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Charles II: July 1673

Pages 414-473

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1673. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1902.

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July 1673

July 1. Sir C. Lyttelton to William Bridgeman. A commission being to be drawn for a chaplain for the Duke's regiment I asked his Royal Highness last night how the regiment should be styled, he being no longer Admiral. He went to the King about it, who then ordered that the commissions in future should be in the name of the Duke's or his Royal Highness' regiment. The chaplain's name is John Evans. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 72.]
July 1. Copy of the bills of mortality for the week ending that day, total christened 192, buried 269, whereof one was plague. By the Assize of Bread a penny wheaten loaf was to contain 10½ oz., and three half-penny white loaves the same weight. [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 73.]
[June] 31.
Tuesday 6 a.m. [July 1.] The Buoy of the Nore.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. Sir E. Spragg sent me intelligence last night that the enemy is gone for their own coast. If it be so, his Majesty, I doubt not, will then go on with the design of landing some men, in which I shall only recommend the choosing of good officers. Some time to-day I shall be able to give you an account of the truth of this news. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 74.]
July 1. Warrant to Sir W. Wylde and Sir W. Ellis, Justices of the Northern Circuit, to allow a full and legal trial to the prosecutors of Richard Calveley, if he is indicted for the murder of George Buckeley, but not to pass sentence on him, as the Justices of Lancashire report that he died rather from an imposthume, than from any wound given by the said Calveley. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 88.]
July 1. Warrant for a grant to William Looker, Gentleman Sewer in ordinary, of his house at Bushy Close, Hatfield, co. Herts., although it is built upon part of the footway, provided he, at his own cost, set out another path as near the former as possible. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 249.]
July 1. Warrant, after reciting that the Duke of York as Lord High Admiral had appointed Charles Wren, Thomas Holder, James Hoare, and Richard Brett, to receive and sell for his benefit the rights, duties, tenths, perquisites, &c. due to him during the war by virtue of his said office, and that by his resignation of that office the said rights and premises belonging to him as Lord High Admiral belong to the King, and that the King had determined to keep the same separate and distinct from all prizes, seizures, rights, &c. belonging to him in right of his Crown, for a commission to the said Wren, Hoare and Brett, and to Tobias, the brother of the said Thomas Holder, who desired to be excused thereof, during the said war and during the vacancy of the said office, to be commissioners for receiving all the rights, duties, tenths, perquisites, &c. that would have belonged to the said office had it been full, and to do all things relating to the premises as fully as the said commissioners were commissioned to do by the Duke when Lord High Admiral. [4½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 2.]
July 1.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to [Lord Arlington]. Some time ago I received his Majesty's approbation of Col. Jeffrys' being Constable of this Castle. The office was heretofore always disposed of by the Lord Lieutenant, but, as the fee belonging to it is left out of the present establishment I cannot grant it with fee without his Majesty's letter to annex such salary to it as shall be thought fit. By the establishment of 1629 the fee was 26l. 13s. 4d., and in the three other establishments of 1662, 1666 and 1669, 20l. per annum. There remains of the 3,135l. 7s. 9d. undisposed of on the new establishment only 35l. 7s. 9d., on which his Majesty may charge this fee. I enclose a draft letter for the purpose. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 1.]
June 2.
[July 2.] Wednesday, The Buoy of the Nore.
[Prince Rupert] to Lord [Arlington]. I do not at all doubt but that the Dutch are gone to sea. S.E. was the course they steered. This is confirmed by many masters of ships which saw them. We now stay for nothing but the taking in the last provisions, the last press for men, and fireships. Of the first 1 hope to have an account to-day, of the second to-morrow, and the last I expect hourly, when some of them will come down to us. I have satisfied most of the fleet in the choice I made of my captains, Reeves and Wetwang, and doubt not now but to put all things in better order, than ever they were before; this I beseech you to assure his Majesty of. My intention now is to get out to sea as soon as may be. What course to steer then, unless we see the enemy, I desire to be directed from his Majesty. As to the 19 companies you sent, I have taken them all into our ships. One company of the Duke of Albemarle's regiment, which are all seamen, Sir Walter Vane stopped, though the Duke desired it might go. They are all seamen. The captain's name is Kerry (Kelly). I beseech it may be sent without delay. We will send a whole company back in lieu of it. I shall add no more, expecting his Majesty's further commands. The chief officers here think best to have the Royal Charles to go along, she being a ship of great contenance, so I have unmanned the London Merchant to man her. If any more must be left I shall let his Majesty know by my next. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 75.]
July 2.
11 a.m. The Royal Sovereign, at the Buoy the Nore.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. Wind S.W. and by W. The recruits of the King's and Duke's regiments now on board are all come, or the most part of them, unless my Lord of Buckingham's regiment, and I am informed he intends none shall come, but that I am to recruit that regiment out of the new companies. I shall desire to know his Majesty's pleasure herein, and also whether such officers as come not on board to look after their commands shall not be pricked, Run. [Ibid. No. 76.]
July 2. The King to the Provost and Fellows of Queen's College, Oxford. Dispensing with the statute of their college whereby all fellows are to be divines, and at a time limited to perform their exercises and take their degrees, in favour of John Skelton, Henry Denton and Timothy Halton (the last of whom is now beyond seas as chaplain to the Ambassadors Extraordinary at Cologne), who on presumption of the customary dispensation have neglected to perform such exercises and take such degrees. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 175.]
July 2. The King to the Lord Mayor of London. As he understands, and has himself observed, how much the Thames both below and above Bridge is obstructed by banks of sand gravel and rubbish, which have greatly increased of late years and are already prejudicial, and, if not removed, will be ruinous to the trade of the city, recommending to his care the removing thereof, and the giving Lewis Bayly, who has patented an engine lately invented by him for cleansing and deepening navigable rivers, all encouragement to build an engine and carry on the work. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 113.]
July 2. Michael Stanyshe to Viscount Conway. I received your letter of the 28th about the quarters being divided into three parts, and then lots being cast, which should have been done to-day, but that our quarter sessions begin to-day, but it shall be done this week. Major Stroud is busy on an exchange betwixt him and Lieut. Tichburne for their employments. Tichburne has a great desire to live in Dublin, and the other as great to live out of it. I once moved your Lordship for my nephew to be your servant, which you did not deny nor promise me. If he be not fit for you, he may be to ride in your troop. [Conway Papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 2.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the petition of Wentworth, Earl of Roscommon, calendared ante, p. 379, directing commissions to be issued to inquire into the King's title to any lands that belonged to Bartholomew Dillon, mentioned in the said petition, and were comprised in the settlement therein mentioned, and, if on the return thereof any title appear to be in the Crown, a grant thereof to be passed to the said Earl of Roscommon with a confirmation of the interest he had in the said remainder. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 461.]
July 3.
Blackheath.
Sir Lionel Walden to Williamson. Thanking him for his great favours and kindnesses to his son, requesting that he may be furnished with whatever he wants, and promising to repay the cost thereof, and begging that he may be employed if there is any business he is capable of. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 77.]
July 3.
Letter Office, London.
James Hickes to Williamson. I hope mine with Sir John Robinson and Sir Thomas Player, our noble stewards', ticket came safe. Last Monday they met with at least fourscore of the noble society, Brethren of the Bow, and treated them nobly at Mr. Pead's, the city cook in New King Street. At which time and before their choice of new stewards, you were often remembered by drinking your health, and, the time come, with accustomed trophies and ceremony they drank to you for succeeding steward, and Sir J. Robinson delivered me the cup, cap, and arrow to answer for you, which I dared not refuse, but received with all respect, yet hope for your safe return to appear and join next year with Sir J. Sheldon, chosen your brother steward by Sir T. Player, all which was done to the great content of the whole company. By command of the old stewards I have deposited 20s. for you towards plate for the target, which is to be shot at next Monday. Mr. Maddox, a hearty and good archer of Clerkenwell, is to shoot for you. After that day I shall give you an account. I present you with the most kind and affectionate respects of all the Brethren of the Bow. [Ibid. No. 78.]
Thursday,
July 3. 9 a.m. Buoy of the Nore.
[Prince Rupert] to Lord [Arlington]. I received yours by this bearer. As for our readiness here to sail 'twill be, I hope, in a few days, staying for nothing now but our fireships which are to come down to-day. If his Majesty has any design for 4,000 men to land, he must tell us what we shall do. You may assure him that my opinion is to go out as soon and as strong as we can and to fight the enemy's fleet, if they be at sea, and this is the opinion of most in the fleet. If he will give me any further commands I shall most humbly receive them, but desire with all duty they may be in writing. The 200 masters of ships which were to be pressed are not yet come in. Mr. Pepys assured me to send away all our small craft, but neither they, nor the Duke of Buckingham's recruits are heard of, only by Lord Widdrington I understand that these lat[t]er were a training at Barnet every day, and that some of his officers could not get leave to come on board. The Duke sent to some ships to demand his colours and drums. Some have refused them, but, if any out of ignorance had granted such a thing, I beseech you to consider how I am to behave myself with this Lieut.-General. [Holograph. 2 pages. Ibid. No. 79.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Thomas, Lord Clifford, late Lord Treasurer, of all treasons, rebellions, felonies, negligences or other misdemeanours whatsoever done before June 30, 1673, whether he be already indicted or impeached of the same or not, and of all judgments, attainders, outlawries &c., by reason of the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 259.]
July 3.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Kincardine to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. The Duke of Lauderdale, having received your letter of 24 June last Monday just as he was going for the Bath, commanded me to show it to the King, and to send you his answer. For the first part concerning the condition of the Treasury, his Majesty said he was sorry it was so low, and that there is no remedy but to be good husbands till the war be over. For what concerns the vassals of the Dukedom of Lenox, he thinks that if the passing of signatours in the Exchequer import the uniting of the superiorities of that estate inseparably from the Crown, he is not willing they should pass in Exchequer, but that a commission should be granted by him, as heir to the Duke of Lenox, to the Treasury Commissioners to grant charters to the vassals, and if you think this way fit, that a commission may accordingly be sent ready for his Majesty's hand, or that you propose what other expedient may be fittest. On this occasion his Majesty told me that he had promised the estate of the Duke of Lenox in Scotland to the Duchess Dowager of the last Duke during her life, and desired that a signatour might be made ready for his hand to that effect. The Duchess is now out of town, but will return before next post, and, after I have spoken with her concerning it, I shall write more fully to you. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 230.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of the merchants trading to Portugal, which set forth that, though his Majesty lately recommended to the Prince Regent of Portugal the just grievances of the petitioners, insisting on the prevention of the like for the future and that the articles of peace should be printed and published and inviolably kept, the Prince, 12 May last, ordered two corrigidoros to seize the books and search the houses of three factors residing at Lisbon without giving any account of the cause thereof, contrary to law and their usage to other nations, to the great terror of all his Majesty's subjects trading thither, who under such illegal proceedings can be safe in neither their persons nor estates, and prayed such redress as his Majesty should think convenient:—that Lord Arlington prepare a letter for the King's signature to the Prince Regent representing the said grievances, and that his Majesty expects the same to be speedily redressed as contrary to the peace, and tending to the subversion of the trade between the two Crowns, and that care be taken to prevent like occasions of complaint for the future, and that Lord Arlington should also make representations to the Portuguese Ambassador. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 80.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of William Davies and other merchants of Bristol, owners of the Unity and her lading, which set forth that the said ship on her voyage from Nevis was, in latitude 44°, 17 May last surprised by the Seven Brothers, a caper of Zealand, whose commander endeavoured to carry her to the Gorina (Groyne) in Spain, but being closely pursued by a French man-of-war he could not secure the prize, and therefore resolved to burn her, but, on the entreaty of the master, forbore it, and gave up the ship and lading to the master, taking out all the Dutch and putting the master and crew in possession of her, who put up the English colours; and that about two hours afterwards the French man-of-war sent two boats on board with 60 men, and having pillaged her of a considerable quantity of goods and abused the seamen, sent her into the Gorina, keeping the master and mariners prisoners two days, till the English Consul procured some officers from the Gorina to fetch the master ashore, but the ship and lading are still detained by the French commander; and prayed that his Majesty would interpose for the petitioners' relief and that the said ship and lading, being in the master's possession when taken, might be restored with what was pillaged:— that Lord Arlington represent the petitioners' case to the French ambassador and effectually move him to procure the restitution of the said ship and goods, in consideration of his Majesty having on all occasions been ready to comply with desires of the like nature made on behalf of French subjects, though their ships have been taken in the actual possession of the enemy. Noted at foot,
Lord Arlington in prosecution of this order wrote to Monsr. Colbert and sent him a copy of this order in French, but the petitioners have found no effect from the said letter, but the ship still remains at the Gorina, running the hazard of being seized by the Spaniards as brought in by the French, and that the petitioners humbly desire that his Lordship would write another letter reinforcing the former, and earnestly press for the restitution of the said ship and goods as truly belonging to Englishmen without delay. [2 pages. Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, Nos. 81, 82.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I have seen the account your Excellencies have both sent Lord Arlington, and you will receive from him his Majesty's directions upon it, and I think little or nothing different from your former. Whether the States will by this war obtain the title of valiant, I know not, but by their fashion of treaty they seem very stout, and, if they could resist bullets as easily as they can reason, their towns would need neither drowning nor fortifying. All I can say on this point is, our Master will make but a bad figure in this war, if, when France, Cologne, Münster, Neuburg, Brandenburg, &c., must all have town or towns, England must be content with the flap of a flag, and that due to us before by prescription and treaty. But I hope, when the Prince has been some weeks at sea, they will speak lower. Our fleet is ready to go out, 15 or 16 good ships stronger than it was, and our Straits fleet under Capt. Le Neve arrived safe last night in the Downs, where he took pilots immediately, and sailed for the River, where we doubt not but they now are. They are richly laden, one ship brings 8,000 pieces of eight, and, besides the money (never unwelcome), there will be a recruit of seven or eight hundred good seamen for the Prince. By a disorderly riot the other day in the playhouse, Lord Buckhurst, Capt. Buckley, and the Governor of Dover happened to be hurt, but none are in any danger, and the offenders are seized. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 83.]
July 4.
London.
Alderman Edward Backwell to Williamson. I am sorry I cannot acquaint you with such good news as Mr. Lloyd, for I have not yet received any of the money on your first embassy to Holland. I have indeed tallies delivered me on the customs, which are not yet due, for trade is so bad, and so little money now comes in at the Custom house, that I know not when it will come to be paid. However, if Mr. Lloyd does not discharge the bill of 368l. you have drawn, I will accept it for your honour. We want fat Wilks here, and by reason of his absence, I cannot now turn on the left hand as formerly. [Ibid. No. 84.]
July 4.
London.
Rene Petit to Williamson. Enclosing a copy of a letter of Mademoiselle de Queroualle in favour of Messrs. Richard Wescomb, Nicholas Warren and George Torriano, of which he will bring the original when he comes himself, and soliciting his favour and protection in their business. [French. 2 pages. Ibid. No. 85.] Enclosed,
Mademoiselle de Queroualle to Williamson. Recommending this gentleman (Petit) and the business he is going to pursue, in the success of which the King has been willing she should take some interest, wherefore she hopes Williamson will endeavour to effect it, either by ordinary ways or, if necessary, by some secret article. 1 July. [French. Copy. 1½ page. Ibid. No. 85 I.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 83.) [4 pages. Ibid. No. 86.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 86.) [8 pages. Ibid. No. 87.] Enclosed,
Daniel Fleming to Williamson. Congratulating him on his Majesty's great favour to him and praying heartily for his health and good success in his great employment, and that he may soon return with honour and safety to his native country. 29 June, Rydal. [Ibid. No. 87i.]
Inland advices received 2 and 4 July. Plymouth, 29 June.—The Dartmouth with the Virginia merchantmen went to sea, but were put back by ill weather, and yesterday they sailed again westward. The Richmond is still here waiting an order to clean. Portsmouth, 1 July.—Yesterday came to Spithead from the eastward the Success, said to be bound westward to convoy some Virginia ships. Southwold, 30 June.—Yesterday we discovered about 15 of the Dutch S.E. of this, plying to windward with the wind S. This morning four ketches belonging to the English fleet were plying southward, the wind S.W., five of the Dutch fleet being then in sight, two of which of about 12 guns apiece bore down to them. Several guns passed between them, and our ketches bore up towards Yarmouth, and the Dutch tacked eastward. Lynn, 30 June.—32 seamen have been pressed here and sent to the fleet. The Deptford ketch went hence last Friday, with about 40 light colliers. Whitby, 29 June.—Yesterday three capers forced under our guns the light fleet from Lynn of between 50 and 60 sail, which stayed at least eight hours and at night sailed for Newcastle and Sunderland. These capers have taken five vessels, and several of our fisher-boats. Newcastle, 28 June. —Nearly 100 small laden colliers are now in port bound for London and other ports, which dare not venture to sea without convoy. Plymouth, 1 July.—Part of the Straits fleet is now in this harbour. A captain of one of the frigates is come ashore. In the meantime the frigate keeps under sail with the whole fleet, being about 30 in sight till the captain returns, so it is thought they will not stop but go directly forward. Portsmouth, 3 July.—The Success is still at Spithead and will sail towards the fleet to-day. Deal, 3 July.—Yesterday came into the Downs five Virginia ships with the Edward and James man-of-war, and to-day the Plymouth, Phœnix and Dover with the Straits fleet. Newcastle, 30 June.—Our coal fleet is still in port. I had advice yesterday from Holy Island that our two Russia ships which wintered at Archangel are arrived in Scate (? Leith) Road. Bridlington, 30 June.—The capers are very busy again on our coast, and have taken several colliers. Southwold, 2 July.—About 9 last night anchored about two leagues eastward of this 11 Dutch men-of-war, and this morning about 4 weighed and stood off to sea. Aldeburgh, 3 July.—This coast has been much troubled by the Dutch since they came over, and they have put us in much fear. Yesternight they were seen standing towards this town, and to-day they are gone off again. Harwich, 30 June.—About 2 or 3 yesterday afternoon it cleared up, and we plainly discovered the Dutch fleet to be gone, the haziness having wrapt them up from the 25th to the 29th, which way they stood we could not learn for want of vessels to send out. I was informed last night that from our beacon were seen one or two, as they judged, of his Majesty's frigates, which came down as low as the Gunfleet, but I can discern only one at anchor to-day. Some vessels are going hence to the fleet, which were kept in during the Dutch lying before us. Wind continues S.W. Harwich, 1 July.—About 3 yesterday afternoon sailed hence the Barbabella ketch towards the place where the Dutch lay at anchor, and so beyond Bardsey Sand. From his topmast he could make no discovery of them, and with this account is gone with some other vessels to the fleet. But this morning one of our packet-boats come from Yarmouth, where he was forced to put in by ill weather, says he yesterday not far from Aldeburgh met 13 Dutch men-of-war, and that the whole Dutch fleet was off Orford Ness. About 11 this morning from the Beacon Hill we saw 12 or 13 Dutch men-of-war off Bardsey Sand. The Barbabella ketch is returned, not thinking it safe to venture about by the Sledway. Harwich, 2 July.—To-day our packet-boat is come in. About 8 in the morning he was called on board a Dutch man-of-war near Aldeburgh Bay, where were nine more men-of-war. They having examined him let him pass, saying their whole fleet was not far off. Harwich, 3 July.—Yesterday evening at the Beacon I saw two ships of good force standing out of the sea and turning up. They sailed very near the lower end of the Gunfleet, when suddenly they tacked about, and stood off the way they came. Upon this tack we judged them to be of the Dutch fleet, which we guess may be near the Galloper, for they stood that way. The wind is southerly, borrowing a point of the west. [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 87ii.]
