BHO

Charles II: August 1673

Pages 474-524

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1673. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1902.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Please subscribe to access the page scans

This volume has gold page scans.
Access these scans with a gold subscription.Key icon

August 1673

Friday.
Aug. 1.
Samuel Lamot to the Earl of Arlington. Requesting him to move his Majesty that one or two fences on the quay be removed, and doubtless all the rest will follow between London Bridge and Dowgate, as the keeping them thus long standing has been an extraordinary damage to those who have built on the quay according to the Acts of Parliament, especially to himself, as he is forced to keep his houses empty for want of the common passage. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 197.] Annexed,
Statement of the proceedings about opening the quay. Recapitulating the statements in the paper calendared ante, p. 472 and adding:— The obstructers petitioned his Majesty, 4 July, against opening the quay, and craved at least some small time as six weeks. The King ordered it must be opened, but as for some small time it was referred to the Lord Chancellor. On the petitioners for opening complaining again to the Lord Chancellor that it was not opened, he replied that two petitioners, obstructers, craved some small time, against which two certificates were delivered to him against them. 23 July, the inhabitants again complain to the Lord Chancellor that the wharf was not yet opened, on which the Council wrote to the Lord Mayor for opening the quay according to the Acts of Parliament, which is not yet done, whereby it seems the King and Council are slighted. [Ibid. No. 197I.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 139.) [4 pages. Ibid. No. 198.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 141, where last line "at" should be "as.") [4 pages. Ibid. No. 199.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
J. Richards to Williamson. Mr. Barry, your express, arrived here the 29th, by whom Lord Arlington had a very large dispatch from you with duplicates of your former. One he since received of July 24/Aug. 8 is not to be interpreted by any of our cyphers, so his Lordship supposes you meant it accordingly. I acknowledge yours of July 22/Aug. 1 and 24/3, and as to the latter nothing shall be wanting on my part that may contribute to your satisfaction therein, as soon as your bill of extraordinaries appears. I enclose a duplicate of his Lordship's dispatch of the 28th by Mr. Francis. Fonseca is released on the earnest solicitations of the Spanish Ambassador. Letters of the 27th from the fleet say they are before the Texel, and are not able to tempt the Dutch to an engagement. However their capers are very busy, and are in whole swarms about the Land's End. [Ibid. No. 200.]
Aug. 1.
Piccadilly.
Henry Coventry to Williamson. Excusing himself for not having written, as he has been almost a fortnight under a malignant distemper, and at last his doctor tells him with great joy he is recovered into the gout, and he has consequently been most of that time a prisoner not only to his chamber but his bed, and so has not been at Council of late. [Ibid. No. 201.]
Aug. 1.
London.
James Hickes to Williamson. News very little, but from you and the fleet much expected. A letter from Dublin of the 27th received to-day says that a great party of the Tories are out in Fermanagh and Tyrone, which makes travelling unsafe. They not only rob but murder man and horse, and such villainous outrages. We hope the prudence of our Governor will soon suppress them. Col. Whitley presents his most humble service, but forbears writing in respect of the great affairs in your hands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 202.]
Aug. 1.
Mewes Yard.
Sir N. Armorer to Williamson. Let me die, if I know what to say, for I never wrote to a Lord Ambassador before. We expect the olive branch from you, and Mr. Jolliffe wants it much. If you keep not things well with him Lord George Berkeley will have him all to himself, for I observe them very dear together. I hope you will bring us peace against October; if not, look to it; my friend Sir Eliab H[ervey], Sir Lewis, and Robin Thomas will belt you all. There are close cabals and profound ones, as time will show. We whisper great changes at Court, but I will not be so impertinent as to tell you what you know better than I do, or whether Lord Arlington shall be Lord Chamberlain, or Sir Joseph Secretary, or not. For new Master of the Horse, the old one is made at the discourse of it, and he has cause, if the consider what he will be reduced to, if ever he parts with that. For all that his Grace is a little out of humour at present, but, as he comes in grace again, the good humour will return to his Grace. His Grace of Lauderdale came last night to his manor of Ham. Many wish him hamstringed there, that he never come further. All your friends are well. Of them none want you more than poor I. But for Tom Nayllor and Frank Newport I should be dead. They comfort me up with ends of verse and sayings of philosophers. All here are either too serious or too mad for my company, except them two, and we backbite all man and womankind. I want Luke in his great chair; so does the Alderman and Lieutenant of the Tower also. We all hope and pray you will send him the next express. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 203.]
Aug. 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General to prepare a bill for the establishment of a mathematical school in Christ's Hospital for 40 boys, to be chosen out of the whole number of blue coat boys, for their instruction in arithmetic and navigation, who, when fit, are to be apprenticed for 7 years to captains of ships, with a grant for 7 years of 1,000l. per annum to provide them with lodging, maintenance and education, with an instruction to the governors to provide 20 bedsteads for them, and with licence to purchase and hold in mortmain lands not exceeding the value of 1,000l. per annum. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 82.]
Aug. [1].
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. In pursuance of the order in Council, calendared ante, p. 457, about the differences in the corporation of Dublin, directing that the last choice made by the Lord Mayor of the complete number of Common Council men all at once, leaving out the ten or eleven Roman Catholics chosen at the first choice, shall stand and be confirmed. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 482.]
Aug. [1].
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Revoking the letter of 5 Nov. last which suspended the execution of the rules for regulating Corporations, and directing the same to be put in execution according to the order in Council calendared ante, p. 456. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 482.]
Aug. [1].
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a pardon to Robert Chambre, clerk, guilty of treason by being privy to the design in 1663 for surprising Dublin Castle. [This and the two preceding entries are dated August, and noted as entered the 2nd. Ibid.]
Aug. 2. Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh to the Earl of Arlington. I have waited these two days for an opportunity to communicate to you this enclosed result of the Emperor to the States-General, but you have been so taken up, that I forbore to be troublesome. Being now at Barnet to make use of the waters as a preparation to take those of Tunbridge I send you this. Having no copy of it your Lordship may command one of your clerks to take one, and return me mine. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 204.]
Aug. 2.
6. a.m. The Royal Sovereign, under sail 7 leagues off the Texel.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. A duplicate of his letter of the 27th, calendared ante, p. 463, with the following postscript. This is a copy of what I sent you by my servant Dowsett. Not knowing how that may fare I send this. I had intelligence last night that the enemy lay at anchor 7 leagues off Goree in the sea. I am now under sail towards them, and hope in a few days to give you a good account. Wind, N.W. and by N. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Aug. 2. Commission to John Vaughan to be chaplain to Lord Vaughan's regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 78.]
Aug. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Samuel Morel and to erect a private printing press within the Court, for the use of the Government. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 82.]
Aug. 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy to Sir Alexander Fraser, of Dores, the King's first physician, and to any of his sons to whom he shall provide the barony of Dores, and the heirs male of his said son's body. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 268.]
Aug. 3.
