasurer's letter to us, directing his paymaster to act accordingly. I hope to finish her and the remainder of people newly come since their ships were paid, by Saturday night, and to visit you Sunday night. I sent your letter to Sir J. Smyth, who went to Sheerness to-day, and, if the wind and weather serve, which I fear cannot be to-day, it blows so hard, goes to the Buoy of the Nore to pay the old wages, short allowance, and wages due to men turned over to Capt. Robinson's division. He took with him 6,000l., the old books, and clerks, and intends thence to London, so by Monday morning no Commissioner will be left here. The Dover, that was laid on the Grain side, got an ill cleaning, and was in great danger, they being forced to lighten her to get her off, though her guns were out before. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 1.]
Nov. 1.
Chatham.
T. Wilson to the Navy Commissioners. Giving particulars of the sheathing lead and lacquer received by him from Deptford. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Nov. 2.
Coventry.
Ralph Hope to Williamson. Yesterday, according to custom, Thomas Bewley, our mayor for the ensuing year, was sworn in at St. Mary's Hall, where he entertained a very considerable number at a very handsome dinner, the plenty and gallantry of which seemed to revive the ancient grandeur of our corporation. Many gentlemen and persons of quality of our country were present. Above 20 does, amongst other things, were sent in as presents, besides what the Mayor himself provided, which were all employed in that day's treat. Notwithstanding the fair hopes, and in a manner certainty of the prosperity of our coal works, yet, when we least feared it, they were thrown up by Sir John Wintour, the chief manager, after spending, as is said, above 8,000l., and being now to all appearance in a way to speedy reimbursement, having several pits open, and a considerable quantity on the bank. Some flatter themselves he will return in spring, only letting it stand this winter because no quick sale can be expected by reason of bad passage, and yet the charge must go on, for it is certain that, had he not wanted a present supply of money, he had not deserted the work; for, though their takings this summer have been pretty brisk, yet as the money came in, it went to pay off the many debts contracted, which caused a want of a full and ready pay, without which those damned fiends, the colliers, will not budge. Sir John pretends much severity from our city, whose too soon and eagerly expecting satisfaction for their debts, he thinks, cancels the obligation of their former kindness. He and his lady are gone to London. The works and materials are seized on, and we know not whether he will return or not, though we hope it; however, colliers tell us that in works of this nature Non progredi est regredi. All our wonder hereabouts is employed at the strange condition of a maid, Elizabeth Tibbots, aged about 18, who lives with her uncle, Thomas Crofts, at Hust, in the parish of Stonely, about two miles hence. For about three weeks past she has been taken with strange fits, in which she has vomited up several things incredible, as several pebble stones near as big as eggs, knives, scissors, pieces of glass, some of them two or three inches square, pieces of iron, an iron bullet at least 8 inches round and 2½ lbs. weight, a black drinking-pot of near half a pint, pieces of cloth and wood, a pocket pistol, a pair of pincers, bottoms of yarn, and several other things, many whereof are now at our Mayor's, and have been evidently seen to come out of her mouth by many credible witnesses. I should not venture to give you this relation, had I not myself been an eye-witness with my most curious observation of so much, that I am confirmed in the belief of the whole. All this is imputed to some diabolical practices of Watson, a strange kind of empiric to whom she was sometime a patient, who had so far wrought with her, that she had promised him marriage, and to go with him, though she knew not whither, but afterwards refused it, and immediately fell into those fits. Yet she has respites, during which she appears reasonable well, and I have heard her discourse very rationally of herself and her condition. 'Tis said these four or five days past, during which I have not seen her, somewhat appears to her in the shape of a dog. Now, whether she is bewitched, or whether she be a witch, or whether the devil be in her, as well as some others of her sex, I know not, but what I have told you seemed to the most vigilant eyes to be infallibly true. If it be not really so, I can only say the devil is in it, who, you may perhaps fancy to be in him that gives this seemingly incredible relation. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 99.]
Nov. 2.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The fleet continues here, and the wind being easterly keeps the light fleet from coming towards us. [Ibid. No. 100.]
Nov. 2.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wind a little S. of E. The New Exchange, a vessel of ours, bound for Bordeaux, was taken by a privateer, and retaken by one of his Majesty's frigates. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Nov. 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. This lamentable weather discourages us very much. The wind has blown a fret from the East. I received the enclosed by the packet-boat that came in last Thursday evening, but our postmaster did not let me know of the going of that mail, else you might have had it sooner. The packet-boat that left Wednesday was blown back again into this port Thursday. Great are the expectations of what the Prince of Orange will attempt, and many censures he already undergoes from those whom nothing will satisfy. [Ibid. No. 102.]
Nov. 2.
Weymouth.
Nath. Osborne to James Hickes. Thursday morning a vessel of about 12 guns was seen off Portland, supposed to be a Dutch caper. The Hatton ketch is here still, wanting men, not having enough to hand her sails. Just now came a ketch from Ramsgate, said to come to press men for the Monmouth. Yesterday a small vessel of our town came home from Portsmouth. Wind N.E., fresh. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Nov. 2.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Yesterday Lord Powerscott (Powerscourt) went hence for Dublin in the Anne and Francis, of Yarmouth. The Trial, of Chester, a small vessel, is clearing out to-day for Bordeaux, resolving to run the risk, notwithstanding the privateers. Wind E. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Nov. 2. Warrant for a restitution of the temporalities of the bishopric of Gloucester to John, now bishop thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 40.]
Nov. 2. Pass for Hamet and Abraham, of Santa Crux, and Alli, of Argiers, to Tangier, in one of the King's ships. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 198.]
Nov. 2. Warrant for a renewal of the commission of the Council for Plantations, inserting Sir William Hickman in place of Sir John Finch, appointed ambassador to the Ottoman Emperor, on the death of Sir Dan. Harvey. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 198.]
Nov. 2. The King to the Stationers' Company. Whereas on several complaints, tendered us concerning the abuses and liberties of the Press, it is suggested by the Surveyor of the Press, that you have already agreed upon certain bylaws, with an oath to be taken by yourselves and your members for the observance thereof, which are ready to be tendered to the Chief Justices for their approbation, and which will very much conduce to the better government of your Company, it is our will and pleasure that you fail not within six weeks to attend the Chief Justices with the said oath and bylaws, giving notice to the said Surveyor that he may be present at the confirmation thereof, and further, that you forthwith apply yourselves to the suppressing of all printing-houses erected contrary to law, and that you do not permit any more such to be erected for the future. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 96.]
Nov. 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Turkey Company. Recommending Sir John Finch to be Ambassador to the Ottoman Porte, in place of Sir Daniel Harvey, deceased. [Ibid.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 105.]
[Nov. ?] Thomas Bankes to the King. Petition for the needful order to Sir John Finch, now going ambassador to Constantinople, to call to account Samuel Pentlow, John Folio, and other merchants at Smyrna, to whom he sent a large estate 13 years ago, which they enjoy at their pleasure, that they may give satisfaction for the same. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Nov. 2.
Harwich.
Thomas Kirk to the Navy Commissioners. Giving particulars of the progress of the third-rate ship building there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 3.]
Nov. 2.
Portsmouth.
Capt. Richard New to the same. Informing them that, according to their orders, he had turned over 30 men to the captain of the Hampshire, and given him their tickets. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Nov. 2.
The Tiger, Cowes.
Capt. Thomas Harman to the same. His Royal Highness sent a warrant to the Mayor of Poole to press 40 seamen for me. I sailed from Spithead Wednesday for Cowes, and that night went myself to Southampton with both boats, but could find very few men. To-day I sent an officer to the Mayor of Poole, to know what he has done, and when I may receive the men. On their receipt I will sail for Plymouth, where I doubt not to find 20 or 30 to complete my number. You said you have given order for the necessaries for the sick and wounded, but did not mention to whom. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Nov. 2. Indenture made between the Navy Commissioners of the one part, and Francis Bayly of the other part, being a contract for building a new ship or frigate at Bristol, to be 109 feet long, 33 feet broad, and 15 feet deep at the price of 8l. 6s. 3d. per measured ton, the said ship to be completed by 31 Aug. next, with memorandum at foot, dated 14 Nov., permitting Bayly to use beech plank in certain parts instead of oak or elm, and with notes on the back of the dates and manner of the payments to Bayly. [6 pages. Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 6.]
Nov. 2. Answer of Capt. James Sharland, commander of the Mary yacht, to the articles exhibited against him by James Lashley (Leslie), gunner of the said yacht, 22 Aug. 1672. To the first, he admits a copper gun was exchanged with Sir Roger Mostyn, but not as he conceives, to his Majesty's disadvantage. It was done by the Duke of Ormonde's order in 1666, and at the solicitation of the Earl of Arran. Finding there was a clause in the order, that the guns were to be of like value, he applied to the said Earl several times for its amendment, but not receiving the same, he informed Sir Roger thereof, who was and is ready to exchange same. 2. He absolutely denies he ever counterfeited or caused to be counterfeited, the boatswain's hand to any ticket, or caused any blanks to be signed by him (except two, which the boatswain signed and saw delivered to the persons therein mentioned), either to his own gain or his Majesty's prejudice. 3. He denies he ever received pay for any runaway, with a long statement about Daniel Wright and Charles Lucas, mentioned in the articles. 4. That about five years ago he had 4 cwt. of old junk and 3 cwt. of old shrouds, both worn and unserviceable, not worth the charge of freight to any of his Majesty's stores, appraised by four masters of known integrity, and allowed the boatswain to have them at their appraisement, which was 38s., which, with more of his own money, was spent in necessaries for the yacht. 5. He never petitioned any Lord Lieutenant for new furniture for the yacht, except when necessity required it, with details of how the money he received on concordatums was spent. 6. He denies he ever undervalued any of the Navy Commissioners, or any of them, or ever said or published anything to that effect. 7. He never licensed any seaman to be on shore, for his Majesty's disservice or his own advantage, but continually punished such as were on shore contrary to orders, but could never keep the informant to his duty on board, averring that when he was on his duty on board he was in prison, which was the occasion of the quarrel with the respondent. 8. He denies that he would have the informant sell a barrel of powder out of the ship, but says that the master of a ship bound from Dublin to the West Indies requested him to spare him a barrel, offering 6l. to buy another at Chester, but the respondent did not consent thereto. 9. The respondent never refused to pass or sign any of the informant's accounts which he knew were just, but did refuse to sign some which he knew were false, nor did the respondent ever desire the informant to forbear presenting anything he could justly charge him with. 10. The last article is most false and scandalous, and shows the malice of the informant. The respondent can plentifully contradict the same by the testimony of hundreds of good quality, integrity, and reputation. He denies he ever said he would heave the guns overboard, and what was that to the informant, or any words to that effect. Prefixed is a copy of the articles against Sharland, dated 22 Aug., calendared in the last volume of the Calendar, p. 518. [7 pages. Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 7.]
Nov. 2. Examination of James Leslie on articles against Capt. Sharland. To the first, Capt. Sharland exchanged a copper gun with Sir R. Mostyn for a brass one, the former being much more serviceable and valuable. To the second, he heard the boatswain say the captain counterfeited tickets, and he has seen the boatswain sign blank papers, but does not know what advantage the captain made by it. To the third, two seamen of the yacht ran away, but he cannot tell if the captain afterwards received any money for them. To the fourth, the captain sold some old cable and rigging to the boatswain, but as to whether the captain charged himself with the price, he refers to his accounts. To the fifth, that the captain, on petitions to Lord Lieutenant Berkeley and Council and to Lord Ossory and Council, received 30l. and above 60l., and expended on repairs of the yacht 20l. of the former and not above 30l. of the latter. To the sixth, the captain said that when General Penn was alive he had a friend there, but now he had none among the Navy Commissioners. To the seventh, as often as the captain allowed men to be on shore, he converted their allowance of victuals to his own use. To the eighth, on 10 Dec. 1667 the captain advised him to sell a barrel of powder, believing he wanted money, which the deponent refused, and he believes he did it to try if he would sell it or not. To the ninth, the captain refused to sign his accounts for the reason mentioned in the article. To the tenth, the captain, 27 July last, came on board in drink, and called the deponent a Scotch dog, and several other ill names, and threatened to lay him in irons.
Examination of William Bromacan, boatswain of the Mary, on the same articles. To the first he knows the captain changed the gun, but does not know the value or weight thereof, or if he had an order for it. To the second, the deponent's hand was counterfeited to a ticket for the discharge of one Simpson, but by whom he knows not. To the third, the deponent signed tickets for the two men mentioned in the article, but knows not of any pay received by the captain for them after their discharge, or for any others after their discharge. To the fourth, the captain, about five years ago, sold him some junk and old shrouds, for which he paid him the price, but whether he placed it to account he knows not. To the seventh, when the ship is on ground, the men go ashore with leave and without, but he does not know the captain makes any advantage thereby. To the tenth, he never saw the captain idle, drunk, or debauched, or ever heard anyone say so of him. [6 pages. Ibid. No. 7a.]
Nov. 2.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to [the Earl of Arlington]. I acknowledge your lordship's of 26 Oct., answering several of mine. As to what concerns Lord Conway, he being at present in the country, I shall respite it till his return. One particular in your letter I find to be a mistake, for in reciting mine of 1 Oct. you say:—It likewise mentions the rules composed for the charters of certain corporations, of which his Majesty expects a particular account, because he hears exceptions are made to them. If you review that letter of mine, you will find I spoke not of any rules for the charters, but only of the rules for regulating corporations, which have been transmitted to Sir J. Williamson as fast as we could get them printed. You will find nothing in them, but what I gave you an account of in my letter of 24 Aug., and afterwards on the return of your letter in answer I received his Majesty's approbation, with his particular directions in a letter of his own concerning the clause relating to the oath of supremacy, all which I have exactly conformed to, and I have been the more cautious because these Rules have the force of an Act of Parliament. In pursuance of his Majesty's letter of 22 Oct., I have inquired of the Treasury Commissioners, what sum was requisite for the pay of the two Irish regiments now in England, who replied that 11,500l. was necessary, which I have required the Farmers immediately to lay down, but they have taken time to consider till next Monday, nor have I any answer from them yet for the 10,000l. I formerly ordered them to pay in. I believe they are very bare of money, and I fear will daily grow more and more so. I shall be as instant as I can with them to make payment, but I beseech you to compare this clause in his Majesty's letter:—You are on no account to allow any pretence of defalcation or days of grace to obstruct the punctual payment of so much of the rent as you shall find necessary for the support of the said forces, and we doubt not but the said farmers will most willingly comply with what is so necessary for our service—with this covenant in the farmers' grant:— All and every the covenants, articles, and clauses in these presents on the King's behalf shall be most strongly and largely construed against the King and largely, beneficially, and favourably for the benefit of the said John Forth, &c.—and to tell me whether they can be obliged to pay in their moneys before the days of grace are expired. Besides, if they do fail in paying, so that the Treasury Commissioners should be forced to proceed against them, none of the farmers is here but one Musham (Muschamp), a man, I hear, of no wealth, so the Commissioners would be forced to prosecute those in England. I have represented the case with the farmers at large, because I fear their money will fall short, and the King will be forced to make use of the law against them. [3 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 36.]
Nov. 2.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to [the Earl of Arlington]. I lately troubled your lordship with a letter referring to some words spoken reflectingly on me in England. I have since discoursed with Colonel Richard Talbot, from whom I expected to have had something instanced that might give the opportunity of a vindication, but he told me he knew no one thing in particular ever laid to my charge, but perhaps some persons, dissatisfied on private grounds, by which I apprehend he meant Lord Berkeley, were willing, by a general accusation, to have me esteemed an ill servant, because I was not, as they sup- posed, a friend to themselves. I pressed him likewise to advise me of an instance that his Majesty's commands or his intentions, so far as they could be known to us, were ever declined or disputed since Lord Essex's arrival. He told me he knew of nothing, nor I presume (said I) ever will know of any false step of that nature, while we are commanded by so wise a person and such a prudent governor as Lord Essex shews himself. I doubt not but at Col. Talbot's return for England he will give you such a candid and ingenious account of the sober management of affairs here by Lord Essex, that his Majesty will be very well satisfied therewith, but I hold myself obliged to give you this relation, that you may see the little ground of some reports and clamours, though they make a great noise before they are enquired into. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 37.]
Nov. 2.
Dublin.
Sir N. Armorer to Williamson. I am lamed these five days of the gout, but it's a damned Irish gout, for I went down to receive between 600l. and 700l. due in several hands, and in all touched 1l. 3s. 6d. Here's bra' work now, is it not? Oxen, cows, and sheep galore, but not a sou of siller. Undertakers and red weares (? wars) have made a bare spot, but mum's the word. There's a bribe preparing for you, to keep you from cold, but mum for that too. As soon as the term ends, I'll end my stay here, and creep home, though with never a penny in purse. The widow thanks me for the crumbs of comfort you gave me to give her that Sir Jo[hn] B[ennet] (?) will not worry her at first. Dick Talbot has his troop, which is not mum here, but time will show. I sent last post to pay you the 10l. for Will. Flower's letter. Both he and Sir John Stephens are much your servants, and say they will tell you so themselves, for they are not able scribes. Our good Lord Lieutenant gets up apace. He is a worthy man, and this country will be happy in him, if you be kind at home. Dick Talbot's troop comes to do duty in Dublin next week. I have not seen Lord O'Brien since I came, but he and his papa are expected now in the term. Here is a Madam Harvell, a kindred, she says, to Goring House, a dainty child, and of your acquaintance, as she tells us. [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 38.]
Nov. 3.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Gloucester, Hampshire, and Roebuck are at Spithead, the Rupert and Resolution in port, noting. Wind E.N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 107.]
[Before Nov. 3.] Reasons why William Angell, of Crowhurst, Surrey, now second in nomination—Mr. Burton, who is first, being likely to get off— should not serve as Sheriff [of Surrey] the ensuing year, viz., that he holds the offices of porter of the outer gate and keeper of the armoury at Windsor Castle, which require him to be present at courts, to execute writs, and to keep a gaol in the Castle, &c., on account of which he and his father, his predecessor in these offices, have always been excused being Sheriffs, as otherwise they would have been as sheriffs of two counties at once, and that his estate of 500l. being charged with legacies to younger brothers and sisters, and two of his children being marriageable, the remainder thereof will be very inconsiderable for such an office. [Angell's name appears second to Burton in the draft list of persons presented to be pricked, calendared in Cal. S.P. Dom., 1671, p. 555, but not in the final list next calendared. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 108.]
[Nov. 3.] List of persons in each county of England presented to the King, by the Council, from whom the Sheriffs should be pricked. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 109.]
[Nov.] List of the Sheriffs pricked for each county of England and Wales for the ensuing year. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 110.]
[Nov.] Names of the three persons returned to serve as Sheriffs for Denbighshire, of whom Sir John Wynne is pricked, but begs to be excused for this year only. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Nov. Statement that Wynne has been excused from serving, at the Earl of Arlington's intercession, and praying for an order for the purpose, with note by Williamson that Dr. John Neale is to be Dean of Ripon, void by the Bishop of Chester's death. [Ibid. No. 112.]
[Nov.] Request that the Earl of Arlington will send a line to Sir Jos. Williamson, to take off Sir John Wynne from the office of Sheriff for Denbighshire, from which he is excused at request of Lady Cleveland, and that the alteration may be put in the Gazette. [Ibid. No. 115.]
[Nov. ?] William Trevill, of Budshead, co. Devon, to the King. Petition for licence to live in his house at Budshead during the time that he serves as Sheriff for Cornwall, for which he has been lately pricked. [Ibid. No. 114.]
[Nov.] Note that Evan Thomas and William Bevans were nominated with James Jones to be pricked for Sheriff of Carmarthenshire. [Ibid. No. 115.]
[Nov. 3 ?] Memoranda by Williamson of proceedings in Council about persons to be excused or put in to serve the office of Sheriff, of the Dutch oystermen (see ante p. 111), of Dr. Butler's wife, W. Overbury's petition, of what to say of the Lord Keeper in the newsletter, &c. [Ibid. No. 116.]
[Nov. ?] Nicholas Butler, M.D., to the King. Petition for a pardon for marrying Jane Stephens, widow, during the life of Dorothy Butler, his late wife, from whom he was divorced, on account of adultery, he being satisfied in conscience that by the word of God it was lawful for him to marry again, and finding several examples formerly, as well as in the case of Lord Ross (Roos), as by the defects of the laws he may meet with some disturbance, as well from Courts Spiritual as Temporal. [Ibid. No. 117.]
[Nov. ?] Walter Overbury to the King. Petition for a grant of the fine to be inflicted on Sir John Pettus, Bart., of Rackheath, co. Norfolk, for detaining the house and estate of the petitioner's sister, Dame Elizabeth, widow of Sir Thomas Pettus, rifling her trunks, closets, &c., for which the Attorney-General has directed an information against him in the King's Bench. [S.P. Dom., Car. II., 317, No. 118.]
Nov. 3.
Whitehall.
Grant to John Werden of the dignity of a Baronet of England. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 199.]
Docquet thereof, dated November. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 273.]
Nov. 3.
The White Fox, Sheerness.
Boatswain John Rudd to the Navy Commissioners. The Bristol being cleaned on the Isle of Grain, I have got her afloat again, to take in her guns as fast as possible. She is ready to take in her provisions, and only sets a new main mast and a set of fore shrouds. She may be ready to sail about the middle of the week. I have received your orders to clean the Princess on the Isle of Grain. She is not yet come in to the shore. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 8.]
Nov. 3.
The Jersey.
Capt. Luke Walsh to the same. I am now making sail for Plymouth, where I am to take in two months' provisions more, and expect the convoys bound southward. You promised that the watermen impressed for me should be sent, or at least such as deserted, but as yet none have appeared. I therefore beseech you once more to order them to be sent on board any of the ships now in the river bound for Lisbon, which are to meet me at Plymouth, being in great need of them, for here I could not recruit. I must call at Portsmouth to change my pinnace, she being old and unserviceable. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Nov. 3.
The Warspite, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Capt. Robert Robinson to the same. Repeating the substance of his letter of 30 Oct. The soldiers are very pitiful men and youths, and sickly, and have no clothes, so, considering their condition, and the weather we must expect, many will certainly die, and those that live will do little good, nay, more harm. Our provisions in the squadron spend apace, so that, ere we can sail, one of the three months will be spent, if not more. I leave it to you to advise his Royal Highness therein. No men have come to any, since I came here, but I hope there will the next fine weather, or we must either stay for men, or go away without them, which will be bad that way, and this time of year. Pray desire Capt. Perriman to hasten away the Essex ketch, and the Rejoice that is getting men for us, and also our pilots. Wind easterly, blowing very hard. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Nov. 3.
The Newcastle.
Capt. John Pearce to the same. His ship being suddenly ordered to sea, requesting she may be supplied with a fore course and foretopsail and a main course and main topsail and a sprit sail and mizen, as after her long voyage to the Straits she has had but slender recruits since her arrival in England, and is very unfit for a winter's voyage, her fore shrouds also having been up five years and being very defective. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Nov. 3.
O'Brien's Bridge.
The Earl of Inchiquin to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland. Capt. Cullen told me to-day that at his house last Thursday afternoon Capt. Walcott made him the enclosed relation, which being of so high importance, as he knew of no account thereof given to the Lord Lieutenant and Council, I thought it my duty to dispatch an express to you with it, that he might receive it of your hands, as I am not in a condition to write in my own hand. Capt. Cullen would have been the bearer himself, were he able to endure such a journey. His duty and loyalty herein have been very great, and, I think, deserve to be taken notice of. He told me further that Capt. Walcott seemed to ground much on the fear the English have of the proclamation lately issued, touching an Act of Indemnity for the Irish. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 39.] Enclosed,
Nov. 3. The several relations of Capt. Thomas Cullen and Capt. Edward Fitzgerald made to the Earl of Inchiquin. Capt. Cullen says that Capt. Thomas Walcott came to his house last Thursday, and, desiring to speak privately with him, he took him into his garden, where the said Walcott first bewailed the condition of the English in general, and of this kingdom, and said that the Irish were like to have all again, so that he wished himself out of the kingdom. Yet, said he, our condition is not so desperate, but we may prevent our ruin, if we stick one to another, and added that Limerick could be secured with a wet finger, and though he knew not how Dublin Castle or any other castle should be secured, yet he was confident, if they could but hold out one month, they should do well enough, and thereupon desired Capt. Cullen to go to a private chamber, where he drew out a paper of at least two sheets, all written, which the said Walcott holding read to him, and the substance thereof, as Capt. Cullen remembers, was mentioning many grievances, occasioned by several Ministers of State, and abuses committed in disposing of his Majesty's treasure, and demanding first that the perpetual Parliament should be re-established, and members be chosen in the room of those that were wanting, and that Popery and Prelacy should be put down and Presbytery established, with many other things of dangerous consequence. Capt. Cullen sent immediately for Capt. Edward Fitzgerald, his near neighbour, who came next day, and both went to the Earl of Thomond. The Earl demanding their advice, Capt. Fitzgerald proposed that the Earl would accompany him with a letter to the Governor of Limerick; he would carry it, and go thither to help to seize him there, being informed he was gone thither. Coming to Limerick, he presented his letter with all the diligence he could, whereon the Governor sent an officer to secure him, who, not finding him, the Governor ordered some horse to be got ready to pursue him, where he thought he was gone, and then Capt. Fitzgerald went immediately to the Earl of Inchiquin, to give him an account. [2 copies. 1¼ page. Ibid. Nos. 39i.-ii.]
Nov. 4.
Amptill.
The Earl of Ailesbury to Williamson. When I was last with you, I gave you the reasons why I thought Sir Humphrey Monoux and his son not fit to be put on the list for Sheriffs, the father having been twice Sheriff, and the son but newly possessed of his estate, and serving as major of the Militia. Since I came down I heard Sir William Gostwick and Mr. Luke named. The former is but newly come to his estate, the latter has ten children and seven brothers and sisters to provide for, and not 300l. a year in possession. None of these persons has sent to me to get them taken off. Persons I think proper, if any are wanted, are Mr. Neale, of Deane, who is rich and lives very privately; one Walker, a citizen, who has a good estate in this country; and Sir John Fontaine, son of Sir Erasmus de la Fontaine, who lives in Lincolnshire, but has a great estate in this country. I interpose the rather because the clerks of assize so little consider who are useful to his Majesty in county business and who are not. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 119.]
Nov. 4.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Saturday came ashore two more vessels, forced from their anchors by the storm, but we hope, if the wind come landerly, and good weather, most of them will be saved. One more is foundered on the Smiddy Sand. Wind N.N.E. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Nov. 4.
Hull.
W. Griffith to Williamson. Sir Solomon Swale returned hence to Stainley Hall last Friday, and the other Commissioners are daily expecting their Lordships' answer to theirs of the 16th ult. The outward bound fleet is still in White Booth road with their convoy, the Golden Phœnix, the wind having been easterly this long time. Yet it has not brought in anything considerable since my letter of the 28th, except the Deptford ketch, which is put into Grimsby Road by weather, with some light colliers for Newcastle. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Nov. 4.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. The Phœnix and Guernsey, with a considerable fleet, are still below, waiting an opportunity for the southward. Last Friday we heard from Bridlington the late storms had put five vessels ashore. Two were lost, but the men all saved. Four of our foot companies are ordered to march hence, and four more to come in their room. The first to go, Sir Robert Hilliard's, which is ordered for Plymouth, it is supposed, will march to-morrow. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Nov. 4.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. To-day two of his Majesty's frigates, one supposed to be the Ruby, sailed northward. Two light ships coming out of Harwich sailed after them, but could not fetch them up, and before they could get about Orford Ness, a shallop came up with them. The sternmost ran his ship ashore, but she would not set, so the shallop took her. She belongs to Newcastle, and is called the George. The other belongs to London, and is sailed northward. Wind S. W. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Nov. 4.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Several masters of ships and others have lately come hither from Bilboa, having been carried in there by the Dutch. They report above 100 English and French vessels are prizes there, and say that they think it impossible for any vessel to escape being taken, and that the whole Bay, from Bilboa to the Passage, is full of such prizes in every creek, and that there were above 60 capers between that Cape and the Land's End. Wind N.N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 124.]
Nov. 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. A small vessel came from Bilboa into Mount's Bay the 31st, bringing over 50 passengers, seamen, that had been taken and carried to that port and other places in that Bay. I am advised by a merchant and some of the passengers that came here that three of the vessels lately taken were the Industry, the Elizabeth, and the Mayflower, all belonging to Topsham, from Newfoundland. As they came out another English merchantman, also from Newfoundland, was being carried in. There is in that Bay 10 or 20 Dutch capers of from 6 to 36 guns, so that a vessel can hardly escape. If the English merchants there had not procured a passport for this vessel from the Dutch Consul there, on condition that the master should take these 50 men, and given them two pieces of eight each to buy victuals, they could not have come safe home, being met by two or three capers that would have carried them back again. A great Londoner has lain there this long time, and dares not venture out without convoy. The ships in this port are here still, expecting convoy. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Nov. 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News identical with the last. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Nov. 4.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. There are so many Dutch capers on this coast, especially about the Land's End, that a vessel can scarce come in or go out, which causes many sad hearts, especially amongst those whose trade is coasting, and makes them admire we have not a frigate to protect us. 20 or 30 sail are here (of which I wrote in my last), expecting a convoy. Wind E., and has this se'nnight been E. and N.E. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Nov. 4. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from 30 Oct. to 3 Nov., all previously calendared except:—Newcastle, 1 Nov. The laden fleet, with their convoy, continue still here. We are in fear for a light fleet, two of which are come in and left the rest beating at sea, so that they dare not make for our bar, by reason of the wind, which is E. and by N. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Nov. 4. Warrant for a pardon to Matthew Delver and John Glover, of Lewisham, condemned at the Kent Assizes for the murder of Thomas Goodson, and afterwards respited. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 72.]
Nov. 4. Caveat that no grant pass of the place of William Peacock, deceased, trumpeter in ordinary to the King, his Majesty having already disposed of the same, without notice to Gervas Price, sergeant trumpeter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, f. 17.]
Nov. 4. Caveat that no grant pass of the estate of Thos. Wheate, of Shadwell, apothecary, being suspected of having murdered the wife of Capt. Jo. Willgresse, Commander of the Assistance, and her child, without notice to Prince Rupert. [Ibid.]
Nov. 4. Privy seal for the allowance, equipage, &c., of Sir Thomas Higgons, appointed Envoy Extraordinary to Venice. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 199.]
Docquet thereof, dated November. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 277.]
Nov. 4.
The Guinea, in the Hope.
Capt. Thomas Trafford to the Navy Commissioners. Since my coming down I have caused the carpenters to make a further survey of some defects in the ship, with the boatswain's account for stores, and desire that Capt. Piles may be reminded of his duty in fitting his ship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II., 330, No. 12.]
Nov. 4.
Bedford Street.
Surgeon J. Pearse to T. Hayter. Desiring that bills be sent for the Cambridge and Revenge, the surgeon of the Cambridge after Sir F. Holles death being exchanged for him in the Dreadnought, who has not yet received any allowance for fitting his chest, and the surgeon of the Revenge having lately died, and another to be appointed. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Nov. 4.
The Augustine, in Tilbury Hope.
Capt. James Watkins to S. Pypes (Pepys). I am receiving today 20 tuns of beer from Ipswich. All the casks are woodbound. We want 25 tuns of ironbound cask to floor the ship, which I humbly desire you to order, and also the things wanting on board, mentioned in a paper enclosed. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Nov. 4. Sir Henry Ford, William Glascock, and Dr. John Topham to the Lord Lieutenant. Stating that, pursuant to his command, they had examined James Leslie and William Bromacan on the articles exhibited against Capt. Sharland, which examinations with the articles of Aug. 22, calendared in last volume, p. 518, and the captain's answer are annexed, and that Leslie produced the counterpart of his indenture with the officers of the Tower, dated 12 March 1669[–70], whereby he covenants that the guns, &c., mentioned therein and then in his possession shall be restored, except what shall be consumed in the service, and that the captain changed the copper gun mentioned in the first article with Sir Roger Mostyn in June 1666, and that the gunner, when entering into the said indenture, well knew the said gun was not on board, and had not been for three years before. [Copy. Ibid. No. 14a.]
Nov. [4]./14.
Leghorn.
Affidavit sworn before Giovanni Alessandro Francisco Catelani, notary public, by Lewis Marchant, purser of the galley there, that being charged by Sir J. B. Duteil to provide things necessary for equipping her with Sir T. Clutterbuck's approbation, the latter had often informed him that he himself was the chief and superintendent not only of that galley, but also of the one at Genoa, that Sir T. Clutterbuck had delayed to clear the charge incurred by the deponent in the equipment of the galley, and that when he went to Porto Ferraio he ordered the deponent to provide an awning for her, which he would not pay for, till the deponent threatened to take it away. [4 pages. Translated from Italian. Ibid. No. 15.]
[Nov. ?] Robert Arthur, heir and executor of Robert Arthur, late of Dublin, Alderman, to the King. Petition, stating that the said Alderman Arthur, the petitioner's grandfather, at the beginning of the late troubles in 1641, was an inhabitant of Dublin, and continued there, till, at the Duke of Ormonde's request, he left his house there for the Duke's own habitation, and repaired to his own country house near Dublin, which his Grace garrisoned with part of his own troop for his security, where he continued till he died, in 1648, and paid contribution and advanced several sums for the support of the army of the late and present King at Dublin, and was always known to be a constant, loyal subject, as by certificates from the said Duke and other persons of quality may appear, and that by clause 228 in the Act of Explanation, it was ordered that the petitioner's father John, lately deceased, should be restored to his said father's real and personal estate, and that, notwithstanding, an indictment of treason and rebellion appears of record against the said Alderman Arthur, and an outlawry thereon, which was contrived by some ill wishers of the petitioner and his ancestors, on purpose to defraud them both of his Majesty's favour and of their estates, all which the petitioner offered to prove, and that the sheriff and officers supposed to have had the management of the same were mere strangers, and never knew of any such proceedings, and that the said record is altogether defective in substance and law to support the same, and that the petitioner has desired the Lord Chancellor of Ireland to grant a writ of error to reverse the same, and prayed the judges of the King's Bench to examine the said practice, but could not prevail without special order from his Majesty, and praying that the Lord Chancellor be required to grant a writ of error, and that the Lord Chief Justice and other judges of the King's Bench be required to admit thereof, and to examine the errors and practice aforesaid. At the foot,
Nov. 4.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney General. On the back,
His report, dated 6 Nov., that the petitioner's grandfather had many certificates of his loyalty, but above all he is expressly so declared by the Act of Explanation, and is also enabled to recover his debts, and doubtless if the attainder by outlawry had been then known it would have been discharged by the same Act; that the above petition seems reasonable and agreeable to law; and that the reversal will not restore the petitioner to any lands held by Adventurers and Soldiers under the Act of Settlement, for their title does not depend on the attainder, but it will enable him to recover debts due by bond or statute as intended by the Act of Explanation. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 40.]
[Nov. ?] George Clare, his wife and children, and Margaret Williams, widow, and her children, to the Earl of Arlington. Petition, praying for a pass for their return to Ireland, having for a long time petitioned at Court for some redress for their great sufferings for loyalty, to which they can obtain no answer, and being unable to attend any longer. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Nov. 4. Pass for George Clare with his wife and children and for Margaret Williams, widow, and her children to Ireland. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 199.]
Nov. 4. Warrant for delivery to Richard Smith, clerk of the cheque to the Yeomen of the Guard, of 120 livery coats, 120 pairs of red breeches, 120 velvet bonnets, 120 pairs of fine gray worsted stockings, 120 waist belts, and 50 carbine belts, and also of 120l. for providing cloth for watching gowns for each man. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 341.]
Nov. 5. Thomas Gale to Williamson. I have sought the library at Westminster for Theodorus and Ælfricus. I find neither. It was only a suspicion of mine, inserted in the paper you sent to France, that a copy of Theodore might be found there. Both these were transcribed out of the MS. in Bennet Library by Corn[elius] Bee. I have dealt with his son for a transcript of them, or to buy them outright, and shall know his answer in two days. I seem to remember that Dr. Turner, at your instance, procured a transcript of the MS. in Bennet. If Mr. Bee's copy cannot be had, I will forthwith write to Cambridge. Noted by Williamson. "MSS. for Dom. Luc." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 129.] Perhaps annexed,
'Note by Dr. J. Pearson on a copy of the Penitentials of Archbishop Theodore, copied from the MS. in Bennet Library, Cambridge, to the effect that the last seven chapters are wanting, and that the Chapters of Egbert which follow in the same MS. are also defective, wanting the first 25 chapters. The extracts from the Liber Scintillarum seem perfect. The Canons of Ælfric are in Spelman, but imperfect, and to be supplied from the MS. in Bennet Library. 'Noted, in a different hand, "See if there is another copy in the Library at Westminster." Noted by Williamson, "For Dom. Luc." [Latin. Ibid. 'No. 129i.]