Friday,
July 4. The Buoy of the Nore.
[Prince Rupert] to Lord [Arlington]. I received this morning intelligence from our two frigates, which I sent out to find out the enemy's fleet, that they left them at anchor in the Wielings, upon which I called our flag officers together, and asked their opinion which way we had best to steer to get them out of that hole. We all were of opinion in fine that we should sail directly to our station in sight of their fleet or the land there, and, if they stir not, as doubtless they will not, we having the wind, that then we are to sail for the Texel or Maes. If this concur with his Majesty's opinion or design of landing I beseech you to let me know his pleasure. Now Le Neve in the Plymouth is come, I hope we shall be reasonably manned. I have sent Vice-Admiral Kempthorne to bring away all the fireships in the River, whether ready or not, and on Sunday hope to be ready to set sail. If his Majesty intends a landing, it will be necessary the officer which shall command the party and myself may speak about it for the better adjusting of that design. I beseech that all our officers may be sent to the fleet. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 88.]
July 4.
The Royal Sovereign, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. Requesting him to assist the bearer to procure payment or a Privy Seal for a debt of 14,980 livres due from his Majesty to Monsr. de Burgues, for money disbursed in specie, for which his Majesty gave a warrant at Paris, dated 2 June, 1654, for payment out of the pension due to him from the French King for 1652, but of which nothing has been paid. [Ibid. No. 89.]
July 4.
The Royal Charles.
Lord Widdrington to the Earl of Arlington. I found the Prince very well, and all the French ships come out of the Swale except Monsr. Martell's. The Prince is impatient for the ten fireships that lie in the River which is now his only stay. I have horses at London to send over to my son in France. If there be occasion for a pass for them I beg you will obtain one. [Ibid. No. 90.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Dean of Windsor to admit Benjamin Poole, who served the late and present Kings in all their wars since 1642, and is now a soldier in the Horse Guards, as a poor Knight of Windsor, in the room of Francis Harris, deceased. [Ibid. No. 91.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Commission to Prince Rupert to be general of all the forces employed in the present expedition against the United Provinces, with power to knight such as shall deserve the honour by eminent merit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 70.]
Copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 92.]
July 4. Commission to Monsieur S[c]homberg to be lieut.-general to Prince Rupert, in the same form as that to the Duke of Buckingham of 13 May previous (calendared ante, p. 243) except that mention of the Duke of York is left out. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 69.]
July 4. Warrant to Col. John Strode, Lieut.-Governor of Dover Castle, for impressing within the liberties of the Cinque Ports and their members able seamen, and for sending them to Dover or Rye, to be transported thence to the fleet. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 8.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
Order in Council upon the letter of the Lord Lieutenant of 12 May (calendared ante, p. 240), that Lord Arlington should signify his Majesty's pleasure to the Lord Lieutenant and Council that they make use of such expedients as they think most proper for furnishing that kingdom with the farthings coined here, and should also transmit the late proclamation for making current his Majesty's copper farthings and halfpence to be likewise published when they shall find it seasonable, with such alterations and additions as they shall judge necessary. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 3.]
July 4.
Dublin.
— O'Neill to Viscount Conway. I have deferred my journey two days to have the honour to kiss your hands before leaving, and to beg you to make no longer lease of the lot in co. Leitrim, without first giving notice to my brother Phelim or myself. [Conway Papers. Ibid. No. 4.]
July 4.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting letters of Charles I., dated 20 April, 1635, signifying his pleasure to give to the clergy in Ireland all the impropriations then in the Crown, the King's letters of 20 Nov., 1660, granting that all appropriate rectories, vicarages and tithes in Ireland then in possession of the Crown, and the reversions of such of them as were then in lease, and also all such rectories, vicarages and tithes as were vested in the Crown by the attainder of any persons convicted of rebellion who were not to be restored to their former estates should be conferred on the present incumbents of the churches to which the same belonged, to be held by them and their successors for ever, clause 107 of the Act of Settlement, clause 28 of the Act of Explanation, and that doubts have nevertheless arisen whether the reversions of any impropriations or appropriate tithes as were in the late King, 23 Oct., 1641, in right of his Crown, were intended to be granted to the said incumbents after the expiration of such leases thereof as were then in being, as well as the interest of any such impropriations or appropriate tithes as was forfeited to the Crown by the said Act, and therefore declaring the King's will and intentions to be that as well the reversions of all impropriations and appropriate tithes, whereof there is any lease in being now unforfeited, as the present possession of all such impropriations and appropriate tithes whereof there is no unforfeited lease in being, whereof he is either seised in right of the Crown, or which by any forfeiture, attainder, or by either of the said Acts were vested in him, or which hereafter have been purchased or given to the use of the Church, shall be granted to the incumbents of the respective parishes where the same do arise and their successors for ever (such a proportion thereof as by the Lord Lieutenant and Council before 1 Jan., 1664[5], has been ordered to be settled on the vicars and quiremen of each cathedral as an additional provision for their maintenance, and has or shall within one year of the date hereof be accordingly settled on them only excepted), and directing the Lord Lieutenant to advise with the King's Counsel of Ireland concerning the manner whereby these instructions may take effect, and accordingly to cause letters patent to be passed of all such impropriations and appropriate tithes and of the reversions and remainders of them as by any of the aforesaid letters or Acts or by the present letters were granted or intended to be granted to the said several incumbents, as amply as if every such particular impropriation, rectory, vicarage, or portion of tithes were named in the present letters, the said letters patent to be passed either to the said incumbents and their successors or to trustees for them as he shall think fit, reserving thereout the ancient rents formerly reserved for the same, with such increase thereof as by him or others the Chief Governors for the time being with six or more of the Council shall be thought reasonable. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 464.]
July 5.
Whitehall, Treasury Chamber.
Warrant from the Lord Treasurer to the Commissioners of Customs for admitting 171 barrels of copper blanks from Sweden for making farthings and halfpence, duty free. [S. P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 93.]
July 5.
The Buoy of the Nore.
[Prince Rupert] to Lord [Arlington]. Lord Ossory let me know your thoughts concerning Sir W. Reeves' petition to his Majesty. He would not have troubled his Majesty with it had he not been very well assured that no man's life was joined to the person who holds the office at present. If it appear to be so, his and my request is only to look on him as a person deserving the justice to be first served. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 94.]
July 5.
Deal.
List of the ships in the Downs, viz., two outward bound. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 95.]
July 5. Commission to Walter Long to be captain of the company whereof Sheldon was captain, in Lord Mulgrave's regiment. Minute. [S. P Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 69.]
July 5. Commission to Francis Williamson to be lieutenant to Capt. Buckley in the same regiment. [Ibid.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant of protection to Randolph Poulson, employed on the King's special affairs, against arrest or hindrance. [S. P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 251.]
July 5. Warrant for a confirmation to Sir William Kerre and his heirs of certain pasture lands, &c. in Northumberland, granted by King James to Sir George Ramsey and Thomas Lumsden, at the rent of one good hare hound at Michaelmas, which lands &c. are now by several conveyances vested in the said Sir William Kerre, at the rent of 6s. 8d. with a covenant for his endeavouring a recovery of the said land within 10 years. [S. P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 253.]
July 5. The King to William Chiffinch. He is to offer his Majesty no warrants for the killing of deer in Kingswood Forest, co. Gloucester, for one whole year, nor afterwards, till the king signify his pleasure, after having first heard Sir Baynham Throckmorton, to whom it has been leased for 60 years. [Ibid. p. 255.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of William Innes on behalf of Nicholas Reeve, who freighted the Bull, now lying at Newcastle, with goods on the petitioner's account, desiring that he may pay only denizen's duties. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 74.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Reference to Sir Robert Wiseman of the petition of John Warren desiring a lease of some small cottages and tenements at Great Marlow, which belonged to Anne Atkins, administratrix of Richard Atkins, deceased. [Ibid. p. 75.]
July 5. Grant of licence to Gilbert Peterson to fish in any part of the high seas, and to carry into Holland any fish he may take. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 72.]
July 5. Reprieve to John Booth, clerk, of Bothell, Northumberland, if condemned for diminishing the coin. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 5. Warrant to the Treasurer of the Household to pay to the Gentlemen of the Chapter Royal 20l. in lieu of three deer customarily allowed them every year. [Ibid. p. 73, and Entry Book 21, p. 125.]
July 5. Licence to John Dancer to print a description of the camp at Blackheath with engravings, with a prohibition to all others of setting forth the same to Dancer's prejudice. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 73.]
July 5. Pass and safe conduct to Johannes Sebennico, an Italian, Master for eight years of his Majesty's Italian music, who desires to return to his own country. [Ibid.]
July 5. Appointment of the Earl of Exeter as Lord Lieutenant of the East division of the county of Northampton, and of the Earl of Peterborough of the West division thereof, instead of their being joint Lord Lieutenants of the whole county. [Ibid. p. 74, and Entry Book 21, p. 125.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Commission to Alexander, Earl of Dumfermline, and his deputies to call, convene and pursue the late collectors of shires, stewardries, regalities and presbyteries in Scotland or their deputies, subcollectors, and intromitters with any public moneys, cess, maintenance, levies of horse and foot, ammunition, forty days long, incident charges, twenty penny, tenth penny, tenth of tenth penny, meal, tax and loan, and all other burdens and impositions whatsoever exacted by them under whatsoever name from 1639 to May, 1660, (except the year 1648, contained in a former commission), as also to uplift what shall be found due by the Justices of Peace, their clerks, collectors, &c. who are to refund to the said Earl and his deputies all sums exacted by them without order, uplifted, uncompted for or undischarged, and to obtain sentences and decreets in the premises before any lawful judicatory, and to cause the same to be put in due execution, and to grant discharges for such sums as shall be descerned or componed for by the said Earl and his foresaids, which said sums so received are to remain in the hands of the said Earl and his foresaids till his Majesty's further order, with a proviso that this commission or anything to follow thereon shall not prejudge any person of the benefit of the Act of Indemnity or of any other Act passed since the beginning of the last Parliament, and particularly of two Acts made 12 July, 1661, the one in favour of the deceased Sir Alexander Durham of Largoe, and Sir John Weems of Bogie, and the other in favour of the said Sir Alexander and Sir John Smith of Grothill, and with a further proviso that neither the said Earl nor his deputies shall have any power by this commission to levy or exact any money from the country, but only from the collectors, &c. aforesaid. [Nearly 2 pages. Docquet. S. P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 231.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a confirmation under the Privy Seal of Scotland of the discharge of 6 Sept., 1670, granted by Charles, Earl of Dumferline, deceased, to William Gray of Haystoun, his servants and others who intromitted with public moneys by virtue of any warrant from him or any in his name, of all receipt and intromission had by them with any public moneys, cess, maintenance, and all other public impositions in Forfarshire under whatsoever name or title by the late pretended public orders or acts. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 232.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter of remission to William Gray of Haystoun, his servants, and others who had any warrant from him, of all intromissions, commissions, and omissions done by them in relation to the cess, maintenance and other public moneys above-mentioned, received by him and them in Forfarshire from 1639 to 1660. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 233.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland, after reciting that the Duke of Lauderdale on the demission of Alexander, late Archbishop of Glasgow, did, by the King's warrant, assure him that an annuity of 300l. sterling out of the rents of the Archbishopric should be settled on him for his life, and that the continuance of the payment of the said annuity out of the said rents will be too great a burden for the present Archbishop, requiring them to pay to the said Alexander so much as remains unpaid of the said annuity out of the said rents since his demission, and also what shall be due to him yearly in future, till course be taken for payment of the annuity some other way. [Ibid. p. 234.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. At the request of the Earl of Midleton, Governor of Tangier, that his yearly pension of 1,000l. sterling may be divided equally between him and his eldest son, Charles, Lord Clermont, directing them to pay only 500l. yearly to the said Earl, and the remaining 500l. yearly to the said Lord Clermont. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 235.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of a yearly pension of 500l. sterling to Charles, Lord Clermont, the first half-yearly payment to be made next Martinmas. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 236.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to David Hay, M.D., in liferent and to — Hay his son, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Kinminty and Corsgildie and divers other lands, all in the barony of Delgetie, parochine of Turreff and sheriffdom of Aberdeen, on the resignation of the said David Hay, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxtward. [Docquet. Ibid.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to William Burgh in the Weymes in life rent and to David, his eldest son, his heirs and assigns in fee (under reversion to William Scott elder and younger of Ardrosse, conform to an above-mentioned contract of wadset), of all the East half of the lands of Newtowne of Riers in Fifeshire, proceeding on the resignation of the said William Scott, elder and younger, and of William Nairne of Kirkhill. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 237.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protections in the ordinary form to William Scott, the elder, and William Scott, the younger, both of Ardrosse, for three years respectively. [Ibid. p. 238.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
Memorial of a protection in the ordinary form to Sir Andrew Murray for two years. [Ibid. p. 239.]
July 5. Michael Stannyshe to Viscount Conway. I have spoken to-day with the officers for enlarging their quarters. I thought it not convenient to alter anything of their former lists by reason of the accounts hitherto contracted with their landlords, but have given them an additional supply out of those appointed for the fourth troop. They were so well satisfied that they engaged me to present you with their thanks for your great care and favour to them, and declared that no troops in Ireland were better accommodated. [Conway Papers. S. P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 5.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a lease to Lord Aungier of the lands of Kilcowan and other lands in co. Wexford, comprised in a lease for 31 years from 20 Dec., 1638 to Joshua Carpenter, which lands are withheld or concealed, having been by the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation disposed of to soldiers and others (who ought only to be satisfied out of forfeited lands), and also of the lands of Aghamanagh and Ballynackelly, parish of Hacketstowne, barony of Ballynecor, and the lands of Glenlurgan, all in co. Wicklow, comprised in a reversionary lease for 51 years to Sir Laurence Edmond dated 10 June, 1619, which lease is now very near expired, for 99 years to commence from the date of this warrant and the expiration of the several estates remaining in the premises or any part thereof, at such rents as are reserved on Adventurers or Soldiers for other lands in the same province. [3 pages. S. P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 467.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Col. John Jefferies of the office of Constable of Dublin Castle, to be held by him quam diu se bene gesserit, with a yearly salary of 35l. 7s. 9d. sterling. [Ibid. p. 471.]
July 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for issuing commissions of inquiry into the king's title to the lands of Killeane, Milltown, Streamstown &c. and the woods of Galdrosse and Clownebrowne, all in the barony of Eglish in the King's County, alleged to have been wrongfully detained by Nicholas Herbert deceased, and for a grant of any of the premises to which the King may prove to be entitled to George, Viscount Grandison, and Edward Villiers in fee simple at the yearly quit-rent of 3d. for every English acre profitable lands. [Ibid. p. 473.]
Sunday,
July 6. 10 a.m. The Buoy of the Nore.
[Prince Rupert] to Lord [Arlington]. Our fireships being in sight we shall all, but one ship of the French, be ready to set sail Tuesday morning, which by God's grace I intend. You will do me the favour to acquaint his Majesty with it, desiring him, if there be no other design thought on than the best way to engage the enemy's fleet, either to give me his positive directions or else leave the way of it to my management, for give me leave only to say and I beseech you to consider in what troubled condition I am left, when either I must undertake (if his Majesty's opinion differ from mine) things against it or mine own judgment. If he should resolve to land men, before we go to the Dutch coasts, I am confident [it] could not well be executed these 14 days at least, and in the discipline his new men are in at present, it would be as bold an attempt to embark them [as] to land them on the enemy's shore. It must be also remembered that we are spending already on our two months' victuals, but in all this I know my duty is to do what his Majesty directs. Capt. Le Neve being now come to the fleet, to keep both him and his men I have sent Capt. Iong (Young) to command all those frigates we leave behind, which may serve to convoy what foot you send us, and what will be necessary for us to have come to us, he being a diligent and a knowing old commander and a seaman, and have put Capt. Le Neve into the Edgar. I have also changed the captains of the Swallow and Phœnix, by which the Swallow is ready with a good brave captain to go to sea; in this I hope I shall [not] displease his Majesty. [Holograph. S. P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 96.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 90, where p. 91, line 3, "each" should be "such" and line 19, "officer's," "officers'.") [4 pages. Ibid. No. 97.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 92, where p. 93, line 6 "Ellison, Friday" should be "Ellis on Friday," and p. 95, line 2 after "all" should be added, "for they now say he (the Duke of Monmouth) shall be the other lieut.-general, and then the Duke (of Buckingham) will not go at all.") [8 pages. Ibid. No. 98.]