Setting sail.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Wind S. Yours of the 23rd from Whitehall is the only letter I received, and this is my third since we were in the Schonvelt. I am very sorry that Monsr. de Schomberg had any mortification by what was done in that business of the flag. I intended him none, and shall always show him the contrary, yet, he being an old commander, I cannot but wonder he should give way for a foot colour to be stripped off from the staff, putting ribands to it, and so making it fit to hoist and lower. But I shall say no more, leaving all to his Majesty's consideration. We expect with great impatience Dowsett's return to have an answer of what I humbly desired. You'ill receive a duplicate by this to which I shall only add we heard by a ship from Bergen that the West India Fleet was expected there. The Dutch fleet lies 4 or 5 leagues off Goree. Our station now will be half seas over West (sic) of Lowestoft (unless the wind favour us to fall upon them where they lie) where we may be resolved from you in all that we demanded. If you intend something to be done northwards, you must hasten the month's provisions to some of the northern ports, and let us have some beer and water with us. If the French should make any difficulties, it may be answered, that it is in their way home, and certainly the securest and nearest. One thing I must mention before closing, which is about our hospital ships. They only serve to transport men. Now, if they were fitted to maintain the sick, not only it would be a great saving, but we should be sure to have a great many men again, which otherwise would be running away. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 206.]
Aug. 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of a baronetey to Sir Robert Cunningham of Auchinhervie and the heirs male of his body. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 268.]
Aug. 3.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord-Lieutenant. Warrant for orders for payment to Col. John Fitzpatrick of 2,000l. out of the yearly sum of 13,730l. 8s. settled for the maintenance of a sea regiment, as a free gift. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 483.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 142, where p. 143, line 6, "the" should be omitted before "P." This probably means "Parliament," not Prince Rupert, as explained in the note, being the sentence "What will P. say to these things" (the intended marriage of the Duke of York). [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 207.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 144, where p. 145, line 11, "the Governor" should be "tho' Governor," and p. 145, line 2, "somewhere" should be "some there.") [6 pages. Ibid. No. 208.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
J. Richards to Williamson. My Lord is prepared to serve you in procuring your extraordinaries as soon as he shall have your bill. Matters in the Treasury are now at some kind of stand, the Lord Treasurer continuing ill. Lord Peterborough had his dispatch sent him by express last Saturday, so that now he will be going with all speed to the Court of Modena to marry that Duke's sister for his Royal Highness, and he has desired that Sir P. Wyche may accompany him in the character he carried hence. Our land forces continue at Yarmouth. [Ibid. No. 209.]
Aug. 4.
London.
Edward Carleton to Williamson. Last Saturday I arrived here, having been much impeded in my voyage from Nieuport. The wind was violently against us and we were in danger. We were kept at sea from Thursday noon till 9 Saturday morning. From Dover I made what haste I could, and, so soon as I quitted my horse, went to Court and delivered all my letters to Lord Arlington, the King being present, who graciously vouchsafed me to kiss his hand. Yesterday I waited again on Lord Arlington and in the evening the King went to Council on your letters that I brought. There were but few Privy Councillors. I saw only the Duke of Ormonde, the Lord Chancellor, the Duke of Lauderdale and Sir G. Carteret. To-day the King and his Royal Highness went a hunting to Bagshot. To-morrow I shall again attend Lord Arlington, and so every day, till I receive my orders to come back. I have not yet delivered your letter to Lady O'Brien, for she is at Billing, and is expected here to-morrow night. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 210.]
Aug. 4. Dr. Fell to Williamson. It will be a much more pardonable fault to forget your present employment, and your weighty task than your person or your friendship, so I take confidence to break in on your affairs. You hear, I presume, from others, how the commonwealth of Queen's College is managed in your absence, and what great favours are done for Mr. Haughton, whilst on the other hand poor Mr. Mill lives under a cloud, but your return will set all things right that are amiss. [Ibid. No. 211.]
Aug. 4. Dr. Fell to Mr. Aldrich. I should have been glad to have heard you had met with some ingenious young man, who will help us in this affair of letter founding, for such a one we extremely want. Germany heretofore has been famed for artists in that kind, and the present disturbances abroad, one would think, might be invitations to a more peaceful retirement. If by chance you hear of a fit man, especially one who cuts and goes through the whole manufacture, Sir Leoline, or Sir Joseph will, I dare say, interpose for a fit encouragement. Pray remember me very kindly to Mr. Haughton and Mr. Conisbye. [Ibid. No. 212.]
Aug. 4. The King to the Consul at Leghorn. After reciting to the effect of the order in Council of 30 July, calendared ante, p. 470, concerning the Mediterranean, informing him, that he has by his letters of that day to the Grand Duke of Tuscany demanded immediate restitution of the Bassa's goods, reparation for the damages to him and the King's subjects, the punishment of the corsair, and the securing of his person, vessel and goods until restitution be made, and likewise signifying the King's pleasure that, if the said ship, the Mediterranean, should arrive in any of the ports of the Grand Duke, the consul is to cause her to be stopped and such examination made as shall be necessary for the clearer understanding of all that has passed and for procuring speedy and full restitution of the money and goods of the said Bassa. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 114.]
Aug. 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy to John Kennedy of Girvanmaines and the heirs male of his body. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 269.]
Aug. 4. Sir Theophilus Jones to Viscount Conway. The honour of your letter has revived me more than the doctors hitherto. It were highly to my advantage to wait upon you and Sir Ar[thur] [? Forbes] at Charlemont, but I fear my fortune will not be so good. As Mr. O'Neil shall not fare the worse for his relations, so his usage shall be the better for your recommendation. [Conway Papers. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 23.]
Aug. 5.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. I shall take care by the next to give you a full account concerning Col. Hamilton's grant. When it is rightly fixed I shall be very glad to be instrumental in promoting it. I conceive there has been some mistake in a letter for the continuation of Sir John Stephens' pension to his wife and son during their lives, for the words will entitle them to such payments as shall be due from next Michaelmas, whereas I presume by the preamble it was his Majesty's intention Lady Stephens should receive the payment due at Michaelmas, but, not being warranted by this letter to order payment next Michaelmas, I cannot do it without some fuller signification of his Majesty's pleasure. I suppose a direction in one of your letters (if it be his Majesty's mind) will be sufficient to authorise the payment, it being comprised within the payments of the establishment. By the last letters I ordered Sir H. Ford to give Mr. Bridgeman a particular account of a fleet arrived at Kinsale, consisting of at least 40 East and West Indiamen. You may on this occasion offer to his Majesty's consideration how necessary it were that harbour were well fortified, for, had four or five of the Dutch privateers on this coast met and had intelligence of them, they might have burnt and taken all these ships. Their stay there was very short; had they continued there long enough to have sent to me, I would have ordered them a frigate or two more for their convoy. They went away with only the St. David, but the four East India ships being of good force I hope they will all get safe to England. We are very impatient to hear the news of the engagement of the fleets. [2½ pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 24.]
Aug. 5.
Bunratty.
Lord O'Brien to Williamson. I think never man was so long in sailing from England to Ireland as I have now been, for I landed at Dublin that day fortnight I first took shipping, where on my arrival I received yours of July 8/18. I am sorry any servant of mine should prove so great a rascal to your service as Dick has. When any appearance of P[eace ?] peeps forth I pray your favour to me. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Aug. 6.
Westminster.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Rochester. Warrant to admit John Bostock, whose right leg was shot off in the Kent in the fight against the Dutch in 1666, and to whom the King has granted the next void place of one of the almsmen of the cathedral of Rochester, to the said place. [Copy attested by the Chapter. Clerk, 13 Oct. 1681. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 213.]
Aug. 6. Inland advices received that day. Plymouth, 3 Aug.—Since my last only one ship is arrived from Portugal. The Hunter and Morning Star are here. Portsmouth, 5 Aug.—Yesterday was launched the Reserve, having been rebuilt and made a much better ship both for beauty and service. The 3rd sailed from Spithead the Mermaid and Hatton ketch with their convoy for the Downs. Harwich, 5 Aug.—No news. Yarmouth, 4 Aug.—Yesterday came into this road a ketch which had been as far as the Texel, and thence to the Dogger Bank in search of our fleet, but could not hear of them. Whitby, 3 Aug.—Yesterday and to-day have passed by 150 light colliers without convoy. [Ibid. No. 214.]