Nov. 5. Sir Richard Lower to Williamson. Requesting him to communicate the enclosed to Lord Arlington, and to use his own interest with his lordship to excuse his friend and kinsman, Edward Herle, from the office of Sheriff for that year, and stating that a friend would speak to Lord Shaftesbury on the same business. [Ibid. No. 130.] Perhaps enclosed,
The request calendared under Nov. 1671 in Calendar, S.P. Dom., 1671, p. 592. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 294, No. 100a.]
Nov. 5.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The winds continue at E. and by N., and keep all ships from going out or coming in. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 131.]
Nov. 5.
Stockton.
Samuel Hodgkin to James Hickes. 25 loaden colliers are here, put in by contrary winds. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Nov. 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Since the enclosed was sealed, my friend on the other side, by a particular message in haste, told one that I trust in the packet-boat, not having time to write it, that he heard the Prince of Orange was with his army in the land of Luycke (Liége). It is reported that more forces are gone from France towards the French army in Germany. About 150 laden colliers are reported here to have been lately off Yarmouth. The long continuing East wind ceased yesterday evening, and is not yet in any fixed point. Our packet-boat that should have come out of the Briell on Saturday had an embargo till yesterday, when she left and arrived here betwixt 10 and 11 this morning. The sea is clear of any ships in view. A Swedish ship laden with pitch, &c., is reported to have been lately cast away about Colne. I believe the French flying army of horse in his letter is overnumbered by mistake. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 133.]
Nov. 5.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Last night the Jersey came to Spithead with two or three merchantmen for Lisbon, and sails for Plymouth to take under his convoy more bound for those parts. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Nov. 5.
Dartmouth.
W[illiam] H[urt] to James Hickes. Your news to-day of some agitation for peace was very welcome, and we pray the hastening of it, for we account our poor Newfoundland men, that are gone to markets, in very great jeopardy, one of them, the James of this port, being lately taken and carried into Bilbao by three capers that lay about 40 leagues off that place. The master being returned home, tells us of 30 English and French more arrived in there and 40 sail into Galicia. The seven Dutch men-of-war that lie about the Straits' mouth will much endanger the rest of our Newfoundland fleet, and it is much to be feared the single convoy with them may be in great hazard. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Nov. 5.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Giving particulars of a ship arrived. The Happy Return came in to-day, and is gone to the Hamoaze, where are several merchant ships bound Eastward. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Nov. 5.
Plymouth.
Extract from two letters. The Dutch are everywhere on our coast. From St. Ives they write that two capers lie between Scilly, and have taken several vessels. They restored one of that place, and the captain sent Messrs. Hamond, Ceely, and Prige, a cheese each for old acquaintance' sake. That very vessel, before she got in, was taken by another, but let go on the paper he had from the first captain. They write from Penzance that every day more or less appear in the bay, and the same off the Lizard. Yesterday imported a Hamburger from France that was scrub'd (?) by two capers, and this morning the fishing-boats were chased in by two capers that came in sight of this port, so that there is no stirring without convoy. The Happy Return, that lay so long in Tor Bay, is come back again.
I had a letter to-day from Penzance from the master of a vessel I have put in there, advising that last week a ketch came there from Bilbao with about 50 taken men, that reports that but one vessel of all those bound thither from Newfoundland is escaped in safe, and that it is reported there are 80 capers between the North Cape and the Lizard. [Probably sent by Nathaniel Herne. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 137.]
Nov. 5.
[Received.]
A memorial of goods laden on the Genoa convoyer and the ships under his charge at Cadiz, consigned to Leghorn and Genoa, consisting of 57 chests of indigo and 19,000 pieces of eight, with the names of the consignors and consignees. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 138.]
Nov. 5. Warrant to Sir John Robinson, for Colonel Whitley to discourse with Thos. Payne, a prisoner, in his or his deputy's presence. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 199.]
Nov. 5. Warrant to Sir John Robinson, for Cornelis de Gelder to discourse with Dan. Van Overscheld and Robert Rogers, his servant, prisoners, in presence of himself or his deputy, concerning merchants' accounts and their private account. Minute. [Ibid.]
[Nov. 5.] Silas Taylor to the Navy Commissioners. His Majesty's gracious pleasure to the commander of the privateer taken by the Portsmouth is worthy of himself, remunerating enemies for kindness to his subjects. But Capt. Page had sold this ship 29 Oct., on which day he sailed hence, to the master of a Newcastle coalship, from whom, I believe, he may easily have her again. I enclose the blockmakers' account for the price of their commodities. They understand it is for ready money. The furious East wind, which had stormed so long, ceased towards evening yesterday, and the wind is uncertain, sometimes Northward and sometimes Southward. It has swept the sea here clear of all ships. We have a report, but as yet no certainty of a great fleet of loaden colliers off Yarmouth. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 16.]
Nov. 5.
The Dartmouth, in the Downs.
Capt. Edward Pinn to the same. When the frigate was in the River six watermen, whose names I enclose, ran away. His Royal Highness directed me to you, and said that by summoning the masters of their Hall you would help me to them again, and that he would have them severely punished by losing the privilege of the River. I sent a small bill of disbursements for pressing men to Sir T. Allin, when he was at Chatham, to be signed. If he has not done so, I beseech him and you to finish it, and leave it with his clerk. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Nov. 5.
The Mary yacht, Dublin.
Capt. James Sharland to the same. I received yours of 24 Sept., 28 Oct., and not sooner, for I was at Chester, and coming towards Dublin, was forced to the Isle of Man, and continued there almost three weeks. I thank you for accepting my bill for a boat, which was greatly wanted, and another new cable is now almost as much wanted, though I had one so lately from London, for all save that are in two, and one in three, pieces. I have been charged with my gunner's false charge. Two of his articles I own, but the other eight I deny, as I have given in my answer on oath sent by post to his Royal Highness, which I hope will be satisfactory, for he cannot prove more than what I would have told you of. Though he cannot bring witnesses to justify his false charge, I can bring enough to prove a true one against him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 18.]
Nov. 5. Capt. Arthur Herbert to S. Pepys. Requesting that 100 blank tickets be delivered to Mr. French, as his ship, the Cambridge, is bound to sea, and several of his men, being sick and wounded, are unable to go on the voyage. Postscript.—My own handwriting is so ill that I believe you will easily pardon my not troubling you with it. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Nov. 5.
The Rubyin Queenborough Swale.
Capt. Stephen Pyend to Col. Middleton. I have brought the Ruby here to be refitted according to his Royal Highness' order of 31 Oct., but the Master Attendant has as yet no orders what is to be done to her. I enclose a certificate from the master, carpenter, and boatswain, of her defects. To-day I informed Sir J. Smyth of our arrival, who is gone to London, and advised me to acquaint you of our being here. We have no beer on board but what stinks, and our men have drunk stinking beer these two days. We had been supplied from Dover, but the weather prevented us. Pray order the victualler from Chatham to send some. [Ibid. No. 20I.] Enclosed,
The said certificate. [Ibid. No. 20I.]
Nov. [5]/15.
Leghorn.
Affidavit by Lorenzo Curlo, chief lieutenant, and Guiseppe Camerata, master's mate, of the galley at Leghorn, before Giovanni Alessandro Francisco Catelani, notary public, that the rigging made there for her is wholly disproportionable and thicker than usual, showing it was made by unskilful persons. [3 pages. Translated from Italian. Ibid. No. 21.]
Nov. 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter to be passed under the Great Seal of Scotland, granting to the Duke of Lauderdale full approbation and exoneration of his service as Commissioner to the Parliament of Scotland during the three sessions which began 19 Oct., 1669, 28 July 1670, and 12 June 1672, and of everything done by him by virtue of the said commission, without prejudice to the said commission, which is declared to remain in full force to all intents and purposes. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 113.]
Nov. 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Being informed of some tumultuary proceedings relating to a protestation against the election of the Lord Provost of Edinburgh, and that about 4 or 5 Oct. a great convocation was made of the meaner sort of townspeople round about the Town Council House, in the Parliament Court, and in the open streets, as such convocations of the people are most illegal, and may be of dangerous consequence, requiring them to make strict inquiry into the whole matter of that tumult and the grounds thereof, and who have been the stirrers up of the people to such unlawful practices, and to report the same with all convenient diligence. [Ibid. p. 117.]
Nov. 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing that the execution of the rules lately made concerning Dublin, Cork, and the other Irish corporations be suspended till the King, with the English Privy Council, has deliberated thereon. [Draft. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 42.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Thomas Parris to be gunner of North Yarmouth in Norfolk, at the allowance of 10s. 6d. a week, to commence from 1 April last. [Sign manual. Countersigned, "Arlington." S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 139.]
Minute thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 46.]
[Nov. ?] George Woodward, of Nottingham, to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner has been employed by several persons to put out their moneys on securities, by reason whereof, and of other business in his employment as bailiff of the Court of the Peverell, he was obliged to prosecute several actions against the debtors, whereupon several of them exhibited an information of barratry against him, on which he was convicted at the last Derby Assizes, and they are still combining to prosecute him for extortion, and praying for a pardon for the said offences. At the foot,
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to Mr. Baron Wyndham. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 140.]
[Nov. ?] George Woodward to the King. Another petition, to the same effect as the last, but in somewhat different language. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Nov. 6.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wind E.N.E. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Nov. 6.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Yesterday was observed with the usual prayers and sermons, ringing of bells, and bonfires at night. Wind yesterday N.E., to-day E. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Nov. 6.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Yesterday sailed the Hunter, of this town, for Leghorn, intending to run through without staying for convoy, and also a French vessel for France and two billanders for Flanders, all laden with herrings. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Nov. 6.
Southwold.
John Wickens to James Hickes. The wind has continued easterly so long, that no shipping has passed by here lately. A Swedish ship laden with deals, being foundered at sea, having lost her steerage, came aground on the Barnard Sand. The men were saved in their boat, and most of the deals came ashore. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Nov. 6.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. Wind E. No privateers to be seen on this coast. Ibid. No. 146.]
Nov. 6.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday was kept very strict, all shops being shut. We had a good sermon according to the day, and at night each of our three castles shot several great guns, and at last concluded with bonfires. The wind these eight or ten days till yesterday has been so violent that there is scarce passage in our eastermost street, but is now S.E., and much more moderate. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Nov. 6.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. Sending by express the enclosed from Mr. Lynch, with notes on the back of the times of its dispatch by the different postmasters. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 148.]
Nov. 6.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in the Mermaid, after convoying some merchantmen from Plymouth to the southward. She chased a small caper, but lost her in the night. The Norwich also came in from Chester. There is also come in the St. Michael, of Genoa, from the Canaries, having on board, besides wines, 250 Spanish soldiers for Ostend. They say as many more lie ready to be shipped for the same place. Those now here are a pitiful, ragged crew. The captain reports there is a very good vintage on that island this year, and that the day before he came in here he met off Scilly an English frigate with a great prize, supposed to be a St. Tubus man taken by the Nightingale. The fleet for France lies here still. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Nov. 6.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News identical with the last. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Nov. 6.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Wind E. We heard yesterday from Knowsley that the Earl of Derby was dangerously ill, so that his recovery was much doubted of. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Nov. 6. Inland advices received that day being extracts from letters from the 2nd to the 5th, all previously calendared. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
Declaration of the King's pleasure—on complaint that his guards and liveries, by being admitted to his play-house without paying, prejudice the company—that no person of any degree enter the play-house without paying the usual price; and particularly that no attendants of the nobility or gentry take a place in the house without paying. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 138.]
Nov. 6.
The Elizabeth ketch, Gravesend.
Capt. Edward Robinson to the Navy Commissioners. We have no chirurgeon on board yet. I have sent to the Hall to inform them, but have no answer. The chirurgeon appointed told me three days ago he would get his chest on board, but I hear nothing from him. I am ready to sail the first opportunity. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 22.]
Nov. 6.
The Ruby. Queenborough Swale.
Capt. Stephen Pyend to the same. To the same effect as his letter of the previous day, calendared ante p. 129. [Ibid. No. 23.] Enclosed,
Another copy of the certificate enclosed in his above letter. [Ibid. No. 23I.]
Nov. 6.
The Mary Rose.
Capt. Thomas Hamilton to W. Hewer. Requesting him to send him by his purser 100 blank tickets. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Nov. [6]/16.
Leghorn.
Affidavit by Guiseppe Camerata, master's mate or boatswain of the galley there, before G. A. F. Catelani, notary public, that he had been chosen at Genoa for that employment by Sir J. B. Duteil, and that Sir T. Clutterbuck had told him he had put him into that employment, and that to him and to no one else belonged the conferring of places and the arming of the said galleys. [3 pages. Translated from Italian. S. P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 24.]
Nov. [6]/16.
Leghorn.
Affidavit before the same by James Catalano, overseer, and four mariners of the galley there, that each of them had been appointed to his employment in the presence and with the approbation of Sir T. Clutterbuck, before whom they were brought, according to Sir J. B. Duteil's order. [4 pages. Translated from Italian. Ibid. No. 25.]
Nov. 6.
Ennis, in Thomond.
The Earl of Thomond to the King. The enclosed is as unpleasant to me, as that I could not attend your Majesty at Paradise, Newmarket. Your Majesty will guess how it goes with me to find that all my inheritance in this kingdom is the second part of the tune of Billing, my son having broken the very marriage settlement made in obedience to your commands to himself. If Sir J. Williamson and my mother are engaged to act their parts for my destruction here, as "your Solomon set" did well abhor in the trial for Billing, I must again fly to you to relieve my poor wife and three children from the ruin of unprovoked, unexpected, savage judges for my inheritance in this kingdom, and I must also use Lord Peterborough's and Lord Anglesey's further swearing for me in the Dublin Courts, as they did in Westminster Hall. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 43.] Enclosed,
The information, dated 5 Nov., of Thomas Cullen, taken before the Earl of Thomond. To the effect of his information of 3 Nov., calendared ante p. 121, adding that Walcott told him that he, the informant, by the next night should know more of it from another, which he did not, though he stayed at home all that day; that the said captain was not a conformist to the Church of Ireland, but was reputed and owned to be a professed Anabaptist; that the captain told him he had the paper from a Scotchman, but named him not, and that the informant saying, when Walcott read the said paper, those things were of dangerous consequence, Walcott said he would carry it no longer in his pocket after that night. [3 copies. Ibid. Nos. 43i.-iii.]
Nov. 7/17.
London.
Pass from Charles Colbert de Croissy, knight, Ambassador to England from the King of France, for the Unicorn, of Rotterdam, employed to bring prisoners from Holland, and to carry back Dutch prisoners from England. [Translation. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 153.]
Nov. 7.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. Last Saturday came in a billander, which left Ostend the Tuesday before. The master makes all possible haste to return, for he fears war will be broken out before he gets back betwixt the French and Spanish Kings. He says there was no talk but of war. Nothing has been seen at sea since my last but three small vessels yesterday, supposed to be coasters with coals from Sunderland. Wind S., with much rain. Postscript.—The wind is newly come E. and by N. or N. E., so I hope the coal fleet may pass by before to-morrow night, if the wind and weather hold. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 154.]
Nov. 7.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Most of the vessels ashore are got off, and run into this harbour. One ship of eight guns is come in, which lost her rudder, the rest that were riding in the bay are now turning out and going northwards. The wind much easterly. We have not heard of any further loss, or seen any capers lately. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Nov. 7.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I now send what I heard on Tuesday, viz., that Van Nesse commands a squadron towards the Sound, where the Hollanders have very many vessels lading with corn for their subsistence this winter. I know not if you received my letter of Tuesday, because the Holland mail, coming in about 10, was sent away about 11 with the ordinary packet to save charge, which used not to go away till 12.30, by which time I was ready. However, my letters were said to be sent after them. We are often served thus, because the post of this road is so subject to petticoats, as I have often complained. I did not receive Mr. Williamson's letter of the 5th till last night, too late to forbid that quantity of oysters being sent this week. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Nov. 7.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Some guns were heard this morning, and it is reported the Dutch fleet are at the back of the Long Sand, northward of the North Foreland, whereupon the four frigates in the Downs, the Plymouth, Phœnix, Dartmouth, and Richmond, command all their men on board, and have loosed their fore topsails. Wind W., a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Nov. 7.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. This morning a vessel arrived from Dieppe with news of the Prince of Condé being on his march with 40,000 men, to join the other forces in the Low Countries, and also of a flying report in France of a great overthrow lately given the Dutch, but in this they are not positive. [Ibid. No. 158.]
Nov. 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Gloucester and Jersey sailed together last Tuesday, the first for the coast of Ireland, the other for Plymouth, being appointed convoy for Lisbon. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Nov. 7.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Acknowledging his letter. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Nov. 7. Pass to Hamet, Darge, and Cidi, subjects of Algiers, to embark in any port of England for Algiers. Minute. [S. P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 199.]
Nov. 7. Pass for Richard Bulstrode to embark in any port of England for Flanders. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 7. Warrant from Lord Arlington to the Master of the packet-boats at Dover, the King having ordered him to receive and bring over such seamen and soldiers as offer themselves, and being informed that Englishmen daily quit foreign service and return in that way, to deliver all such as own themselves or are suspected to have been in foreign service to the Governor of Dover Castle, to be kept in custody till his Majesty's further pleasure be known. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 201.]
Nov. 7. Warrant from Lord Arlington to the Master of the packet-boats at Harwich, to deliver all such men to Sir Charles Lyttelton, Governor of Landguard Fort. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 7. Warrant from Lord Arlington to Sir Charles Lyttelton, to receive the said men and keep them in close custody till further directions. [Ibid.]
Nov. 7. Like warrant from Lord Arlington to the Lieutenant-Governor of Dover Castle. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 7.
Whitehall.
Col. J. Werden to S. Pepys. This morning I received the enclosed note from the Swedish Ambassador, touching the quality of the goods or equipage he designs to transport with him. He also desires that, as soon as you have ordered a fit vessel for the purpose, you would direct the master to wait upon him. [S. P. Dom. Car. II. 330, No. 27.] Enclosed,
The said note, giving a list of the horses, &c., he intends to take. [French. Ibid. No. 27i.]
Nov. 7. John Knight to Commissioner Tippetts. Requesting to be called in before the Board rise to finish the business of the sail cloth and cordage so long disputed at Portsmouth, having received full instructions from Mr. Pley. Noted, that he was called, but could not be found. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Nov. 7. Capt. William Hobbs to Thomas Edwards. Requesting him to deliver to the purser, William Upcher, eight blank muster-books, for the use of the Levant. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Nov. [7]/17.
Leghorn.
Affidavit by Guillaume Barriele, purser (escrivain) of the galley there, that Sir J. B. Duteil presented him to Sir T. Clutterbuck and told him he was his purser. Sir Thomas asked if he had his commission, and that it was necessary it should be signed by the Duke of York, and that it was to himself application should be made for all the equipment of the galley. The deponent said that all who had sold anything for, or had worked on the galley, had to go to him more than ten times for their money, and to those he had paid he had given but half their money, and had so disgusted everybody that no one would do anything for the galley, had not Monsr. Duteil promised to satisfy all those who had worked that Sir Thomas would not satisfy. [French. Ibid. No. 30.]
Nov. 7. Col. J. Fitzpatrick to the Earl of Arlington. As he knows his lordship will be glad of information of the true state of the revenue and of Lord Ranelagh's undertaking in Ireland, recommending the bearer, Mr. Muschampe, who has been a commissioner and farmer of the revenue ever since the Restoration, and whom he has enjoined to wait upon his lordship. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 44.]
Nov. 8. Examination of [Thomas] Ellis before the Earl of Arlington. He helps to collect the New River water rents. He saw this present Payne but three times in his life. He has not seen the other brother these 11 years, which was by having been employed about the Dutch Ambassadors in 1661. This Payne came to him as from his brother, to know if he were alive and how he did, and that was all the first time. The next time was a Friday, and he desired to drink with the examinant, which he refused. Next Friday he came again, and said he was going to Holland, and asked what he would say to his brother, and if he would write to his brother in his absence, which he refused. He never offered the examinant any reward. The examinant never wrote to the other Payne, nor to any person in Holland, nor to any Dutch person in London; and never wrote anything of the Navy or the fleet to Holland. He did not see the other Payne when he was last in England, nor did he receive any letter from him. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 161.]
Nov. 8. Examination of [Isabella Dawson] before the Earl of Arlington. She has been a widow seven years. She now lives with Mr. Overscheldt, who has dwelt several years with her. He only delivered her two letters in all, and she had received but two in all before. She never wrote to Holland, and knows not who writes to her from thence. She had in her house three or four months ago the elder brother of this Overscheldt, who was acquainted with Boreel, the ambassador, and Boreel was often in her house, but she never spoke to him, or he to her. Two letters were brought to her by a boy and a woman from the Post-house, directed to her, but at last, finding nobody came for it to her, and not knowing whence they came, Mr. Overscheldt saying he knew nothing of it, she tore it. Mr. Overscheldt here and there read the letters that thus came to her, but not so as she could hear. He said he feared there was some ill in them. She never made any answer to these letters. She does not know who drew the paper now shown her, inscribed, The State of, &c., nor did she ever write any such paper, or knows anybody who could. She knows no one that can state her case, or write her case. She never conferred with anybody on what has passed in this business, nor communicated with anybody concerning the receipt of these letters, so that anybody could be able to write this paper. Hearing the paper read, she does not know a word of it, and denies knowing anything of what it says is her case, or what this Mr. Peter Overscheldt did, &c. She drives no trade at all, except dressing Mr. Overscheldt's victuals. She has not traded for a long time in anything. Mr. Proctor (?) came to speak with her, who dwells in the Exchange, and Mr. Baker, a haberdasher, in Milk Street, and another gentleman last night as from Mr. Baker. [1½ page. Both these examinations are in Williamson's hand. Ibid. No. 162.]
[Nov. 8.] The case of Isabella Dawson humbly and truly stated. The letters on account of which she is confined as a suspected intelligencer are the correspondence of the late Peter Overscheldt, a Dutch merchant, who lived many years in her house, and was engaging his interest with the Dutch to persuade them to make peace with the King; that his brother, Dan. Overscheldt, now prisoner in the Tower, was ignorant of the whole transaction; that she is a tradeswoman abhorring all treacherous intelligence, and quite unfit for it, has been confined 12 days, and being ill, entreats to be released. [1½ page. Probably the paper alluded to in the above examination. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 163.]
Nov. 8.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The wind being now W., I hope the fleet of colliers may sail to-day. [Ibid. No. 164.]
Nov. 8.
Stockton.
Samuel Hodgkin to James Hickes. The London ships here are hourly waiting for the coming by of the Newcastle fleet, wind being now S.W. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Nov. 8.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. About 11 to-day we spied four or five large vessels about six leagues off, standing northward. I rode to the Head, from which we could plainly make out nine men-ofwar, Hollanders as we suppose, five or six of 50 and 60 guns apiece, the rest smaller. At the same time came about the Head from the northward a pink with Spanish colours out and stood into the bay and anchored, but before we got to the town we saw her loose, and stand off towards the Head, so we suppose it may be one of their company that came in to take notice of the ships riding here, being nine light colliers. We have sent account to Scarborough, that they may give notice to the northwards, to prevent the fleet from Newcastle coming out. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Nov. 8.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The four frigates mentioned in my last sailed westward; there is no certain report on what account. Postscript.—The wind, which is not a topsail gale, is W. and W.N.W. The four frigates are come again into the Downs, and a great ship from the southward is coming in, and about 40 sail are coming thither round the North Foreland. [Ibid. No. 167.]
Nov. 8.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing a list of ships arrived. A letter come to-day from London reports that the Mermaid is taken to the west of this by two Dutch capers. I hope there is no truth in it. The Dutch capers lie very thick between this and the soundings. There are very great complaints here by all merchants and shipowners, that these seas are not better guarded. Advice has now come here of three ships of Topsham and two of this town taken coming from Newfoundland. Last week a Dutch caper came into the Sound, there being no ships there, spread her Dutch colours, and so stood off again. I am, with many other English hearts, sorry to see such things. [Ibid. No. 168.] Enclosed,
The said list, with note that the wind is N.W. [Ibid. No. 168i.]
Nov. 8. Inland advices received that day being extracts from letters from the 4th to the 7th, all previously calendared. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 169.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for an order to the Farmers of the Customs on unwrought wood, to pay to Hen. Coventry, Secretary of State, 462l. 10s. quarterly, in lieu of his pension, so long as he holds the said office, and to the Treasury Commissioners to allow the same in their accounts, cancelling the privy seal of 25 August last for settling the said monies. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 134.]
Nov. 8. Grant of pardon to William Low, late of Dublin, of all treasons, misprision of treason, &c., up to the present date. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 199.]
Docquet thereof, dated November. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 272.]
Nov. 8. Privy seal for 1,095l. to John Werden, Secretary to the Duke of York, as the King's free gift. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 200.]
Docquet thereof, dated November. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 273.]
Nov. 8. Privy seal for the Earl of Peterborough's allowance, equipage, &c., appointed Ambassador Extraordinary to espouse and conduct the Archduchess of Innsbruck on the part of the Duke of York. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 200.]
Nov. 8. Warrant to Sir John Robinson, for Wm. Prickman to discourse with Daniel Van Overscheltde in the Tower, but in his presence only, and he hearing the discourse. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 8. Warrant to Sir John Robinson for the removal of Edward Purcell, committed to the Tower for threatening the life of the Duke of Ormonde, to Bethlehem Hospital, he having committed extravagancies that argue him to be insane. [Ibid.]
Nov. 8. Warrant to [the Governor of Bethlehem Hospital] to receive Edward Purcell and take the same care of him as of other persons of like condition. [Ibid.]
Nov. 8. Post warrant for Richard Bulstrode, to go to Harwich and have 3 horses for himself, servant, and guide. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 8. Privy seal for 300l. to Thomas, Earl of Ossory, appointed Envoy to the French Court. [Ibid.]
Docquet thereof, dated November. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 271.]
Nov. 8. Warrant from Lord Arlington to John Baker, messenger, to apprehend Isabelle Dawson, and keep her close prisoner, for holding correspondence with the King's enemies. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 202.]
Nov. 8. Warrant to the Commissioners for Prizes to deliver the Staveren, a Dutch prize, taken 28 May last, to the officers of the Dockyard at Chatham, to be fitted as a man-of-war. [Ibid.]
Nov. 8. Warrant to Sir John Robinson to receive Isabelle Dawson, prisoner, for several dangerous correspondencies. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 8. Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox to give Sir Charles Lyttelton debentures at every muster at the rate of 10l. a week, in addition to his pay, in respect of his extraordinary charges in command of the twelve companies of the Guard drawn to Rochester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 46.]
Nov. 8. Reference to Sir Thomas Chicheley of the petition of Mary Tenney, showing that she has made it her business to inspect into the management of the powder mills, and is very well satisfied in the discovery of the frauds of the persons, by making powder of late weak and unserviceable. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 46.]
Nov. 8.
Victualling Office.
Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child, and T. Papillon, to the Navy Commissioners. We have just received your letter ordering a month's provisions to be immediately sent down by the victualling vessels undischarged to all the ships commanded by Capt. Robinson, but as there is only 20 tuns of beer left in one of the said ships and a small remnant of biscuit and pease, we pray you to let us know if you desire us to load the said provisions in hoys to-morrow morning, and, if so, what are the ships to which they are to be sent. The provisions are all ready, and will only require the time necessary for shipping such a quantity, which, we compute, cannot be done before next Tuesday night. If you wish it attempted, no time shall be lost. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 31.]
Nov. 8.
The Sweepstakes, in the Swale.
Capt. Thomas Bridgeman to the same. I anchored, 15 Oct., at the Buoy of the Nore, and gave an account of the condition of the ship to Sir E. Spragg, who advised me to go to the Commissioners at Chatham. They ordered me next day to bring her into the Swale and ordered a survey of her, of which a copy is enclosed. The 25th, provisions being short, they ordered me three weeks' provisions out of the great ships, which I find difficult to get. I have been several times with the Commissioners at Chatham for further orders, but found none. The 30th Capt. Robinson gave me an order to fit the ship with all expedition, and I went with him to Chatham, and the master builder said I must go into dock. Sir J. Smyth has since ordered me to stay here for further orders. The builder's assistants surveyed her anew, 3 Nov., and the 6th came down a new tiller and a piece of timber to be fixed to the back of the rudder, and thimbles to fill up the gudgeons, and four carpenters, but no caulker, and no order to take out her guns or to lay her ashore to put in the thimbles, or to clean her. This morning I went to Capt. Robinson for further orders, but there were none, and he was gone up sick to London. I have sent up my purser with this. No victuallers are here, and he may look after his provisions there. I wait here for your further commands, and will go to Chatham to-morrow, to see if there are any orders there. The Princess went ashore to-day, and the carpenters are taken from me, and put on board her. I received an order from Sir J. Smyth to discharge Capt. Bagot's company, and did so 26 Oct., and delivered three books to Sir J. Smyth, and one to the soldiers, according to his commands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 32.] Enclosed,
The said copy of the survey, dated 21 Oct. [Ibid. No. 32i.]
Nov. 8.
The Ruby, Queenborough Swale.
Capt. Stephen Pyend to the Navy Commissioners. In my last I informed you of our arrival here by his Royal Highness' order, but as yet neither Commissioner Middleton nor the Master Attendant knows what is to be done with the ship. For her refitting I have got out all her guns and empty casks, and now wait your orders. According to Sir J. Smyth's orders, I have discharged all the soldiers on board, and send you enclosed the several books of their entries, discharges, and runs. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Nov. 8.
The Newcastle.
Capt. John Pearce to the same. Yesterday, the wind being fair, I sailed for the Downs, where I arrived safe to-day, where I expect further orders. I wrote to you, requesting some sails we needed, and sent our boatswain for the same purpose. A small quantity of our provisions is yet behind. I am informed it was shipped before we came from the Hope, but imagine the roughness of the weather hindered it coming on board. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Nov. 8.
The Augustine, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Capt. James Watkins to S. Pypes (Pepys). Yesterday, having our first fair wind, we sailed hither from the Hope. Our long boat coming the same day from London about two this morning in this place came athwart a dogger and was overset, having in her 15 men, and all the stores sent for our ship. My lieutenant and a boy were drowned; all the rest were saved. The boat is taken up again, but all the stores are lost, wherefore I entreat you to supply me with such stores again, according to the enclosed list. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Nov. 8. James Wyles, master of the Phœnix, to the same. Declaring that all his company was taken away from him by his commander, who took no notice of what he spoke, and desiring to appear before the Board to vindicate himself, and to declare the unjustness of his commander in abusing his Majesty by these most insufferable abuses. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Nov. [8]/18.
Leghorn.
Attested copies by Giovanni Alexandro Francesco Catelani, notary public of Leghorn, of notarial acts of sale done at Valetta before Pietro Fiore, notary public, of divers Turkish and negro slaves, 19 in all, bought from various owners on August 4th, 5th, 9th, and 11th, and Oct. 3rd, by Jean Bardou, the brother of Sir J. B. Duteil, and Nicolao Bencini, of Florence, acting under a commission from Sir T. Clutterbuck, dated 11 July, and of two slaves bought 11 Oct., by the said Bardou and William Flaves, acting under a commission from the said Sir J. B. Duteil. [17 pages. Latin and Italian. Ibid. No. 37.]
Nov. [8]/18.
Leghorn.
Attested copy by the same of a notarial act done at Valletta, 5 Oct., by which Giovanni Mairon, the vendor of six of the above slaves, acknowledged the receipt of the price of them from the said Bardou and Flaves, Bencini having failed to pay it. [2 pages. Latin. Ibid. No. 38.]
[Nov. ?] Capt. Richard Rooth to the King. Petition, stating that Sir William Penn, being governor of the fort of Kinsale and captain of the foot company there, in 1669, with the knowledge and approbation of his Majesty and Royal Highness, surrendered these employments in consideration of 400l. paid by the petitioner; that the petitioner for passing his patent, for commissions, and for removal of his family thither, further paid over 100l.; that about 10 months ago he was commanded to repair to England to serve in the fleet, which he has done under Lord Ossory, that in the mean time his company has been reduced and he has been deprived of his livelihood purchased as aforesaid, no allowance belonging to him as governor, and his Majesty having already declared the 500l. should be repaid him, and that he should have a company annexed to his government, as any shall fall vacant, praying an order for the payment of the said 500l., and letters to the Lord Lieutenant for providing him with a company. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 45.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Ireland. Directing payment to Capt. Richard Rooth of 500l. out of the moneys provided on the present establishment for a sea regiment. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 344.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the Order in Council of 20 Sept., on the petition of Sir Edward Scott, calendared in last volume, p. 640, directing the commission or commissions therein mentioned to be issued accordingly, and the said Order to be executed. [2½ pages. Ibid. p. 341.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 46.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Capt. John Cassells and Rose his wife, and the survivor of them, of the pension of 100l. sterling which had come to the King's disposal by the death of William Halley, late Chief Justice of Munster. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 357.]
Nov. 9. Nicholas Oudart, L[atin] S[ecretary] to Williamson. Begging an effectual word to the Treasury Commissioners, that he may be entered on the list making that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 170.]
Nov. 9. Certificate by Baron Hugh Wyndham that George Woodward was convicted before him of barratry at the last Assizes, but all or most of the offences charged were committed some years since in the undue execution of some employment he had in the Court of the Honour of Peverill, and on his coming to Nottingham he had from several persons of good worth there a good report of the said Woodward's behaviour, which has been since attested by a certificate from the Mayor and divers of the Aldermen and other inhabitants of Nottingham, and that he therefore conceives the said Woodward may be a fit object for pardon. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Nov. 9.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. An order, I hear, is come for Capt. Gollop to take in Sir Edward Charleton's company, and land them at Yarmouth, to prevent their long land march. This may hinder the colliers, who have now as fair a wind as possible, from sailing, unless they leave their convoy, which cannot be ready in less than two days to take in the landmen. Wind W. and by N. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 172.]
Nov. 9.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. Our outward bound fleet sailed with yesternight's tide from White Booth Road with their convoy, the Golden Phœnix, with a westerly wind. We hope at the mouth of the Humber they will join the Guernsey, which lies thereabouts with laden colliers for the south. The Deptford ketch lies in Grimsby Roads, with a few light colliers from the south, which six or eight vessels will join, I hope, to-day, for the service of this port, the least of six and the best of ten guns, for the very garrison here needs, and the town will want coals otherwise before Christmas. Last Thursday Sir Robert Hilliard's company drew out of this garrison and crossed to Barton for their march to Plymouth, whereunto they are removed. The company was full and very complete, and, having fully discharged all their quarters, left the town shouting with good wishes for their well doing, having thereunto obliged them by the general civility of officers and common soldiers. Lieut.-Colonel Sir John Griffith's company also is shortly to march for Rochester, and Major Ratcliff's and Capt. Talbot's two companies of Col. Fitzgerald's regiment for Yarmouth, which are to be supplied with the recruit of two other companies out of the same, as the former with Sir Walter Vane's. Postscript.—We are advised by express from Bridlington of nine Dutch men-of-war, from 40 to 60 guns, seen off the Head in that bay yesterday, notice whereof is sent down by boat from the postmaster here to all ships that are not yet gone out of this river. The Commissioners here have not yet received any answer from you or their Lordships to theirs of the 6th and 12th ult. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Nov. 9.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. Giving almost the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 174.]
Nov. 9.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Several parcels of the Kent that was castaway are driven ashore about Wainfleet, Ingoldmells, Numby, Chapell, and Huttoft. One of the great masts is come ashore at Wainfleet, and several gilt pieces of the great cabin. I sent to-day one of the Custom House officers to these places, to see what goods, planks, or rigging are taken up, and to charge the people in whose hands they are to have them forthcoming, so that his Majesty or whomever else they belong to may have them secured, and may have information in whose hands they are. Wind a little south of W. [Ibid. No. 175.]
Nov. 9.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I am glad the oysters please. I directed Capt. Langley this morning what to write to his friend, according to your desire about them. I have not yet seen his warrant, but he will show it me in the afternoon. I overlooked yesterday Mr. Tucker's and Mr. Reeves' orders for transportation, and what I can certify I will, but no more. I gave you a little account in my last of the Dutch squadron, and shall write to-night to Mr. Dale, to make a narrow enquiry after it, and also Capt. Langley and I have consulted about it, and he will send an honest fellow to Amsterdam under a pretence he has found out. Yesterday sailed hence into the Rolling Grounds about 20 light colliers, in expectation of a fleet of light ships from the Thames with a convoy. They anchor there to be ready to sail with them. The wind got last night into the West, where it continues somewhat boisterous. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 176.]
Nov. 9.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Williamson. I received yours of the 7th, with Lord Arlington's warrant, which I shall observe. As to sending a man to Holland, I have made use of a discreet person, who has gone several times in packet-boats, and also I trusted him with his Majesty's letters when you were with the French army in Holland. I have desired him to make it his business to discover what the squadron is, how many, and whither bound, and with what speed he can to return. What other observations can be made I have given him advice to inspect. I have drawn up the account of the victualling of the seamen and soldiers, and desired your kinsman's help in presenting it to you, and I have showed the orders from Mr. Tucker and Mr. Reeves, who from time to time directed the said prisoners to the packet-boats. I have written to my friend to send two single barrels of oysters in place of two double. [Ibid. No. 177.]