July 7. Inland advices received that day. Weymouth, 5 July.—Last Wednesday passed by a fleet of 40 sail, supposed to be the Straits fleet. Newcastle, 4 July.—The 2nd the two Russia ships came into the river where they met the Guinea. They sailed yesterday together for London. The rest of the ships and ketches with pressed men are still here. Falmouth, 5 July.—Our ships pass daily to and fro without the least molestation. Whitby, 3 July.— Last Monday came hither the Guinea. She took a small caper of one gun and 12 men, near this road. The capers however are very busy all along the coast. Portsmouth, 6 July.—The Success sailed yesterday to the fleet. The Mermaid may be ready to follow in three or four days. Plymouth, 4 July.—Two ships from Jamaica and one from Nevis are arrived here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 99.]
July 8.
8 a.m. The Royal Sovereign, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Since your departure hence I have received intelligence out of Holland that the Dutch East India fleet is supposed to be arrived in the Texel, though not positively believed, but, if true, I may justly suspect that their seven ships being sent out may be there, which I desire you to acquaint his Majesty with and leave it to his consideration. I find by my new commission that the enrolment thereof is necessary, so I desire you to give order that it may be done accordingly. [Ibid. No. 100.]
July 8. Commission to Thomas Barbour to be ensign in Lord Mulgrave's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a., f. 69.]
July 8. Commission to Joseph Echell to be chirurgeon to Lord Widdrington's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. f. 74.]
July 8. Commission to Luke Lilingston to be ensign to Lieut.-Col. Lilingston in Lord Mulgrave's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 8. Commissions to Martin Fenwick and Anthony Maney, to be cornets respectively of the troops of dragoons whereof Edward Talbot and Lieut.-Col. Sir John Talbot are captains in Prince Rupert's regiment. Minutes. [Ibid.]
July 8. Commissions to Charles Kirke to be cornet to Lord Frescheville's troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 8. Commission to John Richardson to be ensign to the Earl of Mulgrave's own company. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 8. Commission to Theobald Fitzpatrick to be ensign to Thomas [Thornton's] company in Lord Mulgrave's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 8. Commissions to Philip Browne, John Evans, John Greenhill and Stephen Dockwray to be chaplains respectively to the regiments of the Duke of Albemarle, his Royal Highness, the Earl of Northampton, and the Earl of Ogle. Minutes. [Ibid.]
July 8. Commission to William Coombes to be adjutant to the Earl of Peterborough's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 8. Commission to William Strother to be captain of the company whereof—Hagge[r]ston was captain in the Earl of Ogle's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 74.]
July 8. Commission to — Lumley to be lieutenant to Capt. William Tempest's company in the Earl of Ogle's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 8. Commission to Edward Beaver to be chaplain to the Earl of Carlisle's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. f. 76.]
July 8.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. Concerning the disputes and differences among the citizens of Dublin. (Printed in Camden, Essex, Vol. I. p. 92, where p. 94, line 17, "greatness" should be "great increase" and there are a few other differences.) Col. Hamilton's letter is still on my hands. I hope by the next to return a perfect account of all the particulars comprised in that grant, that so his Majesty may renew all or such of them as he shall think reasonable. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 6.] Annexed,
Paper by the Lord Lieutenant giving an account of the whole matter of the election of the Common Council men of Dublin. (Printed in Camden, Essex, Vol. I. p. 95, where line 5, "chosen to be of the said City" should be, "chosen to be of the Common Council of the said City" and there are a few other differences.) [3½ pages. Ibid. No. 6I.]
July 9. The King to the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury. Dr. Kingsley, late archdeacon and prebendary of Canterbury and his eldest son George were persons of great loyalty and suffered much during the late rebellion, the former being imprisoned and sequestered, and the latter forced to pay 800l. for serving the late king as chaplain during the war. The archdeacon held a house in the precincts of Canterbury cathedral by a lease which is now lapsed to them, and cannot be renewed without the King's dispensation. He therefore requires them to make a new lease to William, grandson of the archdeacon, and only son of George Kingsley, on a moderate fine, any statutes to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 48.]
July 9.
Thomas Court.
Thomas Worsopp to Viscount Conway. Sending him a hawk, a present fit for a prince. [Conway Papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 7.]
July 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a prize ship belonging to Randolph Poulson to come from Holland to England with free and unprohibited goods. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 252.]
July 10. Warrant granting to the younger son and the daughters of Col. Henry Sandys, killed in the King's service, the precedence they would have enjoyed had their father succeeded to the title of Lord Sandys of the Vine. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 75.]
July 10. Lord Berkeley of Stratton to Lord [Arlington]. This evening I received your letter, signifying his Majesty's pleasure that I should resign my patent for the Presidency of Connaught, as he is informed that many inconveniencies arise by reason that it is in being. First, let me present to you, and through you to his Majesty, that the Court being taken away, I cannot imagine how my patent can be of the least inconveniency to proceedings in law. Secondly, his Majesty having continued to me for my life the pension and the rents in Connaught I shall have nothing whereby to demand either the one or the other, which I hope it is not his Majesty's intention I should lose, and the rather, because some days before my recall I disbanded my own troop without any recompense, which others disbanded at the same time obtained. Nevertheless I shall be ready to lay it down on the assurance of the same sums to be paid me during my life that were due to me on account of my patent. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 8.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 96. Parts in cipher deciphered are:—Count Shomberge will command as Captain General under the Prince so that I question whether the Duke Buckingham being but Lieutenant General will goe this expedition. The King gives the Count two blank Commission[s] to make whom he will major General upon the place. . . . . . The sincerity of the French in observing their present treaty with the King which the King of France dividing his army after the takeing of Mastricht confirms them much in. ) [2¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 101.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 98, where 3 lines from bottom "Dashwood, Vincent Bostocke, and partners" should be "Dashwood, Vincent, Bostocke, and partners.") [8 pages. Ibid. No. 102.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 101.) [4 pages. Ibid. No. 103.]
July 11.
11 p.m. Whitehall.
John Richards to Williamson. I acknowledge two letters from you of June 24/July 2, [June] 27/[July] 7, and enclose a particular of those his lordship received from you of those dates and a later of the 1/11 instant. His lordship's own letter has prevented my acquainting you with the condition of our fleet. To-morrow the King goes to Blackheath to hasten all the land forces on board, and on Monday for Gravesend to see all complete thereabouts. Just now comes in news that the Dutch fleet is out again, which will set all things forward as much as possible. [Ibid. No. 104.]
July 11.
London.
William Everard to Williamson. Finding by the postscript of a letter from Mr. Thomas Williamson that you are concerned for a small misadventure here, I presume to present the particulars. An unhappy woman sometimes heretofore using your house, whom nevertheless I have never seen there since your departure, came one midday into Scotland Yard on pretence to gather some chips and shavings. Finding the coach house door open, Mr. Surveyor's servant having so left it, she went in and untowardly rent out some of the lining of your coach. It was soon missed, and she suspected, and I presently made pursuit to the discovery thereof. She persisted in denying and excusing the matter, but I acquainted those in Scotland Yard with the fact, whence she has been wholly excluded ever since. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 105.]
July 11.
9 a.m. The Buoy of the Nore.
[Prince Rupert] to Lord [Arlington]. I doubt not but you understood from his Majesty how that it was resolved at a Council of War the day after you went hence, that, since his Majesty would have us stay for the men that were a shipping, we should stay in this harbour with the whole fleet, rather than expose ourselves to the mercy of the wind and weather abroad. Now there is some whispering in the fleet and some intelligence from a French sloop from Dunkirk that the Dutch are gone to sea. I sent the Pearl and Nightingale two days ago and to-day the Yarmouth and Success for to know the truth. My humble desire is that you will send me his Majesty's positive commands whether, if the Dutch be out, we shall stay in harbour for any of those ships for the transportation, or if we shall take them with us in case they be ready. For this answer I only shall stay, being now ready to sail with all the ships here on the first opportunity. If the Dutch fleet be out, it is certainly to cover their East India fleet, and to bring them into a safe port. I beseech your answer to this with speed. I must add that Sir E. Spragge assured me he had dissuaded the King from attempting any landing till the Hollanders were beaten, and that it was his Royal Highness' sense also. You remember how they both concurred with his Majesty, and none declared any opinion against landing but myself. [Holograph. 2 pages. Ibid. No. 106.]
July 11.
11 a.m.
[Prince Rupert] to Lord [Arlington]. I just now received yours of the 3rd by Mr. Culpeper. He was sick ashore when I gave this lieutenant's place to a very deserving person, and I did not know there was such a person as Lord Culpeper's brother lieutenant in the Warspite or indeed in being. However in obedience to his Majesty's commands, if I can prevail with the other lieutenant on any terms without losing him, I will endeavour to satisfy Mr. Culpeper the way he desires; otherwise I shall take the first occasion that presents itself. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 107.]
July 11.
Whitehall.
Commission to Arthur Dalgarno to be chaplain to the Holland regiment under Sir Walter Vane. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 86.]
July 11. Commission to John Ogle to be ensign to Col. Villiers' company in garrison at Tynemouth Castle. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 74.]
July 11. Richard Coote to the King. Petition stating that, the most considerable part of the lands which his Majesty granted and confirmed to the petitioner's father, Charles, late Earl of Mountrath, by his Majesty's declaration and Acts for the settlement of Ireland, being decreed away by the Commissioners of the late Court of Claims, the petitioner obtained letters patent under the Great Seal for the remainder, pursuant to the certificate of the said Court, in the names of himself, his mother and Robert Reading, that the said letters patent by reason of the death of the Clerk of the Hanaper and other negligence of the clerks were not enrolled in Chancery within six months from the date thereof, whereby they are void according to a clause in the said Acts, and that nevertheless the petitioner has ever since duly answered the rent reserved to his Majesty, and praying his Majesty to order that either the said letters patent be renewed under the said Great Seal, or that a release of the said condition and forfeiture for non-enrollment be granted. With note that the Duchess [of Cleveland] is content that the letters patent be renewed, so that no further or other estate be granted than what was contained in the former grant, or that a release of the said forfeiture may pass. [1¼ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 9.]
July 12.
8 a.m. The Royal Sovereign, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Prince Rupert to the Earl of Arlington. By the enclosed which came just now from Harwich to my secretary, you will find that such loading is doubtless for the Dutch fleet. I have advised Mr. Taylor to apply to the Lord Commissioners for Prizes about it and also signify as much to you, that, if occasion requires, the thing may be determined by your Lordships. However, as I have given a general order here, I have commanded the stopping of those billanders till the fleet is sailed. I received yesterday the black box from you with the Articles of War, and intelligence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 108.] Enclosed,
Silas Taylor to Capt. Hartgill Baron. Five or six days since Capt. Thurston brought in hither five billanders bound for Ostend, laden in the North of England. I saw their passes, which I take to be as authentic as others of the like nature, but their lading was what induced a stop on them, it being so great a quantity of such provisions as 2,025 firkins of butter, 16 or 17 fother of lead, besides much cloth, alum, and leather, and one of them is laden with coals and grindstones. The captain of the Essex ketch sent an account of them to the Navy Commissioners and I one to Lord Arlington, but I perceive my lord was out of town, and the Commissioners have ordered the captain to receive his Highness's commands, who himself brings this to you. I beg your assistance to him in this business, with humble thanks for your kind favours to me and a particular acknowledgement of your last of the 6th instant. I am fitting up all the few boats I have, according to his Highness' commands, among which is the long-boat of the Royal James, a very good one. Yesterday one of our packet-boats arrived from the Brill. They were very empty of news. They tell us that the Dutch fleet are at their old hold near Schonvelt, where, not without boasting, they give out they wait for the English, but I believe it is rather for opportunity and advantage. Instead of the two companies drawn out of the Brill for the intended relief of Maestricht two more are sent thither, which is all that town is said to have at present for its works. The Dutch pretend both fear and care lest the French should intend against the maiden town of Dort, which is very likely to yield (as they much doubt it) much more easier to a French compliment than Maestricht did. Harwich, 10 July. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 108I.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Pass at the request of the Envoy Extraordinary of Sweden for the Griffin of Stockholm to go to Holland with Dutch prisoners, and some goods for the Ambassadors Extraordinary of Sweden, now residing at Cologne, and to return with English prisoners, and other free goods of Holland (sic). [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 264.]
July 12.
Whitehall.
Similar pass with blanks for the names of the vessel and her master. [Ibid. p. 266.]
July 13.
The Cockpit.
Permission from the Duke of Buckingham to Lieut. Synnot, who is not capable of serving in his regiment, to assign his employment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 109.]
July 13.
The Sovereign.
[Prince Rupert] to the King. The bearer, Sir John Berry, was at the trial I made with my petards. He will give your Majesty satisfaction what effect it had, and how our seamen like it. I shall say no more, but that you may be assured that whatsoever vessel lies by the side of any ship and has the said petard on board has it in its power to blow up the other. What this may do as to your service I intend at the first occasion to try. We are now all ready, expecting only your orders to set sail, the enemy still at Schonvelt, 95 sail, and the East India fleet daily expected. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 110.]
July 13.
8 p.m. The Royal Sovereign, at the Buoy of the Nore.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Wind S.S.E. After Sir John Berry went, at this minute came in Capt. Berry of the Success, who was commanded over to the coast of Holland to discover the enemy in company with the Guernsey. He brings me intelligence that 4 yesterday afternoon he discovered the enemy lying in Schonvelt, very near the place where we fought them the first engagement 28 May last, and meeting with two of their scouts, one of them immediately bore away to their fleet, letting his topgallant sails fly and firing a gun. On this their whole fleet consisting of 102 ships of all sorts by 6 got under way and stood to the westward to get the wind. I conceive by this they resolve to fight us and on that account stood this course now, thinking our whole fleet near at hand. I think it my duty to let his Majesty know this immediately. Capt. Harris of the Guernsey stays on the Holland coast still to discover the enemy's farther motion. When he returns what discoveries are made shall be transmitted to you. [Ibid. No. 111.]
July 13. Commission to — Dullgarden to be chaplain to the Earl of Northampton's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 74.]
July 13. Commission to Frederic, Earl of Schomberg and Mertola, to be captain general under Prince Rupert, the same as his former to be lieut.-general (mutatis mutandis), and agreeing in all things with the Duke of Buckingham's, only the mention of the Duke of York is left out. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 75.]
July 13 and 14. Two blank commissions for major-generals over all the forces under Prince Rupert of the above dates. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 13. A blank commission for an adjutant-general to the Earl of Schomberg and Mertola. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 13. Commission to Charles Turney to be adjutant to the Earl of Northampton's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 13. Commission to Ralph Egerton to be ensign to Capt. Clerk in Lord Craven's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 13.
Westminster.
Commission, at the request of merchants and ship captains trading to Rouen and other seaports in Normandy, Picardy and Brittany, to Rene Petit to be agent of the King at the above places with authority to look after and forward the affairs and interests of the said merchants and ship captains and also those of other English subjects, and to defend them before the magistrates of those provinces and if necessary outside those provinces, with grant to him for his salary of one sol marque per ton on all ships that may touch anywhere in those provinces. [Latin. Ibid.]
Copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 112.]
[July ?] Draft of a similar patent to Petit in English. [Ibid. No. 113.]
[July ?]
London.
Power from numerous captains and masters of ships to Petit to procure an effectual order from the Most Christian King for paying no more for tonnage than is just, with their promise in return, that the same being obtained and a correspondent established in every seaport of Normandy, Brittany and Picardy to see it duly observed, they will pay the said Petit or his correspondents one sol marque which is 5 farthings, on every ton of all their ships coming into the said ports. With certificate by three of the signers that they saw all or most of the captains or masters whose names are in the list willingly subscribe thereto. [2 copies. Ibid. Nos. 114, 115.]
[July?] Memorial of masters of ships. They complain that the officers who collect the tax of 50 sols a ton in France overestimate the tonnage of the vessels, and to remedy the same they request his Majesty to send Monsr. Petit as agent to Rouen, and will pay him a sol marqué per ton on condition of his having a correspondent at each port. If his Majesty will make him some allowances, he will also keep a correspondent at Paris, who will manage the affairs of his Majesty and Mademoiselle, as well as those of the said ship masters, and save the charge of another person. [French. Ibid. No. 116.]
July 13. Warrant for a grant to [Thomas] Musgrave of a prebend in Durham cathedral. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35B, f. 29.]
July 13. Warrant for swearing and admitting Winifred Wyndham to be dresser to the Queen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 76.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting a lease granted by the late King to Sir Edward Povey of a lease for three lives of the rectories of Drome (Drum), Cammage (Cam), Traghboy (Taghboy), Desart (Dysart), St. John's, Athleague, Traghsenagh, Ratharrow (Rahara), Kilmeane, Killinvoy and Killtnam (Kiltoom) in Roscommon, for a lease thereof, to commence after the determination of the said lease, to Sir Edward Sutton for the lives of himself, Anne his wife, and Robert Lucas, his son-in-law, at the yearly rent of 64l. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 477.]
July 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. On the petition of Wentworth, Earl of Roscommon, alleging that the part of his estate in Westmeath was by a mistake in the last survey returned as the property of James, Earl of Roscommon, an Irish Papist, and as such charged with the year's value, for levying which process is now issued, notwithstanding that the petitioner is a Protestant, as were his father and grandfather, warrant for examining these allegations, and, if they prove true, to give the requisite order for discharging the lands of the year's value. [Ibid. p. 480.]
July 14.
Exeter House.
Order by the Committee for the affairs of Hamburg on the reference to them of the petition of Col. Patrick Hayes for letters of reprisal against Hamburg for 4,600 rix dollars, the value of an inheritance detained from him by the Senate, that Sir Walter Walker, his counsel, prepare a state of the petitioner's case, and that the same to be sent to the Senate of Hamburg in a letter from his Majesty demanding satisfaction according to the justice of the petitioner's cause. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. No. 117.]