[Aug. ?] The Mayor and Burgesses of Kingston-upon-Hull to the King. Petition praying him to appoint the Duke of Monmouth to be their high steward, the office being vacant by the resignation of Lord Belasyse. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 215.]
Aug. 6. Letters patent appointing James, Duke of Monmouth, to the office of High Steward of Kingston-upon-Hull. [S.P. Dom., Entry Books 21, p. 128, and 40, p. 87.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for preparing a Bill for renewing the commission appointing Prince Rupert and divers others Commissioners for Tangier. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 87.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Sir Robert Paston and the heirs male of his body of the title of Viscount Yarmouth and Baron of Paston, with a yearly pension of 20 marks. [Ibid. p. 92.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant from his Majesty as King and as Prince and Steward of Scotland for a charter of new infeftment to Quintine McIlvaine of Grimett and Marian Blair his spouse, and the survivor of them in liferent, and to John their eldest son and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to the said Quintine, his nearest heirs and assigns, of the lands of Ballathneill, Nether and Over Grimett and Shanbstoune on the resignations of John, Lord Balgenie, the said Quintine and others, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simpleward to taxtward. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 269.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, on the petition of William Carr, which set forth that his father, Sir George Carr, immediately before the civil wars purchased for his own life for 1,500l. the clerkship of the Council of Munster, and he having made little or no benefit thereof till the Restoration, his Majesty added the petitioner's life in reversion, the only provision left him by his father; and that the Duke of Ormonde added another life yet continuing, so that the petitioner supported himself by the profits of the said office, amounting in perquisites, &c., to 400l. per annum, till it was taken away by the abolition of the Presidency of Munster, and prayed that, in regard the President and officers of the said Court have been recompensed by continuing to them their salaries, which were the chief, if not the whole, of their profits, whereas the petitioner's being but 7l. 10s. a year, was an inconsiderable part of his, his Majesty would make some addition to his yearly fee:— that Lord Arlington prepare a letter for the King's signature to the Lord Lieutenant, requiring him, as soon as any of the temporary payments or pensions on the establishment shall determine, to cause the petitioner to be inserted in the said establishment for a pension of 300l. a year for his life, to take place immediately after the pension of 200l. per annum designed for Dorothy, the relict of Lieut.-Col. John Hubblethorne, and their children. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 26.]
Aug. 6.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Robert Meller, apothecary, recommended by a letter from the Lord Lieutenant and Council of Ireland, with a report of several of the said Council that there is due to the petitioner, after several deductions, 1,300l. for physic and medicaments prepared by him for several years for the regiment of Guards in that kingdom, whereof he has not received any part, though the same was directed to be paid, which prayed that he might be speedily satisfied the same, or at least a certain prospect afforded of payment within some convenient time:—that Lord Arlington prepare a letter for the King's signature to the Lord Lieutenant requiring that, on the determining of any of the temporary pensions or payments on the present establishment, the petitioner be inserted instead thereof in the establishment, to receive such sums as such pensions or payments amounted to, till he be satisfied the said sum of 1,300l., but this is not to take effect, till the pension of 200l. designed for Dorothy, the relict of Lieut-Col. Hubblethorne, and their children be inserted in the said establishment. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 27.]
[Aug. ?] William, Earl of Craven, Lord of the manor and borough of Oswestry, and the bailiffs and burgesses thereof, to the King. Petition praying for a renewal of their charter with their former privileges, and with the alterations and additions in the schedule thereto. The town suffered greatly in the late war, for having been made a garrison for the King it was taken by storm, and all the suburbs burnt, and the walls, castle and church demolished. The corporation not renewing their charter after the restoration, a quo warranto issued against them in the name of the late AttorneyGeneral, whereby great issues have been levied upon and paid by them. At the foot,
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof, and of the schedule annexed to the AttorneyGeneral. At the side,
His report, dated 13 Aug., in favour of granting the liberties desired, only with the addition that the approbation of the Recorder be reserved to the King. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 216.] Annexed,
The said schedule, containing 13 articles. One is that the election of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council be made by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, and the popularity excluded, for the prevention of blood shedding and other great disorders. [Ibid. No. 216 I.]
Aug. 8.
[Read.]
Dame Elizabeth Pettus, wife of Sir John Pettus, to the King. Petition stating that 27 November last by the consent of the said Sir John his Majesty ordered in Council that he should allow her 40s. a week for her separate maintenance, to be increased on the falling in of his mother's jointure, that Sir John after a few weeks made default, so that the petitioner was forced to present another petition to his Majesty, which by order of 9 May last was referred to the Lord Privy Seal and the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who 30 May sent their summons to Sir John to attend within one week of receiving notice thereof, which he received 17 July, but refuses to obey, that since the said first order Sir John's mother has died, so that now by his own engagement he is obliged to make her a larger allowance, but even that of 40s. he has not paid for above 15 weeks, and still refuses to do so, and praying his Majesty to provide that what is due to her may be paid, and the same allowance with such addition as his Majesty shall order from the death of Sir John's mother be ascertained and secured to her, and that Sir John be sent for to attend the Council. On the back,
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, that Lord Arlington write in his Majesty's name to Sir John Pettus, acquainting him with the complaint in the petition, and that his Majesty expects his more punctual performance of his agreement, not only for allowing the 40s. a week, but for increasing it, if his mother's jointure should come in. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 217.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Capt. Terence Byrne setting forth that he has faithfully served both by sea and land, and in the last expedition raised a foot company, serving as lieutenant to Col. Thomas Monke in the Duke of Albemarle's regiment, and took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy and subscribed the declaration according to the Act, but being always with his company was deprived of the opportunity of receiving the Sacrament, by means whereof the Duke has recommended another in his place, and therefore praying to be continued in his command or have liberty to make the best benefit he can of his commission:— it appearing that his statements are true and a certificate being produced that he has received the Sacrament and taken the oaths, that Lord Arlington use his utmost endeavours that the petitioner be continued in his said command, his Majesty declaring that he ought not to have been removed. [Ibid. No. 218.]
[Aug. ?] Lieut. Thomas Gawdy to the Earl of Arlington. Petition stating that a former lieutenant of a company in the Duke of Albemarle's company [the above named Byrne], put out for not complying with the late Act, whose place is given to him (see ante, p. 365), applies for re-admission, on pretence that he has now complied, and requesting an examination of several other causes there were for his dismissal, before the case is decided. [Ibid. No. 219.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
John Richards to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 147.) [Ibid. No. 220.] Enclosed,
List giving the names of 4 East India men, and of 28 Barbados ships for London, and 7 for Bristol, all at Kinsale. [Ibid. No. 220 I.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 148.) [8 pages. Ibid. No. 221.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
J. Vernon to Williamson. I am always ready to receive your commands, which shall be obeyed with all the exactness duty and gratitude are capable of. I expect my brother from Tunbridge next week, and I hope the post after to give a satisfactory account of the expense of your equipage. [Ibid. No. 222.]
Aug. 8.
London.