Nov. 9.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last night came in the Dunkirk and another frigate. Now there are 6 King's ships in the Downs, and two French men-of-war. The wind blows hard N.W. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Nov. 9.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Our coast has lately been very clear of capers, by reason of two frigates continually cruising here, till yesterday three small vessels were taken off this harbour by a Dutch caper, which was an English ketch formerly taken and now made a man-of-war, by which trick she came upon them unawares. [Ibid. No. 179.]
Nov. 9.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. The wind has now come West, but has not yet brought us any shipping out of Ireland. We expect a considerable number the next tide. The Earl of Derby continues ill, small or no hope of his recovery. [Ibid. No. 180.]
Nov. 9. The Earl of Ossory to the Navy Commissioners. Recommending to their favour the bearer, Capt. Richard Rooth, in respect of himself and the seamen he brought from Ireland, that they may be paid from the time of their entry by the Clerk of the Cheque at Kinsale till their entry on the Victory, though his Royal Highness' order for their payment and the Clerk of the Cheque's list was not brought down at the pay. [S.P. Dom., Car, II. 330, No. 39.]
Nov. 9.
The White Fox, Sheerness.
John Rudd, Master Attendant at Sheerness, to the Navy Commissioners. The Princess has been ashore, and cleaned on the Isle of Grain, and I got her afloat again last night to take in her guns, and she is ready to take in her provisions, and may be ready to sail in two or three days at furthest. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 40.]
Nov. 9.
London.
Capt. Sir John Holmes to W. Hewer. Requesting him to deliver to Thomas Cowley, purser of the Rupert, the necessary books and tickets. [Ibid. No. 41.]
Nov. 9. Certificate by the Earl of Ossory that John Colson served under him in the Victory, and coming up to London on leave fell sick, and so could not appear at Chatham when the ship was paid off, and desiring that he may receive his pay. [Ibid. No. 42.] Annexed,
Certificate, dated 9 Nov., of William Owtram, D.D., minister, and the churchwardens of St. Margaret's, Westminster, that Colson, a waterman and an inhabitant of the said parish, was sick at his own house for above a fortnight at the beginning of October. [Ibid. No. 42I.]
Certificate by Joseph Talbot, apothecary, of his having attended Colson. [Ibid. No. 42II.]
Nov. 9. Affidavit by Isaac Hadley that about four months ago he saw about a hundredweight of nails, which the brazier, who had them, told him he had bought from a chapman at Chatham, which nails the deponent believes were part of those he made for Capt. Watson for the use of the Navy, as he never made the like for anyone else, or heard of anyone else who did. [Ibid. No. 43.]
Nov. 9.
Chatham.
Warrant from Commissioner Middleton to the Clerk of the Cheque and the Storekeeper at Chatham to make out a bill for 13 canbuoys supplied by John Charles, cooper, to several ships, as appears by the annexed certificates. On the back,
Draft bill for the same, dated 2 Dec. [Ibid. No. 44.] Annexed, Five receipts, dated on various days in the previous May and June, for different numbers of canbuoys. [Ibid. Nos. 44I.-v.]
Nov. 9.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to the Earl of Arlington. The Lord Lieutenant, after a month's lingering sickness, is at present under the distemper of a fever, and unable to write himself. I send herewith the copy of a late information against Capt. Walcott, afterwards given on oath before the Earl of Thomond, who has enclosed the like copy in his letter to his Majesty herewith sent. Another copy I delivered to the Lord Chancellor, from whom, I presume, you will receive it with his letters. Capt Walcott is reported to be an Anabaptist, was an officer under Ludlow, a very stout man and rich, having in several counties 700l. or 800l. per annum, and full stocked. Notwithstanding that strict search has been made for him, we do not yet hear whether he is taken. The continuance of his Excellency's sickness not a little mortifies us here, but we trust his recovery will revive us. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 47.] Enclosed,
Informations of 3 November calendared ante p. 121. [Ibid. No. 47I.]
Nov. 9.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to Williamson. Acknowledging two packets, informing him that his Excellency is still under a feverish distemper, and asking him to deliver the enclosed (the letter last calendared) to Lord Arlington. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Nov. 9.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Lord Chancellor and Archbishop of Dublin, to the Earl of Arlington. The Lord Lieutenant being these three or four days under a somewhat greater feverish distemper, and being advised by his physicians to relax himself from business, has commanded me to give you the account of these enclosed papers. Those from Lord Inchiquin were received by his Excellency the 6th, who sent orders to have Walcott apprehended, and sent up to Dublin in safe custody, with directions also for Captains Cullen and Fitzgerald to appear here. Yesterday Lord Thomond's information (likewise sent herewith) was brought to his Excellency, who would not have troubled you with any foolish, trivial discourses of that nature, till he had brought them to some certain understanding, but that Capt. Walcott has ever been looked upon as a man of much severe sense in his own way, a very considerable person under the usurper, and a bigot in his persuasions. [2 pages Ibid. No. 49.]
Nov. 9.
Dublin.
Col. Paulus A. Storff to [Williamson]. Congratulating him on his knighthood, which he would have done sooner had he been aware of it, and requesting his favour in procuring him payment of about 200l. due to him for journey money, about which the Earl of Essex has written twice to the King and Lord Arlington. [French. 3 pages. Ibid. No. 50.]
Nov. 9.
Charlemont.
Major Sidney Fotherby to Viscount Conway. I sent you Lord Glenawley's letter, which he sent me by Mr. Wilson, the Recorder of Derry. I expect your orders concerning the troop. I was yesterday at Armagh to wait on the Dean, and there met poor Capt. Chambers, who is almost undone, if you do not get him off from being Sheriff. Sir George Atkinson and Major Richardson, who were at Armagh, are engaged to be here on Thursday to drink your health with the good wine and venison you ordered to be sent me. Lord Glenawley will be at Dublin the end of next week. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 51.]
Nov. 10.
London.
Anthony Deane to Williamson. I enclose a letter to my son and his master under cover of one to Mr. Vernon, and request your directions to Mr. Vernon to call for a letter from M. Lefevre of his charge, and to order him to have it paid, and on his bill I shall pay the money to yourself, or as you shall direct. I have directed my son to be in Paris a month, or till Mr. Vernon can find him some company for Calais. I pray you let this letter be directed to Mr. Vernon, to send the other to Saumur to fetch your young servant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 181.]
Nov. 10.
Queen's College, Oxford.
Henry Smith to Williamson. The enclosed, received from a friend now in Italy, gives a short account of the present state of some of the princely families there. I doubt not you receive fuller relations from those you employ there, yet this gentleman, having very lately passed through all the places mentioned, may have prevented their intelligence. I dare not trouble you with anything sent me from Paris, being sure you have it from better hands. Mr. Skelton is going to Headley, to take an account of that living; if he accepts it, we may hope to live quietly in the College, and be able to mind our studies. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 182.]
Nov. 10.
9 A.M. Harwich.
R[ichard] B[ulstrode] to Williamson. Last night was so great a storm we could not go to the packet-boat, but we are now going aboard with very fine weather and a good wind, and hope to be there early to-morrow. Capt. Langley used me with all civility. I can learn here no certainty of the Dutch squadron. Van Esse (Nesse), they tell me, is still in the Texel. As soon as I arrive you shall hear from me. [Ibid. No. 183.]
Nov. 10.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. I advised in my last that the Gloucester and Jersey sailed westward. The latter is since come to Spithead, for the wind scanted, so that she could not weather St. Helen's Point, and now it is contrary. A great Dutch prize, laden with deals, taken by a French privateer, off Dunkirk, has passed by here, and is gone to Cowes. The last easterly winds forced them hither. [Ibid. No. 184.]
Nov. 10.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Yesterday arrived the Adventure and the Nightingale. Each has brought in a caper of 8 guns, having together 150 to 160 men, being newly come out, one having only taken one prize in the morning, and being taken himself in the afternoon. The prize is a French ship of 10 guns, laden with dry fish from Canada. She was retaken by the Adventure. The caper taken by the Nightingale is, as her captain and all her officers affirm, the same the Dragon fought with, and sank, as the captain of the Dragon declared, which you may see is quite contrary to what was reported. The Norwich is also in Catwater, cleaning. The Happy Return sailed hence yesterday, with several merchantmen for Portsmouth. The Adventure, in a chase, lost her retaken prize, and as yet has no news of her. [Ibid. No. 185.]
[Nov. 10.]
Whitehall.
Commission to Thomas Howard to succeed Sir Thomas Daniell as captain of a company in Col. Russell's regiment of Guards. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F, No. 47.]
Nov. 10. Minute thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 46.]
[After Nov. 10.] Diagram of worms and insects which fell 10 Nov. 1672, in a great snow in Hungary, and lived three days afterwards. The larger were eaten by the smaller. They were sent to Vienna, for his Imperial Majesty to see. Nine specimens, of different sizes and shapes, are given, with the colour of each. Three are black, one blue, two yellow, and one red and black, one black and yellow, and one blue and yellow. Addressed to Dr. Coleman, in Struttenground, Westminster. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 186.]
Nov. 10. Commission to Sir Bernard de Gomme, to be Quarter-master General of all forces hereafter raised for the service in England, Wales, or Berwick. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 46.]
Nov. 10. Commission to John Stringer, to be lieutenant in Capt. Hudson's company in the Earl of Craven's regiment of Guards. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 10. Commission to Robert Cooper, to be lieutenant to Capt. Thomas Mansfield, in the Earl of Craven's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 10. Protections and passports to William Paradine, of Middleburg, and Thomas Carter, of Rotterdam, to transport themselves and servants, families, and goods, to England. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 39, p. 62.]
Nov. 10.
Gravesend.
Phineas Pett, muster master, to the Navy Commissioners. I received your letters sent me for several captains but this morning, and all wet and dirty. The postmaster says they should have been delivered last Friday, but the bag they were in was lost, but was found this morning, in a pond. The Newcastle and Augustine are gone; I have taken all the care I can to send their letters safe after them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 45.]
Nov. 10.
The Phœnix in the Downs.
Capt. E. Russell to the same. The anchor you ordered me I received, and returned my own to Mr. St. Michel. The other day we went to sea on an alarm, and going to hoist in my long boat she was so large I could not stow her on deck, though she was the least I could find at Chatham. If you would order Mr. St. Michel to pay for a large deal boat here built for Col. Digby, it would serve me as well or better than a long boat, and I will deliver mine to Mr. St. Michel. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Nov. 10.
The Diamond, in the Downs.
Capt. G. Cannynge to the same. I arrived here last Friday night. If I am kept here any time by contrary winds (the wind being westerly), I shall want victuals, not having above ten days' on board. If I grow much shorter I shall apply to Dover, where I hope to meet your order accordingly. Besides, I lost my pinnace here in helping to moor the ship. Being very old, she sank under the men, and was lost, with great hazard of their lives. If Mr. St. Michel has an order from you, he will buy me a small yawl here, to supply me till I come to Portsmouth. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Nov. 10.
Portsmouth.
Capt. John Crabbe to the same. Reminding them of his salary, and requesting that it may be paid to his wife. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Nov. 10.
The Castle, Spithead.
Capt. Thomas Willshaw to the same. Informing them that he has not above eight days' provisions left, and desiring an order for receiving some there. [Ibid. No. 49.]
Nov. 10.
The Nightingale, Plymouth Sound.
Capt. Henry Clarke to the same. 21 Oct. we sailed from Falmouth, the wind N.E., with the Adventure and 20 convoys, part of them bound for Virginia and New England. We kept them company till the 24th, and till near 80 leagues S.W. from Scilly, after which we intended to accompany the Adventure within 20 leagues of Scilly, and then to stand over for Kinsale, but between 6 and 7 the morning of the 26th we heard many guns to the southward, wind S.E., being then about 40 leagues S.W. from Scilly. We supposing by the noise some ships were in fight, gave chase, and about 8 discovered three sail to the southward, which proved to be two capers of Flushing, of 9 and 8 guns each, which had met a merchantman of St. Malo of 10 guns, homeward bound from Canada, and had taken him that morning. About 4 p.m. the Adventure retook the Frenchman. We continuing our chase of the capers, which separated, about 8 came up with that of 8 guns, and took her, being the Garden, of Flushing, Capt. Daniel Scaquen, commander, and having been but ten days from Flushing. She is the smaller of the two that fought the Dragon. The captain says the bigger had but 14 guns, which ran away from him, and he alone fought the Dragon. He believes the Dragon received some damage under water, which occasioned her to leave him; otherwise he might have been taken. The 30th, about 20 leagues S. W. from the Lizard, we met another caper of 8 guns, to which we gave chase, when we sprang our bowsprit and main topmast, and the Adventure carried her main top gallant mast by the board, and so he made his escape. The 31st we left the Adventure, intending for Kinsale, but could not fetch it, the wind being N. E. and by N., but fell in about Cape Clear. Wanting water, and our prize being leaky, occasioned us to put into Berehaven 2 Nov., where we continued till the 4th, with a fresh wind at E., when we put to sea, intending to turn up for Kinsale. About 12 that day we saw three sail off Cape Dursey, which we gave chase to, but lost them, night coming on. The 6th, about 8 leagues S.E. from Cape Clear, we met the Adventure again, which on the 2nd had taken the same caper we chased on the 30th, being one of 8 guns, belonging to Middleburg. The wind being northerly, and blowing very hard, we could not seize the coast of Ireland again. Our prize being leaky from some shot under water we could not stop, our bowsprit and topmast being disabled, and believing we could not be supplied in Ireland, and having 70 prisoners on board, and 20 of our men on the prize, and not knowing when we might recover Kinsale, we thought it convenient to bear away for Plymouth, to be discharged of our prisoners and to get supplies. We want two cables, a bowsprit, and two topmasts, and many other necessaries. He will supply us in part only. Whilst the bowsprit and topmasts are fitting, I propose to clean, which he will not yield to, so we must go to sea with a foul ship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 50.]
Nov. 10.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the Navy Commissioners. Thanking them for ordering him 300l., which he hopes will be duly paid, praying them to order the dispatch of his accounts, and giving news of the Adventure and Nightingale, as in the last letter. The Norwich also came in yesterday, from West Chester, with some convoys, and is now by the hulk, taking out her guns to clean, having been above 5 months off the ground. She wants caulking also. Her com- mander complains also of his sails, and that he has but a single suite of courses, which is dangerous in St. George's Channel, where his station is. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 51.]
Nov. 10.
Gravesend.
Phineas Pett, muster master, to W. Hewer. Requesting him to send him the books of which he gives particulars. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Nov. 10.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to W. Hewer. Thanking him for his kindness in procuring the 300l., out of which he leaves it to him to satisfy himself, and requests him to pay the rest to Mr. Hill, who will call for or send for it, and asking if he is not mistaken in his method of measuring a certain ship by multiplying the length and breadth and then half the breadth, and whether it should not be the depth for once the abovesaid breadth. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Nov. 11. Announcement of a representation, from 2 to 4 p.m., of the Dutch cruelties at Amboyna, with the humours of the valiant Welshman, at the Booth at Charing Cross, where forces, drolls, &c., will be presented daily, by Anthony Devo, the King's servant. Printed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 187.]
Nov. 11. Dr. Fell to Williamson. We push forward our printing as fast as we can, having constantly above 20 hands at work, that is, so many men in pay, for to make them always attend their work, is, I think, beyond any skill, printers having a peculiar obligation to be idle, as being paid for it, holiday money being a certain style in their bills. [Ibid. No. 188.]
Nov. 11.
Worcester.
Francis Smith to Viscount Conway, to be left with Phelim O'Neil, at the Post Office, Dublin. Complaining that, notwithstanding his lordship's strict charge that his bill should be satisfied by Michaelmas, though several others have been paid, he cannot prevail for the least part of his, though he has used his utmost diligence to serve his lordship at the best rate, and has this year bought some choice liquor for his lordship's sole use; and hoping for his lordship's speedy and safe return. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 189.]
Nov. 11.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Since my last we have not seen the Holland men-of-war here, but from Hornesey, 10 miles southward, we hear they saw, last Saturday, seven frigates off that place. Yesterday we had account that a vessel which came in here was chased off the Rock Head to the northwards by a Holland caper, but the wind blowing hard, and he standing under the shore, the caper left him, and stood to sea again. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 190.]
Nov. 11.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. Since the surprising news from Bridlington of the nine Dutch men-of-war, we have no further advice from those parts. But by the boat sent immediately thereupon down this river to warn such of his Majesty's ships as had not gone out with their convoys, we understand on its return yesterday that the Guernsey sailed last Friday with the opportunity of the then westerly wind, with his convoy of laden colliers for the south, lying since her first coming into this river only off the Hawk Sand near the mouth, fairest for sea, yet well secured against weather within the Spurn, so we hope they reached Yarmouth Roads before next morning, and may have proceeded on their voyage, or be at least in safety. But the Golden Phœnix, which fell down the same ebb from White Booth Road, with upwards of 30 sail, bound for Bordeaux and other ports of France and the Thames, ventured not further than Grimsby Road, where they still lie with the Deptford ketch and his northern convoy, and so intend till they receive better encouragement to venture out. By a master, who came up from those roads last night, we understand that a small sloop with one mast came on Saturday evening, and lay off one of their outermost ships all night, but at daybreak weighed, gave them a gun, and stood out for sea, which, compared with our former intelligence, causes here a great suspicion of her being a tender to those Holland ships, and sent to scout up this river. There was a report here lately of one of the Kent's quarters being driven ashore about Kelsey, at the mouth of this river, and of a few firearms found on board. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 191.]
Nov. 11.
Post Office, Hull.
George Mawson to Williamson. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Nov. 11.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. The shipping of this town that went to sea 14 days since are much dispersed by bad weather. Three were put ashore at Bridlington, and several we hear not of. We do not hear of any Dutch privateers on either side of us. Wind the last three days W., to-day N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 193.]
Nov. 11.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last Saturday and Sunday passed southward through this road about 50 loaden colliers, and yesterday afternoon came from the southward and are still riding here about 200 sail bound northward, with which 60 or 70 of this town are ready to go. We have not lately heard of an enemy on this coast, only the last post alarmed us with news of a Dutch squadron being abroad, and everyone imagines them to be where his private designs lay. [Ibid. No. 194.]
Nov. 11.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. Yesterday sailed by a very great fleet of light colliers, and later a considerable fleet of laden colliers. This coast is clear of privateers, none have been seen of late. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 195.]
Monday.
[Nov.] 11.
Major Nathaniel Darell to Williamson. Being unable from my great torment in my ear and head to wait upon you, I desire you to press Lord Arlington to finish the business of the Dutch ships I seized, for four or five hundred pounds' worth of oysters being on board, they will be spoiled. My lord told me the Committee of Trade would determine it. I am told a great deal of forbidden goods is on board; therefore it were well I had an order to search them. [Ibid. No. 196.]
Nov. 11.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About 10 this forenoon the wind changed from N.W. to N.E., and is since more northerly. About 30 ships sailed about noon, and about 40 more are making ready with all speed. [Ibid. No. 197.]
Nov. 11.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to James Hickes. A small Bussleton hoy, that came light from the westward last Saturday night, ran ashore against Chesil town in Portland, but may be got off again. This morning the Happy Return came in, which left Plymouth last Saturday. His men say the Adventure brought in there a Dutch caper of 11 guns, and rescued a French vessel. This day se'nnight the Hatton ketch went hence for Guernsey. Wind W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 198.]
Nov. 11.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Nov. 11.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Tuesday and Wednesday came in the Mermaid and the Norwich. Both are gone for Plymouth, and other ships from this, in hopes of a convoy for the Straits. Several others continue here, expecting a convoy for Bordeaux. On Wednesday came in a Genoese from the Canaries, with 300 soldiers, for Ostend. She went out this morning. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 200.]
Nov. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Robert Long, Treasurer and Receiver-General of the revenues late in jointure to the late Queen Mother, to pay to her trustees and administrators their salaries for the half-year ended at Michaelmas last, they being continually employed in bringing in the arrears of her rents, and finding difficulties because the receivers are backward in making up their accounts, believing that their employments will cease by the sale of the fee-farm rents. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 135.]
Nov. 11.
Whitehall.
Commissions for Ralph Wormeley to be Lieutenant, and Edward Watts to be Ensign in Capt. Howard's company in the Holland Regiment, under the command of Sir Walter Vane. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 59.]
Nov. 11.
The Dreadnought, Woolwich.
Capt. Richard Trevanion to the Navy Commissioners. I am arrived here, and hope to get the ship into dock next Wednesday, if you will order a speedy survey of a quantity of stinking beer we have on board. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 54.]
Nov. 11.
The Rachel, in the Downs.
Capt. John Kellsy to the same. We were forced coming over the Flats to carry a press of sail, which caused our ship to spring a leak, so that she makes 12 inches of water an hour. I request an order to stop it, which I will undertake to do in two tides' time. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Nov. 11. Sir J. Smyth to W. Hewer. By his Royal Highness' pleasure requesting an order for the Dover sloop that was convoy for the fishery at Yarmouth, and is come to Deptford, to be put in the wet dock there. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Nov. 11.
Erith.
Richard Mulys to Thomas Hayter. By the Earl of Ossory's order, requesting him to deliver sufficient tickets to his purser, Mr. Woodward, for the widows and friends of such of the men who served under him in the Resolution, as were killed in the engagement with the Smyrna fleet, and for such of the said men as were turned over to other ships, or his lordship brought with him to the Victory. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 57.]
Nov. 11.
Ballymartyr.
The Earl of Orrery to [the Earl of Arlington]. The 5th, about 10 p.m., I received by express messenger a letter from Lord Inchiquin from his house in Clare, near 50 Irish miles from this, sending me an information of which the enclosed is a true copy. The original, the same hour, I dispatched to the Lord Lieutenant, with an assurance I would use my utmost endeavours to apprehend Capt. Walcott, and seize all his papers, and industriously inquire what accomplices he had, and to whom he had communicated the traitorous paper he shewed Capt. Cullen. Soon after I received the like advertisement from Sir Francis Foulkes, my Deputy Governor of Limerick, to whom I immediately sent strict orders to use his utmost diligence to apprehend Walcott and secure his papers. I also employed several English and Irish, and sent to a lady who was very intimate with Capt. Walcott's wife, to employ her interest to bring him in, else it would be the ruin of her and her family. But first of all I ordered Sir F. Foulkes diligently to search Walcott's house and closet for papers, but he found none of any consequence. He also sent out four parties of horse to seek him in counties Clare and Limerick. Three could learn no news of him, but the fourth followed on his heels near 50 miles, and traced him back again to near Limerick, where they understood he had been sick, and had written a letter to his wife at Limerick. But, though they searched in all houses for him, they could not find him. The letter to his wife assured her that, on what she had written to him, he was resolved in two days, by which time he hoped to be able to ride, he would render himself to Sir F. Foulkes. This did not lessen Sir Francis' diligence, and so many ways he was sought after that he must have fled out of the province or been taken. Sir Francis informed me that Mr. Clignett, a naturalized Dutchman, had assured him that the large traitorous paper mentioned in the information had been given to Walcott, as Capt. Cullen had assured him, by a Scotch minister, who said he had received it from Scotland, and that it was drawn up by some thousands of people there. Clignett further told Sir Francis that Capt. Cullen had told him that Walcott said the Scotch had reason to remonstrate what they did, and that he wondered the English did not the like. This morning I received a letter from Sir Francis, assuring me that the 8th Capt. Walcott had surrendered himself to him, that he kept him prisoner under a strong guard in his own lodgings, and that he desired to be tried by the laws, adding, that the Earl of Thomond had sent him an order to send Walcott to him, which he could not disobey, his lordship being a Privy Councillor of Ireland, but sent him with a strong guard to the Earl, whose tenant Walcott is. Yesterday I received an express from the Lord Lieutenant, desiring me to use all my diligence to seize Walcott and his papers, and to send them up under a strong guard to Dublin, which I immediately ordered Sir Francis to do, and to ascertain from Walcott the name of the Scotch minister, and to use his utmost industry to apprehend him, seize all his papers, and send him under a good guard to the Lord Lieutenant, and likewise diligently to learn the names of all those to whom Walcott had communicated that traitorous paper, and to secure all who had concealed it. What is mentioned in the information, that Walcott could secure Limerick with a wet finger, is what I doubt may be too easily effected, because that important garrison is so thin of soldiers that that city, though bigger than Bristol within the walls, has at most but 36 men to do third night duty in it. But to secure the Castle there and St. John's Citadel, in each of which there is an entire foot company, will not be found easy, if any traitors should attempt either, for, I dare say, few citadels are guarded with more exact care. Postscript.—Walcott, on examination, denies most of the things Capt. Cullen accuses him of. Walcott, in the war of Ireland, was Ludlow's captain lieutenant. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 52.]
Nov. 11.
Ennis, in Clare.
The Earl of Thomond to the King. Having last week, by the Lord Lieutenant's conveyance, speeded by my Thomond duty (yours by purchase for many mercies my patents shew me your ancestors admitted me into, and being a thankful receiver, and very sensible what I owe your Majesty in return), viz., the examination of my tenant, Capt. Cullen, against Capt. Walcott, also my tenant, so now, the Governor of Limerick having sent me the said Walcott to be examined, I present it likewise to your sight. My zeal to your interests made me interrupt your affairs in England. You, that have pardoned my English faults, will, I hope, at this time forgive me that Irish transgression, for having taken an oath to serve you faithfully, I could do no less. Whenever my son's business affairs as to shipping, and his merchant affairs come before you by petition, assist him so much as you did me, in the gospel cause of Billing. [Ibid. No. 53.] Enclosed,
Examination of Capt. Walcott, taken before the Earl of Thomond. He was at Ballynaclochy 31 Oct. last, at Capt. Cullen's garden, and then in his house, and the occasion of his going thither was to speak with Capt. Cullen on behalf of Mr. Watts, the clerk of the assessments of the county, who was like to be turned out of his employment by mistake and solicitation of Cornelius O'Mulloney. Also part of his business was to warn the said captain not to pay his rent of Cloggues, &c., to Viscount Clare, but to Sir William King, from whom the said Walcott had a letter of attorney to receive it. Then and there the said examinate and informant, walking in the garden, both condoled the condition of the times, and the said informant saying he was disquieted with the sense thereof so that he could not sleep at nights, he replied that the sense thereof had so stupified him, that he had, the day before, ridden four miles out of his way in a country he well knew, not considering what he was about. The examinate then told him the cause of his fear and trouble, that remembering how the Irish Papists had in 1641 murdered his father, and turned all his children a-begging, whereof he being one and a spectator, he believed their principles were the same now as then, and that they were the same they were in Queen Mary's days, when Bonner acted so many bloody tragedies in England, and the poor Huguenots were massacred in France, and the Protestants of Savoy and Piedmont, and that they were Irish regiments that acted the said massacre of Piedmont, and that they were looked upon by all the world to be the fittest persons for such work, and therefore he wished himself out of the kingdom. The informant then said: We are well enough able to deal with them. The examinate replied, that if the King would stand neuter, he doubted not but we were able to beat them into the sea. Immediately afterwards the informant and examinate, to avoid an impertinent and importunate man, the said Cornelius O'Mulloney, both went into the house, and the informant, first taking the examinate into so narrow a closet that they could not both well stand in, without any discourse there brought him into an upper room, where they discoursed first of the above-mentioned business of Lord Clare and Sir W. King, and afterwards Capt. Cullen minding our present condition, the examinate replied, that he hoped Limerick was and would be secure, and then drew out of his pocket a letter of Mr. Watts', about his place, and another letter of news which he copied out of a letter of news, which he saw in the hands of the Countess of Roscommon, living in Limerick, which copy he showed for news at Clonroane to Mr. Gore, Dr. Mara, and David Nihill, and at Kilbeacon to Lady King and Mr. Clongin, which letters and no others he showed to Capt. Cullen. The substance of the newsletter, which came from Col. Jeffreys, late Registrar of the Court of Claims, from London to her ladyship, dated about 20 Oct., as he remembers, was about foreign news only, and the examinate said to him that the Duke of Lauderdale, he was informed, had raised in Scotland 25,000 men for the King's service, whereof 1,200 lay, as he heard, on the borders of England. Being asked whether he spoke anything to the informant about securing Limerick with a wet finger, or about Dublin Castle, or any other castles and towns, or of holding out a month, and if he spoke or had in his newsletter any complaint against any ministers of state, and in particular the Duke of Buckingham, Lord Arlington, or Sir G. Carteret, he utterly denied that he either said any word of complaint of them or of any other minister of state, nor was there any such thing in the paper then in his hand, the copy of which he doubts not to produce, having lent it to Treneale, an innkeeper, within three miles of Limerick. Being further asked whether he did not talk with Capt. Cullen then and there, concerning the re-establishing of the perpetual or Long Parliament, so called, as an expedient, as also of putting down of Popery and Prelacy, and setting up of Presbytery, he utterly denied the same, and offered that, he being for the Congregational way, none would think he should be for the Presbyterian. Being asked if he did not promise the informant to get him further information next day, he denied the same. Being asked if Capt. Cullen did not tell him these things were of dangerous consequence, and whether he did not reply, that he would carry about him such papers no longer after that night, he utterly denied the same, and further offered that he understands he has adversaries that report and inform against him very falsely and maliciously, and have given out they aim at his life and fortune. [2 pages. 2 copies, signed by the Earl of Thomond, and endorsed respectively, " For the King" and "For the Lord Lieutenant. " S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, Nos. 53i., ii.]
Nov. 12. Sir R. Carr to the King. Report in pursuance of the reference of 17 June last of the petition of the Countess of Devonshire, that, though the rent reserved on the mines called Lott and Coope therein mentioned is very small (though double, as is alleged, which it was formerly), the annual profit is very considerable, that the petitioner has the terms and interest as therein alleged, but never had it in her own right from his Majesty, that the office of Bar-master is distinct and separate from the Lott and Coope, and therefore it is not anyways inconvenient to separate them, as alleged, that the petitioner's title to the said office does not appear to him to be valid in law, and that the said Lott and Coope are parcel of her Majesty's jointure, and are at present at the disposal of her trustees. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 201.]
Nov. 12.
Queen's College, Oxford.
Timothy Halton to Williamson. I wrote to you last week, and must trouble you again till I find you have a better opinion both of the College and him who wrote the letter. I believe no disrespect was intended, and besides what he told then, which I wrote in my last, he added that when our founder had done all the good he could for the College, as the last testimony of his love, he desired to be interred there. He has not been against any motion we have made for composing the differences in the College. If this does not satisfy him, I will acquaint him with what you wrote, but then I desire your directions. [Ibid. No. 202.]
Nov. 12.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wind S.W. So far as I can learn, this coast is at present free from privateers, our vessels going free from port to port. [Ibid. No. 203.]
Nov. 12.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Saturday afternoon appeared near 200 light colliers under sail, some of which anchored in Hoasley Bay, and some in the Rolling Grounds. Sunday they sailed again, taking with them the light colliers that were here, and were seen by the Fanfan past Aldeburgh without any convoy he could perceive. Yesterday with a fair wind he saw 40 laden ships from the Northward within the Gunfleet, bound for London. None of our packet-boats are yet come from Holland. What wind there is W.; the cheerfullest day we have had these six months. I have given a certificate to Capt. Langley's account of bringing seamen and soldiers out of Holland. In his warrant care is taken for soldiers only. We have resolved to begin anew for future, and all are to come ashore in the King's yard to be mustered and examined. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 204.]
Nov. 12.
Margate.
John Glover to Williamson. According to yours of the 7th, I took a boat and spoke to several ships in this Road, and the wind being N.W., they went for the Downs. I likewise gave notice to several lying in Ramsgate Road, some of which came in to the pier here, and some to Ramsgate pier, and are resolved to stay here till they hear the stop is taken off again, of which I desire you to send me word. Mr. Langley is dead, and the post place here not yet settled, but let me receive your commands, and I will serve you what I am able, but the Commissioners of the Customs have deprived me of my employment in the smack, which I hope you will be a means to restore me to, when you hear my case. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Nov. 12.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. I informed you last post of the sailing of the English fleet for France, convoyed by the Dunkirk and Dartmouth, and by four French men-of-war. The Newcastle, Jersey, Plymouth, Richmond, and Phœnix are still in the Downs, which are convoy for the Straits fleet, some of which are in the Downs, and the rest not yet come down Above 40 merchantmen sailed yesterday. Wind S., little. [Ibid. No. 206.]
Nov. 12.
Dover.
Robert Stockdale and John Carlile to Sir J. Williamson and Sir R. Southwell, or either of them. Last night Capt. Knivett, of the Algier, brought in a ketch bound from Bilboa to London, which was taken the day before by a French privateer, on pretence she was an English vessel, taken by the Dutch, and sold in Spain. Indeed, when we discovered her off this yesterday, we judged her an English vessel taken by the Dutch, and therefore a Custom House shallop went to Capt. Knivett, who then brought her in. On examination of three Spaniards, we find she went from Newfoundland with fish, and was sold by an Englishman to Don Delanna, of Bilboa, who is sole owner, and that she was consigned to George Barnes. She is called the St. Michael. We have also examined the lieutenant of the French privateer and another Frenchman. We shall transmit the depositions to-morrow, and shall in the meantime carefully secure her from embezzlement. [Ibid. No. 207.]
Nov. 12.
Dover.
John Carlile to [Williamson]. I received yours last Friday night, with the enclosed order to the master of the packet-boat, and gave it him next morning. Saturday morning were brought in two small French vessels, retaken from the Dutch off Beachy by a privateer. (News of the St. Michael, as in the last letter.) Yesterday passed by about 30 small vessels, under convoy, bound for Portsmouth. I return this letter, hearing that the Cleveland yacht is gone from Calais. [Ibid. No. 208.]
Nov. 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Jersey sails to the westward this morning, wind N.E. No other ships stirring. [Ibid. No. 209.]
Nov. 12.
Dartmouth.
W[illiam] H[urt] to James Hickes. Giving news of the capture of the two capers mentioned in Lanyon's letter of the 10th, calendared ante p. 145, adding that the captain of the caper that fought with the Dragon says the captain of the Dragon deserves to be hanged. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 210.]
Nov. 12.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. We hear to-day from Mount's Bay that the capers still infest that coast very much, that some were in the bay last Saturday, and that one came within a mile of the Mount, and landed the men of a vessel of this town, taken a few days before. Some small frigates are very greatly wanted here, to visit bays and creeks, where capers lie. Wind N.N.E. [Ibid. No. 211.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 211i.]
Nov. 12. Licence for Robert Heath, High Sheriff of Sussex, to come to London and Westminster on his occasions. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 139.]
Nov. 12.
Navy Office.
Lord Brouncker, Sir T. Allin, and Sir J. Smyth to the Master and Wardens of the Trinity House, Deptford. As the Greenwich wants a master, and the bearer, Francis Burrill, is recommended by Capt. Wetwang, requesting them to examine him as speedily as possible. With certificate at foot of the same date of his competency. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 58.]
Nov. 12.
Navy Office.
Commissioners Tippetts and Deane to the Navy Commissioners. Showing how they propose to divide the payment (150,708l.) for the species contained in their late estimate into 18 parts, the first to be paid the 15th instant, and the other 17 weekly in the following 17 weeks. [Ibid. No. 59.]
Nov. 12.
[Received.]
Commissioner Tippetts to the same. I was sorry I could not wait on you this morning at the Board, being not in a condition to attend you at present. I presume it is the fault of the merchant ships if they have not ere this the stores they are to be supplied with by the King, the Clerk of the Survey at Deptford having had directions from me not only verbally, but in writing. The enclosed demands came from Portsmouth. The fireship (the Supply) was surveyed at Sheerness, and found to want much repair, so none of the six named are fit for service. The Jersey has been out about three months. Had not Commissioner Deane been going down suddenly, I intended to order the officers of Portsmouth yard to see the grounds of the demand, and to supply the needful. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Nov. 12.
Victualling Office.
Josiah Child and T. Papillon to the same. We have sent down lighters to clear the Dreadnought of her defective beer, and have ordered a person to join in the survey and to see it staved. A great part of the provisions, which by your order were hastened down to the Warspite, were returned, because the captain was not on board to dispose of them. We have sent the vessels down again, supposing he may by this be on board. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Nov. 12. Thomas Lewsley to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting that 50 loads of elm timber may be received at Deptford, which he has ordered to be brought there from Kent. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 62.]
Nov. 12. Representation and complaint of Daniel Andrews, late master of the Plymouth, to the same. 1. His commander, Capt. Richard Le Neve, commanded from him his cabin in the round-house for the lieutenant's use. 2. The said captain at all times took from him his command for sailing and working the ship, saying he would do so himself, and commanding him down to inferior things not proper to his charge, and particularly when the fleet first went on the coast of Holland this summer, the ship standing in to make the land off Gravesant, finding shoal water, he caused the ship to be tacked for her safety without the captain's command, who came out of his cabin and threatened to break his head if he ever did the like again. 3. The captain in like manner checked him for tacking coming up the Swin, when he knew it was necessary to do so. 4. For the above reasons, fearing the damage to the ship and the discredit to himself, by Capt. Narborough's direction he laid down his employment. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Nov. 12.