July 14.
London.
Lord Hawley to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 103, where p. 104, line 12, "us standdard by" should be "us standders by.") [2 pages. Ibid. No. 118.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 105.) [Ibid. No. 119.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 105.) [4 pages. Ibid. No. 120.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 107.) [4 pages. Ibid. No. 121.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 109.) [3 pages. Ibid. No. 122.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
John Richards to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 110.) [2 pages. Ibid. No. 123.]
[July ?] Sir R. Southwell to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 138.) [Undated, but endorsed 14 July. Ibid. No. 124.]
July 14. Donatus O'Brien to Williamson. Expressing his love and respect for him, and hoping he will read these lines, if he can, it being the first letter he ever wrote. [Ibid. No. 125.]
July 14. W. Mountagu to Williamson. Thanking him for his great favour to — and asking his care that he depart not from him, while the passage into France is so perilous. [Illegible in parts, including the name of the person mentioned. S.P. Dom., Car. II. No. 126.]
July 14. Daniel Sheldon to Williamson. Expressing his gratitude for the many favours he has received from him. [Ibid. No. 127.]
July 14.
London.
Sir Francis Chaplin to Williamson. The City as to health is in a very good condition. Our chiefest business now is to hear the complaints of a great many that say they are overtaxed, and to give them ease, if there be reason for it, in the second and third three months. The City in general is very cheerful, the news of a good peace would add much to it, which we do not question by God's blessing and your prudent management. We have lost our very dear brother, Sir John Smith, who died 18 June. He was very well on Monday and died on Wednesday. Ginny (Jenny) with the rest of his friends are very sorrowful for his loss. He died very rich, and, if you have any mind to a widow, pray let us know. We have chosen two sheriffs, Mr. Linsy, goldsmith, and Mr. Hurt, which, I believe will not hold. A great fire at Wapping Dock, 28 June, burnt near 300 houses and 2 ships. We have had very great winds and great rains. Our meadows are generally overflowed. All our neighbours are gone from Blackheath. Our fleet is in a very good condition. Several of our friends, among them Sir Lionel Walden and your countryman, Dick Ducket, drank your health at my house. [Ibid. No. 128.]
July 14/24.
London.
George Shawe to Williamson. I am got safe hither with my wife and two sons to Sir John Shawe's house. I have a letter from my agents at Antwerp that you had written to me that you would give 140l. for the hangings and not more, and that they had written that you would keep them for that price, which I hereby confirm and have passed 140l. to your debit. You say nothing of the gilt leather. On your return I shall receive them back in case you make not use of them, or like them not at the price. I hope to be in Antwerp in 5 or 6 weeks. In the meantime pray send your bills to my order at Antwerp for 350l. payable in London, which, I guess, I am in disburse for you. On my return I shall make up your account. [Ibid. No. 129.]
July 14.
The Sovereign.
The Duke of Albemarle to the King. Requesting favour for his kinsman, Sir Thomas Modyford, that he may be released on the writer's bail for 20,000l. as granted on a petition, presented 15 June, of which the execution was postponed 3 or 4 weeks. [Ibid. No. 130.]
[July 14 ?] Sir Thomas Modyford to the King. Petition stating that on his former petition, presented 15 June, his Majesty ordered his liberty, accepting the Duke of Albemarle's engagement in 20,000l. for his appearance when required, but he was to be detained 4 weeks longer on a complaint of the Spanish Ambassador, but as he cannot complain of anything done under colour of any order of the petitioner after publication of the last articles, which put all injuries into oblivion, and the 4 weeks are expired, begging his release. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. No. 131.] Annexed,
Brief of Sir T. Modyford's case showing his proceedings in Jamaica towards the Spaniards from 1663 to Nov. 1670. [Ibid. No. 131 I.]
[July 14 ?] Sir T. Modyford to the Earl of Arlington. The time advised for my longer restraint being expired, I beg your assistance for my release. I hear from Jamaica that my son is restored to the governor's kindness, as commander of Port Royal, with 1,000 soldiers and many pioneers to fortify it, which will make it one of the strongest places in the Indies, though it will be very expensive to him. [Ibid. No. 132.]
July 9, 11
[and 14].
Inland advices received on those days. Plymouth, 6 July.—No ships arrived since my last. Weymouth, 7 July.—A Dieppe vessel came in here last night, bound for Rochelle, which reports that nine days since six fireships sailed from Havre towards their fleet. Yesterday came in here 15 small East country vessels laden with corn, charcoal, &c. Portsmouth, 8 July.—Sunday evening came to Spithead four French vessels, one a frigate of 10 guns, bringing with her a prize she took on the coast of Holland, very richly laden. The Mermaid will sail to Spithead to-day. Deal, 8 July.—No ships in the Downs except the Laurel Tree from Barbados. Harwich, 8 July.—No news from sea. Lyme, 7 July.—Yesterday arrived the Providence of this place from Maryland, which she left last May, and arrived with the rest of the fleet about 14 days since at Plymouth. The master says 8 ships from London arrived some days before they came from thence. They left there several other ships not cleared, but obliged by the Governor to make a fleet together, having the Barnaby of 50 guns with them. A caper of 18 guns had been some time on the coast, and had taken two or three ships bound thither. They had news of 8 Dutch men-of-war homeward bound from Guinea, which intended to visit them, which put them on making the best provision for their defence. The tobacco crop has been very good this year, but not the quantity as usual. Plymouth, 8 July.—About 4 yesterday afternoon passed by 10 merchantmen homeward bound from the Straits; they came without convoy. Off this place they inquired of a fisher-boat, if there were any Dutch capers on the coast, and being answered they knew not of any, they kept their course for the Downs. Falmouth, 7 July.—Yesterday came in the Elizabeth of London from Guinea. Some days before she left that coast a French merchantman at anchor was attacked by a Dutch man-of-war, but the French, who were but nine men on board, defended themselves till their captain was killed, and then the French lieutenant set fire to the ship, he and his men escaping to shore in their boat. Several colliers are come here from Wales without convoy. Portsmouth, 10 July.—The Mermaid sails to-day to Spithead, bound for Jersey. Deal, 10 July.—No ships in the Downs. Harwich, 10 July.—No news since my last. Pendennis, 7 July.—The Hunter has been twice here this week, and cruises now to the West. Yesterday came in the William from Gambia. Bridlington, 7 July.—Last Saturday came into this Bay from the Northwards 24 small laden colliers, with the Guinea and two ships from Russia. Yesterday they sailed again Southward. Yarmouth, 9 July.—About noon yesterday came into this Road 20 laden colliers and two great merchantmen from Russia, with the Guinea their convoy. Kinsale, 1 July.—The Adventure, Speedwell, and Morning Star came to our harbour mouth yesterday morning having been cruising 15 or 20 days to the Westward, and met no ships but a Frenchman bound for Newfoundland. Portsmouth, 13 July.—Friday the Mermaid sailed from Spithead for Cowes, to convoy any vessels there for Jersey and Morlaix. Lyme, 12 July.— To-day arrived the Elizabeth of this place from Guernsey, which she left yesterday in a very good condition. Hull, 12 July.—The Drake and Spragg are still here, expecting sailing orders. Newcastle, 11 July.—Our laden fleet is sailed, convoyed by the Portsmouth pink. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. No. 133.]
July 14. Commission to Richard Warner to be chirurgeon to the garrison of Guernsey. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 75.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the principal Commissioners for prizes to issue a commission to Solomon Swale to execute the office of subcommissioner of prizes in the port of Hull, in place of his father, Sir Solomon, who is too much indisposed to ride on horseback in execution of his office. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 268.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Col. Anthony Buller, desiring an order for payment of his debt of 3,436l. 16s. 10d. or an order to the Lord Treasurer to settle it on the arrears of excise or chimney-money, or the customs of the Duchy of Lancaster or on some other fund. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 75.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
Grant to Richard Cooke of the place of serjeant of the Admiralty of the Cinque Ports and droit-gatherer and collector of all droits, wrecks, derelicts and other perquisites belonging to the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 9.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the petition of Richard Coote, calendared ante p. 433, directing that either new letters patent be passed or that a release be passed to the patentees of the condition and forfeiture in such form as shall be advised by the King's Counsel as prayed in the said petition. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 478.]
July 14.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that by the contract with Lord Ranelagh and his partners they covenanted to pay among other debts 6,076l. due for arms and ammunition sent from England to Ireland during the government of Lord Robartes, and the power reserved by the said contract to regulate the method and order of the payment of the debts so undertaken by them:—for giving effectual orders to Lord Ranelagh and the rest of the Commissioners of the Treasury to pay the said debt to such persons as shall be empowered by the Master or Treasurer of the Ordnance as follows, viz. 1,000l. out of the quarter's rent due from the farmers of the great branches of the revenue last Midsummer, 1,000l. out of the quarter's rent due next Michaelmas, 1,000l. out of the quarter's rent due next Christmas, and the remaining 3,076l. to be paid by the said Commissioners at such times and in such proportions as they shall find most convenient, provided that the same be fully paid on or before 30 March, 1675. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 492.]
July 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Godfrey Lee of the King's right to two houses in St. Bennet's parish, Paul's Wharf, London, seized on the outlawry of John Burt at the suit of the said Lee for a debt of 200l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 150.]
July 15.
DublinCastle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. I have received yours of the 5th and with it his Majesty's concerning the impropriations, wherein I am confident the clergy will not neglect making use of his favour. The present commission of inspection, I find, is at an end, and a new one intended, but this only to inquire into such lands as of right belong to his Majesty, to be disposed of afterwards according to the ends of the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, which I conceive will be a very good work, and heartily wish it may be done speedily and effectually, and that there may be once a final conclusion of men's fears for their estates, that they may apply to the improvement of them, which would be much more for the benefit of the King and kingdom than the perpetual little discoveries that are made, and immediately begged by one or other, to the great disquiet and trouble of his Majesty's subjects. Col. Hamilton's letter of 3 May last has lain long by me. It consisted of so many particulars, as it has been some work to inquire into the several natures of them, and possibly the value of them all may be greater than you imagined, for, had they been all clearly in the King's dispose, they would have amounted, I am told, to above 1,500l. a year. The best account I can present you with are the enclosed returns from the Civil Survey, and from the Auditor's office, by which it will appear that most of these lands are already passed in patents to others. Besides, as to Galway, had a grant passed according to this letter, that city had been utterly ruined, for its whole revenue had been taken away. I know several of those concerned with Col. Hamilton in this grant pretend they asked no more than the benefit of the mortgages of parcels of lands and customs which the city had engaged to George Browne and other forfeiting persons, but the words of the letter are very clear, being "To cause a grant for ever of all our right, title, and interest either in possession or reversion unto all and singular the lands, &c. therein mentioned," which, in regard the town at present has no charter, it being seized into the King's hands, as also by virtue of some clauses in one of the Acts, either of Settlement or Explanation, if his Majesty would take the utmost advantage of them, he might pass the inheritance, but then this city, which is one of the strongest in the kingdom would be utterly ruined and destroyed. Together with these papers I have sent a copy of the petition of Galway, all which will give sufficient information what may be reasonable to renew to those persons whom Col. Hamilton has left behind him. (Then follows the passage about discoveries printed in Camden, Essex, Vol. I, p. 98.) Did I only regard my private concerns herein, 'twere certainly much for my ease to pass all without examination, and likewise it would secure me from the odium of many whose grants by such a method will be obstructed, but being offered purely for the public good, I cannot question but his Majesty will approve of it. By the little enquiry I have made into the business between the Duchess of Cleveland and Sir Maurice Eustace, I believe it will prove to be in the King's dispose for the uses of the Acts. For the payment of the arrears of the Army the Commissioners of the Treasury are at length come to an agreement with me about the method of it, so his Majesty need not be further troubled therein. Mr. Frowd, late Secretary to Lord Berkeley is now going for England, and desired my recommendation to you. He seems a very ingenious young man, and I have heard nothing but well of him during his employment here. [7 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 10.] Annexed,
Particular by Hugh Wormington, deputy auditor, of the lands in Col. Hamilton's letter. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 10i.]
Account of several particulars of lands in Col. Hamilton's letter, as they are found in the Civil Survey. [Ibid. No. 10ii.]
The mayor, sheriffs, burgesses and commonalty of Galway to the Lord Lieutenant. Petition, praying for a stop to the grant to Col. Hamilton of the whole revenne of the said town, till the petitioners have been heard, as well on behalf of his Majesty's interest in the said revenue, as on behalf of the said town, and such favourable representation thereof made to his Majesty, as may be most for his Majesty's interest and service, and the advantage of the said town. [Copy. Ibid. No. 10iii.]
July 17.
London.
Thomas Newcombe to Williamson. Acknowledging his letter of 11/1 July, and thanking him for his concern for his son, adding that since he received his letter he has accounted to Mr. Bridgeman, that Mr. L'Estrange is paid the 20l., that the 200l. shall be ready on sight, and Mr. Yard supplied, according to his Excellency's directions, particularly 35l. odd money for wines, &c., and that all care is taken of the Gazette, and Mr. Yard minded, though he needs it not. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 134.]
July 18.
London.
James Hickes to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 111, where p. 112, line 5, "desires of the Bow" should be "desires of all brethren of the Bow," line 9, "Whitey" should be "Whit[l]ey," line 16, "and" should be "are," and line 17, "the same in at one eare" should be "the[y] come in at one eare," and line 19, dele "my.") [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 135.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 115, where p. 116, line 12, "Salina's" should be "Salinas'," and p. 117, line 16, "Commission. Now its past," should be "Commission now its past.") [8 pages. Ibid. No. 136.]
July 18.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 116, where p. 120, line 7, "those they would not; should expect" should be "those they would not should; expect.") [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 137.]
July 16 and 18. Inland advices received on those days. Plymouth, 13 July.—No ships come in since my last, the coast clear of capers. Portsmouth, 14 July.—No ships here save the Reserve in dock. Deal, 15 July.— The Greyhound is in the Downs. Harwich, 15 July.—We hear of a ketch belonging to the Dunkirk being taken yesterday off Orford Ness by a Dutch sloop, the men saving themselves ashore in their boat. Wind N. Aldeburgh, 14 July.—Three Dutch men-of-war were seen yesterday standing in from the N.E., but stood immediately off to sea again. We hear that the tender to the Dunkirk is taken by a small Dutch frigate. Southwold, 14 July.—About 1 last Saturday a Dutch privateer came into this bay, but finding no purchase stood out again. To-day came in likewise three Dutch men-ofwar, but presently stood out again to the S.E. Whitby, 12 July.— Yesterday the Guinea took a Dutch caper of 3 guns and 43 men, which had forced several small vessels ashore, which were however secured. Harwich, 17 July.—The two Russia ships with other vessels from the Northward are passed by for the Thames. Deal, 17 July.—Yesterday a Dutch caper came into Margate Road and took away a French merchantman riding at anchor there. Dover, 16 July.—A vessel arrived from Nieuport to-day says that yesterday the Dutch fleet, 120 sail in all, lay off Ostend, and that two of their men-of-war were cruising near Dunkirk. Newcastle, 15 July.— Yesterday morning about 50 colliers sailed from our bar, with several ketches for the fleet. The Guinea attended the Russia ships to the Road, and came back to the mouth of the Tees to take with him three ketches laden with butter. I believe the laden fleet will fall into their company. Bridlington, 14 July.—Last Saturday the Guinea passed Northwards with 8 or 10 light colliers, and yesterday the Portsmouth pink with 16 or 17. The Dutch capers do much mischief. Boston, 16 July.—Yesterday abundance of coal ships sailed southwards. Lynn, 16 July.—Yesterday a Dutch sloop came into our Channel and forced all our fishermen up to town. Harwich, 17 July.—No news here. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 138.]
July 18.
The Royal Sovereign, at anchor at the open of the Sledway.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Wind S.E. and by E. I must give you an account of a little accident here to-day and beg you to represent the same to his Majesty. About one after dinner the Greyhound came sailing quite through the fleet with a flag on the maintopmast head, which amused the whole fleet. On this I sent one of my lieutenants on board to command the flag to be struck, and seeing him come off almost half way to my ship I fired a shot before her, so that the flag was struck. Capt. Clements coming afterwards on board me, told me it was one of Lord Mulgrave's colours. I laid him in irons for his impudence and had him examined by the Judge Advocate, the copy whereof I have sent herewith. This being done, I pardon the man, for which I think I ought to beg his Majesty's, where such an affront was offered. The Algier struck yesterday on the edge of the Black Tail, though I placed the Emsworth sloop there and others on the dangerous sands to direct all the ships that sailed. I cannot say whether she is got off or not. About two hours since I sent Monsr. Schomberg his commission and the books signed, by Sir Thomas Allin. It was this afternoon resolved by a Council of War to sail the fleet out to-morrow morning at the West end of the Galloper, to avoid all the sands, and thence to send some frigates to discover in what posture the enemy is, who are now said to lie to the westward of the Steen banck in 15 fathoms, according to whose motion we shall steer our course. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 139.] Enclosed,
Examination of Capt. John Clements. Yesterday, the 17th, his Majesty commanded me to follow such orders as I should receive from Count Schomberg, who commanded me to put on the maintopmast head one of Lord Mulgrave's ensigns for a signal, that it might be known where the Count was to be found. I gave my opinion it was unusual to carry any flag in a fleet without order from the Admiral, and notwithstanding it was ordered to be done. As soon as the Prince's boat came on board I called to them to strike the flag, and the Count replied he wore it for no ill intent, but that people might know where he was. [Ibid. No. 139i.]
July 18. Pass for William, Earl of Derby, to go beyond the seas for his education, with his governor, James Forbes, and servants and 40l. in money. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 267.]
July 19.
The Tower. 9 p.m.
Sir Thomas Modyford to the Earl of Arlington. As he understands that his petition and a letter from the Duke of Albemarle in his behalf have been graciously received by the King and conveyed to his lordship, hoping for speedy release; this last favour will consummate his former and his late promises to his said Grace. [Ibid. No. 140.]