H. Oldenburg to Williamson. As he finds by a letter of 5 Aug. (N.S.) from Monsieur Slusius of Liege, that a letter accompanied with some inquiries of a philosophical nature and a copy of one of his own printed monthly tracts, which he had recommended to Williamson's favour for that eminent gentleman, had not yet been received by him, asking him if he could recollect what is become of those papers, and to send them, when found, by the first safe conveniency to that worthy person, who has a particular esteem for the English nation and the Royal Society. [Ibid. No. 223.]
Aug. 8. Commission for Captain James Read to be captain of Col. Henry Williams' company of foot in the Regiment of Guards under Col. John Russell. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 89.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chamberlain for swearing and admitting Nicholas Dixon to be Limner in Ordinary to his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 91.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Grant to Francis Bastincke of the place of Clerk of the Passage at Dover in the room of John Carlile, deceased. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 11.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Christopher, Baron Dunsany, representing that it appears by his Majesty's declaration and the Act of Settlement that the petitioner's grandfather Patrick, Baron Dunsany, amongst others, in an especial manner merited his Majesty's grace and favour to be restored to all his former estate, whereof he was dispossessed by the late usurped powers, that a special proviso was inserted in the Act of Explanation to restore to him the third part of all his former estate without any previous reprisal and the rest after reprisal, that the petitioner's father, Edward Plunket, in his grandfather's lifetime obtained a decree of innocence for all or part of the said estate in remainder, and that, both being now dead, the petitioner for want of indifferency of a trial in the proper county where the said lands lie, is left without hopes by any trial at Common Law to receive anything on the said decree, so that, after all his Majesty's gracious intentions, he has had no benefit but some small parcels of retrenched lands, not worth 40l. a year, not a bare subsistence, much less wherewithal to prosecute the benefit of the said decree, if he might have an indifferent trial in any foreign county:—that Lord Arlington prepare a letter for the King's signature to the Lord Lieutenant, recommending him to use his utmost endeavours that the petitioner may have an impartial jury, when his cause comes to trial, by appointing some honest and unconcerned person to be then sheriff of the county where the petitioner's lands lie, and if he can find out any other means for the petitioner's relief, his Majesty will be very ready to express his sense of the petitioner's sufferings and of the merits of his family. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 28.]
[Aug. ?] The Clerks employed by the Commission of Inspection relating to the affairs of Ireland to the King. Petition stating that since 1 Feb. 1671[–2] the petitioners have received no part of their salaries, and many of them have consequently been forced to contract debts, and fear to be arrested by their creditors, and that the Commissioners for the Affairs of Ireland directed a warrant to Lord Ranelagh, dated 26 Dec. 1672, to pay the petitioners 11 months' salary, a copy whereof, and of his Majesty's letter, and an account of what is due to each of them for that time are hereunto annexed, but when the said warrant was presented to his Lordship he refused to pay it, and praying an order to Lord Ranelagh forthwith to pay the petitioners their money on the said warrant, or that his Majesty would otherwise relieve the petitioners. At the foot,
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
Order by his Majesty in Council that the Lord Privy Seal and Lord Arlington speak with Lord Ranelagh about the contents of this petition, and how the petitioners may be satisfied. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 29.] Annexed,
The Commissioners for affairs relating to the settlement of Ireland to Viscount Ranelagh and the rest of the Treasury Commissioners. In pursuance of the King's letters of 23 Jan. last (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1671–1672, p. 97), desiring them to pay to Christopher Parker, a clerk of the commissioners, 561l. 16s. 2d. for himself and the other clerks for their salaries and for the stationer for stationery, to be issued to the several persons, and for the uses expressed in the schedule thereto, which money to be paid in England, with the fees, exchange, and interest, is to be repaid and allowed to Lord Ranelagh and the other Commissioners of the Treasury, according to the said letter. Whitehall, 26 Dec. 1672. [Copy. Ibid. No. 29 I.] Annexed,
Copy of the said letter of 23 Jan. [Ibid. No. 29 II.]
Account, verified by Sir James Shaen, of the sums due to the clerks and others, making up the said sum of 561l. 16s. 2d. [Copy. Ibid. No. 29 III.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 152 where p. 153, line 15, "battte" should be "battle" and line 24, "eye" should be "eyes.") [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 224.]
Aug. 4 & 9. Inland advices received on those dates being partly the same as those calendared ante, p. 479. Plymouth, 3 Aug.—Our ships are daily taken coming from Wales and elsewhere, which occasions very great complaints. Aldeburgh, 4 Aug.—Last Saturday anchored in this bay about 30 laden colliers. Light colliers daily pass northwards. Southwold, 4 Aug.—Within these 10 days have passed northwards near 400 colliers. Lynn, 4 Aug.—The Deptford ketch sailed to-day with 15 or 16 small vessels laden for London as far as Yarmouth. The Earl of St. Albans is here to-day. Yarmouth, 4 Aug.—About 100 light colliers bound for Newcastle and Sunderland are at anchor in this road. A small privateer of three guns came in here to-day with a prize. The camp is very orderly and in good condition. Some few are sick, which may well be expected, considering the season and the little care they take to preserve their health. Deal, 7 Aug.—About 4 this morning the wind veered northerly, and this forenoon came to N.E. so the whole fleet of outward bound merchantmen, 85 sail in all, most small vessels, sailed to the northward (sic ? southward). Kinsale, 29 July.—Yesterday arrived here 40 merchantmen with the St. David, being four East India ships, one from Guinea, and the rest from Barbados. One of the East India ships took the Mayboome of 18 guns, belonging to the Dutch East India Company, which she left in the East Indies. Two ships from Jamaica are arrived here. Lynn, 6 Aug.—Yesterday arrived 18 laden colliers from Tynemouth. They met no capers on the coast. Newcastle, 5 Aug.—Yesterday came in here about 80 light colliers, convoyed by the Holmes. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 225.]
Aug. 9.
London.
Ann Daston to Williamson. Concerning her son's having, contrary to her opinion and commands, left Cologne, a fault she imputes to his giddiness and folly of youth, guided by an impatience to see Paris. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 226.]
Aug. 9.
The Antelope, Harwich Bay.
Capt. Augustus L'Hostein to Lord Arlington. By his Highness' order I am arrived here, because the wind would not permit us to go into Yarmouth. The same command obliges me to return to the fleet with all possible speed, whereof, as soon as I have satisfied the rest of his pleasures, nothing shall stay me. [Ibid. No. 227.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
Declaration by the King that the present Archbishop of Glasgow should continue in that station for one whole year after the date thereof, with liberty to retire at the end of that time. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 270.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Bishop of Galloway. Intimating that on account of the large extent and the many difficult affairs of the diocese of Glasgow it was the King's pleasure that he should do all the assistance he could to the present Archbishop in the ordination of intrants to the ministry and any other business relating to that diocese wherein he might be helpful. [Ibid. p. 271.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Bishop of Argyle. In the same terms as the last. With note that both these letters were sent by the Archbishop of Glasgow. [Ibid.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for letters patent for the erection of the office of Clerk of the Entries in the port of Dublin, and for a grant of the same to Francis Godolphin, quamdiu se bene gesserit. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 483.]
Aug. 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, in pursuance of the Order of Council of the 6th calendared ante, p. 480, for William Car to be inserted in the establishment for a pension of 300l. a year during his life, the same to take place next and immediately after the pension of 200l. per annum designed for Dorothy, the relict of Lieut.-Colonel Hubblethorne. [Ibid. p. 484.]
Aug. 9 & 10.
The Sovereign, Texel bearing S.S.E.