Chatham.
Joseph Lawrence to the same. Giving the results of his survey of the Violet hulk, taken in pursuance of their order of the 7th instant. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Nov. 12.
The Newcastle, in the Downs.
Capt. John Pearce to the same. Requesting them to supply him with 100 tickets, or with as many as they think convenient, he having discharged several of his company, by orders from his Royal Highness, and many having died, and others put ashore sick and discharged. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Nov. 12.
The Guernsey.
Capt. Leonard Harris to Sir T. Allin. We have arrived at the Buoy of the Nore, with but 5 days' provisions on board, nor has our frigate been cleaned for ten months. Going for Hamburg with Capt. Richard White, I met two prizes, a flyboat of Amsterdam and a Swede bound for Amsterdam, both laden with corn, which, by Capt. White's orders, are left in Sir William Swan's possession. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Nov. 12. Capt. John Wetwang to Sir J. Smyth. Recommending the bearer, Francis Burrell, to be master of the Yarmouth. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Nov. 12. Commissioner Tippetts to W. Hewer. The days being short and the store of hemp but small, suggesting that the several ropeyards be ordered that their men work but single days, who hitherto have worked day and a half. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Nov. 12. Capt. Lawrence Wright to W. Hewer. Requesting him to deliver to Edward Evans four books and 100 tickets for the Nonsuch. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift of the office of Sheriff Principal of the Sheriffdom of Edinburgh to Charles Maitland of Halton for his life. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 118.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
Protection to the Earl of Caithness for three years. [Ibid. p. 119.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a remission to Archibald Beith and Donald McGibbon of the accidental slaughter committed by them in April 1671 upon Allan Gardner and Patrick McGillhattown. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 120.]
Nov. 12.
Whitehall.
Memorial of a protection in the ordinary form to James Kennedy for two years. [Ibid. p. 121.]
Nov. 12.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to the Earl of Arlington. By his Excellency's commands, I have perused your letters to him of the 5th. He bids me assure you that his Majesty's pleasure intimated in your letter, and more fully declared in his Majesty's letter enclosed, shall be punctually observed by him. His sickness, into which he is relapsed at present, so much indisposes him that he has commanded me to trouble him with no business, nor with any letters but those from you, but in all necessary matters pertaining to the Civil List to apply to the Lord Chancellor, and for the Military to Sir A. Forbes, who have been Lords Justices. About five weeks ago he first fell sick, and we thought he had been pretty well recovered, as he sometimes took the air in his coach, and did so but last week, for two or three hours together, but soon after fell sick again, but has not kept his bed above two days together at any time, but his strength is much impaired. Whatever his disease be besides, there is a fever most apparently, which, we hope, rather declines than increases, but both he and his physicians conclude that the spleen is the principal part affected, the symptoms of which are very dolorous, with which he has been once very grievously afflicted before, which being reckoned rather amongst the chronic than the acute diseases, we trust will rather exercise his patience than hazard his life, if the fever abate. He has with very much patience endured the repetition of the methods of physic, of purging, bleeding, vomiting, blistering, and scarifying, and he has, what he very well deserves, the hearty prayers of very many here. In my last letters of the 9th, I sent a copy of an information against Capt. Walcott, whereof the substance was taken on oath before the Earl of Thomond, which was likewise sent you by the Lord Chancellor, and enclosed by the Earl in his letter to the King. The said captain has since rendered himself to Sir F. Foulkes, who advised his Excellency thereof by his letter of the 8th, and that he had set a guard on him, and intended next day to send him to the Earl of Thomond to be examined, of which we have since heard no more. Of the other particulars in your letter relating to Lord Anglesey and Mr. Mead I shall be careful to remind his Excellency. For his Majesty's favour to my son, and to me in him, and for your lordship's in obtaining it, I give my humblest thanks. [3 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 54.]
Nov. 12.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to Williamson. Enclosing the last letter to which he refers him for news, and expressing his obligation to his honourable friends at Whitehall. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Nov. 12.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to [the Earl of Arlington]. Concerning the illness of the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 56.]
Nov. 13.
Almost 12 p.m.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. You were expected to-day at dinner at the Lord Mayor's. Though being very ill of a cold, I was fitter to keep house to-day than to be at a Common Hall, yet I was there, where we had very good luck. Never so great a Hall and so unanimous to choose a Chamberlain at the hustings on old Sir T. Player's surrender. To-day's work has given a great experiment of the citizens' kindness to an honest gentleman. A great judgment may be made of this of the people's affection to his Majesty and his Government. 5,000 people assembled in Guildhall, and five persons were nominated, viz., Sir Thomas Player, jun., Methuselah Turner, Mr. Mascall, Mr. Ball, and Mr. Jekyll. They were gradually put to vote. The three first after Sir Thomas had not ten hands apiece, and the last not 50. All were laughed at by the Hall, and the last hissed, and when he went out, hands were clapped at him; so victorious we have been. The quietness and civility of doing it half an hour before 11. We expected a poll to be called for, but there was no need of it. I and the rest of your friends, Sir R. Vyner, Sir Joseph Sheldon, and Sir Robert Clayton, dined with the Lord Mayor. Pray come to dinner, and bring Sir R. Carr with you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 212.]
Nov. 13. Printed address of Sir Thomas Player, sen., to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty of the City of London, upon the resignation of his office of Chamberlain, which he had held above 21 years, and recommending his son as his successor. [Ibid. No. 213.]
Nov. 13.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. This morning the light fleet sailed northward with the City convoy, and this afternoon came into this road a privateer of Dover, which reports that last Monday, off Flamborough Head, a States man-of-war chased him, and that at the same time he saw in the offing about 16 great ships more, which he judged to be States' men-of-war. If they continue on the coast, we are in great fears that the fleet which sailed this morning may be destroyed. [Ibid. No. 214.]
Nov. 13.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. About 11 last night the Earl of Ossory went hence for Calais in the Algier. [Ibid. No. 215.]
Nov. 13. Anthony Thorold to James Hickes. Last Sunday the Happy Return came before our Cobb, and made a sign for our vessels bound for Jersey, Guernsey, and St. Malo, which the next tide, three in number, went after him into Portland Road, he having several other vessels with him from the western ports. We had a report this week of the Dragon having met two capers, and sunk one and taken another, but I think without ground, we daily expecting our barks from Morlaix, under the convoy of her and the Morning Star. We have hitherto had the good fortune beyond most of our neighbours not to lose any ship nor any concerns belonging to our merchants. The enclosed is from my very good friend. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 216.]
Nov. 13.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in the Pearl. The captain says that on the 5th were taken by two Dutch capers of 24 and 14 guns, four English merchant men from Malaga, viz., the John and Abigail, the Tangier Merchant, and the Love, of London, and the Mevis Adventure, of Bristol, 80 leagues west of Scilly, after 11 hours' fight. The John and Abigail lost 22 men, and the Love 11. The 10th the Love and the Mevis Adventure were retaken by the Pearl off the Lizard, and brought in here, with 30 Dutch prisoners. The Gloucester was in chase of the other two. There are abundance of capers abroad, so that it is most impossible for a ship to pass without convoy. The Reserve is come to-day from the coast of Ireland. [Ibid. No. 217.]
Nov. 13.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News identical with the last. [Ibid. No. 218.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Tobias Eden, of Clement's Inn, Middlesex, of 1,095l., to be paid by Robert Eden, of West Auckland, Durham, on his being created a baronet; the order for paying to the Master of the Great Wardrobe 20,000l. out of the first moneys that come in by creations of baronets notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 133.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Robert Hanson, Lord Mayor, and the Court of Aldermen of London. Recommending William Beveridge, M.A., a person of great learning and piety, to the living of St. Peter's, Cornhill, in their disposal, and now void of a pastor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 41.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. As the bearer, Edmund Salter, has been troubled about words, and is in danger to be prosecuted by some who have got a bond of 15l. from him, requesting him to hear Salter's tale and report what course may be taken for his indemnity. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 73.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master of the Ordnance, to deliver to Anthony, Earl of Shaftesbury, 8 iron guns for the use of the Bahama Islands. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 59.]
Nov. 13.
The Princess, Sheerness.
Capt. Richard Munden to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting an order to the victuallers for the speedy dispatch of his provisions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 70.]
Nov. 13.
The Deptford ketch, Lynn.
Capt. William Anguish to Sir T. Allin. Requesting an order to the victuallers to give their order for his victualling to their agent there, who is now ready to kill, as otherwise he will be forced to leave about 40 sail from there and Boston and the member ports, now ready to sail to London, without convoy, his provisions having been long spent, and he having disbursed what money he could, in consequence of his having been so long wind- bound to the northward with the Newcastle fleet, which are now delivering, and hope to get ready against his return. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 71.]
Nov. 13.
The Bristol, Sheerness.
Capt. Erick Sieubladh to Thomas Edwards. Requesting him to deliver to Mr. Jelley 60 tickets, for the use of the Bristol. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. The former petition of Daniell Arthur, of London, merchant, concerning a debt due to him from Major George Waters, &c., having been sent to the former Lord Lieutenant, that the contents might be fully examined, and the said Arthur, by a further petition, having stated that the then Lord Lieutenant had been recalled before he could receive the full effect of the favour intended him, requiring him to cause the contents of the present petition to be examined, and the alleged obstructions to the petitioner's receiving the full effect of the favour intended him to be inquired into, and then to give such further order for Arthur's relief as he shall deem necessary. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 344.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing him to issue commissions to the escheators of the several provinces to ascertain the remainders and reversions vested in the Crown expectant on the determination of estates tail, such remainders and reversions restraining the present proprietors from disposing of the said estates to the best advantage, and so hindering the plantation and improvement of the same, and on the return of such commissions, to cause letters patent to be passed to such of the present proprietors of the present estates tail as are in being and not determined, or to such other persons as the Earls of Orrery and Carlingford, Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, Lords Kingston and Aungier, Henry Brouncker, and Sir John Trevor desire from time to time, containing grants of all such particular remainders and reversions to such of the said proprietors or others respectively as shall be so desired, reserving the like rents and reservations when such remainders and reversions fall into possession as are incident to the present estates tail, and further revoking all former letters to that effect, whereon letters patent had not yet been passed, other than such letters as have been given to the present proprietors, which are to continue in force. [2 pages. Ibid. p. 347.]
Draft and copy thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, Nos. 57, 58.]
Nov. 14.
Paris.
James Lane to Williamson. I wrote you two letters, but hearing nothing, believe they did not come to hand. I shall put your advices into execution when my progress is so forward. I enclose a letter for my father. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 219.]
Nov. 14.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. To-day have passed two fleets, one the Lynn fleet of 60 or 65 sail, the other of 240 or 250 sail light for Sunderland or Newcastle. These six days or more we have had fears of a Dutch fleet of eight or nine sail, that has been often seen off Flamborough Head, but these coming by safe give us hope they are gone; yet our fleets came by in the night, with a very good gale of wind. We expect 27 into this port, most of which will lie up for two or three months. They bide before our harbour till the tide serve. The wind was better for these fleets than any convoy they had, which was but two merchant men-of-war. I am informed by a master of this fleet, who is come in here, that a Dutch caper fell into our fleet at 4 this morning, near Flamborough Head, and tried to lay on board a Stockton vessel, which ran him down, and most of his men are lost. Some are saved, and one is on board the Stockton man. Pray give the enclosed as directed. To-night are come six sakers, given by his Majesty to this port, to the great joy of the inhabitants, with powder and shot. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 220.]
Nov. 14.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. We have not seen the Holland frigates since, but capers appear every day. This morning the light fleet of colliers passed by, with their convoy. Wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 221.]
Nov. 14.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About noon to-day our packet-boat arrived. All three were on the other side. Two mails were brought and many passengers. Mr. Dale tells the master that all conclude that Van Nesse's squadron is sailed eastward for corn, adding as a reason that he was assured from good hands there was not three months' provision in all Holland. His written news is enclosed. I do not understand him concerning the 19 men. Last Tuesday afternoon the Fanfan sailed, with several light colliers, as far as Aldeburgh. [Ibid. No. 222.]
Nov. 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.S.W. The Jersey is not gone westward, as was supposed, being forced back to Spithead by contrary winds. The Dunkirk, Advice, Diamond, and Success are come in here to refit. The Hampshire and Roebuck are at Spithead. [Ibid. No. 223.]
Nov. 14.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. News of the taking and retaking of the Malaga ships, as in Holden's letter of the 13th, calendared ante, p. 160. Wind S.W., weather stormy. [Ibid. No. 224.]
Nov. 14.
Whitehall.
Col. John Werden to the Navy Commissioners. Your letter of to-day is just come to my hands, and therefore I have not had an opportunity of acquainting his Royal Highness with it. As to the Eaglet ketch, you offer Sir T. Allin's and Sir J. Smyth's general opinion that she is not fit to be ventured to sea on the service for which you understand she is designed. I could have wished by your information to have given his Royal Highness some particular reason for her being unfit, but as I have it not, I shall lay it before him as your proposal, and shall immediately communicate to you his directions. I cannot imagine why Sir T. Allin and Sir J. Smyth represent the Hope fireship as unfit for the voyage she is ordered on, as they give no particular reason, the ship being sheathed, and ready to take in provisions. Above a fortnight ago you received his Royal Highness's directions for victualling her for this voyage, and now, when he expects her to be ready, he will certainly think it strange to receive instead a proposal that another should go in her room. I will let you know his pleasure about it. All I know concerning Capt. Sadlington's charging a bill on you is that by his letter of the 2nd from Leith, he writes that he has taken in a month's provisions, which, I believe, he could not be furnished with ready money to pay for. I have since received his Royal Highness's directions about appointing one of the doggers instead of the Eaglet ketch, which I communicate, that it may be done without loss of time, and shall send orders under his own hand for the purpose the first opportunity. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 73.]
Nov. 14.
The Prize Office.
The Commissioners for Prizes to the Navy Commissioners. Desiring that they would appoint their officer to view sundry doggers lately taken, as some of them may be useful for the fleet, that they may keep unsold any that may be needed till they have obtained an order from the Lords Commissioners of Prizes to receive them. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Nov. 14. Francis Baylie to the same. 1 and 2. Desiring to be allowed to buy or hire the prize called the Peace, now at Deptford, to convey the guns and other stores to Bristol for the new ship he is to build there, the purchase money in the former case to be set off against the payments to him for the new ship. 3. Requesting that his contract may be signed, and that he may have a bill for 200l., or at least for 100l., of the first imprest money. 4 and 5. Requesting to be allowed to provide and make all the gun carriages and rigging at Bristol, to save the charge of transporting them from London. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Nov. 14.
Chatham Ropeyard.
John Owen to the same. Reminding them that he had informed them, 28 Oct., that the hemp there would be spent in twelve days, but he has not yet received a supply, adding that they had lately employed more hands upon laying work to keep all the company at work as long as possible, but unless there is a speedy supply they will not be able to employ their men. [Ibid. No. 76.]
Nov. 14.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. Capt. Eliot, of the Anne, sent Lieut. Consett in a small ketch to meet the laden fleet of colliers to press men from them. He sailed from his frigate last Tuesday morning, and came in here yesterday evening, the wind varying betwixt S. and W. They are 21 men in all, and are in great want of victuals. I never had orders in such cases nor can I tell what to do, for that ketch is not entertained by you, being only a tender on Capt. Eliot and his own. I told the lieutenant this morning, if he could not avoid it, but that they stayed here till Sunday night, I questioned not to receive your commands concerning them, the wind being so much out of the way and the weather so foul and dark. They expect your orders here. Lieut. Edwards sailed hence last Tuesday. I did not see him, when he was here, but he reports himself pressmaster general. I examined him some time ago, to understand on what terms he stood with you, and could receive nothing but imperfect answers, so I cannot learn whether he is under your pay or not, or what pay he is allowed, that so I may know whether he is liable to musters. The Fanfan sailed towards Aldeburgh last Tuesday with some light colliers. There is a rumour here, as if the Mermaid were lost on the coast of Ireland, being said to be taken by two Dutch privateers and Capt. Temple slain, but I cannot tell how it came here, or what the truth of it is. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 77.]
Nov. 14.
The Downs.
Capt. Richard Le Neve to the Navy Commissioners. The arrival here to-day of all the merchant ships for the Straits makes me entreat you again to hasten down the money for payment of our tickets, that we may not be stayed here for it, if an opportunity of wind happen. We have taken in all our provisions. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Nov. 14.
Tower Hill.
Admiral Sir John Kempthorne to Sir J. Smyth. Recommending the bearer, John Holland, who has been master of a good merchantman many years in the Straits, and who was the writer's chief lieutenant in the St. Andrew, to be master of the Monmouth. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Nov. 14.
Cork.
Examination of Richard Purdon, one of Lord Shannon's troop, taken before John Hawkins, mayor, Richard, Earl of Barrymore, and Sir Arthur Denny. Being at Ballyclogh, co. Cork, on Sunday, 3 Nov. Capt. Thomas Walcot and Cornet John Lysaght being there also, after supper, no one else being present, Capt. Walcot demanded of the deponent what companies there were in Cork, who replied four. He further demanded how many men there were in Lord Shannon's troop, to which the deponent replied, as many as to other troops, and asked him also how many old blades there were in that troop. The deponent replied, not very many, not above half a dozen. Walcot demanded if he was not one of the troop, and on his replying that he was, Walcot said, then you are a young soldier. The deponent replied, they must be young soldiers before they are old. The deponent further heard Walcot say, he would go thence to Lord Broghill's to Moyallo (Mallow) Park, and thence to Castletown, Col. Widenham's house. [2 copies. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, Nos. 59, 60.]
Nov. 15. Order of the Council for Trade, appointing their secretary, Dr. Benjamin Worsley, to act as treasurer to receive and disburse the 1,000l. a year allowed for the incidental expenses of the Council. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 225.]
Nov. 15. Examination of [Thomas] Payne taken before the Earl of Arlington, &c. The occasion of his coming over was this: On Mr. Ellis's death, Col. Whitley coming in, he came to secure his 20l. a year, which he had out of the office, and to inform Col. Whitley about the affairs of the office as to Langley, &c., and also as to the matter of the prisoners, &c. His brother was to have come, but hearing Wachtendonck was in the Tower, he was afraid. He confesses, as he did to the King before, that the letter E. stands for Ellis in Longacre, who several times told him news of the fleet. He took what Ellis told him in writing with his crayon. He never gave Ellis any money, nor expressly promised anything, only in general, that he would be civil to him. He has not given a farthing to anyone in England, since his being here. He received a letter from his brother addressed to Overscheld in St. Mary Axe. He enquired for him on the Exchange, and a friend told him he might find him at the Star, near the Exchange. Thence he hunted him out towards Mile End. Thence a boy conducted him to the Star where he found him and gave him the letter, and asked what answer he had to return. The other fumbled, and said he was to speak with somebody, &c. But after that he saw him no more till he met him here. He had another letter from his brother to Mr. Aberdain at the Earl of Craven's, who seemed to answer, that he did not understand any such letters, and would not answer them. Those from whom he had any letters for Holland were, Mrs. Lloyd two or three, Lady Morgan one, Lady Brett one, Mr. Aberdain one, Mr. Flessheir one, Cornelius Bosse one, papers for the Countess of Horne from Lady Arlington, Mr. Victorin, a merchant in London, Monday morning, the day he was apprehended, he went out of his lodgings to Mr. Hart, a tailor in the Strand. Mr. Victorin was not with him on Monday. He stayed with this person till after dinner. No one that he knows has any correspondence with Holland spoke with him that Monday. He does not know, and cannot imagine who wrote the letter shown him of 1–11 Nov. signed Peterson. [In Williamson's hand. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 226.]
[Nov. 15.] Paper endorsed "Payne's Interrogatories, 15 Nov." 1. A letter from Holland to Overscheld, with one enclosed to Mrs. Mary Dawson, proposing a reward of 10,000 guineas for some service to be done here relating to that state. 2. A letter from John Payne in Holland to his brother Thomas Payne, desiring him to deliver the enclosed to Overscheld, and to receive from him the enclosed to Mrs. Elizabeth Dawson, and to deliver it himself. 3. Thomas Payne answers that he had delivered the letter to E., but he would not write, &c. 4. Yet the pretended Dawson wrote the same post to Mrs. Marguarith Bouckworth at the Hague, being the new address to the correspondent there. 5. I believe Dawson a borrowed name, being sometimes called Mary, sometimes Elizabeth. 6. And that Mrs. Dawson, that lives with Overscheld, is not the party, because Payne was employed to deliver her letter, which Overscheld might have done with more secrecy. 7. And that Thomas Payne was engaged in this business by his brother in Holland, that he found out the pretended Dawson by Overscheld's direction, and that they would not trust him. [Ibid. No. 227.]
Nov. 15.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The report of eight Holland men-of-war being off Flamborough, signified here by an express from Bridlington, made me go down to Shields to acquaint the loaden colliers, which caused my silence last post. I suppose they are gone again, for the light fleet of about 200 sail with convoy are come in, except two or three lost by coming ashore near our bar. Wind W. and by S. [Ibid. No. 228.]
Nov. 15.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to James Hickes. Yesterday the light fleet of upwards of 300 sail passed by the Tees, and to-day a billander, for the Tees, sank at Hartlepool pier end. Wind S. and by W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 229.]
Nov. 15.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. No ships have gone or come in for a fortnight, except to-day one of 8 guns for Bordeaux is gone out without convoy. Wind yesterday S.S.W., to-day S.W. [Ibid. No. 230.]
Nov. 15.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to James Hickes. Last Wednesday the Dragon and Morning Star left Morlaix, convoying 17 merchantmen, viz., 6 for this place, 2 for London, and the rest for Southampton, Topsham, &c. Four of ours arrived to-day, being separated by storm from the rest last night off Plymouth. The only news they bring is their ill resenting the loss of the Jacques of St. Malo, at Cadiz, which, they say, is a breach of articles between them and Spain, by which their ships are to be free from search in that road. Wind S.W. and by W., strong. [Ibid. No. 231.]
Nov. 15.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Reserve and Pearl are both at Falmouth. The first came in damaged, with four feet of water in her hold. Here are the Adventure, Nightingale, Mermaid, and Norwich. The last is at the hulk cleaning; the others will come in to clean next spring tide, about 10 days hence. The Dragon and Morning Star are supposed to be on this coast, because many of the Morlaix fleet they went to convoy are arrived here and to the westward. Wind W.S.W., very stormy these three or four days. [Ibid. No. 232.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 232i.]
Nov. 15. Inland advices received that day being extracts from letters from the 8–18th to the 14th, all previously calendared except:— Nov. [8]–18. Delft. All things remain here as formerly, only the Prince of Orange is marched with his army into Liege to intercept the French from succours from those parts, but we since hear the French are come to the Old Bosch to intercept his going back and succours to him. M. Turenne is on his march for Westphalia. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 233.]
Nov. 15. Commission for Thos. Cockaine to be ensign in place of Fras. Wall, to the Duke of York's company of foot in Portsmouth garrison, whereof Andrew Newport is captain. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 59.]
Nov. 15.
Whitehall.
Col. John Werden to the Navy Commissioners. Since my letter of last night his Royal Highness commands me to acquaint you with what the captain of the Hope fireship informed him, namely, that she was sheathed, cleaned, and fitted for the voyage and ready to take in provisions some days ago. He desires to know the particulars of anything that renders her unfit for the voyage; otherwise he directs there be no further delay about her, but that she and the Princess, William and Thomas, Mary and Martha, Levant Merchant and Eagle fireship may receive all possible dispatch. Postscript.—I have since received a letter from Capt. Wetwang, informing me that he only stays for the Sweepstakes, which is not ready for want of her provisions. The wind is now fair, and if it chop about before that squadron sails, you are sensible how great a prejudice it would cause to the service. Therefore pray write very effectually to the victuallers to dispatch her victuals, and let me know whose fault it is that they have not been sent. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 80.]
Nov. 15.
The Guinea, in the Hope.
Capt. Thomas Trafford to the Navy Commissioners. Our ship has been fit to take in our provisions these four or five days, but none have come down, which makes me doubt the neglect of my purser, Richard Alwin, who is very ignorant of his business, and, I fear, negligent. I informed Mr. Sprigg of it last Monday. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Nov. 15.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the same. I will perform your order for supplying the chirurgeon of the Dragon for the sick, when she comes in, and will deliver him the tickets. Concerning the supplying of Nightingale, Adventure, and Norwich with what they want. The Mermaid is in port, so leaky that the captain says he must have her ashore and pretends she wants cleaning also. 'Twere good there were a commander of the squadron to direct such cases. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Nov. 15. Capt. John Berry to W. Hewer. Desiring him to deliver to Mr. Woodward as many pay books as will be required for paying the Resolution. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Nov. 15.
Dublin.
Sir H. Ford to [the Earl of Arlington]. Since my last of the 12th his Excellency is in a fair way of recovery from the danger his late relapse seemed to threaten. He hopes to be able to use his own hand, from which at present he is disabled. I send herewith Lord Thomond's letter to his Majesty, containing the examination of Capt. Walcot. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 61.]
Nov. 16. Capt. Barnett Phillips to the Duke of York. Petition stating that he had served the States-General for 23 years until the former war, that he had then quitted their service, and came to St. James's with Sir William Davis's letter to his Royal Highness, Sir William assuring the petitioner he should have a man-ofwar, but he was made only lieutenant of the Mary Rose, that after the peace he lived in Holland as lieutenant of a foot company, having a pension of 50l. per annum from the States for his good service against Cromwell, till the present war, when on his Majesty's proclamation he quitted that service with 50 seamen, and just before Dover was seized with them by Capt. Andrew Hoch, and carried into Middleburg, where he was prisoner for 11 weeks, and then coming to Harwich went on board his Highness's ship, where he has continued ever since, and praying that his Royal Highness would mediate with his Majesty for an employment for him at sea, or for some other maintenance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 234.]
Nov. 16.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The light fleet have so filled up the narrow at the entrance of our harbour that the loaden fleet, though as fair a wind as ever blew at N.W., cannot get out, till they get up further. Off Scarborough a Yarmouth man, one of the light fleet, a little before day, came foul of a caper, that was scouting there, and by good luck sank him. About 25 of the men were saved, and are now dispersed into the ships here. They write from Leith of a rich Muscovy ship brought in by the Scotch privateers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 235.]
Nov. 16.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wind W. The master, surgeon, and several seamen of the Crown were here to-day to inquire after their ship, which, they say, was put from her anchors, while they were ashore at Scarborough or thereabouts. We are informed nine Dutch men-of-war went northward last week. [Ibid. No. 236.]
Nov. 16.
Harwich.
Captain Thomas Langley to Williamson. By our last packetboat came over 18 poor people, ten of whom owned themselves to have been soldiers. Nine said they were Scots, but all have been in the French King's army, so with Capt. Taylor's advice I sent them all to Landguard Fort. But the captain believes Scotch are not meant as well as English, so we are in question whether to stop all the soldiers that run away or only the English, and also if I shall be at the charges, for none else will. Please help my bill, which I made bold to present to your kinsman. [Ibid. No. 237.]
Nov. 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Concerning the soldiers mentioned in the last. As soon as the mails arrive at the Briell they are dispatched to the Hague, and there always viewed before opening. [Ibid. No. 238.]
Nov. 16.
Dover.
John Carlile to Williamson. At 10 this morning Count Schomberg and Mr. Montague, late ambassador, sailed in the Henrietta yacht for Calais, with a fair wind. The Queen's frigate still waits here for convoy. Yesterday a privateer of this town brought into our road three small prizes retaken from the Hollander, which are now sent to London. Two small Ostend vessels have been cast away before Nieuport. The storm was such that two of our Dover packet-boats had like to be cast away, but are saved. [Ibid. No. 239.]
Nov. 16.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Yesterday the Earl of Arran and Major Thomas Fairfax went hence towards London. They left Ireland quiet and the Channel free from privateers. [Ibid. No. 240.]
Nov. 16. Warrant for making Mary, wife of Stephen Buirard, watchmaker, and Elizabeth Dereing, grocer, both of Westminster, aliens, free denizens. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 139.]
Nov. 16.
Whitehall.
Col. John Werden to the Navy Commissioners. By his Royal Highness's commands, directing them to appoint some small vessel to attend on the Cambridge, for getting her manned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 84.]
Nov. 16.
The Newcastle, in the Downs.
Capt. John Pearce to the Navy Commissioners. Informing them he had that day received the sails with part, but not all, of his other provisions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 85.]
Nov. 16. Joseph Derbie to the same. I was yesterday advised from his Highness the Prince, to present a draft for your consideration, in order whereto I attend at the door, expecting access to you. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Nov. 16.
The Marshalsea.
Thomas Wheeler, pilot, to Lord Brouncker. I was by your order, as one of the Navy Commissioners, commanded on board the Kent, to pilot her from Woolwich to the Hope, and to be discharged there. But the crossness of the captain, who would not anchor at the Hope, nor put me ashore, forced me to sea with him, and he then took away the charge of the ship both from me and the lieutenant and the master, and took it wholly on himself, for when I sent to him to desire the ship might be put to stays and tack about, for I imagined we were near danger, he would not observe my directions, and soon after she was cast away; all which the major part of the company (now through Providence saved) can testify. I therefore entreat you will stand my friend and assist me, that I may not perish in prison by want, having neither friends nor money to support me. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Nov. 16. Capt. Peter Bowen to Commissioner Tippetts. Requesting that an order be sent to Chatham for a new mainmast and a pinnace for the Leopard. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Nov. 16.
The Savoy.
John Knight to W. Hewer. The 7th I entreated you to inform the Commissioners that I had received power from Mr. Pley to conclude with them for the 90 bolts of sailcloth at Portsmouth at 16d. per yard, which I hope they are content to allow. I have since received orders to conclude for the cordage also at 33s. per cwt., or rather than to have any longer obstruction at 32s., which being 6s. short of contract, it is hoped their Honours will think it reasonable to allow. Pray acquaint the Board herewith to-day, if possible, that an order may be sent to the officers there to make out a bill for all together, and to finish this troublesome work. I have sent my son to receive their answer, being obliged to attend myself at Whitehall for some special service of his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Nov. 16. Capt. Thomas Guy to Thomas Edwards. Requesting some more tickets, having lost nearly 20 of those he received last week. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Nov. 16. Account by Ann Tooker of necessaries wanting at the Hill house, at Chatham, being sheets, table cloths, chairs, carpets, kitchen utensils, &c., the price of the whole amounting to 124l. 5s. [Ibid. No. 91.]
[Nov. ?] Sir J. Smyth to Mrs. Tooker. Informing her that he had surveyed the said bill, and that she must demand besides bed curtains, and two beds with all furniture, and likewise two beds and furniture for servants. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Nov. 16.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to [the Earl of Arlington]. Since my last, Capt. Walcot having surrendered himself to the Governor of Limerick, his examination was taken by the Earl of Thomond, a copy whereof I enclose. You will perceive he seems to deny everything he supposes to be criminal, but I am informed Capt. Cullen insists on the justification thereof to a tittle. Walcot is expected here to-night, and Capt. Cullen is likewise on his journey hither. I cannot yet foresee what it will amount to on a full examination, but it shall not want a thorough enquiry. The Lord Lieutenant amends finely, and in outward apprehension is past all suspicion of danger, but continues weak, and in no condition to be troubled with business, which is the reason you have not received any account of his Majesty's letter concerning the rules for the corporations. As soon as he recovers so much strength as to be acquainted with any of the public concerns, I doubt not he will give you a very satisfactory account of that affair. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 62.] Enclosed,
Copy of the said examination. [Ibid. No. 62i.]
Nov. 16.
Dublin.
Francis Godolphin to Lord Arlington. I hourly expect the good effect of your mediation with the Lord Keeper. On my last of 17 Oct., mentioning an escheat fallen to the King, I found by Mr. Richards that you would accept those services, and I have now somewhat of that kind before me, which shall shortly be ready for your views. In the meantime I humbly offer whether you would think it worth while to procure a licence from his Majesty for transporting from hence to England 10,000 cattle, which should be worth the procurer about 5,000l. I shall say this much in defence of it, that if it can ever be expedient for the King to exert his power in dispensing with the severity of that law, it would be now a most seasonable act of grace, and some refreshing to this gasping country, at present under those pressures through the interruption of their trade during this war, that they are by no means capable of paying the public dues, which is notoriously known and felt by Sir W. Bucknall and his partners. 'Tis doubtful whether the law were for the good of England, but 'tis out of the question the advantage of this country that it should be connived at a little. This is no more than is done every day by stealth and in smaller numbers, but the persons I am concerned for would run no hazard, and what they would expect in consideration of their money is only an indemnity from the penalties of the Act by an intimation of his Majesty's pleasure to the governing men of those parts, either Bristol, Chester, or Liverpool, where the money would be paid down at their landing. I thought it my duty to make you this overture, which you may entertain or reject, as you think fit. The Lord Lieutenant continues still indisposed, but amends visibly every day. His illness appears now to proceed mostly from the disorder of his spleen, which, I think, no remedy would sooner or more effectually compose than welcome letters from England. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 62a.]
Nov. 17.
Oxford.
Thomas Hyde to Williamson. I present you with a sheet of my new catalogue of our public library. We are going on with the printing of it as fast as we can, in the form and paper you see. I make bold to renew the request I made in London that you would use your interest to get some sinecure or some such thing annexed to my office of library keeper, that it may prove a more comfortable subsistence to me, and a better encouragement to my industry and pains. The whole revenue of my office is but 50l. per annum, counting all that can be counted, and it requires my perpetual and strict attendance daily. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 241.]
Nov. 17.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. No ship has come in or gone out since my last. The Adventure is not here, as my last informed. [Ibid. No. 242.]
Nov. 17.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to James Hickes. To-day three ships arrived here, two from Guinea, but all three from Barbados, where was a very great hurricane, by which many ships were lost, among them one of this town. [Ibid. No. 243.]
Nov. 17. Warrant to the Lords of the Treasury to grant unto Ralph Montague a lease for 31 years of the one-third part of the enclosures from the Forest of Gillingham, containing about 800 acres, whereof a lease had been granted, dated 26 March 1667, to William Montague, the Queen's Attorney-General, upon the surrender of the last mentioned lease, without any fine, at the annual rent of 32l. 10s. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 96.]
Nov. 17. Licence to Sir Francis Rowles, High Sheriff of Somerset, to live out of his county. [Ibid.]
Nov. 17. Warrant for a grant to James Duke of Monmouth of certain lands, tenements, &c., in a schedule annexed, which reverted to the Crown, in consequence of Joscelin Percy, Earl of Northumberland, the last heir male of the body of Henry, Earl of Northumberland, to whom the same were granted in reversion in 4 and 5 Phil. and Mary, with a reversion to the Crown, dying without issue male. Annexed,
List of lands, rents, and privileges comprised in the foregoing grant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 205.]
Nov. 17. Privy seal for Sir Peter Wyche's allowance, appointed secretary to the Embassy for espousing and conducting the Archduchess of Inspruck on the part of the Duke of York. [Ibid. f. 207.]
Nov. 17. Warrant to the Commissioners of Prizes to pay from their account of incidentals, 140l. to Adrian Direchst, captain of the Dutch privateer Geeldseer, for assistance afforded the company of the Kent frigate. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 17. Warrant for a grant to Sir John Duncombe of the offices of Chancellor and Under-Treasurer of the Exchequer, on the resignation of the Earl of Shaftesbury, Chancellor of England. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 17. Warrant to the Earl of Bath to order the Lord Chamberlain to admit Lourde Cordell to be one of the pages of the bed-chamber in ordinary, without fee till the first vacancy. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 207.]
Nov. 17. Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox to allow the ordinary pay of a lieutenant to Capt. Barnet Philips, who quitted the service of the States-General upon the late proclamation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A., f. 47.]
Nov. 17.
Whitehall.
Another reference of the petition of Trevers', calendared ante p. 80, to Lord Chief Baron Turner, with his report, dated 20 Dec., that the petitioner has incurred many vexatious suits for his faithfulness in managing his Majesty's interest in the farm of Customs, that the farmers think he should be continued, and that there is a very full certificate of the inhabitants of Westminster in his favour; and further reference, dated 4 Nov. 1673, to the Lord Treasurer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 84.]
Nov. 17.
Victualling Office.
Josiah Child to the Navy Commissioners. Touching the Sweepstakes, we had no notice of what Sir J. Smyth ordered at Sheerness towards her victualling, though we often desired it, and once in your own hearing before his Royal Highness, till yesterday, and of what was warranted by him the purser acknowledges but one half, whose word we are forced to take, because Sir J. Smyth gives us yet no account of what was actually delivered by virtue of his warrant. Accordingly we have shipped off all her beer, and the rest of her provisions shall be shipped to-morrow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 93.]