July 19. [The Earl of Ossory] to [Lord Arlington]. The Duke commanding me to give him an account of what passes, I have told him of an accident that happened yesterday to Monsr. de Schomberg. When you have seen it, I desire it may go no farther, for I do not love to be named for an author in such matters. I believe we may see the enemy to-night, if the wind continues, and that they are at any distance out of the Schonvelt. I am in much pain for Capt. Narbrough, who is feverish, and was let blood this morning. You may imagine the want I should have, if he should not be able to act. He now sleeps, which gives me some hopes. God send us good success and all happiness to you and yours. My letters now would rather put my female relations in alarms, than give them satisfaction, which is the reason of my not writing to them. If you show my father this, it will give him all the information I can at present. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 141.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
Commission for Fiennes Wolseley to be ensign to Col. Cope's company in Col. Russell's regiment of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 87.]
July 19.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. (The first part concerning the differences in Dublin is printed in Camden, Essex, Vol. I. p. 101, where p. 101, line 9 from bottom, "in" should be "of," and last line "long" should be omitted, and p. 102, line 9, "his" should be omitted, and line 20, "do" should be "perform.") It continues thus:—I lately received a letter of 23 May, referring to a former of 30 Aug., 1672, both relating to the accounts of Lord Ranelagh's undertaking. I must observe there are two covenants in Lord Ranelagh's patent, in these words:—"And all other his Majesty's revenue in Ireland certain and casual, ordinary and extraordinary, shall . . . during the term aforesaid, be issued out and applied to such uses intents and purposes, and in such order and manner, and at such times only, as the said Lord Ranelagh, &c. have hereinafter covenanted . . . to see done, executed and performed, and to no other uses, &c. except what shall be fit and requisite to defray the necessary charges and expenses of this present undertaking," and "That they, the said Lord Ranelagh, &c. shall from time to time, as often as they shall be thereunto required, give to the Lord Lieutenant . . . and to such others as his Majesty shall appoint a just and true account of all and every the proceedings in and about the premises and the management thereof"; to which clauses these letters ought, as I conceive properly to refer. By the former letter the Lord Chancellor, Lord Conway, Sir A. Forbes, the Lord Chief Baron, and Sir Theophilus Jones, or any three of them are appointed as the persons to take these accounts, but then for their power, they are directed to proceed to the examining auditing and stating of all moneys paid and disbursed. The like clause verbatim is in the second letter. Now I appeal to you, what advantage his Majesty's affairs can possibly have by such an account, which is indeed not properly an account, but only a declaration of disbursements, or how can it be known whether, according to the first recited covenant they have applied all the money received to the ends of their undertaking, unless they do as well charge themselves by their receipts as discharge themselves by their payments? This I have ever since my coming pressed them to do, but could not yet obtain it, only now of late they have promised me to perform it. I mention this, conceiving that some care ought to be taken in the penning of letters sent hither, that they may not be worded for the convenience of the parties concerned, as I fear these have been by Lord Ranelagh's instance. Thus much only I must needs say in behalf of Lord Ranelagh's undertaking that I am very confident they have brought in the money quicker, than I could possibly have done, had it been left to me, as formerly it has been to other Lieutenants, but as these Commissioners of the Treasury have been thus far of use to his Majesty's affairs, wherein I have constantly given them all assistance imaginable, so I cannot but propose it as highly necessary for his service that they duly every half year give an account as well of their receipts as disbursements, that so it may appear, whether they have disposed of all the money according to the ends of their undertaking. [7 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. No. 11.] Enclosed,
The said paper. We, being Protestants of the Church of England, never opposed his Majesty's authority, or his Excellency's commands, nor do we abstain from the pretended general Assembly on account of faction, singularity, or contradiction, nor out of any dislike to the oaths by the new Rules prescribed, as do the favourites of the Presbyterian Lord Mayor and his seven wise masters addicted to that faction, but being single members of several corporations and being fully satisfied that there is not nor can be any lawful assembly held according to the new Rules as they now stand, and that to appear in such a pretended assembly were to wrong our consciences, to overthrow our charter, to wrong our privileges, to subject ourselves to the penalties of law denounced even by the new Rules, and to injure our respective corporations, by whom only we are bound in conscience to be regulated in matters of this nature (Noted in margin, "by this they declare themselves to be free states"), and to bring ourselves into the hatred of all men as the betrayers of our liberty, We not only forbear to come into such an assembly, but also protest against all those, whoever they be, who shall wrong our corporations and the whole City by endeavouring to set up any assembly in it against law, and particularly against the Acts of Settlement and Explanation and against our charter and privileges, and against those of the City more particularly, who have advised that we might be compelled thereunto by threats of our superiors, or questioned and made to answer for our not appearing in the Townsell (Tholsel) last Thursday, we being resolved to give no answer but what we shall be advised to by our several corporations first consulted solemnly with, and, in the meantime, let our adversaries, who are as inconsiderable in their number as they have been in their attempts, know that the attempt of compelling to do what is unlawful will serve only as drink to a man in a dropsy or fever, rather to swell us up into greater discontents or inflame us with new heats than drive us from our unalterable detestation of the new Rules, so far as they impose hardships on us above those who have the most rebellious corporations in the whole kingdom.
All we, being Presbyterians or allied unto them in most of our opinions, and being also members of corporations in this City, declare that we think ourselves as much obliged as those of the Protestant Church, who are more countenanced by law and the magistrate than we seem to be, to yield obedience to all just commands of authority, yet we concur with our fellow members of this City who are of the Protestant Church, so far as to decline meeting in a general Assembly as the same is declared to be constituted by the Lord Mayor &c., and declare that, though we be altogether unsatisfied with the new Rules, yet there is nothing in them so offensive to us as the new oath therein imposed, which is a greater burden to our consciences than we are able to bear.
We, the Catholick members of some corporations of this City, who have not met on account of the new Rules, though least in number and more inconsiderable than the rest of our brethren of other persuasions, are as forward as any of them to declare the sincerity of our desire to show ourselves submissively pliant to all rules of authority, so far as the laws of the kingdom shall require and our consciences permit, but declare that, being as sensible as our brethren of other persuasions of the injury we should do ourselves and the whole City by assembling ourselves a pretended Common Council, we cannot, without the check of a grumbling conscience in ourselves and discontents to those on whose opinions depends our welfare in this City, meet in any such capacity, and shall therefore desire to be excused therefrom, which is the only answer we shall make for our absence from the last pretended or rather intended Assembly, till we shall be otherwise advised by the particular congregations of our respective corporations duly assembled.
We, the Catholick members of several corporations, who have of late met in the Tholsell as called to a general Assembly, though fewest in number of all others, and as much unsatisfied with the new Rules as those who absented themselves, acknowledge our error in meeting there, and had rather we had absented ourselves with those of our profession who are now called to answer for not assembling, than to have been there, knowing how to have justified our absence much better than to have excused our being there, only we declare that we never intended to have stayed at the Tholsell if any considerable number had then appeared, being better fitted with arguments against that meeting than with a desire to fill up the numbers of a plenary assembly on the account of the new Rules, and the rather being well assured that the Lord Mayor, the seven Aldermen, and the Presbyterians of the City would be satisfied that the new Rules including the new oath were thrown into the fire, though the rest of the Aldermen and all other Catholicks as well as Protestants would be content the said new oath may stand, so that the rest of the Rules were shut out of doors, and though we and all Protestants of our several corporations had rather that the oath were dispensed with than that any of the new Rules, which do not oblige all other towns and corporations, should stand. [Copy. 2½ pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. No. 11 I.]
July 20. The King to the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge. Recommending Thomas Mountague, B.A., for the next vacant fellowship there. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31,f. 114.]
July 20. Commission to Richard Whittle to be apothecary general to the forces employed in the present expedition. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 77.]
July 20. Commission to Col. Francis Car to be captain-lieutenant to the Earl of Northampton's own company. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 20. Warrant for a pardon to George Aylmer for the felonious killing of Richard Reeves. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 77.]
[July ?] Samuel Alston, of Marlsford, Suffolk, to the King. Petition, requesting a hearing, not doubting to prove his innocence against his false accusers who have caused his Majesty to put him out of the trusts both civil and military, in which he has faithfully served since the Restoration. At the foot,
July 21.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Chancellor and the Earl of Arlington. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 142.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 121, where p. 121, line16, "same" should be "some.") [7 pages. Ibid. No. 143.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 124.) [4 pages. Ibid. No. 144.]
July 21/31
Whitehall.
R. Francis to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 125, where p. 126, line 20, "Cave" should be "Carre.") [3 pages. Ibid. No. 145.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
John Richards to Williamson. Excusing himself for his fault that Williamson had not had a previous dispatch of Lord Arlington's by the last ordinary, having understood it was to have been sent by express. Fonseca continues still a prisoner, notwithstanding the Spanish Ambassador's pressing instances for his release, and assurance that order is given for Sir Martin Wescombe's liberty, but they first expect to hear from Sir William Godolphin that Sir Martin is actually free. In the interim order is given for the examination of Capt. Le Neve touching the matter that occasioned the Governor of Cadiz to do what he did. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 146.]
July 21.
London.
Sir Joseph Sheldon to Williamson. Last Thursday we paid the last service to our brother Smith, by attending him to his grave. You may easily imagine the good lady is very sad, yet we comfort her up, and I doubt not it will work off in time, and some merry gentlemen tell her the treaty at Cologne will not last long, and 20,000l. is a fair invitation. [Ibid. No. 147.]
July 21. Sir R. Southwell to Williamson. I told you something in my last, which touched our copyhold, about Philip Floyd's pretension to come in a reversioner upon us, but, as that is in appearance damped, so is that gentleman more now at ease in his new master, Mr. Bertie, and the departure of Mr. Aram, so that he may govern there to much more advantage, and think himself warm enough. Yet whether Lord Clifford will give it over, when he returns from the Wells, I know not. When I mentioned this to Lord Arlington he told him (? me) that part of his answer to Mr. Floyd was something of a prior promise the King had made to somebody else. And since I am told that Mr. Bridgeman (whom also some made the other's competitor) told a crony of his that he had drawn a warrant for the King's signature for a reversion, but I have not since heard the thing was done. I inform you only that you may advise in what concerns yourself and also your friends. I hope Lord Arlington will not countenance anything that may be hard to us, and I know your good word will go far, but nothing of this from me. I am not so inwardly acquainted with this gentleman neither, as to prefer his conveniency to my own concern. I do not heap congratulations on you, till I see you in possession of what my Lord told me his Majesty had promised you, nor even then need there be much to what you have executed so long, and deserve its title so well. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 148.]
July 21.
Yarmouth
Monsieur de "Schonberg" to [Lord Arlington?]. We landed here this evening, having no news of the fleet. The troops are encamped along the shore, without causing any prejudice to the town, which appears to me to be content. The officers of the artillery are very negligent of their duty. After arriving long after us, having made us wait two days, they have not given us the tents, the troops being exposed, and I have just learnt that they have forgotten the tent poles. I shall say nothing of the tents of the officers, and of those that were promised me, for they say they ought to come by another vessel. I shall be much annoyed at it, on account of the expense, for their vessels are not half laden. They put the King to much useless expense. We have no news of the fleet, which makes me apprehend what I have always feared, namely, that the Dutch fleet will avoid an engagement all it can. You must have received a gentleman, by whom I have informed you that in some days money for the troops will be wanting. Sir T. Allin, who has been of opinion that I should advise you by an express of our arrival, and about money for our provisions, has, as far as I can learn, sent a courier before mine, and as far as I can judge by some conversations of his, he is strongly a friend of Prince Rupert's, and tries to excuse that prince's violent passion. I will say no more of it, and I am persuaded that the King will recognize that I go only for the good of his service and without any bad ambition. I beg you to be assured that I shall apply myself with complete care and application to the good of his service in everything that I can. Postscript. The officer of artillery has just made me excuses for his conduct, and informed me he has found the tent poles in the hold of a vessel, so that I need say nothing to Sir T. Schitsley (Chicheley), who is well disposed, but is very ill served. [2 pages. French. Ibid. No. 149.]
July 21. Inland advices received that day. Plymouth, 18 July.—The Adventure and Morning Star are gone out cruising, and to-day the Speedwell sailed on the like account. Portsmouth, 20 July.— The Reserve is still in dock, and may be ready to launch in a fortnight. Deal, 20 July.—About 7 yesterday evening a little remote from Deal in the low lands were heard very many guns to the Eastward. It is imagined the fleets met, for the Dutch are said to be on the Banks of Flanders. Harwich, 20 July.—Yesterday our fleet sailed, standing an easterly course with a westerly wind. About noon they were quite out of sight. Wind this morning northerly, and since noon southerly. Newcastle, 18 July.—This morning about 50 laden colliers sailed for Lynn, convoyed by the Deptford ketch. Whitby, 17 July.—This coast is extremely infested with capers. We hear the Dutch are fishing on these coasts about 8 leagues off at sea, and what makes us believe it is that for these three days there have been a great many sail at sea. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 150.]
July 21/31 (?) French translation of part of Robert Yard's letter of the 18th calendared ante, p. 44. Antwerp, 21/31 July. Zealand letters arrived this morning inform us that the English fleet was in sight of the Dutch near Schonvelt. The Dutch and Spanish troops in garrison in several towns of Flanders as the Sas of Ghent, Sluys, Philippine, and Ardemburg begin to march and to keep themselves in readiness to oppose possible attacks. The same letters add that a great noise of artillery, but very far away, had been heard at sea. We have learnt to-day that the English and French fleets were off the coast of Zealand on Saturday. [Extracts. French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 151.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Pass for Nicholas, Earl of Thanet, to travel beyond the seas for the recovery of his health, with his lady, family, retinue, and necessary carriages and utensils and 40l. in money. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 269.]
[July ?] Sir Garrett Aylmer to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner was, 17 Aug., 1663, by the late Commissioners of Claims declared innocent and restored to certain manors, towns and lands therein mentioned in Meath and Louth settled upon him by Gerald Aylmer, his grandfather, which now, on the death of Sir Christopher, the petitioner's father, are in the petitioner's possession by virtue of the said settlement and decree, and praying letters patent of confirmation of the petitioner's title thereto, as some persons have lately given out that they will trouble his estate by some title or pretence they will prosecute in his Majesty's name. At the foot,
July 21.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Solicitor-General. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 12.]
July 21.
Whitehall.
Order by the Committee for Irish Affairs. Whereas Sir James Shaen was appointed to attend to-day with such propositions as have been made for his Majesty's advantage during the late inquiry into the affairs of Ireland, and he, appearing accordingly and being required to produce the same, declared that he neither made any such propositions himself, nor knew of any presented during the late Commissions, it is hereby ordered that the Clerk of the Council attending look out the petition of Col. Talbot on behalf of the Roman Catholics of Ireland, together with his commission from them, the reference, report, and all other proceedings thereupon during the time the said business was managed at this Board; And it is further ordered that Sir James Shaen deliver copies, if he have them, of two former commissions of inquiry, the first of them sat upon here in England, and the other in Ireland during Lord Berkeley's government, and that he also deliver in the two late commissions with the journals and books of entry and proceedings thereupon, and also the commissions and instructions for the sub-commissioners, and the proceedings and report, if any, thereupon, and all such other papers and minutes as relate to the present inquiry, and lodge them all with the Clerk of the Council in Waiting, and Mr. Tomkins, Dr. Gorge, Capt. Rosse and such other of the sub-commissioners as are in town are likewise to attend at the next meeting of the Committee next Friday afternoon. [Copy. 1½ page. Ibid. No. 13.]
July 22.
Dean's Yard, Westminster.
Sir Thomas Meres to Williamson. Requesting that in good time he would take care for satisfaction about the two ships Bona Esperanza and Henry Bonadventure, and would permit Edward Carlton, a gentleman in his retinue, to make address to him, as occasion should be, in that matter, and sending his service to Mr. Wilks. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 152.]
July 22.
9 p.m. The Royal Sovereign, under sail 10 or 12 leagues from Schonvelt to the northward.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Wind S.W. When I got out of the River into the sea, I received some intelligence by the scouts I sent out that the Dutch fleet was in or near Schonvelt. Others said they were about the Rumbles, on which I resolved to discover the truth of their station and strength. Accordingly about 8 yesterday morning, wind S.W., I found them and anchored within 3 or 4 leagues of them, where they rode at anchor in Schonvelt, their whole fleet consisting of about 95 or 100 sail, whereof about 80 men-of-war. About 8 last night I weighed and stood about two leagues to the northward. About 12 I anchored again, the wind N.W. About 7 this morning I weighed, and finding all the Dutch loose and standing towards us, about 4 leagues distant, I resolved to steer along their coast to the northward. On this they stood after us. About 2 I commanded Sir E. Spragge, having the weathergage, to tack. In this time the wind veered to the S.W., by which they got the weather-gage of us, and, when they had taken a view of our whole fleet, having a fresh gale of wind, they tacked, setting all the sail they could, and stood off towards their old banks and sanctuary of Schonvelt. I am now sailing along their coast to the northward. I have sent three frigates and two doggers to the Maes to get what intelligence I can that way. I desire you to present this with my most humble duty to his Majesty. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 153.]
July 22. [The Earl of Ossory] to [Lord Arlington]. We were part of this day in expectation of a battle, but we believe the enemy is now returned to their old hole. We shall suffer inconvenience, for all our cabins are down, and, until we see a little more, we will not be at the trouble of building them up again. I have not slept all last night, having been on my way from a Council of War, and the enemy being in sight, as soon as it was anything clear. I had like to have lost the yacht the King lent me and myself in it by a ship's being like to run over it in the dark. [Ibid. No. 154.]
July 22. Approbation by the King of Sir John Hobart, Francis Bacon, Augustine Briggs and Robert Bendish to be deputy-lieutenants for the county of the city of Norwich. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 76.]
July 22. Commission to Edward Villiers to be lieutenant and major of the King's troop of Guards. Minute. [Ibid. f. 77.]