Prince Rupert to Lord Arlington. This morning there fell into the French squadron an East Indiaman, who parted with his companions at St. Helena, being five and a howker (? hooker). He touched off Shetland, where a Deane (Dane) by whom they give all their intelligence, assured him four days ago he might freely stand for his port, there being no fear of any English at sea. If the rest come the same way and meet with this intelligence there's hopes of them. The weather will not yet permit us to do anything on the enemy. Dowsett is arrived and I shall obey all orders sent me. Looking over the copy of my last I fear I made a mistake, W. for E.
Postscript. Aug. 10. Before I could send away this the weather is grown fair, the wind N.E. We are standing in for the shore, the enemy just in sight on our quarter S.E. and by E. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 228.]
[Aug. 10.]
7 leagues of the Texel.
Prince Rupert to the King. By this East Indian prize, which is sent by this opportunity we understand there are but five more to come home, at least expected this year, which I am very confident have been taken by the ships ordered to St. Helena. If you inform yourself of the prisoners you'll find it can be hardly otherwise. In this ship are many fine birds and porcelain, which, as the Comte d' Estrées assures me, if all come safe home, will be to your liking. I have left her in possession of the French, so, if any be amiss, they must answer it. If otherwise, I doubt not you will be bountiful to the commanders into whose hands she fell. The wind is N.E., the enemy bear E. by S. of us and we stand for the shore. Today there is no likelihood of engaging. What shall happen to-morrow you shall be advised with all possible diligence the first opportunity. By what I hear by these prisoners St. Helena is again in your possession. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 229.]
Aug. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Board of Greencloth to pay to Jane, relict of Maurice Deladale, page of the Bedchamber, a pension of 60l. a year, in consideration of her husband's long and faithful services. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, p. 151.]
Aug. 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a release to Thomas Spiller and Mary Gery of the fines of 40l. and 50l. respectively imposed on them for being concerned in a riot, in endeavouring to take Elizabeth Gilburne from her mother, Mary Gilburne. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 89.]
Aug. 10. Pass for Sir Bernard Gascoigne, late Envoy Extraordinary to the Emperor, and his servants to land at any port in England with their horses, &c. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 91.]
[Aug. ?] Sir Hugh Cholmley, Alexander Stanhop, Francis Roper, John Hall, and George Porter to the King. Petition, stating that the King had promised that the Gentlemen Ushers in ordinary of the Queen's Privy Chamber should receive the like privileges and salaries as his other servants in the like places, whose usual allowance is 50l. for board wages and riding charges, and praying that he would confirm to the petitioners the allowance thereof and cause it to be entered on the establishment of his household. At the foot,
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Steward of the Household. At the side,
His report that the four Gentlemen Ushers of the King's Privy Chamber had an additional allowance of 200l. a year settled on them for their board wages, and that no such allowance is settled on those of the Queen's Privy Chamber, though their places are of the same degree and have the same obligations. Whitehall, 20 Nov. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 230.]
Aug. 11/21.
Whitehall.
Henry Coventry to Williamson. My late sicknesses and the great debt of letters I am engaged in make me afraid I shall not acquit myself to you as I ought, having received divers from you and your colleague jointly and several from yourself, particularly that of 28 July (S.V.) Your cause was so good it needed no defender. Though I am by my master's great favour got ashore, I cannot but think of my having been at sea, and consequently consider your condition, and in my own judgment cannot but agree with Monsr. Courtin, and, I think you are my witness, did formerly propose it, but it seems to better judgments affairs will not bear it, but we are comforted that such propositions are sent from the Most Christian King as will do the work. None of the Council but applauds both the sincerity and ingenuity of your proceedings. For my part I think the same Monsr. de Groote said, though I wish it not, and if that happen, Quorsum haec ? Your admonition, I think, was seasonable. You will receive from Lord Arlington the last result of his Majesty in Council, and I suppose before that the French plenipotentiaries will have received further instructions than Monsr. Loc[k]hart could acquaint you with. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 231.]
Aug. 11/21.
London.
Col. Roger Whitley to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter, and wishing him a prosperous issue in his great negotiations, and a speedy return to his friends and the new honours that attend his merit. [Ibid. No. 232.]
Aug. 11.
London.
Edward Carleton to Williamson. This morning Lord Arlington told me I must not go till he heard again from you that the Dutch Ambassadors were returned to Cologne. I shall not be remiss in waiting on him every day, and hope I may be suddenly dismissed. Yesterday I attended him when he was in Council, and then came Sir Lionel Walden post from Yarmouth, where he left all that army well and heard the Prince with the whole fleet was six leagues below the Texel. Mr. Ball says you will receive a better account than I can give by this post. To-day I waited on my Lord of Canterbury and did your compliments to him. He was very glad to hear of you and commanded me to wait on him before my return. I delivered your letters to Lady O'Brien; my Lord is in Ireland. [Ibid. No. 233.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
T. Ross to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 154, where p. 155, line 7, religionis esper. should be religionis ergo.) [1½ page. Ibid. No. 234.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
John Richards to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 156.) [Ibid. No. 235.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 156, where p. 157, line 19, "Querovelle" should be "Querouelle," and p. 158, line 12, "off the Scheveling" should be "off of Scheveling.") [8 pages. Ibid. No. 236.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 163.) [4 pages. Ibid. No. 237.] Enclosed,
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I am very glad that what I have done is approved by you. There cannot be anyone more your servant than I am, nor more your friend than my lord, and truth and friendship were never more scarce than now, but you may depend on both as much as if you were here yourself. Yesterday your two officers dined with me, who are very careful, and carry themselves with great discretion. We drank your health as we did to-day at my lord's, where dined Lords Townshend and Suffolk, Secretary Coventry, Mr. Savile, your brother Burges, Mr. Hyde, Mr. Harvey and others. My wife and niece present you with their services, and hope they shall have your company at our new house, whither we remove at Michaelmas, oftener than formerly, having a back door, and ministers delight in private passages. 8 Aug. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 237 I.]
Aug. 11. Inland advices received that day. Plymouth, 8 Aug.—To-day passed by 16 sail to the westward, but we know not what they are. Yesterday and to-day came in four small merchant ships. Portsmouth, 10 Aug.—Last Friday came in here six empty victuallers with the Guinea. They are to take in provisions and return with all speed to the fleet. Pendennis, 6 Aug.—Several capers lie cruising off the Land's End, and have taken a great many of our ships. It is said they wait for our Virginia ships. None of our frigates are cruising that way. Kinsale, 1 Aug.—The Barbados and East India ships are here still. Yesterday came in a ship of this place from Antego (Antigua) with tobacco, which says 17 capers are cruising about those islands. Harwich, 9 Aug.—The Antelope is come in from the fleet, bringing with her an English ship, retaken by the Crown off the Texel. She came from the West Indies. Hull, 8 Aug.—Last Wednesday were drawn out of the five companies here 100 men, who the same day marched under the command of Mr. Cecil for Yarmouth. A hundred colliers are passed by Humber without convoy, though several capers are on the coast. Chester, 9 Aug.—Last Wednesday arrived the Mary yacht from Dublin with Sir William Temple, and several other passengers who are gone for London. Rye, 9 Aug.—A Dutch caper that has lain long on this coast, has taken an English vessel laden with linen and sent her for Holland, and forced two others ashore. Whitby, 7 Aug.—Yesterday sailed by 30 empty colliers for Newcastle, and 100 laden for London without convoy. A small vessel from Scotland arrived on Tuesday reports that last Friday the Portsmouth pink took a caper and carried her into Berwick, being an English ketch taken since this war, which might have done us much mischief. Yarmouth, 8 Aug. —The soldiers live here in the greatest order imaginable, very few of them sick, considering the season. [2½ pages. Ibid. No. 238.]