Nov. 17.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the same. I have supplied the Nightingale's wants except cables, wherein I expected your direction, but considering the necessity I shall order one to be laid for her against her next coming in. Her captain wanted to bring her in to clean, which I thought not convenient to assent to, as she was but two months off the ground. If you think fit these ships be cleaned in two months and supply me for it I shall do my part. A ship from Barbados brings news of seven ships cast away by hurricane. [Ibid. No. 94.]
[Before Nov. 18.] Henry Sparks, Robert Jarrold, Edward Pyeman, Leonard Cocksadge, and Susan Linge, prisoners at Bury St. Edmund's, to the King. Petition for release in accordance with his Majesty's declaration, they having been presented in the Ecclesiastical Courts for Nonconformity, and imprisoned under writs de excommunicato capiendo in the gaol there, where some of them have continued for several years. [Certificate of the keeper concerning them is dated 18 Nov. Privy Council Register, Vol. X., p. 364. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 244.]
Nov. 18.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Thursday, after the light fleet passed by, an old galliot, belonging to Ipswich, being astern of the fleet, was chased ashore by a caper betwixt Hornsey and this. It being high water she ran so close to the cliff that her men landed from the bowsprit and escaped ashore. The Hollanders followed, the caper lying close to the vessel, and attempted to catch some sheep in the fields, but the country people coming down, chased them away. They could not get the vessel off, but took what small things they had time to take, for several countrymen running down with firelocks and muskets forced them away, and report they killed one of them. To-day were seen off here three large vessels with a small one, supposed to be some of the States' frigates. We hear from the northward that a light collier last Thursday by daylight ran on a caper of 8 guns and sank her, saving 30 odd of her men. Wind N.W. and by W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 245.]
Nov. 18.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. These coasts, as far as we yet hear, are in safety, notwithstanding the apprehensions, which the appearance of those Dutch men-of-war had put us into, and by a Swede or two come in since my last, we hear of nothing considerable they met with in their whole course. Early the 14th a light fleet of about 300 colliers passed by the mouth of the Humber with two convoys for Newcastle, and the day before the Deptford ketch went out of this river with his light Norfolk men and some from this port bound thither also: of all of whom we hear nothing yet amiss, and hope they are arrived in safety. Our French and London fleet lie still in Grimsby Road, wanting both favourable wind and weather, which has put in again hither the free Swede, which some days since ventured out, but could make no work of it. [Ibid. No. 246.]
Nov. 18.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. This coast has been lately very free from privateers. Wind W. and N. [Ibid. No. 247.]
Nov. 18.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to James Hickes. The Dragon having been at Morlaix as convoy to several ships, came back to this road Saturday, having by foul weather lost most of the ships he brought over, four belonging to Lyme got in thither, and two of that port are not yet come in. The Hatton ketch that came four or five days ago from Guernsey is bound thither with the first fair wind. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 248.]
Nov. 18.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Very great storms since my last. This morning it is more serene. Wind W.N.W. [Ibid. No. 249.]
Nov. 18. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from the 11th to the 16th, all previously calendared. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 250.]
Nov. 18. Warrant to the Lord Chancellor to pass under the Great Seal all warrants, grants, &c., directed to the late Lord Keeper, which had not yet passed under the Great Seal, and to sign injunctions, decrees, &c., already given, which required to be signed by the Lord Chancellor or Lord Keeper, and had not yet been signed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 98.]
Copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 251.]
Nov. 18. Pass to Capt. Timothy Crow for himself and family to Denmark. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 207.]
Nov. 18. Pass for John West, with his wife and children, and Mary Winter with her children to Ireland. Minute. [Ibid.]
[Nov. ?] Thomas Bartram, foreman of the ropeyard at Woolwich, to the Duke of York. Petition stating that his Majesty has been wronged for many years, having had several hundred parcels of work done on tonnage at an exacting rate, as for dressing fine hemp and white oakum, and making various lines, spun yarn, netting and lashing, and that the petitioner is willing to serve his Majesty at a much easier rate for such work, and praying a warrant for doing such work in future. At the foot,
Nov. 18.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Navy Commissioners. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 95.] Wafered on,
[Nov. ?] Another petition of the same to the same. Stating that his Majesty has been wronged as above, which the petitioner is ready to testify, having good evidence that for some years his Majesty's check book has been falsified, and praying his Royal Highness to consider the inconveniency for any clerk that keeps the check book to undertake any work, he having his own account to make according to his own mind, and to order the petitioner to be heard, that some speedy course may be taken therein. At the foot,
Reference thereof, dated 3 Dec., Whitehall, to the Navy Commissioners. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Nov. 18.
Prize Office.
Sir Paul Neile, Ch. Myddelton, and Richard Kingdon to the Navy Commissioners. We have received orders from the Lords Commissioners of Prizes to deliver you the Stavoren prize and such of the doggers as you shall desire, which we pray you to determine, and to receive them as soon as possible. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Nov. 18.
Chatham.
Joseph Lawrence to the same. Giving the results of another view of the Violet hulk, and estimating the cost of her repairs at 550l. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Nov. 18.
Spithead.
Capt. John Stanesby to the same. I was to go over for the coast of France with some vessels of Weymouth and Lyme, that were ready laden for St. Malo, but coming to the Isle of Wight with convoys to see safe in at the Needles the 13th, with the wind S. W., I stood back again eastward, hoping to turn up again for Weymouth, but the wind blew so hard I could do no good, but was forced to stand for Studland Bay, where I anchored till the 15th, and then sailed again with wind at W.S.W., hoping to beat up for Weymouth, but then it blew so extreme hard I was forced into the Needles, and anchored here to-day. We have but a week's provisions on board, and the ship, by reason of bad weather and bearing hard sail, is something leaky. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Nov. 18.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the Navy Commissioners. On my arrival on Thursday night I found the Rupert still in the dock for want of water last spring to launch her, which shall be done the first opportunity, and the Resolution dispatched with all speed, as soon as she can be got into dock. The Dunkirk, Diamond, and Advice are come into harbour. I desire to know if they must be fitted for sea as fast as they can, or whether any of them shall be paid off. It will take a good while to fit the Dunkirk and Advice, they requiring to be docked. At Spithead are the Hampshire bound for the Downs, the Jersey to the West, the Success for Guernsey, and the Roebuck waiting for further orders. The commander of the Jersey requires stores for a southward voyage. I desire to know if it be thought necessary to supply for more than a Channel voyage. The Diligent ketch coming about wanted victuals, and was supplied for 10 men for 14 days. The commander of the Diamond complains that some of his beer stinks, and is unfit for use. I have ordered a survey of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 100.]
Nov. 18.
The Warspite.
Capt. John Wetwang to Sir J. Smyth. I wrote to you from Chatham, but have not had a line from the Board or from Secretary Werden, since I came to the ship. What provisions are come down are divided among the ships, but in broken quantities, because some could take more and some less. The Sweepstakes has three months' complete of all sorts, so if his purser get but wood and candles on board she may go with us, but he is at London still. The Falcon has neither wood nor water, nor a captain that has been near her these 14 days, but he has the pinyess (pinnace) with him all the time, so I think we must go a small squadron, but I intend to go away this morning to Hollesley Bay, and bide there 24 hours, and, if they do not come, then to make the best of my way. None of the rest was ready till yesternight, and besides the weather was so bad and think with rain that we dared not have ventured down the Swin. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Nov. 18. Certificate by John Butler, captain, and the other officers of the Mary and Martha, that her company being very sickly on her late return from sea two surveys were taken of her beer, and out of 65 tuns no less than 58 were found stinking and unfit to drink, and were staved, and that of her company 16 were sick on board, and 80 at London and Gravesend, and three died in the little time she was at sea, which they conceive was occasioned by the defectiveness of the beer. [Ibid. No. 102.]
Nov. 18. Capt. George Legge to S. Pepys. Requesting him to send by the bearer, the purser of the York, 90 blank tickets, that he may give tickets to the relations of those of the men that came out of the York into the Fairfax without their tickets, who died on board under his command. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Nov. 18. Notes of licences to the following persons for the following places:—
S.P. Dom., En. Bk., 38A. Page. Name. Place. Denomination.
268 William Hodges Shipton, Gloucestershire Presbyterian
" John Walker House of Jane Eckersall, widow, Ratchdall (Rochdale), Lancashire Presbyterian
" Henry Parsons House of Robert Dalliver, called Swillcots, Abbotstoke, Dorset Presbyterian
269 Thomas Holland His house, Oldham Presbyterian
" Edward Delamaine House of William Bowers, St. Mary Cray. Kent Baptist
" John Wheeler House of Edward Billinghurst, Elstead, Surrey Baptist
" Matthew Clarke House of Thomas Johnson, Horninghold, Leicestershire Presbyterian
" David Jenks Shrewsbury Presbyterian
270 Richard Worle His house, Romsey, Hants. Congregational
" Richard Boothhouse His house, Derby Congregational
" James Cokayne House, called Utkinson, Tarporley, Cheshire Congregational
" Samuel Faircloth Chippenham, Cambridgeshire Congregational
" Hugh Rogers Welchpool, Montgomeryshire Congregational
271 Richard King Reading Presbyterian
" Stephen Lanclark His house, Minehead Baptist
" Francis Bryant, John Carnall, and Isaac Farman All of Ashbrittle, Somerset Baptist
" Thomas Motte, or Mote His house, Higham, Suffolk Presbyterian
" John Lummock Bishopric of Durham Independent
" Richard Harmer His house, Kilby, Leicestershire Congregational
" Theophilus Browning House of William Wombwell, York Baptist
" Henry Forbes House of James Brookes, Ellingthorpe (Ellenthorpe), Yorkshire Presbyterian
" Edward Warren House of John Rayner, Colchester Presbyterian
272 Henry Coleman His house, Terlington (Tur Langton), Leicestershire Congregational
" Robert Seddon Langley, Derbyshire Presbyterian
" Hugh Henshaw His house, Knotford (Knutsford), Cheshire Presbyterian
" William Worsley House of John Paine, Hawkhurst, Kent. Baptist
" Robert Webb Harsley (Hursley), Hants. Presbyterian
" William Mayo His house, Po[u] shot, Wilts. Presbyterian
" James Rawson His house, Haselbury, Dorset Presbyterian
" John Short Lyme Presbyterian
273 John Hamer Llanbister, Radnorshire Congregational
273 and 277 Maurice Griffith Beg[u]ildy, Radnorshire Congregational or Presbyterian
273 Edward Owen Glasscomb (Glascwm), Radnorshire Congregational
" Richard Dowley His house, Orton-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire
" John Garside Marksfield, Cheshire Presbyterian
" John Rawlins Gracechurch Street, London. Presbyterian
273 John Fox House of Widow Fidsall, Devizes Baptist
" Richard Hilton West Bramwick (Bromwich), Staffordshire Presbyterian
" Robert Bennet Wad[de]sden, Bucks. Presbyterian
274 Samuel Girdler His house, Birmingham Congregational
" Nathaniel Broadshaw His house, Hemingford, Hunts. Presbyterian
275 Thomas Silly. Thomas Vaux, and Robert Collison All of Pirton, Herts. Baptist
" Stephen Kilbey Shefford, Beds. Baptist
" John Beebee House of William Ash, Tid[e]swell, Derbyshire Presbyterian
Nov. 18. Notes of licences for places mentioned in the last entry, and also for the following:—
S.P. Dom., En. Bk., 38A. Page. Place. Denomination.
268 House of John Walker, Westbury, Bucks. Presbyterian
" House of William Palmer, Sherstone, Wilts. Presbyterian
" House of Matthew Bragg, Burstock (Powerstock), Dorset Presbyterian
269 House of Robert Coates, Ashover, Dorset (Derbyshire) Presbyterian
" Houses of Robert Porter and John Billingsley, Mansfield, Notts. Presbyterian
" Meeting-house built on Cockey Moor, Middleton parish, Lancashire Presbyterian
" House of Richard Holland, Manchester Presbyterian
" House of John Paige, Blan[d]ford Congregational
" House of Roger Buswell, Husbands Bosworth, Leicestershire Independent
" House of John Cave, Theddingworth, Leicestershire Independent
" Houses of Humphrey Jameson, Gr[i]esley, Notts.
" House of Gawen Wrenn, Crosthwaite, Cumberland [Congregational]
" House of George Fox, Hermitage, Dorset Congregational
" House of George Johnson, Horninghold, Leicestershire
" House of Elizabeth Elston, Kensfroid, Denbighshire
" House of John Roberts, Ruthin, Derbyshire Congregational
" House of Thomas Knight, Cockainhill, Kent
270 House of Ann Sleighton, Chipingham (Chippenham), Cambridgeshire Congregational
" House of John Hornsbee, Standupawordell (Stanhope in Wear Dale), Durham Presbyterian
" House of Samuel Sturgess, Sibbertoffe (Sibbertoft), Northants. Presbyterian
" House of Matthew Bloome, Attercliffe, Yorkshire Presbyterian
" House of Robert Booth, Mottram, Longdendale, Cheshire Presbyterian
" House of Elizabeth Upton, Brix[t]on, Devon Presbyterian
" House of Robert Wine, Landilp (Landulph), Cornwall Presbyterian
" House of John Parkins, Tingwich (Tingewick), Bucks.
270 House of Christopher Sherwin, Kennet, Cambridgeshire Presbyterian
" House of David Thomas, Wimllimglym, Denbighshire Congregational
" House of John Prichard, Penyralt, Denbighshire Congregational
" House of Nathaniel Price, Andover Presbyterian
" House of Edward Wilson, Cannock, Staffordshire Presbyterian
" House of widow Mott, King's Bromley, Staffordshire
" House of Oliver Bransell, Great Coughton, Warwickshire
271 House of William Buknald, Farn[h[am, Surrey Presbyterian
" Houses of John Ball and Thomas Bryant, Bampton, Devon Baptist
" House of widow Merrin, Stonehouse, Devon Presbyterian
" House of Margaret Fitzcame (? Fitzjames), Lew[e] stone, Dorset Presbyterian
" House of Digory Cole, South Molton, Devon Presbyterian
" House of Henry Fox, Wighstone (Wigston) Magna, Leicestershire Congregational
272 House of George Borfert, Fleckney, Leicestershire Congregational
" House of Richard Coleman, Leicestershire Congregational
" House of James Keate, Leigh, Dorset Presbyterian
" House of Francis Jerham, Langley, Derbyshire Presbyterian
" House of — Marsh, Hith (Hythe), Kent Presbyterian
" House of William Luke, Bridlington, Yorkshire Presbyterian
" House of George Filliter, sen., West Morden, Dorset Presbyterian
272 and 280 House of Richard Cooper, Nedgin [g], Suffolk Presbyterian
272 House of Henry Whiteman, Cardington, Beds. Congregational
" Houses of Richard Bures and Noah Webb, Frimley, Surrey Presbyterian
" House of Richard Launder, Lurgashall, Sussex Presbyterian
273 Houses of Richard Mills and Thomas Price, Glascombe (Glascwm), Radnorshire Congregational
" House of Richard Smith, Worcester Presbyterian
" House of widow Lisle, Moyles Court, Hants. Presbyterian
" House of Thomas Langhorne, Penrick (Penrith), Cumberland Congregational
" House of Ann King, Llanbister, Radnorshire Congregational
" House of Richard Griffith, Llangunl [1] o, Radnorshire Congregational
" House of John Clark, Northampton Presbyterian
" House of Thomas Clarke, Raina (Rainow), Cheshire Presbyterian
" House of Elizabeth Morgan, Neath, Glamorganshire Presbyterian
" House of Rice Powell, called Kildaudy, Glamorganshire Presbyterian
" House of Thomas Tonman, Llanyhangel (Llanfihangel), Nant Melan, Radnorshire
" House of Gabriel Major, Leicester Presbyterian
" House of Richard Woolcoots, Monk Silver, Somerset Presbyterian
" New-built meeting-house of Thomas Cawton, the New Way, Westminster [Presbyterian]
" House of Henry Pitfield, Whitechurch, Dorset Presbyterian
274 House of John Greene, Wigan Presbyterian
" House of Ellinor Hopkins, Wedenbury (Wednesbury), Staffordshire Congregational
" House of John Bagot, Over, Cheshire Presbyterian
274 House of Rowland Nevet, Bolas, Shropshire Presbyterian
" Houses of John Hand and Edward Bury, Stokeupon-Tearne, Shropshire Presbyterian
" Houses of John Griffin and Richard Jenks, High Arcall (Ercall), Shropshire Presbyterian
" House of Allen Linzey, Daventry Presbyterian
" House of John Hanson, Ashdon (Ashton), Gloucestershire Congregational
" House of Edward Robins, Crapthorn (Cropthorn), Worcestershire
" House of Richard Joyce, Dowgate, London Congregational
" House of John Davy, Farmcoate, Salop (? Gloucester)
" House of John Littleford, Bovinghall, Salop
" House of William Winkell, Albrington (Albrighton), Salop
" House of Richard Mase, Okams (? Oaken), Staffordshire Congregational
" House of Edward Hand, Patsell (Patshull), Staffordshire Congregational
" House of Thomas Browne, Copley, Staffordshire Congregational
" Houses of John Smith and Joshua Granger, Wedenbury (Wednesbury), Staffordshire
" House of Samuel Horsman, Campden, Gloucestershire Congregational
" House of Philip Wright, Over Pe[o]ver, Cheshire Presbyterian
" House of Joseph Whishall, Great Badworth (Budworth), Cheshire
275 House of Thomas Carter, Pirton, Herts. Baptist
Nov. 18.
Treasury Chambers.
Present, his Majesty, the Lord Chancellor, the Duke of Buckingham, the Earl of Arlington, Lord Clifford, Secretary Coventry, and Sir J. Duncombe Lord Ranelagh's proposal read, about paying the arrears of the army by 12 payments, which is agreed, as proposed, to be by 12 equal quarterly payments, the first to be made at or before next Christmas. The farmers called in. That they pay in 10,000l., half at Dublin and the other half in the country, and then be heard by counsel as to their pretences to defalcation as to a foreign war, but that they are never hereafter to make any detainer of their rent, but pay the same in duly at the limited days, and that in mean time, on payment of the 10,000l., process be stopped against them by the Lord Lieutenant. Minutes. With query how the question was determined concerning the days of grace for payment of money by the farmers. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 63.]
Nov. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing him to cause the Lord Chancellor to grant to Robert Arthur a writ of error, in order to the reversal of the outlawry of his grandfather, Alderman Arthur, and the attainder thereon, and to require the judges of the King's Bench to admit thereof and examine the record, and to give judgment thereon according to law. (See ante, p. 125.) [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 349.]
Nov. 19. John Cooke to Williamson. Notice should be taken at Lord Arlington's office that the King has promised the reversion of the prebend of Lambister (Llanbister), now in possession of Dr. Mews, to a friend of Secretary Coventry, if it becomes void. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 252.]
Nov. 19. Certificate by Sir John Frederick, that Adryan Bancker, late of Schiedam, mariner, took before him on that day the oaths of allegiance and supremacy. [Ibid. No. 253.]
Nov. 19.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. Most of the loaden fleet went out yesterday; the rest are sailed this morning. The Crown, with some ships from the northward, came opportunely to sail with them. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 254.]
Nov. 19.
Hull.
William Griffith to Williamson. This afternoon is come out of Holderness a master with three men of a hoy, of which the Mayor of Sandwich is sole owner, of about 70 tons, bound for Newcastle, for coals. Last Sunday they were chased by a dogger of six or eight guns lying on these coasts, and being for want of wind unable to run the hoy ashore, they anchored between Hornsey and Sister Churches, and went off in their boat on one side, whilst the dogger's long-boat boarded them on the other, and, while they escaped to land, carried off the hoy to sea. As they were coming hither on the sea coast yesterday, they saw from about 10 to 12 in the morning nine great Dutch men-of-war of above 60 guns each, as they judged, standing southward off the Humber, and with them both their own hoy and the dogger that took her the day before. This news puts merchants here in great apprehensions for our French and London fleet, which, they conceive, sailed out of Grimsby road with yesterday's winds, with only the Golden Phœnix for convoy. I have not yet heard from you concerning either the retaken Yarmouth collier or the four Dutch prisoners taken in her, who lie here on charge. [Ibid. No. 255.]
Nov. 19.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By the Essex ketch come in this morning, we understand that Capt. Wetwang in the Warspite, with the Moncke, Greenwich, Yarmouth, Falcon, Sweepstakes, Augustine, this ketch, and two fireships are under sail this way from the Buoy of the Nore, a convoy bound for Gottenburg. [Ibid. No. 256.]
Nov. 19.
Past 10 p.m. Harwich.
The same to the same. The packet-boat coming in this evening affords the enclosed intelligence, and by that person Capt. Langley pretended to employ to Amsterdam. He having made the experiment at Rotterdam, would not go further, because he had such a repulse there. The excuse he made was concerning prisoners sent over on the Hollanders' concern. He carried over an account of prisoners discharged from Capt. Langley, but they of Rotterdam pretended they were unconcerned in it. The packet-boat's men say that young Van Tromp commands this squadron, though it was first reported De Ruyter commanded. They now report they are designed for the Straits, and are past the Channel betwixt Dover and Calais. They are 38 sail, fireships and all, which they say are 11. It is near a fortnight since they went through. Their rendezvous was about Schowen. They are well manned. Many Hamburgers took pay under them. Everything begins to be dear among them. Their great expectation is from the Prince of Orange's army, which is in the land of Luick (Liége), and they impatiently expect to hear of some considerable attempt made by them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 317, No. 257.]
Nov. 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W. To-day the Hampshire sails for the Downs, and several vessels with her, that have lain a long while here for want of a convoy. The Happy Return came to Spithead yesterday. The Jersey is still there, bound westward the first wind. Wind W.S.W. [Ibid. No. 258.]
Nov. 19.
Dartmouth.
W[illiam] H[urt] to James Hickes. Thanking him, on behalf of Mr. Ivy and Mr. Peters, for his care and pains in the business, and requesting him, on their behalf, to thank Sir J. Williamson. The Gloucester and Morning Star are in Torbay. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 259.]
Nov. 19.
Plymouth.
List sent by Capt. Philip Lanyon of ships arrived there. [Ibid. [No. 260.]
Nov. 19. Warrant to the Lord Chancellor entrusting him with the custody of idiots and lunatics and their estates, formerly administered by the Court of Wards, and since the disuse thereof in the immediate care and dispose of the King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 97.]
Minute thereof, dated 20 Nov. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 208.]
Nov. 19. Warrant to the Lord Chancellor, referring to him all petitions for licences to make collections, presented either by the King's subjects who had suffered loss by fire, shipwreck, or by being taken captive by pirates or enemies, or by Christians of other nations forced to fly to England for the sake of their religion, and empowering him to issue licences in the usual form in such cases as he thinks fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 97.]
Copy of the last two warrants. [S.P. Dom., Car., II., No. 251.]
Separate copies of the same. [Ibid. Nos. 261, 262.]
Nov. 19.
Victualling Office.
Josiah Child and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. On receipt of your general order for taking into our stores all returned provisions, we sent down to all ships that we knew had any, and wrote to our agent at Chatham to press vessels there, and receive into them all returned provisions, and we know not but that all is received that would be delivered. A lighter was sent to the Fortune flyboat, but then the provisions would not be parted with. On receipt of your particular order about her, which came not to our hands till last Sunday, we ordered a lighter to her on Monday, but she could not stir, on account of the high wind, but she went to-day before the receipt of your letter. As to the victualling of the said ship, we have had no notice of what she wants to complete her, except only of the beer, which is sent. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 104.]
Nov. 19. Col. John Russell and S. Titus to the Navy Commissioners. According to your demands, we have paid 27l. 10s., the incident charges of our Nassau prize, and desire your immediate order for her delivery to Mr. George Pott, for our use. Further detaining her will no way advantage the service, but increase the charge, prejudice the vessel, and obstruct his Majesty's intention in carrying on the pier at Newhaven, which has already been damaged to near the value of the vessel by the violence of the last storm since his Majesty's grant of her, which might have been prevented had she then been delivered to us and sold, and the money been in hand to carry on the work. We therefore request you to gratify our desires herein, or to let us know your further pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 105.]
[Nov. ?] Capt. Edward Andrewes to the Duke of York. Petition, praying further order for the immediate delivery of the Nassau prize, for which he had already obtained an order (calendared in last volume of the Calendar, p. 466), being concerned with Col. Russell in the regaining of the decayed harbour of Newhaven, where the last storm made a breach that, without present remedy, will endanger the pier. [Ibid. No. 106.]
Nov. 19.
Chatham.
Edward Homewood to the Navy Commissioners. I am charged by Boatswain Attewell to transmit you the enclosed [a letter from Capt. Wetwang, probably that calendared ante, p. 175], which he brought last night from the Nore. He had some disaster with it, likely to the loss of his life. The Gottenburg fleet sailed last night, between four and five, with a fresh wind, under Capt. Wetwang's conduct. [Ibid. No. 107.]
Nov. 19.
The Nightingale, Catwater.
Capt. Henry Clarke to the same. Yesterday, in taking out our bowsprit, we sprang our foremast in three places, and must have a new one, which is now a-making. I hope by the middle of next week she may be cleaned, revictualled, and completed for sea. The Adventure is bound for Penzance, to fetch some ships thence, but by reason of the high winds cannot yet proceed. The Norwich is completed for sea. The Mermaid and we are now on board the hulk, preparing to haul ashore on the rise of the spring. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Nov. 19.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the same. Giving an account of the Nightingale, Norwich, and Mermaid, as in the last letter, and enclosing for their direction a long bill for his boatswain's supply from the Capt. of the Adventure, which will have to be cleaned when she comes in next. Postscript.—Capt. Grant is just come to me, and complains of a great leak in his ship, the Reserve, so that he doubts of going further, though otherwise he judges her well and strong. I shall send some master carpenters on board to-morrow, and give you their opinion in my next. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Nov. 19.
The Marshalsea.
Thomas Wheeler, pilot, to S. Pepyes (Pepys). Almost word for word identical with his letter to Lord Brouncker, calendared ante p. 169. [Ibid. No. 110.]
Nov. 19.
London.
Count Gustav Horn to S. Peeps (Pepys). Requesting about 20 sheets of tickets to be sent him by the bearer, his master, to keep his men from being pressed into other ships. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 111.]
Nov. 19.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to the Earl of Arlington. The bishopries of Kilmore and Ardagh being void by the death of the late Bishop, recommending that Francis, Bishop of Limerick, be advanced to the said bishoprics, and that John Veasy, D.D., be advanced to the bishopric of Limerick, and sending the drafts of the letters for the purpose to be presented for his Majesty's signature. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 64.]
Nov. 19.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to Williamson. The Lord Lieutenant recovers from his distemper, but yet continues weak. We usually make haste down the hill, but get up with difficulty and by slow degrees; but we all conclude that all danger is passed for this time. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Nov. 19. Michael Thompson to Viscount Conway, at Dublin. Concerning the arrangements made for quartering the troop of the Lord of Ardee, who were well satisfied therewith, and apologising for troubling him with this second address in Capt. Chambers' behalf about the sheriffship of Armagh. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 66.]
Nov. 20. The French workers of thread to the King. Petition for the same favour granted to other foreigners to establish themselves in England, especially in London, and sell all such goods, both wholesale and retail. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 1.]
Translation of the above. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Nov. 20.
Silver Street, Southampton Buildings.
Edward Harris to Williamson. My indisposition with my desire of discoursing Mr. Tucker's affairs with you have detained the enclosed from you some days, which I now send as it came. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Nov. 20.
Maydwell.
Jeremiah Bullyvant to Williamson. The readiness you expressed when I saw you at Billing to do me any kindness in your power, and the proof of it in the quick dispatch you afforded my brother Chambers about a living in Yorkshire in the King's gift (though it succeeded not as well as was wished), have encouraged me to become your petitioner. I have been lately presented to a living of considerable value, and am to be soon inducted. I have not yet taken my M.A. degree, being incapacitated by non-residence through my absence in the King's service. I therefore request you, if possible, to procure me a mandate to take it at Cambridge. Mr. Wolaston will pay the fees. If it can be done, speed will add to your kindness, for I intend to go to the Bishop at Christmas for institution. I had waited on you in person, did not affection and duty oblige me to wait on my mother, who is breathing her last. [Ibid. No. 4.]
Nov. 20.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Between 45 and 50 laden colliers are now passed by. The rest that passed before, we suppose may be put into Humber, the wind having been much southerly. We hear of no obstruction this fleet or the former has had from the capers. Wind W.S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 5.]
Nov. 20.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. Last week only two vessels have come in. One, the St. Nicholas, of Stockholm, coming from the Sound, saw no Dutch nor Scotch privateers, nor any fishermen on the Dogger, but says several English ships are at Elsinore, waiting for a convoy, some of which have been there this half year. The other, a billander of Bruges, brings as little news. We hear by the fishermen from Bridlington that some small vessels are daily seen off the Head, standing to and fro, supposed to be privateers. The wind continuing so much southerly has stayed our Bordeaux and London fleet with their convoy, the Phœnix, in the Humber. Wind S. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Nov. 20.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. Wind S.W. Our coast is as free from enemies as we are of traders. Our custom-house vessel, after cruising ten days along the coast, returned last night without seeing one sail. [Ibid. No. 7.]
Nov. 20.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Yesterday came into this road a Hull fleet of about 17 sail, some for this town, some for London, and some for Bordeaux. This evening came into this road a fleet of loaden colliers, and in their company some from Scotland, who were about 16 sail when they came out with the Crown, their convoy, who, they report, left them, after which two of them were taken by a caper. One belonged to two merchants of this town, and was laden with salt on the King's account. The vessel without the salt is valued at 2,000l. The convoy to the Hull men, the Phœnix, of about 30 guns, a merchantman taken up in the King's service, is run on the Middle Grounds off Winterton. Some say she is got off; others not. [Ibid. No. 8.]
Nov. 20.
Southwold.
John Wickens to James Hickes. No ships have passed by since the 10th, when a light fleet of about 300 sail went northward. No Dutch privateers have been seen lately on this coast. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Nov. 20.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. A privateer is riding S.L. of this town. Wind S.E. This evening sailed by here to the northward eight of his Majesty's frigates, with two ketches. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Nov. 20. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from the 15th to the 19th, all previously calendared. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 11.]
Nov. 20. Grant to Sir Orlando Bridgeman, Bart., late Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, of a pension of 2,000l. a year. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 208.]
Docquet thereof, dated Nov. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 277.]
Nov. 20. Commission for Captain George Legge to be LieutenantGovernor of Portsmouth. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 47.]
Copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 12.]
Nov. 20. Dispensation for the High Sheriff of Oxfordshire to live in Berkshire, and to go to London or elsewhere out of the county, on his occasions. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 139.]
Nov. 20.
Victualling Office.
Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child, and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. The Guinea's beer was gone down before the receipt of your letter of yesterday, and the rest, without fail, shall be shipped to-morrow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 112.]
Nov. 20.
Chatham Dock.
Joseph Lawrence to the same. We have gone on sheathing the Mary with lead, as far as we have nails, which will be all spent to-day, the ship being rather more than half sheathed. Without a speedy supply we cannot get her ready to launch this spring, which will be the 23rd. The demand was sent up 30 Oct. The lead is come, and but half the nails. I beg the other half be sent down by post to-morrow, otherwise we must lose the spring for docking the Prince. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Nov. 20.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. Yesterday came to Spithead the Happy Return, which wants victuals. I desire to know his Royal Highness' pleasure as to what quantity shall be put on board, and whether she shall come into harbour or not. Her commander says she is something leaky, and wants cleaning. Enclosed is the return of a survey of the Diamond's beer, nine butts being extremely bad and unfit for service. The Roebuck is still at Spithead. If she is to be paid off, as was determined by his Highness when I was at London, it were better she were at the moorings in harbour and save her cables. Being mighty foul she must come in before proceeding on any service. The ship of Sir W. Warren and Justice Wood, with masts, is begun to unliver. When it is done I shall give you a further account of them. The office yacht building is planked within three strakes of the wale, but we want plank very much. I desire the long wainscots be sent forthwith, and some sprucia deals to lay her deck. Some of the things to perfect the last demand are to be had here, but very little will be served in without ready money. [Ibid. No. 114.] Enclosed,
The said return of the survey, dated the 18th. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Nov. 20. Certificate by R. Mayors of the measurements and tonnage of the Mary and Hannah ketch, Robert Fox, master. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Nov. 20. Note of a licence to Anthony Procter, M.A., of Kirby Massard (Kirkby Malzeard), Yorkshire, Presbyterian. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 38A, p. 275.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. We enclose a memorial presented by the Envoy of Sweden relating to the procedures in Scotland against some ships alleged to be Swedish, which is to be sent to the Court of Admiralty there, who are to give a clear and full answer to the particulars therein mentioned, to be returned to us or our Secretary with all convenient diligence. As to the letter desired in the said memorial from us to the Lords of Session, requiring them to do justice to the pretended owners of those ships, we are resolved not to interpose, not doubting but they will give impartial and quick dispatch in all actions depending before them, according to law. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 121.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant, as the first term's payment of the pension of 500l. per annum sterling given to Sir James Dalrymple, of Stair, President of the College of Justice, did not commence till Martinmas 1671, though his entry to the said place was almost a full year preceding, for speedy payment to him of the said half-year's pension. [Ibid. p. 122.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to John, Earl of Atholl, for his life, of the office of Keeper of the Privy Seal in Scotland. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 123.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
Protection to John, Lord Sinclair, for three years. [Ibid. p. 124.]
Nov. 20.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to [Williamson]. Though Ireland and Dublin have been full of the report of the Lord Lieutenant's death, yet this brings you news of the very good hopes we have of his recovery after a very dangerous relapse, when we thought he had been very well recovered. Lord Arlington will by this packet receive the letters for the King's signature to translate Dr. Marsh, Bishop of Limerick, to Kilmore, and for Dr. Veasy, Dean of Cork, to be Bishop of Limerick. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 67.]
Nov. 20. Capt. Walcott and Capt. Cullen being to-day confronted, Walcott confessed that his examination before the Earl of Thomond was what he could say in the matter, and that he did not remember more. He denied all the particulars now alleged against him by Captains Cullen and Fitzgerald. He said one Connor (Cornelius) O'Mulloney was with him, and would have him give money to him not to say anything against him. He confessed, but at first denied, that he had some conference with Capt. Mansfield (Mansel), bemoaning the condition of the English, and concerning his discontents against the Irish. He said that what Cullen alleged against him was out of malice, and Cullen saying he had never any occasion of quarrel against him, Walcott alleged he was an arbitrator against him in a difference between him and one Drue, about seven years ago, concerning 7l. or 8l. debt. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas Sir W. Bucknall lent us 2,800l., and paid the same to William Chiffinch, and by letters patent of 13 May 1670 we commanded that out of the year's rent or the sum of 300,000l. to be raised in Ireland, the said sum should be repaid to Bucknall, with interest at 10 per cent. from the date of its advance to the date of its repayment, and that in case the said principal with interest should not be repaid out of the said moneys within two years from the said dates of payment, the said Bucknall, his executors and partners, might detain the said principal and interest and allowance for exchange, or so much as should remain unpaid, out of the rent of the farm of the Irish revenue, and whereas the said sum was not so repaid, and the said Bucknall and partners have accordingly detained the said principal, with interest amounting to 592l. 19s. 8½d., and exchange at ten per cent., amounting to 280l., lest any doubt should arise on account of the rate of exchange not being particularly mentioned in the said letters patent, directing him to give order for the allowance of the total sum of 3,672l. 19s. 8½d. out of the rent of the farm of the Irish revenue on their two years' account ended 25 December 1670. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 350.]
Nov. 21.
The Golden Hind, over against St. Dunstan's, Fleet Street.
Dr. Beeston to Williamson. I had not the good fortune to find you yesterday, nor to know what you intend for your little kinsman at Winton, since our miscarriage last year, of which Mr. Brath[w]ayt promised to give you an account. If you have no better provision made, and think my particular nomination may be serviceable, I freely offer it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 13.]