July 22. Commission to Thomas Walkeden to be lieutenant of Capt. James Walker's troop in Prince Rupert's regiment. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to George, Marquis of Huntly, his heirs and assigns, of the lands and barony of Cairdines and other lands in the parochine of Anwith and Stewardry of Kirkcudbright, which formerly pertained to William McCulloch, of Mairtine, and Mary his spouse and others, and are now fallen into his Majesty's hands by reason of recognition and privilege of the Crown, to be holden at the usual rights and services, with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 239.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Warrants for charters of new infeftment to the following persons of the following lands:—
William, Earl of Dundonald in life rent, and to William, Lord Cochrane, his eldest son, and his heirs male, which failing, to his nearest lawful heirs and assigns in fee. Lands and Barony of Polkellie and divers other lands in the sheriffdoms of Ayr and Bute, on the resignation of William Cunningham of Cunninghamhead and his tutor, and others, with a novodamus and an erection of all the said lands into a barony to be called the barony of Polkellie, to be holden of his Majesty as King, and as Prince and Steward of Scotland, and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward.
Sir Hugh Campbell of Calder, and his heirs male, which failing, to his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Towns and lands of Moynes, and Boighall and other lands in the parochine of Aulderne and sheriffdom of Nairne, all united in the barony of Moynes, on the resignation of Robert Dumbar of Westfield and the said Sir Hugh, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward.
David Scott of Scotstarvet, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Sypsies, being part of the lands and barony of Airdrie, and the lands of Thomastowne and Pittincreife, all in Fife, on the resignation of Sir John Prestone of Airdrie, with consent of Dame Christian Lumsdane, his spouse, and Robert Balfour of Balbernie, with a novodamus, and a change of the holding of the lands of Sypsies from simple ward to taxt-ward, the said David Scott and his foresaids giving yearly to the Crown for the said lands of Thomastowne and Pittincreife, the few ferme and blench duties therein specified.
John Veitch of Dawick and Isobell Grierson, his spouse, in conjunct fee; and the heirs male procreate betwixt them. Lands of Easter Dawick and Lowre, and east side of the lands of Wester Dawick in place of the lands of Over Glenrath, provided in liferent to the said Isobell by her contract of marriage.
John Veitch and his heirs male and of tailzie. Lands of Wester Dawick, all in the parochine of Dawick and Sheriffdom of Peebles, on the resignation of the said John Veitch, with a novodamus, and an erection of the above lands into a barony, to be called the barony of Dawick, and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward.
John Murray, son of the deceased Laird of Stenhope, and his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Nether and Over Glenrathes in the sheriffdom of Peebles as principal, and the lands of Easter Davick in warrandice of the said lands of Over Glenrath on the resignation of Sir John and John Veitch of Davick, James Nasmyth younger of Posso and others, with a novodamus and a change of the holding of the said lands principally disponed from simple ward to taxt-ward, excepting the said lands of Over Glenrath, the holding whereof was formerly changed in the barony of Posso, whereof they form part.
Francis Hay of Balhoussie, and the heirs male of his body, with remainders to his brothers Thomas and George and the heirs male of their bodies respectively, which failing, to the said Francis, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands and barony of Balhoussie in the parochine and sheriffdom of Perth, on the resignation of umquhile George Hay of Balhoussie and the said Francis, with a novodamus, and an erection of the premises into a barony to be called the barony of Balhoussie and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward.
Alexander Bannerman of Elsick, and Margaret Scott his spouse, in conjunct life rent and to the heirs male procreate betwixt them, which failing, to the said Alexander, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands and barony of Pitmeddin in the parochine of Oyne and sheriffdom of Aberdeen, on the resignation of the said Alexander, for new infeftment to be made to him and his foresaids, under the reversion always by Sir Alexander Abercrombie of Galcorse, his heirs and assigns by payment or consignation of the principal sum of 18,000 merks Scots for the use of the said Alexander Bannerman and his foresaids, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward.
John Gordon of Balmade, late Provost of Banff, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Town and lands of Balmade, and others in the parochine of King Edward and sheriffdom of Aberdeen, on the resignation of James Gordon of Buthley, and Sir William Gordon of Lesmore, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward.
John Browne of Cultermaines, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Cultermaines in the parochine of Culter and sheriffdom of Lanark, with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward.
William Beatson of Souther Glasmouth in life rent, with remainders successively to James his eldest son, and the heirs of his body, Alexander his second son, and the heirs of his body, and Robert his third son, and the heirs of his body, which failing, to the said William's nearest and lawful heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Souther Glasmouth in the parochine of Kinghorn and sheriffdom of Fife on his own resignation, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward.
[Docquets. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, pp. 240–253.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to Agnes Dunbar, spouse to Patrick Murdoch of Camleddan, in liferent (in full satisfaction of her liferent right of lands provided by her marriage contract) of the lands of Blacklaggan and others in the parochine of Monegoffe and stewardry of Kirkcudbright, and also confirming to the said Patrick and the heirs male of his body, whom failing, to his other heirs of tailzie, the lands of Camleddan with the pertinents and fishing thereof in the Water of Crie and other lands, with the other lands above specified, all in the said parochine and stewardry, on the resignation of the said Patrick, with a novodamus and an union of all the said lands and premises into a barony to be called the barony of Camleddan-Murdoch, and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 254.]
July 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a presentation of James Ramsay, Bishop Elect of the Isles, to the Bishopric of Dumblane. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 255.]
July 22.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. Concerning the affairs of Dublin. (Printed in Camden, Essex, Vol. I, p. 103, where p. 103, 3 lines from bottom "lease for" should be "lease of," and p. 105, line 17, "in return" is omitted after "arrive.") [7 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 14.] Enclosed,
Narrative of the differences between the Recorder and the City of Dublin. (Printed in Camden, Essex, Vol. I p. 106, where line 12, after "chosen" should be added "and should consist only of 48 persons to be chosen," and line 24, "Brusler" should be "Brewster," and p. 107, 8 lines from bottom, "fully" should be "plainly.") [3 pages. Ibid. No. 14i.]
July 22.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to the King. Concerning the affairs of Dublin. (Printed in Camden, Essex, Vol. I. p. 108.) The passage omitted is:—The accounts I have given of the rise and progress of this whole affair are so particular, and (if I may say so) so impartial that your Majesty may as clearly and securely determine what is to be done, as if you were upon the place, especially since I can assure you that whatever you shall command cannot fail of being punctually executed. It is time some resolution be taken, and therefore I humbly offer that, as soon as your greater affairs permit, you will put an end to this matter, which has been the only difficulty I have met with since my arrival and is the only uneasy thing in the whole government. [4 pages. Ibid. No. 15.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
Order in Council that Lord Arlington prepare a warrant for the King's signature to the Commissioners of the Admiralty for their impressing 1,000 men to serve in the fleet this present expedition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 155.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Mary How, setting forth that her husband William How, being master and part owner of the Thomas and Mary, on his return from Jamaica in 1672 was taken by a Spanish man-of-war and carried into Spain, where the ship and goods were made prize, and that he is still detained prisoner at Seville, and praying relief:—that Lord Arlington effectually recommend the petitioner's condition to the Spanish Ambassador, and endeavour to prevail with him that her husband be released and satisfaction given for the seizure of the said ship and goods. [Ibid. No. 156.]
July 23.
Yarmouth.
Monsr. de "Schonberg" to Lord [Arlington]. I have received the letter you wrote me by Monsr. de Renfosse. If you are content with me on the subject of the insult Prince Rupert has given me, I shall be also, assuring myself that at a proper time and place you will take care of me, and prevent me from being often exposed to the violence of that Prince. I am afraid he does not take the advice of the wisest, and that he allows himself to be governed by his former page, Sir William Reeves. I have hitherto worked at making the troops encamp regularly, and we have begun to make them perform their exercise by companies. In three days we shall do it by regiments. I shall say nothing of their being badly enough disciplined, but they are also insolent and disobedient to their officers. This comes from their allowing them to drink too much. Also some soldiers have been taken who deserted when actually on guard; they are in prison. I received the articles from Prince Rupert, but there is no Judge Advocate to go by the forms in a Council of War, and one should be sent us and a minister or two, for here there is only Sir Walter Vane's. We have no news of the fleet. A ketch just arrived saw them at sea on the 21st half way between Zealand and England. I beg pardon for the liberty I have taken in enclosing a letter to Madame de Schonberg. One of your secretaries has only to send it to the post with yours. [2 pages. French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 157.]
July 23.
The Royal Prince, about 10 leagues north from the StenBank, under sail to the Broad Fourteens.
Sir C. Lyttelton to Lord [Arlington]. Yesterday the Dutch being in sight of our fleet, and the General riding next to them, wind W.N.W., his Highness weighed. The enemy at the same time got loose, and stood in for their own coast a little way, and then tacked and stood off with us. Then the General about 11 o'clock made a signal for the rear to tack, so the Blue squadron became the van. The wind shifted about 2 and came about to the S.S.W. and S.W. by S. by which the enemy had the weather gage, and in number 78 sail. Our fleet was in great disorder by making that tack, which brought the rear into the van, and brought the Red and White squadrons so much to leeward of the Blue, that about 3 Sir E. Spragg thought fit to bear away again into the fleet, the enemy keeping the wind, as if they had no great mind to bear down to us. About 4 the enemy tacked, and bore away towards their own coast, and we kept on this course towards the Broad Fourteens. Their fleet seemed very inconsiderable to ours, and, if they would have been drawn out to sea, which was his Highness' design, as I suppose, no doubt we should have had much the odds in matter of force on our side. I beg that what I write to you, my name may not be used in the report of, because through ignorance of the sea matters I may be liable to many mistakes and to write of them, not as they will be told from those whose business 'tis more properly to give account of them. I should not presume to trouble you with them, but from the obedience I owe to your commands. It's the opinion of very few here that we shall be able to draw the enemy to give us a fair battle for it, and, till that be done, there is not much to be expected, I fear, of any other considerable advantage upon them. Therefore I pray God send his Majesty a good peace, which I assure you is as well the prayer of almost all I have spoken with of that matter. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 158.]
[July ?] Capt. Redmond Bourke to the Earl of Arlington. Petition for a pass to France, and for money for his journey, having returned on the King's proclamation, and being so ill that his physicians say he cannot recover without returning to France. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 159.]
[July ?] Capt. Redmond Bourke to the King. Petition for relief, having served first in the foot guards, then in the late war against the Hollanders, till forced abroad, because Roman Catholics were forbidden to serve here, and having returned home on the late proclamation recalling his Majesty's subjects. [Ibid. No. 160.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Thomas, Viscount Osborne of Dumblane in Scotland, the Lord High Treasurer, and the heirs male of his body, of the dignities of Baron Osborne of Kiveton, co. York, and Viscount Latimer, to show the King's value of his services, with a grant of 20 marks a year for the better support of this honour. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 269.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Cyril Wyche and Henry Guy, who had purchased for 1,000l. of the Queen Mother a lease for 31 years of the reliefs payable out of the fee-farm rents in jointure to her, praying for compensation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 76.]
July 23. Pass for Redmond Bourke to go to France. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 76.]
July 23. Warrants for payment of 60l. per annum for board wages in lieu of diet and of 300l. per annum for salary to Winifred Wyndham, dresser to the Queen. [Ibid.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. The Committee for AIrish ffairs having to-day presented the ensuing report, viz.:— We have in obedience to your Majesty's commands considered certain Rules and directions published last September for regulating the Irish corporations, and find that the Act of Explanation requires that a regulation be made before 29 Sept. last, and in pursuance thereto observe that the Lord Lieutenant by a letter of last August represented the necessity of dispatching this affair, and also specified the particular Rules, which on consideration in Ireland were thought fit to be published, and that in answer thereto your Majesty, by your letters of 31 Aug. last, approved of the said Rules, but with variation in one particular. After this we proceeded to read such of the Rules as extended to all corporations in general, next those made for 17 principal corporations, and lastly those made for the City of Dublin, in all which we find a power reserved to the Lord Lieutenant to dispense with the oath of Supremacy to such of the Roman Catholics as being chosen for magistrates he shall think fit. But we presume not to advise anything hereon, because the Lord Lieutenant has pursued your Majesty's commands, this being the variation in the above royal letters. We also observe in the said Rules that the oath of Allegiance is without any dispensation enjoined to all magistrates, and therefore we conceive it is meant the oath of Allegiance usually administered before the late rebellion, and because the Rules extending to the generality of small corporations mention but two points, the one, for qualifying magistrates, and the other, for encouragement of aliens, we conceive in all other points of government the regulation is to be made according to their own charters. On the whole we are humbly of opinion that the Rules and directions are much for your Majesty's service and the good government of that kingdom, and are therefore fit to be put speedily into execution:—which report being read and seriously considered, his Majesty approved and confirmed the same, and directed that the suspension of the above mentioned Rules and directions enjoined by his letter of 5 Nov. last be revoked, and further ordered that Lord Arlington cause the contents of the said report to be framed into a letter for his Majesty's signature to the Lord Lieutenant, with a signification of his Majesty's pleasure that the above suspension be taken off, and the said Rules put in execution. [1½ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 16.]
July 23.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. The Committee for Irish Affairs having presented the following report, viz., In obedience to your Majesty's commands we have examined the late difference in the Corporation of Dublin about the election of Common Council men out of the several companies, which by the Rule ought to be by the Lord Mayor, and only in the presence of a Sheriff and eight Aldermen. The Lord Mayor, being very unsteady in this point of his power, made first a choice of Common Council men (among whom were ten or eleven Roman Catholics), but in the whole they were not a third of those that should be chosen, and therefore he takes a subsequent day to complete the number, but between these two days, varying from his first opinion, he choses a complete number of all at once leaving out the said Roman Catholics. We are of opinion that this last choice was most legal and agreeable to the Rules, and we the rather judge it proper for your Majesty to approve thereof, because we find by what the Lord Lieutenant has represented touching some disorders in that Corporation in consequence of the said double choice, that the adhering to this Rule, and the choice made according to it is likely to pacify and compose all: —which report being read and considered, his Majesty approved thereof, and ordered the Earl of Arlington prepare a letter for his signature to the Lord Lieutenant, intimating his Majesty's approbation of the said report, and requiring him to give directions that this affair be settled accordingly. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Copies of the reports recited in the last two documents. [Ibid. Nos. 18, 19.]
July 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of [certain of the Yeomen of the Guard] and, if it appears that, as they allege, they have not assigned away the money appointed them out of the hearth money for a year's wages, he is to give order for payment of the same to them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 161.]
July 24.
London.
Elias Ashmole to Williamson. As he has been informed by Mr. Francis on his late return from Cologne, that his Excellency had ordered the delivery of his Book of the Garter to the Elector Palatine and Count Marchin, presenting him with his humble acknowledgements for so great a favour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 162.]
July 24.
Whitehall.
Commission to Sir Thomas Armstrong to be lieutenant and major of the King's troop of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, p. 77.]
July 24. Commission to Thomas Coale to be ensign to Major Halsey in the garrison of the Isle of Wight. Minute. [Ibid.]
[July ?] John Richard, postmaster in France between France and England and other foreign countries, to the King and Privy Council. Petition, praying that Lord Arlington, the Postmaster-General, or any other Lord of the Council be appointed to examine into and report on the difference between the petitioner and his partners and Col. Bishop, who in 1663 was entrusted for the posts between England and France, and who by an account made in that year in the customary manner according to the lists of the number of letters sent by every post was a debtor to the petitioner and his partners for two sums of 3,647 livres 6 sols and 439 livres 3 sols, for which sums the petitioners and his partners have never been able to obtain satisfaction, it being improper that all that passed between the postoffice in London and that in France should be submitted to the judgment of the Courts in the ordinary course of law. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 163.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the above petition that the petitioner attend Lord Arlington with his petition and the accounts thereto annexed, who, having examined the same and heard Col. Bishop, is to report the true state of the case with his opinion thereon. [Ibid. No. 164.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
John Richards to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 127. The part in cipher is:—Don Bernar b [d?] o 369. 707. 24. 68.
de Sa li na s 115. 500. 166. 143. 151. 83. went not hence till last night and trouble d hast ne d a wa y not a little 954. 31. to find himself 301. 152. 31. 22. 182. 101. by his Majesty lest the King of France should 279. 1,001. who did so 484. 342. 918. 678. any je a lo y upon his long er st a entertain 703. 135. 21. 144. us 102. 784. 216. 481. 204. 252. 22. y here Ma d l le Qu ru ue l le 101. 303. This night 231. 31. 58. 142. 248. 251. 181. 56. 142. is made Dutch ess of Port s Count ess of Fa re ha 808 542. 155. 414. 83. mouth and 368. 542. 155. 121. 165. 129. m. 62.) [Ibid. No. 165.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 128.) [3 pages. Ibid. No. 166.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 130, where, 7 lines from bottom, "Coke" should be "Croke.") [7 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 167.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. All we have from the fleet is that the Dutch having on the 22nd made a show as if they intended to engage, his Highness put everything in order accordingly, but on Sir E. Spragg's advancing towards them, they, having the weather gage, retired again within their banks, and the Prince sailed Northwards. Our land forces remain encamped at Yarmouth, and the vessels ready in the Road to transport them, if occasion be. Meanwhile Monsr. Schomberg busies himself in exercising and disciplining both officers and soldiers, who, it is said, stand sufficiently in need of it. The King has made Madlle. Querouelle, Duchess of Portsmouth, &c. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 168.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
R. Francis to Williamson. To-day being your birthday, going to wait Lady O'Brien's commands, she obliged me to dine there, as did also Mr. Everard, Mr. Yard and Mr. Ball, where we had some Cobham venison, and wine by her order to drink your health, which was likewise very religiously done by the innocent expressions of your little godson and the rest of the family. I do not perceive any prospect of an occasion of sending me back yet, and do not think there will be one till something offers from your Excellency or the fleet. [Ibid. No. 169.]
July 25.
Durham.