Aug. 11. List of the cargo of the Papenburgh of Enkhuyzsen of 500 tons burden and 16 guns from the East Indies, taken by the French. [Copy in the hand of one of Lord Arlington's clerks. Ibid. No. 239.]
Aug. 11.
Tonbridge Wells.
Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh, to the Earl of Arlington. I was twice on Friday morning to take leave of you, but you were indisposed. The Ambassadors' letter of the 1st expresses an extraordinary joy of the nearer overture made by his Majesty's plenipotentiaries, for which the said mediators not only find themselves highly obliged to his Majesty, but the whole world also, by getting so great a step to a negotiation of so great an importance, whereof they have also imparted all the Courts in Christendom that his gracious resolution and real inclination to a peace may be known to all the world. They had also communicated it at the very instant to Mr. Isbrand, the other Dutch plenipotentiaries being not yet returned, and desired him to inform the States-General thereof with all speed, and desire a speedy resolution. [3 pages. Ibid. No. 240.]
[Aug. ?] Hugh, Earl of Mount-Alexander, to the King. Petition, stating that the Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, pursuant to his Majesty's pleasure declared in page 111 of the said Act of Explanation, decreed several acres of land in several counties for reprisal of two-thirds of the estate late belonging to Sir Thomas Allen or his lady, &c., as in page 56 of the said Act of Settlement is expressed, given by his Majesty to the petitioner's father and since decreed away, which estate is worth in clear yearly value 1,200l. and the lands so decreed as a reprisal do not amount to above 61l. per annum, which does not answer the quit-rent payable thereout, so that the petitioner is totally deprived of his Majesty's intended bounty to his deceased father and himself, and that the petitioner offers to discover and make out a clear title for his Majesty to certain lands in the barony of Lecale, co. Down, hitherto concealed, and praying a letter and order to the Lord Lieutenant to cause letters patent to be passed containing a grant of the said lands to the petitioner in fee-simple towards his satisfaction for the said estate, as soon as his Majesty's title thereto shall be made out, and also of such other forfeited and concealed lands as shall be discovered to be in his Majesty by the petitioner or his agents, till the petitioner has made up the said 800l. per annum. At the side,
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 30.] Annexed,
His report dated 12 Aug. that the petitioner is justly entitled to a satisfaction according to the rules of the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, and, if therefore the discovery offered be of such lands as are vested in his Majesty by the said Acts, and are not part of the ancient demesnes of the Crown, those lands when discovered will remain in his Majesty as a royal trustee for the uses of those Acts, and it is a good discharge of that trust, and his Majesty may lawfully apply these lands to the petitioner's satisfaction according to those Acts, if he be so pleased. [Ibid. No. 30 I.]
Aug. 11. The Duke of Ormonde to the Earl of Arlington. Though I do not pretend to understand the niceties of the Acts of Settlement, yet methinks it is very plain that, if Col. Dillon be in the place of a deficient adventurer or soldier, and his case so reported authentically, his Majesty may order his satisfaction proportionably out of any lands in his Majesty's hands to that end, or that the Colonel shall discover. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Aug. 12.
Near the White Bank.
[Prince Rupert] to Lord Arlington. I will not trouble you with a narration of what passed, but shall leave it to the bearer, Capt. Howard, who is wholly informed, and has been himself where the greatest danger was threatened. I do not send it to you in writing since I doubt not Lord Ossory has done it. All I say is we are refitting the fleet ourselves upon the coast in two days, and thence where the wind will permit us. [Holograph. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 241.]
Aug. [12]. [Prince Rupert] to the King. I crave pardon that I cannot give you that account I had hoped to have given, if opportunities had been taken and orders of seconding one another had been observed, for want of which I was left with my division and some more of my squadron in [presence] of 66 sail of the enemy, the French to windward of them, in an entire body, and Spragg, as far as I could discern his ships to leeward, engaged with a few ships. Notwithstanding all this you may be assured the enemy's losses are greater than ours. Monsr. Martell offered as handsomely as can be was seconded (sic). The particulars I shall leave to this Capt. Howard's relation, by whom I most humbly desire your commands concerning Spragg's place. I hope you will think of Holmes, now the other is gone. I must assure you, that my whole division has done as much as could be expected from them, and some of the rest of the squadron as ill. There's no doubt but Lord Ossory on his part did well, for he is well paid off. I hope you will send us your pleasure for our flags. Sir Edward being unfortunately drowned, I hope there will be no dispute to have Sir Robert Holmes in his place. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 242.]
Aug. 12.
The Royal Prince, on the coast of Holland.
P. B. (fn. 1) to Sir Charles Lyttelton. 10 Aug.—Our whole fleet had the wind of the enemy's and were plying hard to prevent their getting between us and the Texel, when by order of Prince Rupert you went for England with the East India Prize, and yet in the night, while we were uncertain of their position, a little veering of the wind helping them, they weathered us all, and so in the morning we found them the assailants, who overnight we were afraid dared not stand on the defensive. 11 Aug.—As soon as it was light enough for us clearly to discern one another, and to bring our fleets into the order of battle, which the darkness of the night had somewhat discomposed, the Dutch began to bear down upon us, and we, meeting them as far as the wind would permit, showed ourselves very ready to receive them. Of our fleet the French squadron led the van, the Blue brought up the rear, and were attacked by Bankaert with the Zealand Squadron and Van Tromp with that of Amsterdam; while the two great admirals, Prince Rupert and De Ruyter, in the middle of their fleets encountered each other. What passed between the van and the body of each fleet I am able to give no account of (more than that about 8 the whole were engaged) because they made sail all the time they were fighting, but Sir E. Spragg and Van Tromp, three hours together, lay braving one another with their topsails to the mast. Tromp was well seconded by several stout ships from which a gun was not fired at anybody but Sir Edward, as long as they could bring any to bear on him, which, I conceive was the chief reason our ship was disabled so much sooner than any other in the fleet, for in those three hours our mainstay was shot in pieces, and almost all the rigging, and our main and mizen masts disabled, a great part of the fine cabins beat into chips, and many valiant men sent into the other world without any ceremony besides peals of thundering ordnance. Sir Edward all the while stood fearless on the quarterdeck and did not seem troubled at anything, but that for want of the wind he could not make a closer fight than his enemy would give leave, who would not come within less than a cable's length. About 11 Sir Edward bore up a little to mend his rigging, bring new sails to the yards, &c. In the meantime the Royal Charles and others took his place, and Lord Ossory and they, with the help of a fireship that was just going to lay Tromp on board, put him and his division quite to leeward of us a little before 12. Sir Edward being glad he should now have an opportunity to fight at his own distance resolved to be yardarm and yardarm with the enemy, and make short work of what they always endeavoured to lengthen. He presently sent his lieutenant, Horner, to signify his intentions to Lord Ossory, and quickly after his own main and mizen masts went by the board, and disappointed a design which would certainly have proved fatal to the greatest part of the squadron he engaged with. To Capt. Fowler he then recommended his lame ship, and with a promise of speedy relief left her, and went on board the St. George, at that time a little to windward, and the nearest ship to us of any considerable force. The first thing he did, after putting up the flag, was to back astern, and so get to leeward between the enemy and us, in attempting which he lost his foretopmast, and received much damage in his rigging, and, worst of all, most of the men being unacquainted with sea service did not stand by their guns with the courage he expected, at which he was sensibly troubled, and resolved not to stay where he could not effectually follow the business he came for. The Royal Charles which had done some very good service and yet remained undisabled he thought fit to decide the old quarrel in between him and his consort Van Tromp, as he used to call him, who by this time had also tired one horse, and had mounted another. To that end he called for a boat to the next ship, the St. George's being all lost before, and stayed a little to take his flag with him, fearing he should find the Royal Charles unsupplied, which some think was observed by the enemy, and occasioned the disaster that soon followed, for scarce was he got a cable's length before the bullets began to fall thick about his boat, and one found easy passage through her to let in that good servant, bad master, the watery element. A few minutes sooner his page begged with tears that the Dreadnought instead of that little boat might be his conveyance to the Royal Charles then about a quarter of a mile distant, and his lieutenant seconded the motion as a far safer way; but Sir Edward, scorning to be governed by arguments of fear, and hating the delay which that shifting might occasion, rejected the advice at the cost of his own life and the lives of most who were with him. He had often endeavoured but never attained any skill in the useful art of swimming, yet his lieutenant, coxswain, and armourer kept him a good while from drowning, and (when the Bristol's boat came to their relief) with great hazard to themselves they saved his body, though his glorious soul had forsaken that habitation.