Nov. 21.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. I enclose a copy of a letter this town sends of thankfulness to his Majesty and to Lord Fauconberg, who procured six guns for the defence of this town and port. On Tuesday passed by two fleets of 130 or 140 sail, with coals for London, but the winds being southerly, we fear the foremost is got no further than Humber. Yesterday passed by three light colliers. I hear of no enemy on these coasts this week. At the foot,
[The town of Whitby to Lord Fauconberg.] Expressing their gratitude to him for procuring the guns and ammunition, and begging him to offer their humble and hearty thanks to his Majesty, as the remoteness and disproportion of their earthly centre from that glorious sun and the knowledge of their own inability deters them from so sublime an enterprise. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Nov. 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I have nothing since my last by the Dutch mail, by which you will find that Mr. Dale is very constant with the boats, if there be anything stirring. I shall observe your orders concerning the soldiers; I know not whether they have any conveniency for a number of them in the fort. They often complain they are straitened for room. Wind S.W., where it has been three or four days, and so stormy that it forced a laden collier ashore here last night. Yesterday sailed by before the wind for Gottenburg Capt. Wetwang in the Warspite, with the Moncke, Greenwich, Yarmouth, Falcon, Sweepstakes, Augustine, Essex ketch, and two fireships. The Essex ketch came in here the day before, and sailed after them last night. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Nov. 21.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Williamson. By your last I have the promise of your kindness in my account. But you seem to speak as if Capt. Taylor had not given full satisfaction. If expedient, I shall send up all the orders I received the men by from Mr. Tucker and Mr. Reeve, of Rotterdam, which I produced to Capt. Taylor. What I desire is only my just disbursements, and hope that my care and pains in the end will be considered. As to your order about sending my men in each boat to make inquiry, I do my best, and put money in their pockets, but they generally inform me that all sorts of persons are very cautious of speaking any word in their hearing, yet they inform me that some say the Dutch with their squadron are designed to burn the French in their harbours, and some say they intend to fetch home their merchantmen from the Sound, but the certainty is not well known. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 16.]
Nov. 21.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The past week the wind has been very high at S.W., but these 24 hours it has blown a storm. Only a French vessel from the West Indies was put from her anchors, and went northward; and we hear is well. But the rest, being, besides the King's ships, above 50 sail in the Downs, outward bound, lie secure, and have received no damage. The wind continues, and, it is feared, will be at N.W., the worst wind for us, the sea often in former years then passing through all our street. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Nov. 21.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Last night the Hampshire sailed from Spithead, convoying several vessels for the Downs, &c. They had the wind last night at S.S.E., blowing hard. Wind W.S.W. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Nov. 21. Warrant for a grant of the deanery of Ripon, void by the death of the late Bishop of Chester, to Dr. Neale. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 26.]
Nov. 21. Captains John Brooke and William Rand to the Navy Commissioners. We enclose a note from Mr. Pett, frustrating all the preparation we have made for this spring, as was agreed between us, himself and his assistants, before he went to London, namely, for docking the Prince and Montague, in the room of the Mary and Triumph, which according to the time would have been ready. But this new appointment of the shipwright's seems very strange to us, and that we should receive no order from his Royal Highness, your Board, or the Commissioner for the place, who left only yesterday. But we will do our utmost to fit the two ships now nominated by the shipwright, yet we very much fear we shall not be able to comply therewith, the time being so short and the weather so bad. Besides, one of them lies at such a distance, and all her cask and ballast brought from sea is on board, and a quantity of her cask is full of sea water in her hold. We acquaint you herewith, that if time and weather will not permit us to comply, the fault may not be laid on us, and that for the future we may have more certainty in our work. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 116.] Enclosed,
Phineas Pett to Capt. Brooke or Capt. Rand. As his Royal Highness has ordered that the Prince should not be docked till her stuff is ready, so that she may be dispatched in one spring, and also that the Montague be stripped, the Surveyor and I judge the Unicorn to be fittest to be docked next spring, in the room of the Triumph, and the Old James in that of the Mary. Chatham Dock, 21 Nov. [Ibid. No. 116i.]
Nov. 21.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I am sorry the service is so obstructed for want of nails for sheathing the Mary, though a ton and a half were demanded, 30 October. Not a moiety thereof has come yet. If the rest are not dispatched by the bearer the very next trip to Gravesend, and thence transported immediately hither by waggon, the spring is inevitably lost. When I was last at London, the Surveyor was of opinion that the Montague ought be stripped, to which I found his Royal Highness inclinable, which will make some alteration in the order of docking the ships, so it will be convenient not to dock her till the Rainbow is launched, and then to dock her in her room. The Surveyor concurred with me in docking the Unicorn next spring in the room of the Triumph. which I have acquainted the master attendants with, and as his Royal Highness wishes the Prince not to be docked till we are supplied with fir timber, I judge the Old James will be fit to dock in the room of the Mary, but beg your further directions therein speedily, and also the method and order of docking the rest of the Navy here. The work of lightening them, as they ought to be, will require a considerable time. I beg you to hasten down the large fir timber and sprucia deals for the Prince and Rainbow. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 117.]
Nov. 21.
Chatham Dock.
The same to the same. Having received your warrant for building a third-rate on the wreck of the Defiance, I estimate the charge thereof at 6,000l. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Nov. 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. I thank you for informing me of the Mermaid being well at Falmouth. Lieut. Consett returned last night victualled from Ipswich, according to your orders. He waits for a more favourable wind to return to his frigate. The Essex ketch came in here with Lieut. Tempest, to try if he could get any men recovered from the hospital here, in which I doubt he did not speed any more than Capt. Thurstan, who, his chirurgeon staying behind in London, could not get another here. Other news, as in his other letter of the same date. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Nov. 21.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. When the Antelope arrives, I shall put her works in hand, as we intend the Diamond to be one spring in the dock with the Resolution, which shall be got in next spring, on Monday, if possible. Thirty men turned over from the Roebuck into the Hampshire have been with me about their wages when the ship is paid off, that their wives and friends might have their tickets, they being of the Straits fleet. I desire your advice whether by the late instructions they are not to be paid notwithstanding their absence, it being by command and not their fault. Capt. Griffith applying to the Clerk of the Cheque to perform your order for conduct-money for his men, the clerk said he never had order about it, nor was I willing the ship should lose a minute's time, but I told him I would desire you further advice to him in the Downs, whither he sailed this morning, and desire that he may have a letter of what you decide concerning it. I am ordering payment of the money in Mr. Steventon's hand according to our obligations and to the best advantage of his Majesty's credit for carrying on the works here, but above 1,100l. more will be wanted to pay off what we have already under contract, besides what must be provided for the ships in hand, so I pray you to order weekly some money, if only 300l. or 400l., till these four ships are done, which I hope may be in a month, if weather favour, and there is no want of stores. I shall husband it for the best advantage both for the credit of the Board and the expedition of the service. There is some complaint of bad provisions in the Advice, which shall be surveyed, and the result sent you. The Morning Star is come to Cowes, and has but one day's victuals on board. I desire to know by the next what quantity shall be put on board. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330. No. 120.] Enclosed,
Commissioners Lord Brouncker, Tippetts, and Deane, to Capt. Griffith. Informing him that they had ordered the Clerk of the Cheque to pay conduct-money both to the seamen and the watermen travelling by land to Portsmouth, on his giving them a certificate. Dated 31 Oct., Navy Office. [Ibid. No. 120II.]
Nov. 21.
[Read.]
John Knight to —. Informing him that he had received orders last post from Mr. Pley to accept the prices certified from Portsmouth, viz., the sail cloth at 15½d., and the cordage at 30s. per cwt., and desiring that the Board would send orders to that purpose to the officers there, that a bill may be made out accordingly. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Nov. 21. Certificate by R. Mayors of the measurements and tonnage of the Anne ketch. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Nov. 22. The Gambia Adventurers to the King. Petition to prohibit the import from Holland of Sanders wood, used instead of red wood in dyeing. Calendared in S.P. Col., America, &c., 1669–74, p. 438. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 19.]
Nov. 22.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The loaden fleet, if the wind be with them as with us, at W. and by N., have the probability of a good passage. We hear from Bridlington that eight of the enemy's men-of-war were seen off Flamborough Head within two hours after our last light fleet came by. The Thomas and Francis, with the two City convoys, went with the loaden fleet. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Nov. 22.
Stockton.
Samuel Hodgkin to James Hickes. The loaden fleet, that lay here, got to sea last Tuesday, and fell in with a fleet of colliers then going southward with good convoy. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 21.]
Nov. 22.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. This evening a loaden fleet of colliers with the City convoy are passing through the road southward. About 100 sail are already in sight. Two pinks of this town that went northward with the last light fleet were set upon by a caper of six guns, but standing by one another they managed to run stemling on board of him, and ran him under water. They suffered the men to come aboard, but opened the hatches, and forced them as they came over the side to jump into the hold on the ballast, and so saved 55 of them, and carried them into New- castle. There is great inquiry after the sale of the prizes here, so I believe they will sell for more than they are worth, if the sale be any time within this month. The packet-boat from the Brill arrived here yesterday afternoon, and the mail was sent away forthwith. The Phœnix was got off the Middle Ground, and is come into our harbour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 22.]
Nov. 22.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. This morning nine of his Majesty's ships, commanded by Capt. Wetwang, sailed northward, having rid at anchor since Wednesday, the weather being very bad yesterday. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Nov. 22.
Dover.
John Carlile to [Williamson]. A fireship, which sprang a leak, came in here to stop it, and so out again. Here is also a vessel for Tangier with 150 barrels of powder. The 20th came into harbour the Henrietta yacht, which waits for the coming of Monsr. Shambourg (Schomberg). A French vessel, which came from the westward, laden with sugars, is run ashore, half on and half off, about Roman's gate (? Ramsgate) in Thanet. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Nov. 22.
Dartmouth.
W[illiam] H[urt] to James Hickes. Last Wednesday five London merchantmen came into Torbay, one from Zante, one from Barbados, and the others from Smyrna. The Gloucester, now in Torbay, sent an express last night to Plymouth, to two Barbados ships and any others there, in order to convoy them all to London. Just now is coming in the William and Thomas, from Barbados. She has lost her foremast, maintopmast, part of her bowsprit, and her rudder, and came 600 leagues in that condition. You may judge she met with no capers. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Nov. 22.
Plymouth.
List sent by Capt. Lanyon of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Nov. 22. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from the 10th to the 21st, all previously calendared. [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 27.]
Nov. 22. Licence to the High Sheriff of Lincolnshire to live out of his county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 97.]
Nov. 22. Approbation of the Earl of Northampton as Recorder of Northampton. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 208.]
Nov. 22. On the petition of Martin Call, of Thetford, showing that being taken captive by an Algerine 20 November last in the William and Thomas, he petitioned for his redemption, and his Majesty gave orders for it, but they are not executed, and desiring his Majesty's further commands for his redemption, recommendation to the Committee for the redemption of captives, to make such a charitable provision for him out of the funds raised for that good work, as they shall think fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 46.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
Col. John Werden to the Navy Commissioners. As the Swedish ambassadors, being now ready to go on board, complain that the Fortune flyboat, which is to carry their goods, has not men enough to sail her, by his Royal Highness' commands desiring them to have her immediately supplied, if necessary ordering men to be lent her from other ships at Deptford. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 123.]
Nov. 22.
Treasury Chambers.
Sir Robert Howard to the Navy Commissioners. By order of the Lords of the Treasury, informing them that Commissioner Tippetts' report concerning the timber in Wall Wood has been communicated to the King, who does not think fit to have any part cut at present. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Nov. 22.
The Levant Merchant, in the Hope.
Capt. William Hobbs to the same. Here are women every day to get their husbands and relations clear, pretending they come from you, and you have given leave for them to be cleared, but they have nothing under your hands to show. I pressed them out of colliers, but they pretend to be landmen. I find them very fit to serve. I have everything ready to sail with nine months' provisions, except a pinnace, having nothing but a waterboat on board. I desire an order for one. The owners of the ship will not allow one. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Nov. 22.
The Greybound, Harwich.
Capt. John Clements to the same. Yesterday, riding between the Buoy of the Nore and the Blacktail, we had a very hard storm, and lost both our anchors and one cable, and having no anchor, were forced down the Swin in a very dangerous time, for the sea was so all of a breach that we could not know the channel from the sand. What put us to a very great loss was the beacon being down at the Shoe Sand, and for want of the sight of it two Yarmouth men broke away before us, and ran down the Burrow deeps, and what is become of them since I know not. So we ran down to the east end of the Gunfleet, and found no buoy there, but lay an hour and a half there till five for the tide, and then ran in through Golderman's gat and got safe into Harwich. We thought to run her ashore on the ooze, but the wind proving less, we borrowed an anchor from a collier, and so rode her safe that night. I have been with Capt. Taylor, who tells there is here nothing to furnish me. Therefore I desire you to order a vessel to the Buoy of the Nore to take up our anchors, or else to send us two anchors and cables. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Nov. 22.
The Hampshire, in the Downs.
Capt. Richard Griffith to the same. I arrived here yesterday, where I find orders from his Royal Highness to convoy the Bordeaux fleet. You promised to pay the Roebuck's men turned over to me, which you may order to be done here, otherwise it cannot be till my return. I sail the first opportunity. If the Governor of Dover does not find us pilots for the French coast without your orders, I desire them to him accordingly to find them for that coast of Nantes, Rochelle, and Bordeaux for the Hampshire and for the Elizabeth ketch that goes with me. Mr. Steventon has not received your promised order about conduct-money. I desire you will order the payment of it here. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Nov. 22.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the same. I send herewith the account of disbursements on the Norwich, and also for a small supply to the Happy Return, wherein the most considerable is the charge of repairing a floating stage borrowed to search for a leak, which was cast ashore on the rocks under Mount Edgecombe and broken in pieces, but the whole amounts to but 7l. 3s. 7d. The Mermaid must be caulked down to the keel, and therefore we have hauled her on the ooze. The carpenter accounts to have her Monday and Tuesday next in the graving place, and so she will be well done. The Nightingale's new mast is ready, though not set, the very bad weather having hindered us, and she will be ashore to-morrow to clean. I enclose the shipwright's opinion about the defect of the Reserve. I have promised Capt. Grant our best endeavours to repair it, being assured by him she was otherwise sufficiently repaired at Kinsale. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 128.]
Nov. 22.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Alderman Robert Deey, of Dublin, which set forth that the petitioner was appointed captain of a foot regiment in the Irish Army 21 Feb. 1660[–1], and by letters patents of 23 Feb. 1661[–2] the King granted the said command, after the petitioner's decease, to the Lord Mayors of Dublin successively during their office, and the said company being now disbanded, praying to be continued in the said command:— That Lord Arlington prepare a letter for the King's signature, containing a grant to the petitioner of a foot company in Ireland next after Capt. Rooth is provided for, who has his Majesty's promise of the next vacant company. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 69.]
Nov. 22.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant. Proclamation requiring all officers and soldiers of the Irish Army now absent from their commands forthwith to repair to their respective garrisons and quarters, from which they are not to absent themselves without his licence in writing. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 309, p. 353.]
Nov. 23. The Duke of Somerset to the Earl of Arlington. Returning his wife's petition, with his case in answer thereto, which he hopes will satisfy the King, intending soon to pay his duty to his Majesty, and thanking his lordship for his kindness. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 28.] Enclosed,
i. Sarah, wife of John, Duke of Somerset, to the King. Petition, praying him to interpose with her husband to allow her maintenance, since he will not cohabit with her, having been married to him 11 years ago, with a portion of 10,000l., and having lived in a condition below her rank to assist in paying off his debts, but of late he has, by evil instigation, refused to live with her, or to allow her to enter his houses, leaving her destitute of apparel, meat, drink, and maintenance. [Ibid. No. 28i.]
ii. Case of Sarah, wife of John, Duke of Somerset. That she was daughter and heir of Sir Edward Alston, President of the College of Physicians, and widow of George, son of Sir Harbottle Grimston, by whom she had two children, since dead; that the now Lord Keeper negotiated her marriage, she having 10,000l. portion; that after her marriage she found her husband was greatly in debt; his mother, the Duchess Dowager of Somerset, refused on a quarrel to pay him the 600l. a year left him by his father, and turned him out of her house, whereupon she took lodgings for him in Gray's Inn, and after ten years' care, paid off the debts, except 1,000l. lost by him at play, and set him at liberty; that the Dukedom falling upon him by death of his nephew, he got into fresh debt, by furnishing Salisbury House, which they took, and she refused any jewels, &c., till this new debt was paid, though he told her that she had long suffered for him, and should now be the better for him; but some ill people who got about him persuaded him that she had water put into his wine, and governed his affairs too much, &c., so that he treated her harshly, and at length refused her admission to either of his houses, pretending she had taken away his will, &c., he having forgotten where he put them, and as he will not communicate with her or her friends, she is forced to appeal to the King. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 28ii.]
Case of John, Duke of Somerset, in reply to the above. That his wife knew of his debts before marriage, and was asked to let 4,000l. of her portion go to pay them, but refused, and gave her whole portion to his mother; that his debts were discharged from a legacy and the arrears of an annuity paid him by his father's trustees; that his debts since his coming to the title were chiefly contracted by her and for her satisfaction, his wife suffering less than he, having the management of 800l. a year, the residue of his estate; that, having ordered her to stay at his house at Marlborough, he refused her admission to his house in London, fearing she might convey away the residue of his fortune, as she had done his plate, deeds, &c.; that she has still 600l. a year, has had the disposal of his moneys till of late, and he has offered her more on her giving an account of his plate, deeds, &c. [Ibid. No. 28iii.]
[Nov. ?] Reply of Sarah, wife of the Duke of Somerset, to his answer to her petition.
That she was never informed of his debts before their marriage; that her whole portion was paid to his mother because she insisted on having it; that she was to have 300l. of the 800l. per annum settled by his mother for her own use, and so had only 500l. per annum to manage for him, which was always at his disposal; she admits his debts were paid out of the arrears of the 600l. per annum paid by his father's trustees and a legacy, but that would have been spent but for her extraordinary care; that she was not ordered to stay at Marlborough, and came to London only to tell him where he had deposited his will, &c., which she was accused of purloining, but which were deposited with the Master of the Rolls, who sent him word thereof; his plate was sent partly to his goldsmith and partly to the Rolls, for security, there being but one porter in the house; his moneys have been used to discharge his bills, &c.; he has offered her 400l. a year, in addition to her 600l., but she does not think that suitable to his condition and her fortune. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 29.]
Nov. 23. Information of Joseph Derbie, of Dorchester, attorney. Being last Wednesday evening at a coffee-house near Temple Bar, called the Pewter Platter, he heard Mr. Rushworth, late secretary to the late Lord Keeper, on a discourse concerning the pricking of sheriffs and their getting off, say, that last year the first of the three on the bill (the county the informant has forgotten) being pricked got off by money, so likewise did the second, but the third got off by a white apron, and it cost him never a farthing, and that the said Rushworth, by a courtier, had procured a fourth person not on the bill for Cornwall to be pricked sheriff for this year, there being a competition between him and the present Sheriff for a vacant burgess' place in Cornwall, which he did that the present Sheriff might not be elected. Mr. Whiteway, who lives in Hertfordshire, Mr. Davies, a student of the Middle Temple, and others were present. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Nov. 23.
Balliol College.
John Goode, Master, to Williamson. Requesting him to hinder any letters coming to the College, as there is now a vacant fellowship, which is Sir White's right by seniority (the son of Sir Samuel White), who was put by last year by reason of letters and friends. Postscript.—I met lately with an excellent piece, an MS. concerning the Original of Government, which I shall ere long present you with. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Nov. 23.
Prize Office, Leith.
James Standsfeld, James Hooper, and John Clobery to Sir Robert Southwell. Informing him that they had been presented by James Hunter, master of the Hope of Burrowstones, with a warrant from the Lords Commissioners for Prizes for discharging the said ship with her loading, tackle, &c., which they had accordingly done, begging him to move the Lords Commissioners for their salaries, of which half a year is due on the 24th, and asking him to present to them the enclosed account of their particular disbursements. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Nov. 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat arrived since my last. On Thursday night the Greyhound was forced into this harbour, being blown from her anchors at the Buoy of the Nore at noon that day by that violent storm. After her yesterday morning came in two light colliers, forced by the same storm from their anchors, and for want of ground tackle pitched themselves on our oozy shore. Yesterday afternoon passed by about 10 sail without the West Rocks, of which one was judged to be the Portland, bound with the Greyhound for Yarmouth, but the Greyhound cannot go hence till she be refurnished. To-day, wind S., weather calm, we see 60 or 70 laden colliers, some of which are come in here, many into the Rolling Grounds, and the rest into Hollesley Bay. The wind stops their going up. The Capt. Lieutenant of the fort is now with me, and acknowledges the receipt of your orders for Scotch and Irish as well as English, and of your promise of a yacht to be sent him. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Nov. 23.
9 P.M., Dover.
Richard Bulstrode to Williamson. I am just arrived from the packet-boat, after a very troublesome and tedious voyage, which has so wearied me that I am forced to repose myself two or three hours, but hope to be at London by noon to-morrow. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 34.]
Nov. 23.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. To-day came in 16 to 20 small merchantmen from the Isle of Wight, for London. The bad weather, and, as some say, having lost their convoy in the night, made them put in here. Capers still very much infest this coast. Hardly a day but one or two are seen cruising. Yesterday two were off this, which took a considerable merchant ship, but we know not whether French or English. One of them carried her off and the other anchored off the Ness. Three or four days before a caper took a French merchantman off the Ness. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Nov. 23.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. I am informed by the master of a ship that left Dublin last Wednesday, that the Lord Lieutenant was then in a hopeful wav of recovery. Lieut. Rigby desired me to let you know Sir Geoffrey Shakerley is at his country house, Hulme, but is expected here to-day. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a conqé d'élire to the Dean and Chapter of Wells Cathedral to elect a Bishop to that see, void by the death of Dr. Robert Creichton, and for a letter recommending Dr. Peter Mews, Dean of Rochester, President of St. John's College, and ViceChancellor of Oxford, for election thereto. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 41.]
Nov. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for presentation of Dr. Edward Rogers, Fellow of St. Mary Magdalen's College, Oxford, to the prebend of Lambister (Llanbister), belonging to St. David's Cathedral, void by promotion of Dr. Peter Mews to the bishopric of Bath and Wells. Noted it should have been, "belonging to Christ's Church, Brecknock," and was accordingly mended in the presentation. [Ibid. f. 42.]
Nov. 23. Warrant for a grant to Dr. Thomas Doughty, chaplain to the Duke of York, of the prebend in Windsor Chapel, void by promotion of Dr. Peter Mews to the bishopric of Bath and Wells. [Ibid.]
Nov. 23. Commission for John Trelawney to be captain of Captain Maynard's company in Col. Fitzgerald's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 47.]
Nov. 23. Warrant for a grant to Dr. Thomas Lamplugh of the deanery of Rochester, void by promotion of Dr. Mews to the bishopric of Bath and Wells. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35b, f. 26.]
Docquet thereof, dated 23 Jan. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 298.]
Nov. 23. Licence for John Newland, High Sheriff of Rutlandshire, to come to London or elsewhere out of the county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 140.]
[After Nov. 23.] Thomas Pointer to the Navy Commissioners. Petition, praying that other tickets may be ordered to be made out in lieu of three tickets for three seamen therein described, which had been delivered to the petitioner October twelvemonth, and had been lost or mislaid by him, it appearing by the certificates annexed that none of them had been paid. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 129.] Annexed,
Certificate, dated 20 Nov., by R. Hutchinson, that the said tickets had not been paid during the Joint-Treasurership of Sir T. Osborne and Sir T. Littleton. [Ibid. No. 129i.]
Thomas Pointer to Thomas Rocke, dated 19 Nov., inquiring if the said tickets had been paid, with note dated 22 Nov. by Rocke, that he did not find they had been paid. [Ibid. No. 129ii.]
Certificate, dated 23 Nov., by Nathaniel Whitfeld, that the said tickets had been examined and passed in the Ticket Office, but do not appear to have been paid. [Ibid. No. 129iii.]
Nov. 23.
The Monmouth yacht, near Irongate.
John Brisbane, Judge Advocate, to the Navy Commissioners. By command of the Court Martial assembled on board, informing them that Capt. Stephen Pyend had appeared before them for three consecutive days to answer the charge which the Court is informed some of the Board have against him, and requesting that the informations concerning that matter be sent that forenoon. [Ibid. No. 130.]
Nov. 23.
The Guinea, in the Hope.
Capt. Thomas Trafford to the same. Complaining much of the knavery and cheating of his idle purser, and desiring they would call him to account and put another more diligent and honest in his place, and informing them that they have received and stowed 36 tuns of iron-bound beer, and that the rest is ready to come on board that day, and that they want the beef and pork very much, and the bread and dry provisions last of all, and requesting orders accordingly to Mr. Sprigg, which would further the business very much in the stowage of the ship. [Ibid. No. 131.]
Nov. 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. Giving the same news as in his other letter of the same date, adding that they had secured the Greyhound by borrowing an anchor, that they could not then supply her with anchors and cables, and that Lieut. Consett is still there. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Nov. 23.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. I have ordered the caulking and cleaning of the Happy Return at Spithead the first fair weather, for should she come in now the spring will be past, and her men, being pressed, will get away, as those of the ships in harbour do now. Besides, she was graved here but four or five months ago. The Roebuck is to-day come into harbour, and at the moorings. The Castle fireship rides hard at Spithead, and drove very much the last storm. I think it were good to bring her into harbour, if no voyage is designed for her. The Rupert is undocked to-day, and it is intended on Monday to get in the Resolution and Diamond. The provisions of the Supply fireship being spent, I have ordered 14 days' provisions for 35 men to be put on board. The quarter bill for wages due to the sawyers in 1667 is in the office or in my lord's hands. They pray it may be returned signed for payment when the yard is paid. Richard Maddoxs with the money arrived here Thursday night, but I have no direction for the pay, which pray send. Enclosed is what may be had for ready money, and must be provided, being part of the demands for fitting those ships for sea. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 133.] Enclosed,
The said demand, the price of the total amounting to 1,559l., with note that if this money is imprested to Mr. Steventon, we can have the above-mentioned provisions except plank, which we are promised from Sussex the first fair wind, but without money they would not be served in. The former money in Mr. Steventon's hands is paid and paying as far as it will go, which will not complete the contracts and promises by the sum mentioned in the last. [Ibid. No. 133i.]
Nov. 23.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to [the Earl of Arlington]. By the Lord Lieutenant's commands, who has not yet recovered strength enough to write with his own hand, I send this further examination of Capt. Cullen before the Council, wherein are several particulars not in his first examination before the Earl of Thomond. Capt. Walcott acknowledges his first examination formerly transmitted to you, but denies everything else informed by Capt. Cullen. They were brought face to face before the Council. Cullen insisted on the truth of his information, with several circumstances which Walcott denied, but the Council was so far unsatisfied with Walcott's weak defence that they have made him a close prisoner, and Captains Cullen and Fitzgerald are bound over to attend the prosecution thereof at the next Assizes in Counties Limerick and Clare. On consideration of the whole matter, the Lord Lieutenant has issued a proclamation commanding all officers to repair to their commands, and in regard some animadversion has been made that Walcott intended to manage his design by the assistance of some of the Militia, his Excellency has sent orders into Munster to have a speedy and particular account of all the officers of that Militia, with special directions for an extraordinary care of the citadels in Limerick. Directions are likewise sent to examine Capt. Mansell, Peacock, and Westrop, to whom part of the information refers. No endeavours will be wanting to search out the utmost of this business, wherein we expect the greater success, not only because the people who sit quiet on their holdings in the country abhor all disturbances and troubles of that kind, but also because Walcott is a professed Anabaptist, which was a generation of people that have been very severe under the usurped government, and are in no degree confided in or approved by the generality of the English in this Kingdom. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 70.] Enclosed,
Information of Thomas Cullen, given before the Privy Council 20 Nov. Thursday, 31 Oct., Capt. Walcott, with Connor (Cornelius) O'Molloney came to my house at Ballyneclogh, Co. Clare, and first desired me not to sign Molloney's paper against Mr. Watts, and then told Molloney to do his business with Capt. Cullen, for he had few words to speak privately to him. Molloney replied: Do your business first, I will stay; whereupon Walcott desired me to walk into the garden with him, where he bewailed the condition of the English in general, for the Irish were like to have all again, and wished himself out of the kingdom, for the King had given the Irish an Act of Indemnity. I said: Who can help it, if it be the King's pleasure? He replied: If the English should stick together, their condition was not so desperate, but they may do well enough, and then said he would undertake to secure Limerick and the Castle, though he did not know how Dublin or any other place could be secured, but would secure Limerick with the help of the Militia. If they could keep it for one month, that would do the business. It being winter-time, they could not be besieged, and they would seize on the revenue, whether of Limerick or the kingdom he did not say. He said that the Tuesday before he discoursed with Capt. Mansell of the condition of the English, and the Act of Indemnity, and further, that he, Walcott, had expended 200l. of his own money to bring it to this pass, and that there was a great store of wool in Limerick, which they would send for Holland, and bring arms and ammunition from thence. That there were several thousands of Scots come into England by the King's command, and that the people were overawed with an army, and that I should hear further of this by another hand by to-morrow night. He then desired me to go into a private room with him, and drew out a paper which he held in his hands and read, which was of the nature of a declaration, mentioning several grievances. That the King should establish Presbytery, according to his Coronation oath in Scotland, and that Popery and Prelacy should be suppressed; that the hearthmoney should be put down; that in regard the privileges of Parliament and Magna Charta were not maintained, the people may dispense with the Oath of Allegiance; that the Duke of Buckingham and the Earl of Arlington should be called to account for making this war with the Dutch; that Sir G. Carteret should be called to account for some money that belonged to the soldiers of the Navy in the last Dutch war; that the Duchess of Cleveland should refund what she got out of the revenue; that the perpetual Parliament should be re-established, and what members are wanting should be elected; that the King employed the Earl of Inchiquin and his brother, being Papists, to command the English in Portugal, by which many of the Protestants were there lost, with several other things I cannot call to mind. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 70i.] Probably enclosed,
Information of Capt. Edward Fitzgerald, of Carrigdocane, Co. Clare [20 Nov. ?]. That 1 Nov., Capt. Cullen had told him of his conversation with Walcott the day before to the same effect as in Cullen's information last calendared, and that Cullen then desired the informant to go with him to the Earl of Thomond, but as Walcott had promised he should hear more from him, they thought it better to wait, but not hearing anything, they went early the next day to the Earl and informed him, who, hearing that Walcott went to Limerick, wrote by the informant to the Governor to secure him, but, he being gone from Limerick, the Governor sent a party of horse after him, and the informant repaired with all expedition to the Earl of Inchiquin, and next day Cullen also came to inform his lordship. Noted as received 22 Nov. [2½ pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 70ii.]
Information of the same. 22 Nov. That about 8 Nov., Peacock, a tenant to Sir Thomas Southwell, told me at my house, in the presence of Gerald Fitzgerald and others, that Capt. Walcott proffered Mountifort Westrop to be lieutenant of horse, who answered he would willingly take it, if he were to pay nothing for it. [Ibid. No. 70iii.]
Examination of Cornelius O'Molloney, taken at the Council Board, Dublin, 22 Nov. Deposing to his going to Cullen's house with Walcott, as in the other informations, and that he told him to do his business first. Both the captains then walked together in the garden, and the deponent followed. They were discoursing a long time there, and he was walking in another alley far from them, not in their audience. Then Cullen asked what his business was, which was about the administration of a poor woman. The deponent then departed, and did not see or hear from either of them till he came to Dublin, where he saw Capt. Walcott and his son in a window at the Mitre at Oxmantown, who called him in and said: I hear you are a greater accuser of me. The deponent answered: I hear so myself, but there is no such thing, for I had nothing to inform against you, and, if I had, I would not keep counsel for any that would speak treason in my hearing, and besides you provoked me much that day, but God forbid I should charge you unjustly. So we drank a cup of beer together, and he desired me to stay for dinner, and he would pay for my ordinary. At dinner he was told that Mrs. Roberts would speak to him, so he left the table and was discoursing with her, and then Capt. Purdon came, and then I left, and never saw them since. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 70iv.]
Copies of the above information of Capt. Cullen and of Capt. Fitzgerald's second information. [Ibid. Nos. 71, 72.]
Abstract of part of Cullen's above information. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 73.]
[Nov. 23 ?] Sir Maurice Eustace to [the Earl of Arlington]. Your lordship will by this post receive the examinations against Walcott, to which nothing need be added to conclude him guilty, and to evince the implacable hatred of Presbyterians and fanatics to Monarchy, and all power but their own. This Walcott I have known a long time. He is a proper fellow, sober and discreet, and likely enough to have mastered any passion, but that rebellion is the maxim and religion of them all. It is therefore not to be admired that he should be overcome by that witchcraft. He has a plentiful fortune, and needed not to have ventured to enlarge it at so dear a rate, but that zeal for the old cause and the long Parliament spurred him on. Capt. Cullen is a very sober fellow, and of good esteem in the country, and no objection to be made against his evidence. Mr. Shirley was yesterday acquitted. [Endorsed as received 2 Dec., the day some of the previous and subsequent letters were received. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 74.]
[Nov. ?] Anthony Collingwood, Attorney-at-Law, to the King. Petition, shewing that he served as Town Clerk, Prothonotary, and Clerk of the Peace of Newark five years after the regulation of Corporations, and was ejected by sinister means, and begging his reappointment on the renewal of the Charter, which the Mayor and Aldermen are now requesting. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 37.]
Nov. 24.
Gravesend.
Sir Francis Leeke to Williamson. As he hears the Corporation of Newark are now attending at Whitehall for a renewal of their charter, and as his Majesty on all renewing of charters nominates a town clerk, requesting that he will have the name of the bearer, Anthony Collingwood, put in for town clerk in the warrant to the Attorney-General for drawing the charter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 38.]
Nov. 24.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning arrived in the Downs the St. Lucas, of about 200 tons burden, from Zante. The day before he was met by a Dutch caper of 14 guns and 80 men, who hailed him, and when he understood he was of London, welcomed him into the Channel, and came on board him, after some guns fired on both sides, with trumpets sounding and other music playing, being sure of their prize. But the English behaved so stoutly that the caper left them, having his bowsprit and foremast shot by the board, leaving seven of his men on board (of whom one was an Englishman), five of whom are much wounded. This forenoon she sailed for the river with the seven prisoners on board. Though very many of the caper's men were killed and wounded, but one of the St. Lucas' was shot, and that not mortal. However, Capt. Edward Robinson, of the Elizabeth ketch, pressed four of her men. To-day arrived in the packet-boat several persons taken by the Dutch, who came out of Algiers slavery. They say when they were redeemed, above 90 were ransomed. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Nov. 24.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. The Hampshire sailed for the Downs, but the wind that night came about to S.E. and blew hard, so that several of the small vessels under her convoy bore up to St. Helen's road, and are since ventured without convoy, hoping after so many storms the coast might be cleared of the capers. The Rupert went out of dock yesterday, and to-day the Resolution and Advice come into the same dock. The Diamond is hauled to the graving place, so all three will be fitted this springtide. [Ibid. No. 40.]
Nov. 24. Warrant for a grant to James, Duke of Monmouth, on surrender of Aubrey, Earl of Oxford, of the office of Chief Justice in Eyre on this side Trent. [S.P. Dom., Entry Books 21, p. 120 and 34, f. 208.]
Docquet thereof, dated December. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 286.]
Nov. 24. Licence for Sir Thomas Putt, High Sheriff of Devonshire, to come to London or elsewhere out of the county on his occasions. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 139.]
Nov. 24. Licence for William Lawson, High Sheriff of Staffordshire, to go to Cheshire, London, or elsewhere out of the county. Minute. [Ibid. p. 140.]
Nov. 24. Capt. Richard Beach to the Navy Commissioners. Being commanded to the Downs with all expedition by his Royal Highness, I desire you will be mindful of his order concerning the two fireships, that are to go with us, and of the men to be turned over to us out of the fireships to be laid up, and also of the vessel which is to wait on us, for want of which we can neither get men nor water, and that you will order us a pilot, to carry us through the King's Channel into the Downs, and also hasten the victualler, if all our provisions are not sent down. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 134.]
Nov. 24. Capt. Peter Bowen to the same. The Leopard being ordered to the Straits, I request that an imprest bill be made to John Aldridge, her purser, for the usual short allowance to her company, and sufficient books and tickets delivered him. [Ibid. No. 135.]
Nov. 24.
The Guinea, in the Hope.
Capt. Thomas Trafford to the same. Enclosing a list of the provisions and beer received on board. Of the beer on the last hoy, 14½ tuns were returned to the victuallers, on account of the badness thereof, and the defectiveness of the cask. [Ibid. No. 136.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 136i.]
Nov. 24.
The Thomas and Francis, in the Rolling Grounds.
Capt. George Gollop to the same. The 19th, after a long and tedious expectation, a fair wind presented, and that tide came over Tynemouth Bar 80 or 90 laden colliers, great and small. There were at least 140 more laden that could not get over the bar, by reason of a light fleet of 250 sail so choking the harbour that they could not get clear. The wind being northerly, I could not persuade them to anchor, so we sailed that evening, leaving the two City convoys to come with the remainder. The 21st we saw the Golden Phœnix aground on the pitch of the Nest. He made a waft with his antient and fired several guns, but I could not assist him without hazarding my own ship. A little more than half flood we saw him clear of the sands and under sail. I know not what damage he has received. That night we got into the Roads, with the whole fleet under my convoy. Next day it proved a mere fret of wind, but with little damage to my ship, but I hear many of my convoy came to great damage, but not one was lost. The 23rd we met some light colliers, that informed us of the Portland's being aground on the Shoe. We saw no infesters on the coast. Our ship sails as well as any merchantman in England. We can leave and take with half our sails the best of the colliers, but she has an old distemper newly broken out, a leak in the stem, by which she makes at least 2½ feet of water a watch. Her anchors are too light, she must have a new mainsail, and new stay sails, and a new rudder. She will need two or three tides for fitting to sea, if she is to be kept out this winter. We have had a very sickly ship, and within this fortnight men are fallen down, so that it is as bad now as ever, though I dare say no ship in England is better kept, and our chirurgeon, with all his dissection, cannot tell what to make of it. I believe we have on board three months of all sorts of provisions for 184 men. Since writing the above, we saw the remainder of the laden ships from Newcastle. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 137.]