The two most strange and wonderful Prophets, created before Adam, and now living to the admiration of all People, by J. G. With a faithful description and account of their miraculous habits, unusual course of living, and unheard of deeds. As also a New Prophecy, lately discovered, written on a Smaragdian Table by a learned Rosy-Crusian, With its Prodigious interpretation. Ignorantia Filia Admiratio. (The two prophets are a cock and a raven.) [Printed Pamphlet. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F.]
July 25. Commission to Robert Delavall to be ensign to Capt. Robert Delavall in the Earl of Ogle's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 77.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Pass for Rowland Joris, of Dort, to transport himself into England. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 77.]
July 25. Pass for Algernon Sidney to come from any port beyond the seas by any ship into any English port. [Ibid.]
July 25. Warrant to the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral of England, to take off the embargo from ships in the port of London and the Thames, ordered 12 May. [Ibid. p. 78.]
July 25. Grant to John Boreman of the offices of underkeeper of the Palace at Greenwich, of keeper of the house called Newhouse or Whitehouse, near Greenwich Park, and of surveyor and keeper of the dwarf orchard and wildernesses of the Honour of Greenwich. [Ibid.]
July 25. Warrant to four of the undersearchers in the port of London, for the enjoyment by John Seymour of the fees and other benefits of his place of undersearcher during his absence from that duty on the King's service. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 80.]
July 25. Warrant for a grant to Thomas Derham of the offices of clerk or register of the Court of Chancery and Patents in the Island of Jamaica for his life. [Ibid.]
July 25. Warrant for a grant of the office of clerk of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas, at Port Royal in Jamaica, to Anthony Wingfield. [Ibid. p. 81.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter under the Great Seal of Scotland requiring James, Archbishop of St. Andrews, to consecrate and install James Ramsay, Bishop Elect of Dumblane, to be Bishop of the said bishopric. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 256.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Warrants for a charter in favour of Sir George Gordon of Haddo, his heirs male and assigns, for erecting the town and lands of Tarves into a free burgh of barony with a weekly market and four yearly fairs. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 257.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to William Gray of Inverightie, and the heirs male of his body, which failing, to Michael Gray of Turfbeg, and the heirs male of his body, which failing, to George Gray of Halcartowne, and the heirs male of his body, which all failing, to the said William Gray, his nearest heirs and assigns whatsoever, under the reservations and conditions specified in the letters of disposition granted to the said William and his foresaids by William Gray of Carse, his father, of the lands, barony and thanadge of Tannadace (with the exceptions therein mentioned) and other lands, on the resignations of the said William Gray, elder and younger, Patrick, Earl of Kinghorn, Sir James Sinclair of Auldbarre, John Scrimgeor of Kirktowne, and John Skene of Halzeards, with a novodamus, and a union of the premises in a free barony to be called the barony of Tannadace, and a ratification of the infeftments to Elizabeth Paterson and Magdalen Wood of the respective lands whereunto they are provided during their lifetimes. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 258.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to the persons named in the last charter in the same order of succession under the reservations and conditions specified in the said letters of disposition of the said William Gray, the elder, of the lands of Inverightie, Halcartowne and others on the resignations of the said William Gray, the elder and younger, Gideon Guthrie, and Patrick, Lord Gray, with a novodamus and a union of the premises into a free barony and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 259.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter from his Majesty as King and as Prince and Steward of Scotland, to George Houstoun of Johnstoun, brother of Sir Patrick Houstoun of that ilk, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Over and Nether Johnstoun and other lands and teinds in the parochine of Kilbarchane and barony and sheriffdom of Renfrew, which formerly belonged to Sir Lodovick Houstoun of that ilk, deceased, and were disposed by him to the said George his second son, and the heirs male of his body, which failing, to return to the said Sir Lodovick and his heirs, the superiority of which lands and teinds was resigned by the said Sir Patrick to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer in favour of the said George, and the said Sir Patrick renounced, in favour of the said George, the provision whereby, failing the heirs male of the body of the said George, the premises are to return to the said Sir Lodovick and his heirs, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 261.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment from his Majesty as Prince and Steward of Scotland to William Wallace of Sewaltowne and his heirs of the lands of Sewaltowne and other lands with the fishing of salmon and other fishes in the water of Irving and in the mouth of the said Water, all in the parochine of Dundonald, bailliary of Kilstewart and sheriffdom of Ayr, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 263.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter of new infeftment to William Stodart, merchant, burgess of Edinburgh, and Elizabeth White, his spouse, and the survivor of them in life rent, and to Christian Stodart, their daughter, and the heirs of her body, which falling to the said Elizabeth and her heirs and assigns in fee, of the lands of Southhouse and Stratoun, on the resignation of Thomas Bowman and Hugh McCulloch, who disponed the lands of Southhouse to the said William Stodart, and of Alexander Stratoun of that ilk, who disponed to the said William the superiority thereof, with a novodamus and an erection of the premises into a free barony to be called the barony of Southhouse and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt-ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 265.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
The King to Viscount Ranelagh and other the Treasury Commissioners in Ireland. Warrant for payment, out of the 13,730l. 8s. per annum designed by the present establishment for the maintenance of a sea regiment, of 2,000l. sterling to the Earl of St. Albans, in repayment of the like sum formerly disbursed by him in obedience to the King's commands and for his particular and secret service. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 481.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for ordering Viscount Ranelagh and the rest of the Commissioners of the Treasury in Ireland to make the payment directed in the last. [Ibid. p. 499.]
July 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the warrant of 3 July, 1672 (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1672, p. 310), and that doubts had arisen whether payment was thereby warranted of the 750l. therein mentioned out of the yearly sum designed for the maintenance of a sea regiment, which was at present the only visible fund for answering the said sum:—for giving effectual orders to Lord Ranelagh and the rest of the Treasury Commissioners in Ireland to pay the said sum of 750l., or so much thereof as remains unpaid, to Richard, Lord Le Power and Curraghmore, out of the said yearly sum designed for the maintenance of a sea regiment. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 496.]
July 26. Commissions for Charles Coventry to be lieutenant and Edward Harris to be cornet in Sir Charles Wyndham's troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment of horse. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 87.]
July 26. Commission to Charles Wheldon to be chaplain to the Earl of Peterborough's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 76.]
July 26. Approbation by the King of Thomas Jervois and Sir Herbert Crofts to be deputy-lieutenants for Hampshire and Herefordshire respectively. [Ibid.]
July 26. Commission to Sir Charles Wyndham to be captain of Sir Thomas Armstrong's troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. f. 77.]
July 26. Commission to [Edward] Griffin to be cornet and captain of the King's troop of Guards. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 26. Commission to Charles, Lord Cornwallis, to be guidon to the King's troop of Guards. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 26. Commission to [Edward] Aston to be lieutenant and major of the King's troop of Guards. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
Licence to Richard, Viscount Lumley, to hunt in any part of Bere Forest this summer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 271.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Earl of Rothes, Sir James Dalrymple of Stair, President of the College of Justice, and to the remanent Senators thereof. Whereas Samuel Souton, of London, merchant, has represented that the free Swedish ship Calmer, on which he had shipped 92 lasts of pitch and tar for the supply of the King's stores and 200 ship pounds of iron for ballast, was last September brought into Leith by a Scotch privateer, and there condemned as prize on pretence of the master being a Hollander, and the pass running in the name of the Tar Company of Sweden, notwithstanding the proofs offered that he was a citizen of Calmer and a free Swedish subject for these five years and was then bound for London, and the pass and other papers ran in the name of the said Tar Company for the more certain supply of the King's stores and securing them from the enemy, being all done in Sweden by the knowledge and advice of Henry Coventry, then Ambassador Extraordinary there, requiring them to take the case into their further consideration, that Souton may be restored to or satisfied for his goods, or else explain the reason why in justice it cannot be done, and further desiring that another case of Souton's founded on the same contract for supply of stores, concerning the Fortune of Stralsund, bound for London, now depending before them, she having been declared free by the High Court of Admiralty in Scotland last December, may be speedily dispatched. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 266.]
July 27.
The Royal Sovereign, before the Texel.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. In my last of the 22nd I gave you an account of my last sight of the Dutch fleet, and indeed of my last hearing from them, for though I have sent scouts abroad and to Schonvelt, I cannot yet hear any certainty, but conclude them to be there. In my last I also gave an account of that whole proceeding, and doubtless had I not had his Majesty's positive restraint from attacking them in Schonvelt, or had not the wind on their setting sail after us so strangely veered, I had given a good account of them. I then likewise gave an account of my steering along the coast of Holland northward. I am now before the Texel, which is 6 leagues S.E. from us, and we ride along the coast in a line N.N.E. and S.S.W., the White to the Southward of us, the Blue to the N., and I with my squadron in the centre. I have sent a small vessel, a good sailer, express with this, and desire to receive his Majesty's positive commands by this bearer as to these particulars and with all possible speed. Whether I shall send for the land forces? (If I receive his Majesty's commands herein, I intend to send four frigates to convoy them and to stand half seas over to receive them.) Whether I shall attend the Dutch East India fleet, if I get intelligence of them, and in what ports I may attack them? Whether I shall attack the enemy in Schonvelt, in case they come not out to us? Though I presume in these desires hazards may appear and attend, yet I shall use all my care to obey, in case his Majesty shall think fit to command me, and if he shall on second thoughts command me to attack the enemy in Schonvelt or to put in execution any other of these desires, I request no time may be lost, the season being far spent, and consequently we cannot expect much more fair weather. I have only now one small concern more worth your knowledge. I sending yesterday the Crown towards the Texel, she, making a sail, in a few hours got up with her and took her. She proved to be a Bristol ship of 12 guns taken by a Dutch privateer off Jamaica, laden with sugars and logwood (about 250 tons). She was sent round Scotland for Amsterdam with a lieutenan and 18 seamen. The privateer who was her convoy being not far off I am in hopes to find also, this being the 10th of French and English she has taken in those parts. She carries 40 guns. The Dutch have much lightened her; what remains shall be taken care of and sent for England. I only beg you further that I may hear as often as possible, for it will be a great guide to me in my transactions here. I have not heard from you since I sailed out of the river. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 170.]
July 27. [Prince Rupert] to Lord [Arlington]. In Capt. Baron's hand I sent you my opinion what is to be done against the Dutch, to which I shall only add, that, if his Majesty will have either of them well done, he must send me Sir Robert Holmes. If there were not a necessity of this, I would not, after so many denials, press it. I do it only to save the King's honour, which, if we do nothing more this year will suffer. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 171.]
July [27]. Prince Rupert to the King. I have given your Majesty by Lord Arlington my humble opinion concerning your business. You will pardon me, if it should not agree with your Majesty's, being my ends are only for your honour and service. We sailed along the shore by Scheveling, where some colours of the Guards were drawn up, and all along some men in no very good order, so that I suppose them to have been most of the country people. In the Texel lie three great ships, of what condition I could not yet learn. What is in the Vlye within a few hours I shall know, I hope before this re-taken prize goes off. The new shallops prove extraordinary well, especially those with your Majesty's invention. The Charles bears a very reasonable sail, yet will be serviceable. The Gillingham frigate gets up her anchors as fast at present as any of the great ships, and, I doubt not, when her guns are loose will sail as well. Heaven send us but such weather as hitherto we have had. I most humbly beseech your Majesty to dispatch this bearer back with all speed with your pleasure, which, whatever it be, shall be most exactly obeyed by me. [Misdated 17 but endorsed 27. Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 172.]
July 28. Certificates by Henry Bodvill that Thomas Tillett, late chairman, and Anthony Goddart. late footman to the late Queen Mother, never received any reward or gratuity from the King or from the trustees of the revenue late in jointure to her Majesty besides the salaries and linen money due to them. With note at foot of each, dated 29 July, by Sir Robert Howard that nothing has been paid, nor are there any moneys payable to the above mentioned at the receipt of the Exchequer. [Ibid. Nos. 173, 174.]
July 28. Paper by the Gambia Adventurers, stating that when their contract not to sell redwood expires next September, they intend to sell it by auction, whereby salters, dyers, and clothiers may be supplied at first hand, hoping that the Council of Trade will thereupon advise his Majesty to recall his suspension of the Navigation Act, as to bringing in saunders and other dyeing woods from Holland, which make a false dye and are prejudicial to the trade of his own plantations, and praying that by order of Council his Majesty's resolution may be published and that theirs may be put as an advertisement in the Gazette. [Ibid. No. 175.]
July 28.
London.
James Hickes to Williamson. I have imparted the contents of yours of the 16/26th to several archers, who rejoice exceedingly at your acceptance of the Stewardship, and your free and kindly remembrances to them. Your health and safe return with the conclusion of a happy peace is sincerely prayed by all that know you, and that I converse with. Time has not yet permitted me to see Sir J. Robinson, Sir T. Player, or Sir J. Sheldon, but I shall make it my business to wait on them and make known your kindness. I am now just got out of my bed from the violence of the gout, which there detained me all last night till noon to-day. [Ibid. No. 176.] Annexed,
List of the Archers that won the 54 prizes 7 and 14 July. [Ibid. No. 176 I.]
July 28.
Spring Garden.
Sir R. Southwell to Williamson. I hear no further of the progress of our two executors, but how active they may be in private I cannot say. I minded Mr. Francis of your box of wax candles sent by Frank Parry, and he will contrive their going to Cologne. My last from Mr. Parry tells me of the very scandalous rumours that many merchants of Cadiz and Seville, coming to his town, declare touching our friend at Madrid, as if he and all his family but the cook were professed Romanists. The Prize business lies very sick. We all have orders for half a year's salary signed, but, unless the fleet send in something, we may despair of payment. We have solicited for half a year's salary as Clerks of the Council, and our orders are signed. I hope you left power to somebody to give a receipt. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 177.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
W. Bridgeman to Williamson. Requesting him to supply a blank date in the copy of the King's instructions which he will receive in Lord Arlington's letter of that night, being the date of a letter sent him from the King in June concerning the East India Company, as the date as entered in the books is probably wrong by mistake, and so he has thought it better to leave it blank to be filled up by his Excellency, and also requesting him to order Mr. Benson to send him the date as it is in the letter remaining with his Excellency, that it may be so put in the original signed by the King. There is no news here, except that the Lord Treasurer's indisposition is so much augmented as not to be without apparent danger. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 178.]
July 28.
London.
Thomas Derham to Williamson. As his Majesty, or rather his own merits, at his return will make him principal Secretary of State, recommending Mr. Platt as his secretary. Besides his good mien, and his honesty and deportment he speaks and writes most elegantly and perfectly in their proper phrases Italian, Spanish, French, and Dutch, which none could do in the former office but Williamson himself, there being between understanding languages and performing this, as his Lordship knows, a vast difference. The Great Duke would not have placed him where he now is, if he had seen he did not well deserve it. Mr. Platt is not privy to this address. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 179.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to Williamson. I received yours of the 16/26th and am extremely troubled that your equipage sent from Paris did not answer your expectation, though I cannot find any neglect in myself of what lay in my power. I was exceedingly straitened in time both because the Duke pressed his departure from Paris, and you were somewhat late in your resolutions, and often changing, which might be a cause there were not so many clothes sent ready made up as I received measures for, though I am sure very few were wanting, for which I sent cloth and lace according to my directions, and I sent nothing that I had not your commands for in your letters that I have by me, nor have I to my knowledge omitted anything I was ordered to send. I imagine I am little beholden to Mr. Ellis in this matter, for had he but given an account of things nakedly as they passed, though you might not have been satisfied in every point, yet you could not but have pardoned it on the necessity I lay under. But it is a most unhandsome dealing to disown his having any particular of what was sent, for he knows he took it himself when he saw everything put up, which I can recall to his memory by several witnesses, if he has so soon forgotten it. I sent likewise by him a particular account of all the moneys I laid out. There were then remaining in my hands 700 and odd livres, which I gave him, taking his receipt. If he has not given you the account he ought, I suppose you will think yourself mistaken in him, for I received your commands to put all things into his hands. I wonder at Sir Peter Wych's not giving you an account of what moneys he received. I understand 300l. were remitted him, which would more than pay what was behind, but I cannot justly tell what the sum was or what I paid, my brother being out of town at present, in whose custody are all the papers I sent from Paris. At his return I will endeavour to satisfy you more distinctly. My Lord Duke acknowledges those of your Excellency by the enclosed. I reminded him to do it twice or thrice at the army, but still something intervened. The whole office is so concerned to give you an account of all that passes that nothing remains for me to add. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 180.]
July 28.
Asperbie.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. Congratulating him on his good health, and desiring his commands, if he may be capable of serving him in any way, resolving to be at London the latter end of next week. [Ibid. No. 181.]
July 28. Commission to Job Harby to be lieutenant to Capt. Stockman's company in the Duke of Buckingham's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 76.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
Licence to Tamberlaine Harvey, the king's sworn servant, who has attained great skill in preparing and administering medicines, and performing difficult operations in surgery, and is of the company of Barber-Surgeons, London, to sell his remedies and perform manual operations in public, in any place in England or Wales, he being already licensed thereunto by the Master of the Revels, and order that no stage be allowed to be erected by or near the place where he has erected one. Headed "Mountebank licence." [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 272.]
July 28.
Westminster Palace.
Warrant to Ralph Montague, Master of the Great Wardrobe, for the delivery to Lowde Cordell, appointed a page of the Bedchamber in ordinary in place of Maurice Deladale, deceased, of the following for a summer livery due at the Feast of the Nativity of St. John Baptist last, viz. 8 yards of scarlet for a cloak, jerkin and breeches at 25s. a yard, 2½ yards of baize to line the cloak at 2s. 8d. a yard, 6¼ yards of velvet to guard the cloak etc. at 20s. a yard, 10 doz. of silk lace at 5s. a dozen, 5 yards of fustian for a doublet at 2s. 6d. a yard, 8 doz. of silk buttons at 6d. a doz., two pair of worsted stockings at 7s. 6d. a pair, one pair of silk garters price 3s., one hat with a band price 12s., and for making the said cloak, jerkin, doublet, and breeches 40s., and for further delivering in future to the said Cordell the like parcels of the like stuffs at the like rates and prices, with the making before mentioned, at the Feasts of St. Andrew and the Nativity of St. John Baptist for his summer and winter liveries. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 16.]