Van Tromp, discovering by the want of our flag, that our Admiral had paid his debt to nature, began to reckon that the Royal Prince, being extremely disabled, would now at an easy rate fall into his hands, and so with his squadron attacked us three times very smartly, but in the end had little reason to boast of the attempt. After two close engagements to leeward, in one of which Admiral Kempthorne was our rescue, the third time he weathered us, about 4, and came within his ship's length by our side, when he found all the guns of our lower tiers doubly loaden to give him a welcome. Besides his Vice-Admiral and several others he brought up two fireships, which attempted to board us. One came on our weather quarter where was nothing to fasten and so was put off with ease. The other came stem for stem with us, and not a foot to leeward of the bowsprit. She hitched her sheer hooks in part of our foreshrouds, but the boatswain, standing on the forecastle, cut them away, and the shoe of the anchor helped to put her clearly to leeward of us. Thus the two overgrown bavins burnt together for company, leaving Tromp the displeasure and us the satisfaction to see him make bonfires at his own cost, which he had designed we should pay for. Certainly never was good ship in more eminent danger of boarding, sinking and burning, nor did ever gallant men demean themselves in it with more resolution or less show of fear. This was the last time he intended to trouble us, for he was so close plied by Lord Ossory and others, that by 5 he was just in a running condition. About that time Prince Rupert with the Red, and De Ruyter with the two squadrons of his fleet, having tacked some time before, were come near us. De Ruyter made all the sail he could to bear down on our squadron and destroy our ship, which now had got the Ruby and Hampshire towing her out of the fleet. At the same time Tromp tacked again to join his Admiral, and we must at last have been made a sacrifice, if the Prince, Capt. Legg and others had not bore down, and Lord Ossory (who fought all day very gallantly) luffed up just between us, and continued so fighting till night, before which his Highness had sent the Monmouth and Pearl to help, tow, and convey us away from further danger. The French all this while lay clearly to windward, and why they made no use of such an advantage I never knew, nor am I concerned to enquire.
I make no mention of particular captains, though many very well deserved it, because I never had skill enough, especially in time of fight, to know one private ship from another. As to the conclusion of the fight I must also be silent, for by that time we were at too great a distance to distinguish more than that our valiant defenders were deeply engaged. Headed "Narrative of the late fight. so far only as concerns Sir Edward Spragg." [10 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 243.]
[Aug. ?] Capt. James Barrett and others to the King. Petition for payment of arrears due for service in the Barbados regiment, having since been captain of a troop in Prince Rupert's regiment, and being now reduced with some of the soldiers that served under him in the Barbados for their religion. [Ibid. No. 244.]
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord High Treasurer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 76.]
[Aug. ?] Richard Neile to the King. Petition for a grant of the forfeited estates of Jane Wren and Thomasine Palmer, both found guilty at Durham assizes of the murder of their bastard children. At the foot,
Aug. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to Sir Francis Goodrich, temporal Chancellor of the county palatine. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 90.]
Aug. 12. Caveat that no reprieve or pardon pass for John Booth, minister of Bothall, convicted of treason, without notice to Thomas Killegrew and Edward Progers. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 19.]
Aug. 12. Commission to Thomas Oldfield to be captain of Capt. Mannaringe's former company in the Marquis of Worcester's regiment, and commissions to William Morgan and Thomas Frankland to be lieutenant and ensign respectively to his company. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 78.]
Aug. 12.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. Reporting at the desire of the Farmers of the Revenue, that they have cleared all with the Commissioners of the Treasury to 24 June last, except 1,100 and odd pounds the Commissioners yet claim, but in answer to this the Farmers allege they have overpaid them in some of the former quarters 900l. There are also some little reckonings for inconsiderable sums concerning customs for logwood, which must be determined by the Court of Exchequer. They have likewise paid all due from them for the Customs to this day, and have a considerable sum in money and good assignments ready towards their quarter's payment due last Midsummer. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 32.]
[Aug. ?] William Jonas, Augustine Bryan, and William Colombe to the King. Petition for a patent to them of their new invention of making women's black, brown, and red hair to be white and of curling the same. At the foot,
Aug. 13.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Solicitor-General. At the side, His report of the same date in favour of the petitioners. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 245.]
Aug. 13.
London.
Sir Robert Vyner to Williamson. I had not interrupted you but to acknowledge the great favour of your letter. My hearty wish and prayer is that the Almighty will bless you in all things both in your public and private capacity, and make you as great and as good as yourself, your best friends and servants wish you. Sir Joseph Sheldon and Sir John Robinson are in the country with their ladies. Sir R. Clayton and Sir Francis Chaplin desire their services presented to you. [Ibid. No. 246.]
Aug. 13.
Whitehall.
Commission to Edward Gerrard to be ensign to Sir Thomas Daniell's company in Col. John Russell's regiment of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 87.]
Aug. 13.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, in pursuance of the Order of Council of the 6th, calendared ante p. 480, on the petition of Robert Miller, apothecary, in the terms of the King's letter thereby directed. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 486.]
Aug. 14. [Prince Rupert] to Lord [Arlington]. As soon as I have dispatched the lame ships, which are but five, I intend to sail for the coast of Holland, and there show his Majesty's fleet, which, I hope, will be done to-night, and I noways doubt but the French, being ashamed of what they have neglected in the last (which was an occasion I should bless God for ever to have such another for our squadron) will do very well the next engagement. I have disposed of the flags, Sir John Harman the Blue; Lord Ossory, my Vice-Admiral, with a promise to Narbrough, if my Lord leave the fleet, to have what his Majesty promised, and to Holmes, the RearAdmiral of the Blue. The rest stays as it did, but all this is done with condition till his Majesty's pleasure be further known. If at any time Lord Ossory quits, Capt. Narbrough is to be my RearAdmiral, and Chicheley my Vice-Admiral, or Vice-Admiral of the Blue, and in this business I am as much obliged to Lord Ossory as ever man was. It will be too long to relate the particulars. The only man discontented was G. Legge, who pretends to have merited more than Sir John Holmes. To Berry I have given the command of a division detasche (detached), as I intended for Sir Robert Holmes, and thus with much ado have I satisfied and brought our flags in order. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 247.]