Nov. 24.
Dover.
Capt. John Kellsy to the Navy Commissioners. I received his Royal Highness' order of the 12th instant, to carry the ship into Dover pier, and fit her there, which I have accordingly done. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Nov. 25.
Bridk[irk].
George Williamson to his brother, Sir J. Williamson. Introducing the bearer, Mr. Skelton, who is acquainted with all the gentry in the country, and gives the writer a great respect at all times. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 41.]
Nov. 25.
Rochester.
Dr. Bréval to Williamson. Requesting him not to forget to procure him some benefice at the present opportunity, as it is said several will be vacant in a few days by the promotion of the new Bishops, suggesting, if he is unwilling to serve him publicly, to acquaint the Countess of Arlington privately with the means she might take to obtain something for him, asking him to give her the enclosed, reminding him of his extreme necessities, and concluding with wishes and prayers for his happiness here and hereafter. [French. 2 pages. Ibid. No. 42.]
Nov. 25.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. We are pretty clear of capers, not having seen or heard of any of late. Wind S. [Ibid. No. 43.]
Nov. 25.
Hull.
W. Griffith to Williamson. My last gave account of our apprehensions for our outward-bound fleet, but having heard nothing since, we hope they got safe into Wells Deeps, at least, if not Yarmouth Roads, the night of the day they sailed from the Humber. The great light collier fleet I mentioned to have sailed by the mouth of our river early on the 14th, passed by Whitby the same day, having joined the Lynn fleet and the Deptford ketch, which went out of Humber the day before. A dogger of 6 guns and 70 men fell into the former the night of the 13th, and was boarding a pink of Stockton, which, being made of harder wood, sank the caper, saving only about 20 or 25 of his men. The 23rd three or four laden colliers came in here from Newcastle, which came to the mouth of the Humber under the protection of the two convoyers, which are returned for the South, with about 80 sail laden, having left the rest to lade, and only the Deptford ketch at Newcastle, which attends on the Lynn and Norfolk fleet. Most of the ships of this town, being near a hundred, are at present abroad, not above ten or twelve being now in harbour, some of which are outward bound, to sail with the next convoy. Last Wednesday Capt. Sidney's company came here from Berwick, to recruit this garrison, in the room of Sir Robert Hildyard's, which marched on the 6th, for Plymouth. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 44.]
Nov. 25.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. For many days past no ships have gone out or come in. We have not for a long time heard of any Dutch privateers in this bay. The wind to-day and yesterday S.W. [Ibid. No. 45.]
Nov. 25.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. A very great fleet of near 200 laden colliers sailed by this last Saturday. Wind S. [Ibid. No. 46.]
Nov. 25.
Plymouth.
List of ships arrived, sent by Capt. Philip Lanyon. [Ibid. No. 47.]
Nov. 25.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Last Wednesday, near Padstow, a caper was cast away, after riding three days at anchor there, and last week an Ostender was cast away near the Lizard, and only eight men saved, who passed through this place, but are supposed to belong to Holland, speaking most Dutch. Their master and four men were drowned. Wind W.N. [Ibid. No. 48.]
Nov. 25. Warrant for the presentation of John Sharpe, M.A., to the archdeaconry of Berkshire, void by promotion of Dr. Peter Mews to the bishopric of Bath and Wells. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 42.]
Nov. 25. Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox, to pay Captain Bevill Skelton's pay to his assigns during his absence in France in the service of the Most Christian King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 47.]
Nov. 25. Grant to Isaac de Mercado of a protection in the same form with that granted to Joseph Franses. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 142.]
Nov. 25. Reference to Sir John Howell, Recorder, of the petition of Christopher Randall, desiring that he may not be transported. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 47.]
Nov. 25.
Victualling Office.
Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child, and T. Papillon to the Navy Commissioners. We have as yet received no certificate of the readiness of the Leopard, but the purser was here the 13th or 14th, and told our officers she was in a state to receive part of her provisions, but not all, as he thought there was a new mast to be set, whereupon, though we had no due certificate, we dispatched down the greatest part of the provisions, of which we were informed yesterday that three hoys lay by her side undischarged, and since we have sent off all the rest, except 50 bags of biscuit, which the vessel could not take in, but which go by another to-morrow. We cannot speak with our agent about the victualling ships till to-morrow, after which we shall give you the best account. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 139.]
Nov. 25.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett, master shipwright, to the same. At the request of Mr. Walker, the painter, who is already so much out of purse, as will appear by his bills passed formerly, which remain unpaid, and also by fitting out the late ships both here and at Sheerness, and by the work he has now in hand on the Lyon, Henrietta, and Mary, which are as good as new, besides the greatness of the continual work on the ships in harbour, recommending him for an imprest, to enable him to carry on the service, which otherwise, for want of money, he will be unable to do. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 140.]
Nov. 25.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners. I received yours of the 21st, directing the using of the crumpled lead for sheathing the bread-rooms of the Lyon and Henrietta, but it having already been returned hence, I desire you will hasten down the three tons of thin lead and the three cwt. of copper nails demanded 30 October. As to the abatement to be made to Mr. Madox, by reason of his plank falling short of contract, I judge 18d. a load should be abated on each load of the 3-inch plank. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Nov. 25.
The Antelope, in the Downs.
Capt. Richard White to the same. By reason of very much wind, between S. and S.W., and extraordinary bad weather, I have been forced to ride nine days between the Kentish Knock and the North Foreland, and to borrow victuals of Capt. Narbrough. I desire you will order me a fortnight's provisions from Dover. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Nov. 25.
The Phœnix.
Capt. E. Russell to the same. Requesting them to order him a new cable, his outermost one having been broken by last Thursday's storm, it being worn and having been spliced. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Nov. 25.
The Fairfax, in the Downs.
Capt. John Narbrough to the same. I arrived here this forenoon, having met with much bad weather in my way, which has much damaged the cables. If the wind hold westerly, I desire to have a cable sent the first opportunity. I am ordered southward the first fair winds. I shall want this week two months' provisions of all sorts, having spent so much since I last victualled, and having been forced to victual the Antelope. Could it be supplied from Dover, it might be suddenly had on board. I have but nine weeks' provisions on board, and victual daily 376 men. Wind S.W., a fine gale. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Nov. 25.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to [the Earl of Arlington]. No less than five packets are due to-day. His Excellency is now so well recovered that he begins to gather strength, but not yet so as to use his pen. A further account of Walcott's business, both as to the information taken on oath before the Council here, as also his examination before the Council you will receive from the Lord Chancellor, to whom I presented them to that end. A notable riot was acted on the Mayor of Clonmel, as he came down from church 5 Nov. The informations thereof I delivered to Mr. Godolphin, as pertaining to his province, from whom, I presume, you will receive them. The Council has provided that the offenders be duly prosecuted, and his Excellency has lately issued a proclamation requiring all officers and soldiers of the Army to repair to their garrisons and quarters. [1½ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 75.]
Nov. 25.
Dublin.
Sir H. Ford to [Williamson]. I enclose a letter lately received from Lord O'Brien, the Earl of Thomond's son, and a petition con- cerning the same matter, to which his Excellency can say nothing, because of the English Act of Parliament. Several similar petitions have been exhibited before his Excellency and the Council, wherein the petitioners would have been relieved, had there been power on one side as there was equity on the other, of which pray consider, and acquaint Lord Arlington, that, if he see cause, his Majesty and the Council may be moved. It tends both to his Majesty's profit and to the preservation of the goods, men, and ships, if an expedient may be found. His Majesty's letter, which came enclosed in one of yours, is with his Excellency, at whose sole disposal is the favour therein conferred by his Majesty, but your kindness must not be forgotten by me, and as to other duties in the case, you shall not be neglected. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 76.] Enclosed,
Lord O'Brien to Sir H. Ford. Asking him to recommend a petition to his Excellency on behalf of some honest men, who freighted a ship from himself and a friend for the Barbados, which is arrived at Galway, but is unfit for a further voyage, and who beg liberty to unlade here, paying half custom here, payable in England, besides the whole that is due here. Should she miscarry, the King would lose above 400l in duties, the merchants the cargo, and he himself the ship. 19 Nov. Limerick. [Ibid. No. 76i.]
John Lynch and Thomas Tate to the Lord Lieutenant. Petition, stating that last December they had freighted the St. George, of Topsham, now belonging to Lord O'Brien, for the Caribbee Islands, for nine mouths certain or twelve uncertain, which, after relading there, was detained by his Majesty's commands divers months till 1 October last, till the whole fleet was ready to sail, and was by contrary winds and storms forced into Galway, that, through their provision being spent, the great insufficiency of the ship, and the sickness of the men, she is unable to sail for England, and therefore praying him to write and state the matter to his Majesty, hoping thereby his Majesty will grant his licence for unlading the said ship at Galway, the petitioners being ready to pay both the dues for the cargo as they ought to be paid in England, and the duties in this kingdom, as though come from England. [Ibid. No. 76II.]
Nov. 26.
Chiswick.
The Marquis of Worcester to Williamson. Had I found others fit among the six the judges of circuit sent me for Denbighshire, none of the three I presented to his Majesty had been in. But being necessitated to name them as fittest of the six, I desired to have saved Sir John Wynne, and therefore did not put him first in my list. But the earnest desire of some of the county, just before the Council sat, assuring me of the unfitness of the other two gentlemen for that employment, and their activity in the King's service in other capacities, I was forced of the three to desire Sir John should be pricked. Therefore I cannot say which is fittest of the others, thinking neither very fit. I think Holland may be the unfittest, but I hope to be in town to-morrow, and may then, perhaps, give a name fitter than either. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 49.]
Nov. 26.
Gravesend.
Sir Francis Leeke to Williamson. I received a letter to-day from Anthony Collingwood, who delivered you one from me concerning his being Town Clerk of Newark, on the renewing of the charter. You asked him, he says, if he was the present Town Clerk. I believe he has satisfied you. After the regulation he was so by the choice of the Court of Aldermen, and afterwards by the interest of a Mayor having a near relation, he made an interest for that party. I will not say that party is not as fit for the place as the bearer is, but I will say he was not displaced for any demerit, but by chance. I told Lord Arlington he was very fit for the employment, and his loyalty was without blot. Perhaps his lordship has forgotten it, but if you will remind him of it, and give your assistance, you will be very obliging to me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 50.]
Nov. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. You might have had the enclosed the last post but for the carelessness of a packet-master, who did not deliver it me till after the post was gone. Betwixt Sunday morning and to-day have passed by, convoyed by two merchant men-of-war, the Phœnix and the William and Thomas, it is said 250, but Capt. Gollop, one of the convoyers, told me, about 200 laden colliers. He came into the Rolling Grounds, but is gone, and all the rest of the ships, this morning, though the wind is westerly. Saturday morning, off Orford Ness, an Ipswich collier ran Lieut. Edwards' smack (the press master) to the bottom, where 10 or 11 newly pressed men are said to have been drowned. Col. Buller's company is marched hence this morning, and three companies of Lord Power's regiment are on their march hither this evening. By a letter received last Sunday night from a friend in London, I heard of the death of my brother Sill, in Dublin Castle, 24 October. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Nov. 26.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W. The Happy Return is to come to refit. The Jersey is at Spithead. No ships are stirring either in or out. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Nov. 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Col. Henry Eubanke, of the King's interest in the sum of 500l. discovered by him as belonging to the Crown and in the hands of George Dawson, late collector of Customs at Newcastle in 1660, to be recovered in the King's name, but at his own charge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 136.]
Nov. 26. Letter from the King to Lord Willoughby, Governor of Barbados, in favour of the Guinea Company, being a duplicate of that of 25 May. Calendared in S.P. Col., America, &c., 1669–1674, p. 436. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 98.]
Nov. 26. Warrant for a Dutch vessel, called the Old Waggoner, to be made free, at request of Capt. Charles Hayward, commander of the Noble Katharine, who took her. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 208.]
Nov. 26. Warrant to Sir John Robinson for completing the number of 40 Wardens of the Tower, notwithstanding a former order for their reduction to 20. [Ibid. f. 210.]
Nov. 26. Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Newark-onTrent, praying for a new charter, with several additions and alterations. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 48.]
Nov. 26. William Borroughes to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting a bill of imprest for 50l., as he has lately received a demand for a considerable quantity of goods, and his stock is exhausted, and nothing is to be had except for ready money. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 145.]
Nov. 26. Commissioner Tippetts to the same. Sending a report by himself, Jonas Shish, and others, dated the 20th, on the doggers and busses at the Red houses, which divides the former into three classes, whereof two contain those which may be made serviceable, and the third those that are not worth repairing, and stating that he had caused two of them to be laid ashore and their well holes plugged up, and that he had seen four more, and reporting on them also, and giving an estimate of the sums necessary for various repairs on one of them. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 146.]
Nov. 26.
The Mary and Martha, in the Hope.
Capt. John Butler to the same. At six last night I received an order from his Royal Highness to go to the Downs and remain there for further order, which I shall observe the first opportunity. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Nov. 26.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett, master shipwright, to the same. I received yours of the 23rd, approving of docking the Unicorn and Old James, in the room of the Mary and Triumph, which I hope will be ready to dock to-morrow. We launched the Mary and Triumph yesterday, and to-day got the docks ready to receive the others. Whereas you desire my opinion about the order the ships ought to be docked in, I gave it some time ago to the Surveyor, placing them in the order I judged them fittest to be docked. There is only some small alteration by docking this spring the Unicorn and Old James, whereas the Prince and Mountague were intended, which are already fitted for the docks, their ballast being now out, and will be the fittest to be docked next, especially as riding now so light the longer they continue so the worse, being the more strain to them. As to docking the remainder, I judge there need not be any alteration. [Ibid. No. 148.]
Nov. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. Most of the news the same as in his other letter of the same date. Lieut. Edwards was absent in his pinnace when his smack was sunk. On his return he seized the collier, and caused her to sail towards London yesterday. He blames her master, and several blame the lieutenant. I had occasion to send last week to Orford and Aldeburgh, about some affairs of the Prize Commissioners. At the last place those I sent found a ten-oar pinnace of his Majesty's. I formerly informed you of another belonging to a fireship that went to Hamburg, which is still at Woodbridge, and of the water boat of the Royal James, which I have here. I desire to receive your commands about them. Pray let me have a standing order, directed to the Mayor for the time being, and to all military officers, not to quarter in his Majesty's yard here, for I fear they will to-night, but I intend to speak with the officers concerning it this afternoon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 149.]
Nov. 26.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Maddocks and the money arrived Thursday night, but no advice how to be guided in its payment, which I desire. The Resolution and Diamond were got into dock Sunday, where all possible dispatch will be made if money according to the particulars in my last be supplied, for those goods will not be served without ready money, and are wanted. I informed the Surveyor of the great want of hammocks, which, I hope, will be dispatched, else the men must lie on deck, particularly for the Tiger, now at Cowes, whose commander complains greatly of the want of them, and waits only for a wind to sail. The commander of the Happy Return desires his ship may be done at Spithead, as she wants but little, being loth to come in for fear of losing his men. Men were sent to do the work before this second order came, but if, after this, his Royal Highness would have her in, I desire his pleasure concerning it. She could not be cleaned till next spring. Mr. Eastwood says she is in good condition, and wants only cleaning between the wales, caulking the bows, and a new mizen mast. The Morning Star wants a cable. Her provisions will be put on board, though the victuallers' agent says he has received no order yet. Just now Col. Slingsby tells me 500 hammocks are at the town, which shall be sent for. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 150.]
Nov. 26.
The Nightingale, in Catwater.
Capt. Henry Clarke to the same. There was no neglect in taking out our foremast, but proper precautions were taken. At the time there was something of a rolling sea in the Sound. I would have come into Catwater to do it, but Mr. Lanyon would not allow us. Our foremast and bowsprit are set and rigged, and the ship is cleaned and off again, with ballast and guns in. I hope by the 29th or 30th to be completed again to sea. The Adventure and Pearl are gone to sea this morning, one for Penzance and the other for Falmouth, to fetch ships. The Norwich, Reserve, Mermaid, and Nightingale are still in Catwater. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Nov. 26.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the same. The Norwich is yet here, attending some convoys for Ireland. The Nightingale is ready to get into the Sound. The Mermaid came off the ground this morning, and is at the hulk, taking in her guns, &c. When the Adventure returns, I shall see her dispatched, and supply the boatswain with no more than is necessary. I am at a stand about the Reserve. Her carpenter, boatswain, and gunner give out strangely concerning her condition, but the captain, master, and carpenter's mate seem as confident that, this leak being repaired, she will be fit for service. I purpose to-morrow to have them altogether, to answer, one the other, to such things as are doubtful. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Nov. 26.
Portsmouth.
Matthew Wood to W. Hewer. Requesting that some pay-book paper be sent down for making up books for the Advice, as though he has ruled books himself according to the form, Mr. Maddox questions the acceptance of them, because they are not made of the printed paper. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 153.]
Nov. 26. The King to the Lord Lieutenant. On consideration of the petition of the farmers of the great branches of the revenue, desiring that no proceedings be taken against them till their pretences to defalcations on account of a foreign war be determined, directing that, if out of the 21,000l. or thereabouts now detained by them, they shall immediately pay in 10,000l. to the Commissioners of the Treasury, 5,000l. thereof in Dublin, and the other 5,000l. by good assignments in the country, they may retain the balance till their said pretences to defalcations be heard, and that proceedings against them be stayed in the meantime, but that without a particular order they shall not detain any more of their rent payable for the said customs than what is allowed in these letters. [Two drafts. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, Nos. 77, 78.]
Nov. 26.
Cork.
— to his cousin, Capt. Cullen. I understand you are in Dublin about the prosecution of Walcott. They talk here somewhat hardly of you, not being fully informed of your fidelity. One Richard Purdon here, that rides in Lord Shannon's troop, met Walcott at Sir Nicholas Purdon's house, who, after Sir Nicholas went to bed, asked Purdon what soldiers were in Cork, and what kind of officers, whether they and their men were not raw and young fellows, and whether their watch was strict, with several other words. If you have occasion for this, send down to examine Thomas Kitchinman, who can fully satisfy. I would write to Capt. Fitzgerald, had I time, and desire to hear from him. Capt. Folliot stops the post, and he, with the rest of our friends at Martell's, desires to be remembered to you. [Endorsed, by the Archbishop of Dublin: Copy of a letter sent me by the Earl of Inchiquin, 16 Dec., a transcript whereof was sent down last week to the Earl of Orrery, to examine the persons referred to, but no return is yet made. Ibid. No. 79.]
[Nov. ?] Capt. John Bourke to the King. Petition, stating that, having served as a foot captain during the wars of Ireland under the Duke of Ormonde and his successor, the Marquis of Clanrickard, till the usurper wholly suppressed his Majesty's authority there, he and his company went for Spain in 1653, leaving behind his small estate, to which some of his neighbours entered with (? without) proper authority, who were neither adventurers, soldiers, '49 men, nor transplanted persons, and continue in possession thereof, the petitioner and all his house of Clanrickard being never concerned in the late or any other rebellion, but having faithfully served his Majesty and his predecessors, and praying (the said estate being in his Majesty's disposal) his Majesty's letter to the Earl of Essex, that he may be restored to his small inheritance, of which he and his predecessors were in possession wholly 800 years, and be paid his arrears. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Nov. 26. Reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 47.]
Nov. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting that by their contract Lord Ranelagh and his partners covenanted within four years from 25 December, 1671, to pay the arrears due on the establishment on 25 December, 1670, not exceeding 144, 148l. 11s. 4d., by even and equal proportions, the first payment to be made on or before 25 December, 1672, lest any doubts should arise, declaring and explaining that the said arrears shall be discharged by twelve even and equal quarterly payments, the first to be paid at or before 25 December next. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 352.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 81.]
Nov. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing a grant to Henry Brouncker of the offices of ranger, gamekeeper and chief ranger of all the parks, forests, chaces and woods in Ireland, of ranger of the Phoenix Park, and of keeper of the Newtown Walk in the said park during pleasure, as the same were held by Mark Trevor, Viscount Dungannon, deceased. [Two copies with some differences. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 354 and p. 361.]
Two drafts of the first letter. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, Nos. 82, 83.]
Draft of the second letter. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Nov. 27. Anthony Mayne to Williamson. Recommending the bearer for employment by him, who, he understands, was also recommended by Mr. L'Estrange. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 53.]
Nov. 27.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. A small fleet of colliers is come in here, which came with the London fleet, convoyed by Capt. George Gollop. From Newcastle to this they saw no enemy, so it is to be hoped the London fleet will get well to the Thames. Wind W.S.W. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Nov. 27.
Weymouth.
[Nathaniel Osborne] to James Hickes. Last Sunday came into this road the Bonadventure of this port after a 16 days' passage from Malaga. She left Newfoundland with six others a little before the grand fleet, but on leaving Malaga could hear no news of the arrival of the rest. They parted in a storm. Two Southampton ships of her company were taken by the Dutch, being the five ships that were at Smyrna. It is said they came up to them, thinking they were French, having white colours. Two others of her company, one of Poole, and one of Southampton, were taken into Sallee. With explanations why this news was not sent the last post. Postscript.—The Dragon is here taking in a month's victuals, and so bound for St. Malo. The captain was beholden to Capt. Pley to advance them, else he must have gone to Portsmouth. [Ibid. No. 55.]
Nov. 27.
Chester Castle.
Sir Geoffrey Shakerley to Williamson. Complaining of his not formerly answering his numerous letters, but, now he has abundantly satisfied him, assuring him he will write as occasion offers. [Ibid. No. 56.]
Nov. 27. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from the [11]-21 to the 26th, all previously calendared except:— [11]-21 November, Delft. We judge the number of the fleet for the Baltic will be under 24, though some say no less, and their force from 46 to 24 guns. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 57.]
Nov. 27. Caveat in favour of Mr. Overbury that nothing pass of a fine likely to be set on Sir William Pettus in the Court of King's Bench. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 17.]
Nov. 27.
Whitehall.
Order from Lord Arlington to the Clerk of the Signet for entering the above caveat. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 58.]
Nov. 27. Licence to Sir William Glynne, Bt., High Sheriff of Flintshire, to go to Bedfordshire, London, and Westminster. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, f. 140.]
Nov. 27.
The Phœnix, Tilbury Hope.
Capt. William Whyting to the Navy Commissioners. Informing them of his arrival there that day with the ships under his conduct from Hull and desiring further orders. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 154.]
Nov. 27.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett, master shipwright, to the same. At the request of Mr. Taylor, the brazier, praying them to imprest him some money, the provisions daily required from him for fitting out the fleet being very considerable and also the workmanship, he being very ready and willing, but much incapitated at present for want of money. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Nov. 27.
Chatham Dock.
Captains John Brooke and William Rand to the same. We received your order about the Staveren prize, and shall be ready to receive her per inventory from the Prize officers. We hope you have ordered Mr. Rudd and Capt. Page with the companies of the ships at Sheerness to bring her up, for, if we should go down with our men, it will be very chargeable, and a great hindrance in carrying on the work here. To-day we docked the Old James and Unicorn, and desire your order as to what ships we shall now go in hand with to fit for the double dock against the next launching, the Prince being almost ready for the single dock. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Nov. 27.
The Monmouth, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Capt. Richard Beach to the same. Repeating the requests in his last for a pilot, a tender, and for the men that are to be turned over to him from the ships that are to be laid up, and asking them to order some money for his men that were in the Hampshire, before they go out of the Downs. [Ibid. No. 157.]
[Nov. 27.]/Dec. 7. Statement by Giovanni Jesi, storekeeper of the galleys of his Highness at Leghorn, of the price of new cotonina (cotton canvas) of Marseilles double for waistcloths, with attestation of the same on oath before a notary dated [Nov. 29]-Dec. 9. [Translated from Italian. Ibid. No. 157A.]
Nov. 28. Statement by John Rushworth that, Wednesday the 19th, going to see his kinsman, Charles Rushworth, a student of the Inner Temple, who lodges at the coffee house near Temple Bar, he sat down at the table in the coffee room, where Mr. Whitway and one Darby and others were sitting. A gentleman, a stranger to Rushworth, said a friend of his was pricked sheriff, and he would give 50l. to any that would get him off. Rushworth replied he knew some that had offered 100l. and could not get off, and yet he knew some that got off without money, particularly a lady (whose name he could not then call to mind, but now remembers it was the wife of Col. Kenrick of Berkshire), who by her prudent deportment and the reasons in the petition, got her husband off from being Sheriff of Berkshire, though two had been pricked before him and had got off. He further declared he was very instrumental therein, for he drew the petition and advised her to give it herself to Prince Rupert, for he was General of the King's forces, and the Colonel, being under his command, marched with his company from Reading to the Isle of Wight, and maintained them there and in their march thither and back at his own charge, and his Highness on that account got her husband off, and Mr. Vachell was named sheriff in his stead. There was no discourse concerning any other woman but this lady, and only on the occasion aforesaid, and not a word of defamation spoken of her, for she is a person of virtue and goodness and of great discretion. As for Rushworth's saying he was instrumental in getting Mr. Treville pricked Sheriff of Cornwall it is false, for he knows not the man, nor anything of the business, but it was said by one of the company, whom he knows not, that Mr. Treville might thank a gentleman for that, who stood in competition with him to be a Parliament man. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 59.]
[Nov. 28.] Further statement in Rushworth's hand that if convenient it may be added:—1. That this Darby is a distracted man; his neighbours now in town persuade him to go home, but he refuses. 2. He goes to many of the Privy Council, saying he can make a vessel at the fourth part of the charge of a frigate that shall destroy the Dutch fleet. 3. He is so apt to raise false reports on others that Sir William Constantine, for reproaches cast on him by this Darby, recovered judgment against him for 1,000l. 4. He came the other day to the Lord Chancellor's, saying he came to inform against Mr. Rushworth, who, happening to be at his elbow, said, "Sir, you come in good time; I shall be heard face to face, whereas you intended to inform behind my back," whereupon, being reeling drunk, he departed, which Mr. Sherwin and others can testify. [Ibid. No. 60.]
[Nov. 28.] Certificate by Mr. Whitway that he is ready to testify that nothing was said by Mr. Rushworth at the coffeehouse on Wednesday the 19th that had anything of reflection either as to the King, government, or any particular person, the bent of his discourse being to magnify the prudence and wisdom of a lady that got off her husband without parting with any money. [Ibid. No. 61.]
Nov. 28.
His house in Tuthill Fields, over against the Almshouse.
Dr. B. Worsley, secretary to the new Council for Trade and Plantations, to Col. George Duke, secretary of the late Council. By order of the Council, as all former commissions granted to any Councils for Trade or Plantations have been recalled, desiring him to inform the Council what books or papers he has relating to Trade or Plantations, and informing him that their Lordships meet at ten every Wednesday and Friday morning at Lady Villiers' house, King Street, near Whitehall. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 62.]
Nov. 28.
Queen's College, Oxford.
Timothy Halton to Williamson. I thank you for your favourable construction of what was so rudely expressed. I hope the College affairs will be carried on for the future much more to your content and our credit, as Mr. Skelton is willing to accept the living of Headley. He desires a year of grace, which contains six quarters. I think we shall part with him on any terms, but then he is to clear the doctor's executrix of dilapidations. The Moral Philosophy lecture in the University, worth 100l. per annum for five years, will shortly be vacant. If you think it proper for Mr. Smith, I hope with your assistance it can be procured. The electors are, the Vice-Chancellor, and the two proctors pro tem., the Dean of Christ Church, and the Presidents of Magdalen and St. John's, or the major part, and in case of equality of votes, then whom the Vice-Chancellor shall nominate. As it now stands the Vice-Chancellor and one more can elect, because he has a double voice. It may be mentioned, if you think fit, before the Vice-Chancellor returns from London. Dr. Fell will be more easily inclined because none of his House is capable at present. What you wrote to me about examinations shall be punctually observed, at least before all elections. I do not press this at all if it does not suit with any other designs you have for Mr. Smith. [Ibid. No. 63.]
Nov. 28.
Whitby.
Allan Wharton to James Hickes. To-day passed by 20 light vessels with two convoys for Sunderland, and this tide sailed twelve hence all for Sunderland, most of them for coals for the alum works. We hear of no enemy on these coasts, but very few vessels have been seen at sea this week by us, not above eight. One, a billander for Stockton, passed to-day after the fleet. A woman near us is newly brought to bed of three children. [Ibid. No. 64.]
Nov. 28.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Tuesday morning came into this bay about 20 light colliers with two merchant men-of-war, the City convoys. They set the laden fleet as far as Yarmouth Roads without any disturbance of capers. Yesterday, the wind coming fair, they loosed, and are stood northwards. Early this morning passed by southwards about 20 laden colliers from Sunderland, most of them small vessels for Hull and the coast. Wind S.S.W. We have not seen or heard of any capers in these parts of late. [Ibid. No. 65.]
Nov. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. None of the packet-boats are yet arrived, and so we have no news except what the Fanfan brought from sea last night, viz.:— That the coasts were all clear from privateers. Since the ten persons, who deserted their colours beyond sea were sent to and kept at the fort, not one has come over on his Majesty's account. Capt. Langley says you seem not well pleased with my certificate, which could not be otherwise considering I could not see them, and in that short time a great many were brought over. He has the commands of Mr. Tucker and Mr. Reeve to transport most of them. Two or three laden colliers are passing upwards in the Sledway, and some small vessels below them, but we cannot yet tell what they are. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 66.]
Nov. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About three this afternoon arrived one of our packet-boats, bringing a letter to me from Mr. William Carre, wherein he writes of his travels into Dalmatia, Hungary, &c., and of his study in chemistry, but I do not know him. He adds that at his coming into that country he wrote to Lord Arlington to acquaint him of his being there, and gave him an account of the state of affairs there; that he had as good intelligence as most men, being particularly acquainted with the Pensionary Fagel and De Ruyter, and that if Taylor thought he could be anyways serviceable to the interest of England by writing weekly what passes there he would be ready to comply. Things, he said, stand there at present strangely. Most men are persuaded that our King and the Prince of Orange are agreed, and according to outward reason and appearance it should be so, for all the forces are drawn out of Zealand and Holland (that is the seaports); they are all marched for Brabant with the Prince. This week he was at the Brill, where are now but 240 men, four small companies; in Helvoetsleys 150 men; in Rotterdam four companies under Lieut.-Col. Grimes, and thus in other places; so that, if there is not an understanding between the King and the Prince, the English may now have the best opportunity in the world. Four frigates may take the Brill; the masters of the packet-boats will tell more. Besides, the Boers and others of the country told him they wished the English well settled, and swear they will not resist. The countryman is quite tired, and so are most cities. Col. Bamfield is taken prisoner, and his regiment lost. They have lost many men this week. The Prince's army has done nothing as yet. Their provisions are almost spent and money grows scarce. Their men die very much at several posts, &c. He concludes with money, which I shall not be very forward in, nor proceed without your orders and my Lord's. I have long expected, but not yet received his Majesty's order to proceed in intelligence. I enclose a letter to Lord Arlington, directed to me in a cover from Mr. Dale, and a small book, sent me by the said Carre, who writes he was the author of it and that he is at Rotterdam. I shall do nothing without order. I am called in haste to muster the men brought over in this packet-boat. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Nov. 28.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday the marching company under Capt. Cornwall, who have lain here about six years, were paid part of their arrears, due in this captain's time, but are yet 3l. 15s. in arrear, besides about 5l. every sentinel in arrear at Capt. Digby's death, which they say they shall have as well as the other, after they come to Rochester, where they are to quarter. Wind since my last very still at S. and S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 68.]
Nov. 28.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. At Spithead are the Tiger, Happy Return, Jersey, Morning Star and Castle fireship, in the dock here the Resolution and Diamond. The Rupert is graved, and almost ready to go out. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Nov. 28.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Acknowledging his letter. Wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Nov. 28.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. Wind N.W. We had such a great discouragement of trade in these parts of late by the number of Dutch capers on the English coast and the Land's End that nothing worth your cognizance has offered. Now our frigates appearing has given some revivings to our coal trade. This morning a master of a vessel informed me that Capt. Grant of the Reserve has taken a caper of 16 guns on the Irish coast. A vessel from Guernsey says that island is in a good and healthful condition, but much infested with privateers. [Ibid. No. 71.]
[Before Nov. 28.] The case of John Banckes, the Hamburg merchant. The substance appears by the recitals in the next document, adding that the company were acting thus, though Lord Arlington both by himself and by Sir Richard Ford had signified to the Resident at Hamburg that what Banckes had done was by his Majesty's special command, and though Lord Arlington had written that the company should cancel all the penal orders they had made against Banckes for so doing, and that Sir William Swann should return him the names of such as were refractory. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Nov. 28. The King to the Deputies, Assistants and Fellowship of Merchant Adventurers at Hamburg. Whereas, soon after the beginning of the present war, we had taken such resolutions against the City of Hamburg that we thought fit to advertise the principals of your company to remove their estates as speedily as they could into some other jurisdiction for their greater safety, and whereas John Bancks, an eminent trader of your company, thereupon ordered his factors at Hamburg to send to Leipsic 80 bales of his stuff, part of his estate there, and whereas notwithstanding such our especial direction you have proceeded according to the strict rules of the company to condemn the said Bancks in the penalty of your orders to be executed on his estate there, we command and require you to forbear your violent assertions of your orders, and that in particular you annul and make void those penal orders against Bancks or his brothers, for what he did in obedience to our said orders, and our further pleasure is that the said Bancks may freely dispose of his said estate where it now remains and have all conveniences for promoting the sale thereof, and that he, his relations, and factors enjoy all privileges, freedom and liberty in their trade and affairs. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 100.]
Nov. 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Dr. George Stradling, chaplain in ordinary, of the place of Dean of Chichester Cathedral, void by death of Dr. Lambrook Thomas. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 43.]
Nov. 28. Licence for John Forster, High Sheriff of Northumberland, to remain in Durham or elsewhere in England, where his occasions may call him. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, f. 140.]
Nov. 28.
Chatham.
Edward Gregory to the Navy Commissioners. Requesting leave to come to London to pass his account for money received by way of imprest during the last year. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 158.]
Nov. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to the same. Capt. Clements received your letters in my office last night and those from Sir John Werden, and is ready to obey his orders of sailing as soon as the anchors come. Capt. Pibus of the Fanfan came in here last night to victual according to your former orders to me. He says he escaped the last storm, sheltering in some hole (as he calls it) northwards, and that the sea is very free from privateers. It seems a mistake of what was seen hence the 22nd of those eight or ten ships off the West Rocks. Lieut. Consett went two or three days ago. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Nov. 28.
The Portsmouth, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Capt. James Page to the same. This morning I received your order for surveying our provisions, which shall be done, and one from Sir John Werden to go to Yarmouth Roads to convoy the herring fleet to the Downs, but I am doubtful I shall come short of provisions, for we have not above 14 days' of all sorts. The new purser informed me there was an order for re-victualling our ship, so I sent him to London to look after it. [Ibid. No. 160.]
Nov. 28.
The Portsmouth, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Capt. James Page to Sir J. Smyth. To the same general effect as the last, with a request for an order for a month's more provisions. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Nov. 28. Capt. Stephen Pyend to Commissioner Tippetts. To-day his Royal Highness has appointed a new boatswain to the Ruby. I request an order for a survey of the old boatswain's remains, and will keep the key of his storeroom till you send your instruments to survey the same. [Ibid. No. 162.]
Nov. 28. Certificate by R. Mayors of the measurements and tonnage of the Mary and Hannah ketch, Robert Fox master. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Nov. 28. Brian McMahon to Lord [Arlington]. Sending him his hearty acknowledgments, as by the account he has from Father Patrick he finds himself extremely obliged to his Lordship. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 85.]
Nov. 29.
Whitehall.
Order in Council referring the petition of the Gambia adventurers, calendared ante p. 190, to the Council for Trade and Plantations. [1¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 73.]
[Nov. 29.]/Dec. 9.
Venice.
W. Blathwayt to [Williamson]. I have been hitherto too much on the wing to write. In Germany I found everybody strongly concerned for the interests of Holland and exasperated against England because of the war, and maliciously misinformed of the reasons, progress and success thereof, which they turn altogether to our disadvantage. Here I find all merry-making and preparing for their famous carnival. I will send you the best advice I can. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 74.]
Nov. 29.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The two City convoys which went with the last loaden fleet are come back opportunely to go with the loaden fleet of about 250 sail now here, but the wind is N., so they cannot sail. [Ibid. No. 75.]