July 29.
London.
Dr. L. Moody to Williamson. I am going into the country, and hope to return a month hence, where, if I cannot please every little humour in my old Lady, yet, if I can do any real service for her, as I hope my endeavours will be accepted by my Lord and Lady, so I doubt not but to have the favour you have hitherto shown me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 182.]
July 29.
2 a.m. Whitehall.
J. Richards to Williamson. We have lately received two grand affronts in the Mediterranean, one from Andrea Valier, the Venetian general, who with 20 galleys under his command at Zante took from the Jersey by violence a Dutch prize he was possessed of; the other from a Leghorn corsair, who took the Mediterranean, an English merchantman going from Tunis to Tripoli, that had on board the estate of the old Bassa of Tunis to the value of 200,000 or 300,000 pieces of eight. The Bassa himself, by the captain's care being first put ashore, escaped with his company, but his cry is so great for what he has lost, that he threatens, unless all be restored to him to complain to the Grand Signior, for whom, he says, the greatest part was designed as a present, and the merchants begin to fear the consequences thereof may be very ill. The Lord Treasurer continues very ill. [Ibid. No. 183.]
July 29.
The Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 113.) [The first part was written 18 July, but it was not finished till the 29th. Ibid. No. 184.]
July 29.
Guildhall.
Sir Thomas Player to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol I. p. 133, where p. 134, line 7, "coated" should be "routed.") [4 pages. Ibid. No. 185.]
July 29.
The Royal Sovereign, before the Texel.
Hartgill Baron to [Williamson]. Yours of 20 June found me here in the fleet about three weeks since. I am very glad that the true relation I sent you of our two battles came so seasonably, when the industry and activity of the Dutch had so vigorously spread their lies to the contrary. I question not that the same temper still governs, and that your country swarms with more inventions. After our last battle, having fought two in eight days, our yards, masts and rigging being battered, and our victual much wasted, his Highness thought fit to go into the Swale to revictual and refit, which we did. About 14 days since we sailed out again with the whole fleet, and this day sennight discovered them in their old hole at Schonvelt behind their sands. It not being thought fit as yet to attack them in, last Wednesday morning we sailed off with a gentle sail, either to entice them or provoke them out to sea. About an hour or two the Dutch set sail after us about 9 a.m. About 2 p.m., when his Highness thought he had drilled them a pretty distance, the wind being then N.W. he commanded our van to tack, and then we tacked with the whole fleet. This time the wind veered to S.W., by which the Dutch got the weather gage and a very good and fresh gale, and came up about a league from us. When they saw we were in earnest to fight them, they immediately tacked, and as the wind was then veered 'twas impossible for us to stretch to them, so they in great haste fled to their old sanctuary at Schonvelt. His Highness on this sailed a gentle sail along the coast of Holland to this place, where we now ride with the English and French fleets, both in very good condition. His Highness has commanded me to desire you to give him all the intelligence you can, particularly of the Dutch East India fleet. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 186.]
July 29.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. I have received yours of the 14th with the order of Council concerning farthings, wherein I cannot but observe a plain misrecital of our letter, which consequently produces a direction impossible for us to fulfil, for it seems to direct us to make use of such expedients as we shall think most proper for furnishing this kingdom with the farthings coined in England, whereas our letter desires, that, if we cannot be so conveniently supplied with those same farthings from thence, we may receive his Majesty's allowance to use such other means for our supply, as we shall think agreeable to the kingdom's wants. That you may see I am right I enclose copies both of our letter and the order. As for our drawing our farthings out of England, it is impossible any private man should undertake it, and I think it as unreasonable that the King should be at the charge, for whoever does it must pay money for them in England and consequently be at the loss of the exchange, amounting at least to 10 or 12 in the hundred. I do not wonder that those who are sharers in coining these farthings in England should desire, if they could, to put the expense of bringing them hither upon the King, but I think it a little strange that this was not perceived by the Council, when the order was agreed on. I am utterly ignorant how far the present grant for coinage of farthings extends, or whether Ireland as well as England is to be served with them by those patentees, but sure I am, if Ireland be in their grant, 'tis fit they should perform their undertaking and not suffer the kingdom to lie under the cheat of the small money, which, to the great prejudice of the whole nation, is now put upon them. I have a good deal considered the matter, and have, since my coming, heard several proposals relating to it, particularly one, of which Sir Edward Ford, long since dead, was the author, and Lord Inchiquin and others should have been sharers in it, and this is by little marks and other devices to know and prevent counterfeits; but I am clear of opinion that no trick will ever avail to hinder such frauds, and therefore there is but one way to obviate such abuses, which is by making the metal very near the intrinsic price set upon it, and on that ground I have desired the very same farthings, which are coined in England, may be sent us, fearing some might get a grant to utter farthings here of a slighter value. When I proposed my own undertaking to serve this kingdom with small money, my intention was, that if another would have gained 4,000l., I would have contented myself with two, out of which I purposed (though altogether unknown to him), to have given Sir Arthur Forbes, whom I find a very worthy man, and no other thing ready to gratify him with, a considerable share; but, my desire being chiefly for the public good, I beseech you to move his Majesty that it may be speedily put in some way or other, whatever he pleases, for the kingdom so abounds with counterfeit money of this sort, as 'tis a most insufferable grievance, all that list setting up to coin what farthings and half-pence they will, and put them upon the people, which truly we know not how absolutely to call in, till some public ones be allowed. Lord Orrery has had several letters from his Majesty for the remittal of his year's value, amounting to 900l. The consideration of this, as in all cases of the like nature, I referred to the Commissioners of the Treasury, to know whether, if I ordered this remittal according to the letter, they would not expect a defalcation from his Majesty. Their return is something ambiguous, yet I perceive, if I should direct it, they will reserve themselves a capacity of claiming a defalcation on that account. I therefore desire you to acquaint his Majesty with the state of this affair, and to know whether he continues this his favour to Lord Orrery, notwithstanding he foresees the money must be discounted to him at the conclusion of Lord Ranelagh's undertaking. Yesterday in Council we read the letter from his Majesty in justification of Lord Ranelagh, the Commissioners of the Treasury and the Farmers of the Revenue being present. The Farmers desired to have a copy, which, finding it not attested as entered at the Signet Office we denied them, but ordered the King's Counsel at law to proceed according to the directions therein. Mr. Godolphin has a request from his Majesty, which he has sent over to you. I have found him a very ingenious and faithful servant, and would be very glad to do something for him, which the reversions on all places here have hindered me, both to him and all others who depend on me. If you think fit to get what he now proposes passed, I conceive it will not injure any. The most likely to be prejudiced are the Farmers here, whom I have already spoken with and have their allowance, but before it shall be executed I shall likewise hear all objections that merchants or any others concerned may have against it. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 20.]
July 29. Report by Sir. F. North, Solicitor-General, on the petition of Sir Garrett Aylmer, calendared ante, p. 449, that his Majesty may grant to the petitioner the lands and hereditaments for such estates as he is restored to by the decree of the Court of Claims, with a proviso that they shall be subject to all charges and incumbrances they were made subject to by the said decree or the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, and may also grant him the reversion after the estate tail. [Ibid. No. 21.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. Whereas a letter from Sir Clement Harby, the consul at Zante, states that Capt. Walsh of the Jersey coming from Smyrna with his charge of merchant ships for Zante, took, about twenty miles from Zante, a ship he suspected to be Dutch, and brought her into that road, which Andrea Valier, general of the Venetian galleys, hearing of, sent to require the prize, on pretence she was a Venetian, but Capt. Walsh refusing to deliver her, because he justly suspected her to be Dutch from her master and most of her men being Dutch, from her trading for several years in those parts with Dutch colours, and from her paying obedience and consulage to the Dutch consul there, besides divers Dutch colours being found on board, the said general immediately sequestered the commanders of the English merchant ships then on shore, and with his whole fleet of 20 galleys and two galleasses in the night forcibly possessed himself of the said prize, threatening, if Capt. Walsh opposed him, he would not only destroy the King's ship, but detain and carry to Corfu all the English merchant ships, and whereas the said letter further represents, that about six weeks ago, when the Amity, a small English merchant ship, was trading in the Zante road, her boat was set upon by that of the customers, and two Englishmen were dangerously wounded and one killed, but the murderers having taken refuge in the State's ships of war, no justice could be had against them; it was ordered that Lord Arlington prepare a letter for the King's signature to the Republic of Venice complaining of the said injuries and affronts, which his Majesty highly resents, and expects that speedy justice be executed on those that set on the English boat, and that the said Dutch prize or the value thereof be restored. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 187.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of the Levant Company which set forth, that they are informed by the Consuls at Leghorn and Tripoli, that Haly Bassa, the Bassa of Tunis, embarked for Tripoli on the Mediterranean, an English ship, but was chased by a corsair of Leghorn, yet with his men landed safe at Tripoli, and afterwards the Mediterranean went away with the corsair without any shot or sign of hostility, which has given the Bassa occasion to pretend that there was on board a present of the value of two or three hundred thousand dollars for the Grand Seignior, which, if not returned, shall be made good by the English in the Levant, and that the consequence thereof will redound to the disturbance of the trade in Turkey, where the matter will be represented with all aggravations, and that this corsair is the same that lately plundered the Lyon, another English ship, on her passage from Tunis to Smyrna, and now again presumes to affront the English navigation, notwithstanding the King's interposition and letters in that former case, and prayed his Majesty's letters to the Grand Duke of Tuscany:—that Lord Arlington prepare a letter for the King's signature to the said Grand Duke, demanding entire restitution of the Bassa's goods and moneys with reparation for damages, and that the said offender may receive condign punishment, and further desiring, that the commanders of the said corsair and the Mediterranean and the goods in both ships be secured till the business be examined and restitution made as aforesaid. [Ibid. No. 188.]
July 30.
The Royal Prince, near the Texel.
Sir C. Lyttelton to Lord [Arlington]. This goes by a prize taken three or four days since by the Crown, which might have proved of considerable value, had she fallen into better hands. I have written more fully thereof to Sir R. Southwell. We are in some expectation that the enemy's fleet will come to us, because they were seen out the day before yesterday and stood this way. Last night his Highness intended to have weighed this morning, but it's now 8 and his topsail is not loose, so possibly there may be new advice. Wind N.W. and we have a lee shore. A small dogger boat valued at 200l. is ordered to attend me here as a Commissioner of Prizes. If you will move his Majesty to bestow it on me when the service is over, it will be a very seasonable obligation to support the expense I have lately had, and am still making in his service. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 189.]
July 30. Warrant to the keeper of the Gatehouse to discharge Don Emanuel de Fonseca, the Spanish consul. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 81.]
July 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiral to impress 1,000 men to serve in the fleet in the present expedition. [Ibid.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 135, where last line but one "there yn" should be "there, then," and p. 137, last line but 3 "he said" should be inserted after "else.") [6 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 190.]
July 31. Richard Minshull to Mistress Grant at Longacre. On her son's return commending his carriage and behaviour, he having lived both frugally and studiously to the great improvement of his parts. [Ibid. No. 191.]
July 31. Caveat that no presentation pass of the Rectory of Barkhamsted Norchurch, co. Hertford, without notice to Mr. Chiffinch. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 19.]
July 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas we formerly granted all our right, remainder and reversion in the barony of Decies, formerly belonging to John FitzGerald of Dromana, co. Waterford, or to any of his ancestors to the Earl of Arlington, who has agreed and compounded about the same with Richard, Lord Le Power, whereby with the consent of the said Earl we have, by letters patent of 20 April last, granted and confirmed to the said Lord Le Power in fee simple all our right, title and interest in all the hereditaments formerly belonging to the said John FitzGerald, or to any of his ancestors; our will and pleasure is that you forthwith cause our Attorney or Solicitor General in Ireland to bring a writ or writs of covenant against the said Lord Le Power, or such other persons as his counsel shall advise, and according to law to accept of one or more fine or fines of all the hereditaments comprised in the said letters patent, and yet, notwithstanding the said fines, our will and pleasure is to grant to the said Lord Le Power all the said hereditaments in fee simple according to the tenor of the letters patent, notwithstanding any privy signet granted thereof to the Earl of Arlington, and notwithstanding any other matter or any opposition of any person to the contrary. [Draft. 1½ page. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 22.]
July. Warrant to pay to Richard, Viscount Ranelagh, and William, Lord Brereton, 8,397l. 2s. 4½ d., due to them in right of their wives as daughters and coheiresses of Francis, late Lord Willoughby of Parham, for their moiety of 4½ per cent. of the revenue of Barbados employed in the King's service in the former war against the Dutch. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 353.]
[July ?] Statement concerning the opening of the Quay from London Bridge to the Temple. On a petition presented to the King in Council and referred to the Lord Chancellor he appointed to hear all parties in April, where it was agreed the fences should be pulled down and the way cleared and levelled, which the Lord Mayor promised to do himself. Nothing however being done, the inhabitants complained again to the Lord Chancellor, who appointed 26 May for hearing them, when it was agreed to make a beginning of a quay and that all fences and other obstructions be forthwith removed from London Bridge to Dowgate Dock and from the Temple to Whitefriars Dock so as to begin at both ends and meet, for which purpose an order was signed by the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Mayor and served on all parties between London Bridge and Dowgate Dock. Nothing being still done, 16 June, the inhabitants petitioned his Majesty in Council again with a copy of the said order annexed, on which it was ordered that the obstructions from London Bridge to Dowgate Dock be forthwith removed and the quay laid open, and the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs were directed to see the same executed accordingly. They have accordingly in person warned the parties whose fences were standing to pull them down before Monday, June 28 (sic), at furthest, and they accordingly came on that day and warned them again to pull them down, or let them stand at their peril; for that they must return the names of the offenders to the King and Council, but notwithstanding the fences and obstructions remain standing. [See ante, p. 381. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 192.]
[July ?] Reply of Thomas Ireland to the letter of the Dean of Durham calendared ante, p. 397. Much thereof is irrelevant, for granting they have the guardianship of the spiritualities, sede vacante, it is only asked why they did not allow the King the recommendation of him to be their commissary, whom he constituted to be chancellor when there shall be a bishop. They chose the last bishop's chancellor to be so; why not now the King's ? The weightiest is, they say they are bound to chose a commissary within 8 days, and they did so, before anything was known of my appointment as chancellor. But the Dean had notice of it at the burial of Dr. Burrell, and again 3 or 4 days after. If, as he says, he was to send news of the vacancy to his brethren, which would take 3 or 4 days by post, and then they must have a meeting to propose persons to him, which asks the same time to return, and then his consent is to go, certainly he might have prevented the effects of his first letter. It seems from his letter they would have chosen me had they known of it. To say they did not imagine when I asked to be chancellor, I meant to be commissary, is to suppose I moved the King for an uncertainty. I did not know indeed there was such a thing to be asked, nor that their statutes obliged them to so quick a choice. As soon as I did, I made all civil application for it, with a letter to the Dean from Lord Arlington, and have not been guilty of the least disrespect. The Dean told me he was sorry it was out of his power, but, if the King's letter came, they knew not how to oppose it, which was the ground of seeking a mandate which was accompanied by a most obliging letter from Lord Arlington, to both of which the above was the answer. I must insist they are under their promise of resigning at the King's feet; the delay of their immediate obedience has been dispensed with in order to it, and now it is what is desired and expected of them. As to my aspersing the Dean, I meant only what I had heard from his own mouth, that having been at great expenses in a suit with the Archbishop they thought to exercise this office by some of themselves. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 193.] Probably enclosed,
July ?] Statement of the case as to the Chancellorship of Durham with arguments against the contention of the Dean and Chapter. [Ibid. No. 193I.]
[July ?] Copy of 37 Hen. VIII. c. 17, empowering chancellors etc. to exercise ecclesiastical jurisdiction. [Ibid. No. 193II.]
[July ?] Paper of the Dean of Durham concerning Mr. Ireland. After shortly stating the facts about him, inquiring whether this Chancellor by virtue of his patent from the King can act as judge in the Ecclesiastical Court, so as acts done by him by virtue thereof are valid, and whether on an appeal, they will not be made nullities as being acts done coram non judice. [Ibid. No. 194.]
[July ?] Statement that Henry Hickmote enlisted in the Earl of Mulgrave's regiment, 16 June, but having previously given bail in the Marshal's Court in an action for a pretended debt of 20s., lest his bail should be injured, appeared, and was committed by Sir James Butler, who would not allow him to return to his colours, though demanded by the sergeant. [Ibid. No. 195.]
[July ?] John Giles to the King and the Privy Council. Petition, stating that he by order of the Earl of Mulgrave, commander of the Royal Katherine, pressed several seamen by virtue of his Royal Highness' warrant, and having 21 June last pressed two seamen, the constable not only refused to assist him but released the men, and carried the petitioner and his men before Justice Barker who committed them to New Prison, where they still remain in great distress, although discharged by the Justice, because they have not money to pay their fees, and praying an order for their discharge, that they may return to their ship. [Ibid. No. 196.]
[July ?] Humphrey Holcombe, of London, merchant, to Thomas, Viscount Osborne, Lord High Treasurer. Petition, stating that the late Lord Treasurer had ordered Alderman Backwell to pay the petitioner 650l., due by his protested bill from Lisbon, in part of 1,000l. he owed the petitioner, that the Alderman pretending want of money the late Lord Treasurer assigned him the same out of the Queen's portion by Mr. Pollixfin and Mr. Parry, the agent at Lisbon, and that the petitioner has received only 470l., leaving 180l. due, and praying his Lordship to see the late Lord Treasurer's order of 17 Dec. and the petitioner's papers in Sir R. Howard's hands, and to command Alderman Backwell to give obedience thereto without further delays. (See S.P. Dom., 1671–2, p. 425.) [Ibid. No. 196A.]