Nov. 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats brought the enclosed this evening. Money is wanting for all things of this nature. I think it convenient to give encouragement by a small piece for their care. Mr. Carre, who offers his intelligence from Rotterdam, is a stranger to me, and I do not well understand his book which he sent. All I can perceive is that he means well. I disposed of eight to the fort yesterday with Capt. Langley, and three more this evening. I desire your directions and his Majesty's order for intelligence, which I have formerly desired several times. I suppose the person called Major Clerke to be that Mr. Carre. The master of the packet-boat reports from the passengers that there has been a fight between M. Turenne and the Brandenburghs, but they can only say several French are taken prisoners, and that two or three men-of-war passed by the Brill towards Rotterdam this week. I shall proceed no further with that Mr. Carre without your orders. Pray remember Mr. Dale. [Ibid. No. 76.]
Nov. 29.
Gravesend.
Sir Francis Leeke to Williamson. Thanking him for his kindness to Mr. Collingwood about the town clerkship of Newark, and asking him to look upon him with favour, and sending his humble service to Lord Arlington and Sir Robert Carr and all his family. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Nov. 29.
Barnstaple.
William Wakeman to James Hickes. Here are arrived safely from St. Sebastian the Willing Mind and the Truelove of this place, though they were threatened by a Dutch man-of-war that lay beside them at St. Sebastian. They are the first of our Newfoundland fleet that went to market, and we hear all the rest arrived safe to their respective ports in Spain, &c. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Nov. 29.
Bristol.
Sir John Knight to Williamson. The bearer, my kinsman, Richard Hart, lately had a ship, the Margaret of Bristol, laden with about 3,500 quintals of fish and bound for Bilbao, taken by the Fountain of Gold of Amsterdam, which last May obtained a pass from his Majesty for carrying to Spain an Ambassador and a Resident for and at the request of the States-General, and also for their return home, but ever since the said ship landed the Ambassadors, it has continued in Biscay and on that coast, and has taken the said ship and several others, which have been condemned in St. Sebastian and elsewhere, so that the owners of the Margaret can by no means obtain justice, and are desired by their agents there to try to obtain his Majesty's letters to the States-General to order the delivery of the said ship and goods as taken in abuse of his Majesty's passport, and another to the King of Spain to the same effect. I request you to do the bearer what favour you can. Several of the ship's company, his Majesty's subjects, were killed and wounded before they could take the ship. A copy of his Majesty's pass and an affidavit of some of the ship's company have been sent the bearer from Spain. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 79.]
Nov. 29. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters from the 22nd to the 28th, all previously calendared except:—November 26, Newcastle. We fear the late light fleet, now lading, of about 200 sail, will venture without convoy, the wind being fair at W. and by N. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 80.]
Nov. 29. Caveat that nothing pass of the grant of the place of Customer of Dover, void by the death of Cadwallador Jones. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 17.]
Nov. 29.
Whitehall.
Order from Lord Arlington to the Clerk of Signet for entering the above caveat. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 81.]
[Nov. ?] Request that such a caveat be entered. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Nov. 29. Warrant to the Lord Steward and Board of Greencloth to swear in Francis, Lord Newport, as Treasurer of the Household, in place of Lord Clifford. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 209.]
Nov. 29. Warrant to swear in William, Lord Maynard, as Comptroller of the Household, in place of Lord Newport. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 29. Warrant to Sir John Robinson to permit Cornelius de Gelder to have access to Daniel Van Overscheldt in the Tower, in his presence or that of the keeper. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 29.
Whitehall.
Privy Seal for 200l. and 100l. a year to Samuel Martin, Consul at Algiers. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 29. Warrant for inserting John Harrison, alias Wilson, in the next general pardon for co. Cambridge. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 29. Warrant for creating Sir Thomas Allin of Blundeston, Suffolk, a Baronet, with discharge from payment, in consideration of his services. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 29. Warrant for a privy seal to the Commissioners for Prizes to pay out of the proceeds of prizes the rates allowed by order of Council of 13 March last to the Admiral and commanders of the fleet, in recompense of gunnage and tonnage. Minute. [Ibid.]
Nov. 29. Warrant for continuing to muster Robert Pigot, ensign in Capt. George Creighton's company in Lord Power's regiment with one servant, during his absence in the service of the Most Christian King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 47.]
Nov. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a licence to Wm. Whitlock to grub up the underwood on certain parcels of ground containing about 100 acres in Henley parish, co. Oxon., of which he is seised, and convert them into tillage; with a non obstante of the statute of 35 Henry VIII. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, f. 141.]
Nov. 29.
The Guinca, in the Hope.
Capt. Thomas Trafford to the Navy Commissioners. I have received an order from his Royal Highness to sail into the Downs, and am forced again to write to you about the remainder of our provisions, and especially the beer, which is not yet come, and we cannot well stow the ship without it. I desire an order that the vessel which brings the beer should take my water cask to be filled with water above. I enclose a list of the victuals already taken in to inform you what is received and what remains behind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 164i.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 164i.]
Nov. 29.
The Phœnix, in the Hope.
Capt. William Whyting to the same. In answer to yours of the 28th I have ordered our master to render an account of what you require concerning his wilful ignorance in laying our ship aground at Winterton, which he has now sent, but I suppose you will not be satisfied till I appear myself for you. Our ship is not in any respect wronged by it, but is as capable as the first day I sailed with her. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Nov. 29.
The Portsmouth, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Capt. James Page to the same. Repeating the substance of his letters of the 28th, and adding that he had made a general survey of all the provisions, and finding that he had three weeks' of all sorts and the wind being W.N.W. he had concluded to make the best of his way, according to his order. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Nov. 29.
Deal.
Capt. Arthur Herbert to the same. At my arrival in the Downs I found that all the tickets were paid that those men had that were then belonging to any of the ships there, which put me in hopes that the tickets of the men turned out of the Victory into the Cambridge would have been paid likewise, but after two or three days the clerks told me there would be no money sent for that use. Since my men have been told it they make grievous complaints, and indeed not without some reason, thinking it hard they should receive worse usage than the rest that are upon the same account in the service, or than those that by a discharge have absented themselves from it. I have several that served in the Dragon and are now in the Cambridge that I desire may not suffer for their attendance to the ship more than those that are run on the Cambridge's book, and have since, as I am informed, received their Dragon's pay at London. If they are not paid I enclose a list, which may be of some use, if you will stop the wages of such as have without cause absented themselves from the service. If you will order money down for the payment of such as have given their constant attendance on board it will doubtless be a great encouragement for others hereafter to do the like, whereas the contrary will give them an uncontrollable liberty of saying that if they had been less dutiful they had been better paid. Of what prejudice this in time may prove to the service you are better able to judge than myself. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 167.] Enclosed,
List of men who came from the Dragon on board the Cambridge 12 June, 1672, containing 32 names, of whom seven are marked as not on board, and two as not on board, sick. [Ibid. No. 167i.]
Nov. 29.
The Antelope, in the Downs.
Capt. Richard White to the Navy Commissioners. I have received 14 days' provisions from Dover, and am ready to sail to Portsmouth. I enclose his Royal Highness' letter to you for paying those hundred men I brought with me out of the Algier into the Antelope. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 168.]
Nov. 29.
Plymouth.
Capt. Jasper Grant to the same. The carpenters here have surveyed the frigate and have stopped the leak she chiefly complained of, so I intend to-morrow morning to sail with the Nightingale for our station formerly ordered by Prince Rupert. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Nov. 29.
Plymouth.
John Lanyon to the same. News of the Reserve as in the last letter. Capt. Grant and his carpenter were with me this morning for some small supply of stores. I enclose account of my disbursements on the Mermaid and Nightingale. The former was caulked throughout, and is now directed for Dartmouth and Topsham for some merchant ships there. The latter accompanies the Reserve on their station about Cape Clear. I hope you have dispatched my former accounts. These latter ships have carried away above that 300l. you lately paid me, so I must desire a further supply. [Ibid. No. 170.]
Nov. 29.
Newcastle.
Ralph Grey to Capt. Perriman. In my last I thought that Mr. Andrew Wairdlow had the anchor and cable you wrote to me about, but now it is found that Mr. Christopher Shadforth of our town went down to Shields and told the man that took them up that he was ordered to look after all prize goods, and on that pretence got both anchor and cable, and has disposed of the anchor if not the cable for his own use, so I desire to know what you would have done about it. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Nov. 30. Alphabetical list of the members of the Royal Society, with a list of the 21 members of the Council, eleven of whom are to be continued, and ten fellows elected in. [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 83.]
Nov. 30. Thomas Willis, M.D., to Williamson. Prescribing a confection and a cordial for his brother to be taken in his journey to London. [Ibid. No. 84.]
Nov. 30.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. The wind being S. the laden fleet of upwards of 250 sail may stay for better tides and a light moon. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Nov. 30.
Boston.
John Butler to Williamson. This instant arrived several vessels from London, convoyed by one of his Majesty's frigates, to the great joy of the Londoners, who had great concerns in those vessels for this mart, which began to-day. Some colliers are also come in here. Wind S.E. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Nov. 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I wrote a letter yesterday, but the Dutch mail went before I received Mr. Dale's letter. I sent it after the mail by a Colchester merchant. I hope you received it, for I sent Mr. Dale's letter in it to you. He writes himself Degrave from Delft. Mr. Carre, it seems, is known to him as Major Clarke. A privateer sailed after the last packet-boat from the Brill last Wednesday, but the packet-boat outsailed him. She met a fleet of light colliers off Aldeburgh. Three soldiers came over, whom we sent to the fort. Mr. Dale says they were of the Duke of Monmouth's regiment, but on my examination I found them to be of Douglas'. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 87.]
Nov. 30.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon the wind veered northerly, and came this morning between N.E. and E. The whole outward bound fleet of above 120 sail weighed, and have the wind now very fair. About noon we descried a fleet of 26 ships at the back of the Goodwin, standing southerly, which we imagined was the Dutch fleet, but we afterwards descried with our glasses the English colours, and are confident it is the Yarmouth fleet for the Straits. In the Downs are four King's ships, and six merchantmen came down at noon. Wind E.N.E., a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Nov. 30.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to James Hickes. The Dragon went last Thursday night for St. Malo, with the Hatton ketch, and five merchant ships for St. Malo and Guernsey. Wind S.E., but calm. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Nov. 30.
Bristol.
Thomas Moore to James Hickes. Two days ago we had certain news of three ships of this city taken by a Dutch caper of 14 guns about 40 leagues west of Ireland. They put out of Cork 5th November and were taken the 6th, and are at the Groyne, the master of one being come home. Yesterday we heard of the arrival at Tangier of the Bristol Arms and the Dolphin and at St. Lucar of the Levant frigate in eleven or twelve days' passage. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Nov. 30.
Navy Office.
Commissioner Tippetts to the Navy Commissioners. Offering his opinion as to the order in which the ships in port should be repaired, so that it may be managed to the best advantage and with the least interruption. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 172.]
Nov. 30.
Victualling Office.
Sir T. Littleton, Josiah Child, and T. Papillon to the same. The Portsmouth is so far from having all her provisions on board that she has not had any as yet, we never having had notice of her readiness nor of where she lay till the receipt of your letter just now. We shall apply ourselves to give her a present dispatch. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Nov. 30.
Chatham Dock.
Phineas Pett, master shipwright, to the same. At Mr. Ruffhead's request, entreating them to order him the payment of his last quarter's bills, or to imprest him some money to enable him to carry on the service here, he being 1,800l. out since he received any, and the work in fitting out this fleet proving so considerable, especially in these old ships (and others) proving so iron-sick, besides the Montague and Defiance to be rebuilt, so that without a speedy supply he is no ways capable to carry on the service without great detriment thereto, though he is very willing to hasten the carrying on thereof to the utmost of his power. [Ibid. No. 174.]
Nov. 30.
Spithead.
Capt. John Stanesby to the Navy Commissioners. My ship is refitted at Spithead, and to-day we have received most of our provisions, and by the middle of next week, if wind and weather permit, I doubt not to have all on board, and to be then in a condition to attend your commands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 175.]
Nov. 30.
Portsmouth.
Commissioner Deane to the same. To-night I have finished paying the yard, one old and one new quarter as directed, and intend to pay the Roebuck Tuesday. The money for paying the Dunkirk and Diamond came Friday night, but I have no directions about it, which I desire by next post. The Happy Return is dispatched at Spithead, and may be ready to receive orders for sailing when sent. The Castle fireship, when the tides lift, shall be brought ashore, and dispatched as soon as possible. The Morning Star is supplied with a cable and some other stores, and sailed to-day for Plymouth with the Jersey. The Tiger sailed for the Downs Thursday. The Rupert's beer and guns are taken on board; if the weather favour she may go to Spithead in seven or eight days. 130 loads of compass and ten of knee timber very fit for our use are offered at 36s. a load, if I will promise payment, which I will do, if you can give me any assurance to perform it, and also 15 tons of Riga ring cordage at 36s. per cwt., if we could pay for the last we had from Damerent, amounting to 400 and odd pounds. The cordage from Roy is paid for except 100l. The Antelope is come to St. Helen's point. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Nov. 30.
Portsmouth.
The same to Commissioner Tippetts. As to what stores can be had here towards the supply of the last demand, if no money can be had, all must be sent from thence, and that is why the demand was sent as you mention, for as yet the provision ordered to be provided here is not come in towards the last two demands, nor dare I engage further than I have when you say every post you are in no condition to help us with money. The ironwork and provision from Dr. Perin are delivered of the last demands, and for the other none can be had. Timber plank, &c., can be had here as formerly, but, if no money, all must be sent from thence except Dr. Perin's ware. Wainscots and sprucia deals are much wanted for the yacht, which is shut in to the lower wale. I hope to get out the Roebuck and Diamond next spring in good condition for sea, I am sorry the plank ship missed coming here. The master attendant much wants the sheaves. To-day came some plank very seasonably from Mr. Coalle (Cole). Other news given in his last letter. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 177.]
Nov. 30.
The Levant Merchant.
Capt. William Hobbs to Mr. Hewer or Mr. Edwards. Requesting him to deliver to the bearer, his purser, 50 blank tickets. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Nov. 30.
Newcastle.
Ralph Grey to Capt. John Perriman. Since my last I was with Mr. Christopher Shadforth, who confesses he disposed of the anchor and cable to his use, being out of purse for the Prize office, and if you would pay him his money you shall have them. I told him he went a wrong course, for I reckon it felony to embezzle the King's stores, and he had better restore them. His answer was: Pay him 5s. for his charges and you shall have them, with 15s. out of the price, in all 20s., so I refer it to you. Thirty colliers are arrived with the City convoy, and I hope ere Monday most of the fleet will be ready to sail. Pray write me the price of lead. It has fallen here to 12s. a fother. If any will buy here, the overweight will pay charges. Pray write if there be any hopes of peace. Mr. Wardley has an anchor and cable he cannot make out to be his, and has given bond to the water bailiff. It may belong to one of the King's frigates, having been in a wreck since the last Holland war. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 179.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant appointing the Duke of Lauderdale, the Archbishop of St. Andrews, the Lord Chancellor, and all other officers of State for the time being, the Archbishop of Glasgow, and others as Commissioners for visiting the Universities of Scotland, St. Andrews first, then Glasgow, Aberdeen, and Edinburgh, the visitation of each being finished, before that of the next is begun. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 125.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to John, Lord Elphingstoun, his heirs and assigns, for five years, of the seizures, escheat and confiscation of all brandy, wine, foreign aqua vitæ and strong waters whatsoever, and of all mumbeer (except black beer), imported into Scotland after the date thereof, with power to seize the same. [Ibid. p. 129.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Rothes, Chancellor, Sir James Dal rymple of Stair, President of the College of Justice in Scotland, and to the remanent Senators thereof. Directing them to receive John, Earl of Atholl, as one of the four extraordinary Lords of Session, in place of Charles, Earl of Dumfermline, deceased. [Ibid. p. 130.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Directing them to give orders for building fortifications at the Castle of Stirling, according to a design drawn by Slezer, the King's engineer in Scotland, and to provide a train of artillery of twelve brass guns, four to carry a bullet of six lbs. and eight of three lbs., and to provide carriages for them and all other things requisite for such a train, the charge of the said fortifications and train to be paid out of the last twelve months' cess given by the last Session of the Parliament, and the rest of the money arising therefrom to be secured in Edinburgh Castle and not disposed of without the King's special warrant. [Ibid. p. 131.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a new gift to Alexander, Earl of Kincardine, his heirs or assigns, of all wards and marriages, whether simple or taxt, which have fallen or shall fall into his Majesty's hands from 1 Aug., 1672, to 1 Aug., 1674, and of all non-entries due at any time theretofore, or which shall be due 1 Aug., 1674, with an exception of all wards, marriages and non-entries given to any other person or already componed by the Commissioners of the Treasury without prejudice to two former gifts thereof to the said Earl, [Docquet. Ibid. p. 133.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant to fit the Bass and make it convenient for keeping close prisoners and to allow the gunner there 14d. a day, no pay for one having been allowed in the former establishment, and the commander there the ordinary pay of an ensign instead of the 20d. a day allowed by the former establishment, and to take care that all things be done necessary for the maintenance of that garrison and for strengthening and repairing the fortifications there. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 134.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the same. Whereas the trumpeters and kettle drummers of the two troops of guards in Scotland have received no liveries for many years, and the Treasurer Depute, by the King's order, has agreed for ten suits of fine liveries, each consisting of a rich coat, a cloak, double banners for kettledrums, and trumpet with tassels, according to the pattern of the liveries ordered for England and Ireland at the rate of 58l. 3s. 6d. sterling the suit, commanding them to pay the same to John Allen, the King's tailor, in London, amounting in all to 581l. 15s. sterling, and likewise to pay him for ten suits of liveries for their ordinary wear. [Ibid. p. 135.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of James Garshore, minister at Moniaburgh, to the kirk of Cardrosse, vacant by the death of Robert Watson. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 136.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for payment to Sir William Purves of the arrears of his salary of 50l. sterling as agent for the Church, and for payment thereof in future. [Ibid. p. 137.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protections in the ordinary form to William, Earl of Morton, and Lord Mordington for three years, and to James Johnston of Scheines, William Jackson of Leith, and James Lockhart, one of his Majesty's Life Guard of Horse in Scotland, for two years respectively. [Ibid. pp. 138, 139.]
Nov. 30.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to [the Earl of Arlington]. Though my indisposition makes me very unfit to write, not having been able yet to leave my chamber or dispatch business, I am unwilling not to acknowledge yours of the 12th with the exceptions to the rules for corporations, which I doubt not in a short time to answer fully to his Majesty's satisfaction. I fully agree with your opinion, not only in the governing here, but in all other things, that the middle course will prove in the end always the best, and not leaning to any party, but doing right and justice to all equally is not only the wisest policy (?), but is indeed every man's duty to do. I am sure 'tis that I shall steadily pursue in all my actings here, while the King shall continue me in this government. I also agree that the petition of Patrick Groom O'Quin is a matter of state, and I was only troubled that I had not the honour of doing what you did in England, which is highly reasonable, for should men be admitted to have separation for all the trespasses and injuries done in the time of the war here, it would, I may say, turn the world upside down in this place, though there is a statute 21 Jac., c. 16, that bars all suits of this nature unless commenced within six years, and had the poor Irishman, who petitioned, pleaded it, he had never lost his cause. I had some difficulty to quiet his adversary, James Tyrrell, who was very earnest to take out execution on his judgment, but at length I have persuaded him to acquiesce. I find no mention in any of your letters as to regimenting the army, it may as well be omitted as done, and the army kept in distinct troops and companies, if his Majesty thinks that best, only I should be glad to know his pleasure with convenient speed, as I cannot till then give out commissions, and I find it causes some little jealousy among the officers of the army, who think themselves a little unsettled in their commands till they have my commission. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 86.]
Nov. 30.
Dublin Castle.
Sir H. Ford to [Williamson]. The 28th, with four packets which came then together, I received several of yours, the last of the 19th. His Excellency and the Countess are pretty well recovered. You have herewith a letter from him to Lord Arlington. The next, I hope, will be in his own hand. He has not yet perused his Majesty's letter, for which your favour must now be acknowledged, whether there be any further proceedings thereon or no. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Nov. 30.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to Lord Arlington. The crossness of the winds keeping back several packets, I received not yours of the 12th till the 28th. As to the rules you refer to, I doubt not but the Lord Lieutenant will give all the satisfaction that may be expected from him, as soon as his strength enables him to consider the remarks that have been made on them. I, therefore, shall not trouble you on these several particulars, but as to the generality of them I must confidently aver that in the composure of them there was not the least design of retrenching his Majesty's intended favours to any of his Roman Catholic subjects, nor any purpose of imposing any difficulties or alterations on any citizens in their charters any further than to make them more dependent on his Majesty and his governors. This I must avow as to some that were of the Council about that affair, and this, some of us understood, to be principally intended by the liberty given the Lord Lieutenant by the Act for regulating Corporations, and the rather because it is much more agreeable with the late Act in England for the same purpose, and because it has been too much experienced that popular assemblies, while they have assumed the authority of managing their own affairs, especially when they grow great and factious, have not always proved most faithful and obedient to the Crown. This being the clear and only intention of some of us (I cannot say of all, because men's minds are secret to themselves), I doubt not but his Majesty will pardon the error (if any), run into by an earnest desire and zeal to his service. I shall not either justify or condemn the rules themselves, because his Majesty is as yet in suspense upon them, and what he shall declare ought to be not only our acquiescence but satisfaction, but as to what seems to lessen his just favour towards his Roman Catholic subjects, I mean the oath of Supremacy, pray consider, whether some such oath were not requisite while we have a variety of people that scruple that oath as much as the Roman Catholics, and perhaps are more dangerous in their principles, in their numbers, and dependencies than they are. Besides this oath is to be dispensed with by the Lord Lieutenant, as he pleases, and in my opinion, his Majesty may dispense with it as to all persons if he shall think fit, so for what time he shall hold most convenient, and if so, I offer for your consideration, whether he does not keep all persons in a more strict dependence on himself and in a more continued sense of his favour by allowing a temporary dispensation he may recall at his pleasure, than by opening the gate of freedom to all at once, which perhaps he cannot so easily shut again, when occasion shall require it. But his Majesty is so much master of his own business that all inconveniencies and conveniencies of this kind ought to be referred to his own breast and not argued by us. I, therefore, write nothing on the consideration of the rules themselves, but only to satisfy you there were not those rude and unmannerly intentions in some about the contrivance of them that were hastily suggested against us all. Besides, you know, these rules in this point were not concluded without some representation and allowance. I must not conclude without returning my most humble thanks for your favour concerning my retrenchment by the late establishment. I presumed to acquaint you therewith, not with a design of engaging you to move his Majesty in that affair, but only to satisfy you that what I desired from Lord Ranelagh was reasonable in itself and but indifferent with others, and since you seem to be of that opinion with me I am thereby oversatisfied more than that retrenchment deserves. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 88.]
Nov. 30. Information of Robert Peacock of Cloghatrady, co. Limerick, taken before the Earl of Orrery. 11 November he was at Cahircon, co. Clare, his father's house, where, discoursing with his brother William about Capt. Walcott's going to Dublin, his brother told him that being that day at a christening at Mr. Mountiford Westroppe's house, Westroppe told the company that his cousin Capt. Walcott lately told him he heard that he, Westroppe, was a notable sturdy fellow and might be capable of an employment, and that he answered no employments were to be had without money, and that he had no money to lay out on one, and that Walcott replied, if he would accept of an employment, he questioned not in a short time to help him to one without money. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas the farmers of the great branches of the Irish revenue, by virtue of the grant of 12 July, 1669, have covenanted to pay the rents thereby reserved quarterly at the four usual feasts, and whereas in the said grant it is agreed that if any part of the said rents be unpaid for 90 days after any of the feasts on which the same ought to have been paid the farmers shall forfeit so much money as the interest of 70,000l. for a quarter of a year at the rate of ten per cent. per annum shall amount to, and whereas the farmers, under the colour of the last clause, pretend to 90 days' grace, not conceiving themselves bound to pay in the quarterly rents till the end thereof; declaring that the said farmers are not by their contract allowed any days of grace, but ought to pay their rent on or before the said feast days, but nevertheless directing that no advantage be taken of their breach of covenant, if they shall thereafter pay their respective quarterly payments within 31 days of the feasts on which the same are respectively due, and further directing that, as the bringing up of money to Dublin from the country parts may require much time and trouble, the Commissioners of the Treasury shall accept from the farmers good and sufficient assignments into the country for so much of the said rents as they shall not be able to pay in Dublin, and further directing the Lord Lieutenant to take effectual care that the farmers thereafter comply therewith, and in case of their failure to take proceedings against them. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 355.]
Two drafts thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, Nos. 90, 91.]
Thursday,
Nov. [7, 14, 21, or 28.]
Major Nathaniel Darell to Williamson. Requesting him to let him know what has been done in the Feversham business, from which gaol two of the restrained masters have broken out and come up to the Spanish Ambassador, and hoping that the gaoler will be punished severely. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 91.]
Nov. Monsieur de Mignon to [Williamson]. I came here to tell you that the ambassador has as yet had no answer from his brother concerning the vessels which ought to cruise. He hopes to receive one by the first ordinary post, but fearing he may forget it I will write again to-day on the subject. [French. Ibid. No. 92.]
Nov.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of Prizes, in pursuance of the Order in Council of 13 March last, directing payments of money in lieu of gunnage and tonnage to the Admiral and Commanders of the fleet, ordering them to pay 600l. in lieu of the gunnage and tonnage in respect of the Hollandia, taken in the sea fight of 28 May last, to William Wren, to be disposed of by him in accordance with the said order. [Draft. Ibid. No. 93.]
Nov. Table showing the direction of the wind at the different ports from which advices had been received during the month. [Ibid. No. 94.]
Nov.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to George, Viscount Grandison, and Edward Villiers of an annuity of 5,300l. per annum, to be charged on the rents and revenues arising from wine licences, for 99 years, if the Duchess of Cleveland should so long live, in trust for her, and also for a grant to the said Viscount Grandison and Edward Villiers of the said revenues, in trust also for the said Duchess, with a grant after the decease of the said Duchess of the said annuity to Charles, Earl of Southampton, and the heirs male of his body, and a further grant of the residue of the said revenues subject to the payment of the said annuity, after the decease of the said Duchess, as to one moiety to Henry, Earl of Euston, and the heirs male of his body, and as to the other moiety to Lord George Fitzroy, sometimes called Lord George Palmer, and the heirs male of his body, with cross remainders between them, with a proviso that, if the said Earl of Euston and Lord George Fitzroy shall both die without heirs male of their bodies, the said Earl of Southampton shall enjoy the whole, and with power to any of the above persons to settle not exceeding one-third of his respective share for a jointure and for portions for younger children. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 34, f. 202.]
Docquet thereof, dated 6 January. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 295.]
Nov. Pardon to William Low of Dublin for all treasons, &c. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 272.]
Nov. Confirmation to Sir William Juxon of a park in Seasincott, co. Gloucester. [Ibid. No. 275.]
Nov. Grant to Thos. Williams of a messuage and 25 acres of land called Cantrill, in the parish of Ougborough, co. Devon. [Ibid. No. 276.]
Nov. Warrant to pay to Sir Robert Vyner, Bt., 5,437l. without account, for plate delivered to the Jewel House. [Ibid. No. 278.]
Nov. Grant to George Legge of the office of Lieut.-General of the Ordnance. [Ibid. No. 280.]
Nov. Grant to Dr. Chamberlaine, first physician in ordinary, of the benefit of his new invention of writing and printing true English. [Ibid. No. 282.]
Nov. Warrant to pay to Sir Stephen Fox 2,000l. per annum without account for secret service; also 10,000l. for secret service without account. [Ibid. No. 283.]
Friday,
Nov. [1,8,15,22, or 29.]
Sir Robert Southwell to Lord Brouncker. I understand Capt. Minors in the London Merchant is going for Kinsale to convoy the fish ships thence to the Straits. I asked Mr. Werden that he might take in there what provisions he could, which may be a month's or more. He advised me to apply to your Board, which I desire you to do, that there be no waste by remains of provisions there, which have already lain so long, and next that my father might be entitled to his payment, for hitherto the victuallers here have objected to any payments till upon delivery and indents returned thereof, which is a severe rule. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 180.]
Nov.
The York, at Purfleet.
Capt. William Finch to S. Pepys. Requesting him to send 50 blank tickets by his purser, William Cleggett, as people come to him with letters of administration for the tickets of men that were put sick on shore, and died there. [Ibid. No. 181.]
Nov. J. Pelling to W. Hewer. Requesting him if the Mary Rose and Barnaby are not in the writer's memory (memoranda) to put them there for four months, being bound to the Canaries. [Ibid. No. 182.]
Nov. The masters of the John and Mary, Hamburg frigate, Success, Jamaica Adventure and Fortunate Mary, victuallers, to the Navy Commissioners. Petition for speedy payment of their freight, they having been discharged 28 September, and it being due by contract 20 days after, and remaining unpaid, though two months have elapsed, as their ships are much out of repair, and the petitioners cannot fit them for sea for want of the payment prayed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 183.] Annexed,
Paper with the names of the victuallers and their masters. [Ibid. No. 183i.]
Nov.
Whitehall.
The King to the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin. Directing them to constitute and admit John Muschamp, B.A., to the Senior Fellowship first vacant in the said college. [Draft. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 92.]
[Nov ?] Sir Edward Fitzharris, Bart., to the King. Petition stating that on a reference to the Lord Keeper to examine the title of Major Gerald Fitzgerald and the petitioner to the lands of Glyn, co. Limerick, he reported that the said Fitzgerald was heir male in tail and the petitioner's wife, Lady Fitzharris, was heir in reversion, if the said Fitzgerald should die without heir male of his body, and that notwithstanding Fitzgerald has surreptitiously procured a King's letter for a patent of the said lands to him in fee simple, though he had formerly no title except in tail male, and, therefore, praying that the patent may only pass to Fitzgerald and the heirs male of his body. [Ibid. No. 93.] Annexed,
The said report dated 12 December, 1671. A grant of 13 June, 1588, was produced to Edmond Fitz Thomas, grandson and heir of Sir Thomas Fitz Thomas, called the Knight of the Valley, and the heirs male of his body, of the manor of Glancorbery and the lands belonging to the same in the parish of Kilfarisie and country of Connello, co. Limerick, with other hereditaments therein described, being parcel of the lands of Thomas Mac Rudery de la Glan, alias the Knight of the Valley, attainted, at the rents therein mentioned, and Lord Castle Connell made oath that the said Major Fitzgerald was the true heir male of the body of the said Edmond Fitz Thomas, alias Fitzgerald, commonly called Knight of the Valley or Rudery an Glana, which is the same in Irish, and that the said Edmond was reputed the lawful proprietor of the said manor, and had issue two sons, Thomas, his eldest son, who enjoyed the said manor till expelled by the usurpers, and died without issue male, and John, father of the said Gerald, who is dead, and that the said Gerald is his eldest son now living; and for the said Sir E. Fitzharris was produced another grant of 22 June, 1635, to the said Thomas Fitzgerald in fee simple of the said manor, &c., at the rents therein mentioned, which neither recites nor notices the former grant to Edmond Fitz Thomas, so that it appears to me that the said Gerald Fitzgerald and the heirs male of his body would by law be entitled to the said lands, had no war happened in Ireland; but by order in Council of 10 March, 1670[–1] on the petition of Edward Vernon, entitling his Majesty to the premises upon a concealment at his great expense and trouble, it was referred to several Lords to report thereon, his Majesty declaring that before any distribution the discoverers, Col. Vernon, Mr. Ruthorne, and Mr. Alden be first rewarded according to his promise, and then, if it be found that any of the said lands belong to any nominees, that they be restored thereunto, before any further disposition be made of the said lands. [Copy. 2¼ pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 332, No. 93i.]
Nov.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the letters of 16 Aug. last, directing a grant to Gerald Fitzgerald in fee simple of the manor of Glancorbery, &c. (calendared in the last volume of the calendar, p. 497), directing a stop of the said grant till further pleasure, it having been represented that Lady Fitzharris is heir in reversion thereto if the said Fitzgerald die without heirs male of his body. [Draft. 2½ pages. Ibid. No. 94.]
[Nov ?] Edward Lee to —. Thomas Ellis, reported to be in hold for giving intelligence to the Dutch, has lived in Longacre, next the Three Tuns tavern, about ten years. He is a journeyman tailor, but has not wrought at his trade since he came thither, and has since increased much in riches. He was formerly porter to a Spanish Ambassador. He sailed in a privateer, of which Harris of the King's Head, James Street, near Covent Garden, can give information. His neighbours think he was in Holland. He often rides to haven towns on the sea coast. Inquire about this of Manders at the White Lion, Hart Street, who keeps horses for hire, and has furnished him with them. It is said brandy and wines often come to him from beyond the seas. He has stoves or hothouses, and Mrs. Worrell, that looks after them, may be able to give account of how long he stays away from home. My chamber is at the sign of the Angel, next door but one to Ellis' house. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 95.]
[Nov ?] Viscount Falkland to the King. Petition for order of payment of the pension of 300l. out of the tenths of the bishopric of Winchester, granted him two years ago for his support and education, the receipt whereof is obstructed by the late stop in payments in the Exchequer. [Ibid. No. 96.]
[Nov ?] Viscountess Falkland to the King. Petition for direction to the Lord Treasurer to pay without retrenchment the pension of 300l. a year, granted to her son, Lord Falkland, for his support and education, whereupon a year ago he went into France for his accomplishment, but is in great distress, his pension being nine months in arrear. [Ibid. No. 97.] Annexed,
Memorial for Lord Falkland that according to the order of January last for retrenchment of pensions one half during the current year, as Lord Falkland had half a year's pension paid Lady Day last, although it was for what was due the preceding Michaelmas, there must be a special order and a sign manual to enable the Lord Treasurer to pay any money to Lord Falkland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 318, No. 97i.]
[Nov ?] Sec. Coventry to the Duke of Somerset, Lord Lieutenant of Somersetshire. The King wishes him to restore to the office of muster master of the county Capt. Thos. Littleton, who was always loyal during the usurpation, and has held the office during the lieutenancies of his Grace's father and of the Duke of Ormonde, in which he always behaved himself well and diligently. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 61.]
[Nov ?] Capt. William Whyting to the Navy Commissioners. Desiring them to inform him which way and when he may appear before them to vindicate himself from the complaint made against him by James Wyles, the master of his ship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 330, No. 184.] Enclosed,
The officers of the Phœnix to the Navy Commissioners. In reply to the complaint of James Wyles stating that they were ready on their oaths to make it appear that their commander, Capt. Whyting, has at all times seen that all men have their due allowance of provisions as in any of his Majesty's ships, and declaring that before the said Wyles came on board the company was as well governed as in any ship in the Navy, but that he has since endeavoured to put all men at variance, and also that, whereas their Honours are informed by Wyles or others that their commander is a great drunkard, to their knowledge he is clear of that aspersion and is known to them to be a mariner. See Wyles' letter of 8 November, calendared ante p. 139. [Ibid. No. 184i.]
Nov. Lists sent by Morgan Lodge to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.:—
Vol. 318 No. Date. King's Outward. Inward. Wind. Remarks.
98 1 6 3 0 E.
99 3 5 3 0 E.
100 4 3 0 0 E. No ship yet to carry the packet directed to Sir T. Lynch at Jamaica.
101 6 3 1 0 E.
102 7 4 1 0 S.W.
103 8 6 2 0 N.W. Yesterday we heard from Dover that about 10 or 12 Dutch ships were near that place, and that several guns were heard, on which the King's ships in the Downs sailed, but could not see or hear of any ships, so to-day they are returned to the Downs.
104 10 8 14 0 N.W.
105 11 6 18 0 E.
106 12 5 16 0 S.
107 13 4 18 0 S.W.
108 14 5 18 0 S.W.
109 15 4 20 0 S.W
110 16 5 21 0 W.
111 17 8 31 0 S.W.
112 18 6 30 0 W. Last night the Cost and the Guinea Merchant arrived from Barbados. The last off the South Foreland met a privateer, and after two or three disputes left him with his master shot in the shoulder. The 5th of Oct. a hurricane put six laden shipsz` ashore, which were staved to pieces. The next day arrived Mr. Collier, Mr. Williams, and Mr. South, but not yet Lord Willoughby.
113 19 8 32 0 S.W.
114 21 8 34 0 S.W. Very stormy woather. I have still your packet for Sir T. Lynch, having had no opportunity to send it, and desire your order whether I shall keep it or return it.
115 22 9 36 0 S.W.
116 23 8 38 0 S.
117 24 9 47 0 S.W. Account of the fight between the St. Lucas and a caper identical with that in Watts' letter, calendared ante p. 201.
118 25 13 55 4
119 26 11 60 0 W.
120 28 14 66 0 S.W.
121 29 N.W. The same ships in the Downs as yesterday intending to sail to-day.
122 30 4 5 0 E. All the Yarmouth fleet passed by the back of the Sand to-day about 26 sail.