[Aug. 14.]
The Sovereign.
[Prince Rupert] to the King. I am now sending our lame ships to the River under the command of Sir W. Ginings (Jennens), who behaved himself as well as any. He has with him the Royal Charles, Gloucester, Advice, Staverin, and Portsmouth. With the rest, God willing, I intend to see the coast of Holland, and show your fleet there, and so put an end to those lies which are already given out concerning our being beaten. We are now about East of Yarmouth, the wind at South. Poor Sir W. Reeves is like to recover. If he die you will lose a very good and stout officer. His brother is on board. I beseech your directions how to dispose of him at our return, which, I fear, the next blowing weather will force upon us. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 248.]
Aug. 14.
10 a.m. The Royal Sovereign, under sail, about 18 leagues S.W., and by W. off Yarmouth.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Capt. C[r]ownley of Sir Walter Vane's regiment being slain in the late engagement, I have given a commission for that company to Sir John Berry, and also commissions to several inferior officers to supply the commands of such as were killed then and before, being empowered by his Majesty under the Great Seal to do so. If any application is made to his Majesty for such commissions I desire you will give a stop to them to prevent interfering. [Ibid. No. 249.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Doctor Samuel Barrow, Judge Advocate, to call a court martial upon Captain Thomas Monck and Lieutenant Therrence (Terence) Byrn, of the Duke of Albemarle's regiment, against whom William Craigmill has given information concerning alleged false musters and other misdemeanours. Sign Manual. Countersigned "Arlington." [Ibid. No. 250.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 161, where p. 162, line 5, "Ulie" should be "Vlie," and line 17 "Howard" should be "Haward." The part in cipher is as follows:—
It is whispered as if the French did not behave them well, as having the wind and yet not bearing upon the enemy but keeping at a dis[t]ance though the sico (fn. 2) all was given them to beare upon them. This may proceed from the little incli[na]tion the English generally have for the French.) [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 251.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 163, where p. 164, line 25, "behind my Lord," should be "behind, my Lord.") [8 pages. Ibid. No. 252.]
Aug. 15. Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 166, where p. 168, line 22, "Howard" should be "Haward.") [4 pages. Ibid. No. 253.]
Aug. 15.
London.
Edward Carleton to Williamson. Though I know you will receive a more particular relation of the news from the sea, I think it my duty to tell you what I hear from good hands at Court. Sunday afternoon the Dutch appeared, whereupon the Prince gave the signal for an engagement, which they fought that day and Monday. This news came by a tender, which left them fighting on Monday evening, the Prince having then got the weather gage, and the Dutch flying northwards. No other account is yet come, though hourly expected. An India Dutch merchant taken by the French and sent into Harwich has in spices, besides other rich cargo, to the value of 20,000l. Sir C. Lyttelton was commanded to board her and to come in her to the Thames, and is expected here to-night. It is confidently reported here that St. Helena, which the Dutch took from us last year, is retaken by Capt. Munday, and he has likewise taken these four India ships that came in company with the one sent into Harwich, and her men confess that four of their company called at St. Helena to get fresh water. The Duchess of Modena is reserved for the King of Spain. A courier is sent after Lord Peterborough to call him back, as Lady Peterborough says. I daily attend Lord Arlington for his dispatch. Yesterday he told me he would tell me in a day or two, when I should go. [Ibid. No. 254.]
Aug. 15.
London.
John Paige to Williamson. I have been for some time with my wife at Tunbridge to pass away the summer, as having little to do in these dangerous times, which has been the cause of my long silence, and since my coming home little has offered worth your notice, save the good news of four of our East India ships being arrived at Kinsale. They came from Surat 13 Jan. last, and arrived at St. Helena 22 April, where, finding the island taken by the Dutch, they fired several guns from the fort at them, having never a Dutch ship in the road. They were answered by our ships again, upon which they steered for Barbados, where they arrived 9 June and left 17 June. I enclose the cargoes of three of them both in English and French. The other is not yet come to hand. The four may be computed to be worth about 250,000l. We expect six more from the coast of Coromandel, worth above 300,000l. God send them well. To-day is come an express from Prince Rupert, who has sent a Dutch East Indiaman as prize to Harwich. Her burden and lading are not known. I hear the Prince has given his Majesty notice how the prisoners have informed him that Capt. Munday, commander-in-chief of the four men-of-war, has retaken St. Helena, and in all probability has taken five Dutch Indiamen, which came in this ship's company from Batavia. From Yarmouth, Harwich, and other places to the northward they write they have heard many guns both Sunday and Monday last, so it's concluded the fleets were engaged, but as to the success we know not. God grant us victory over our stubborn enemies, otherwise it's to be feared they will not stoop to any reasonable terms. Our East India Company followed your directions in applying themselves to his Majesty, who ordered Lord Arlington to advise you the needful about that affair. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 255.] Enclosed,
Printed list of the cargoes of the Loyal Merchant, the Golden Fleece and theRainbow. [English and French. Ibid. No. 255I.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent to William Jonas and others of their invention for dyeing hair, mentioned in their petition calendared ante, p. 493. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 92.]
Aug. 15. Warrant for a privy seal for 2l. per diem to William Perwich, employed in state affairs at Paris, for his entertainment, and for such other sums for intelligence, &c., as may be allowed by a Secretary of State. [Ibid. p. 97.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland, and the remanent auditors of the Earl of Crawford's accounts. The Duke of Lauderdale having represented to him what they write in theirs of 16 July last concerning the accounts of the Earl of Crawford, authorising them in respect of his age and infirmity to audit and close his said accounts of such moneys as he actually intromitted with whilst he was Treasurer, and for the 2½ years' tack duty of the Customs, the time he was sole Commissioner of the Treasury, on the terms mentioned in the said letter, and further authorising them to allow to him 1,000l. sterling for his pension from Martinmas 1648 to Martinmas 1649, when the tacksmen's accounts for that year shall be made, albeit they who intruded themselves at that time into the managing of the affairs of the Treasury would not grant a precept for the same by reason of his loyalty and accession to the honourable and laudable engagement of that year. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 271.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. At the request of Lady Katherine O'Bryen, sister of the deceased Duke of Lenox and Richmond, that persons appointed by her may have liberty to take inspection of the writs and evidences of that family, now in the custody of the Commissioners, authorising them to grant liberty to such persons (with others to be appointed by the Commissioners to be present with them) to take inspection thereof, and to suffer her agent to take copies of such of them as he shall find useful to her. [Ibid. p. 272.]
Copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 256.]
Aug. 15.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Transmitting a petition presented to the King on behalf (as they say) of above 107 of the tenants of Duncow complaining of very hard usage from the Lord Maxwell and Earl of Nithsdale, notwithstanding their being the King's tenants and that they pay their few duties in the Exchequer there, that they may examine the matter, and, if the case stands as therein represented, may order such a course to be taken as may hereafter preserve his Majesty's interest in the said lands and secure his tenants in the peaceable possession of their farms. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 273.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall, Treasury Chamber.
Lord Treasurer Viscount Latimer to the Commissioners of the Customs. Warrant for 174 barrels of copper blanks to be landed and delivered custom free, which have been brought from Sweden for the Mint for coinage into farthings. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 257.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
Commission to Humphrey Creswicke to be ensign in Col. John Strode's company of foot in the regiment of Guards under Col. John Russell. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 87.]
Aug. 16.
Whitehall.
Commission to William Fairfax to be captain of John Merrywether's former company in the Duke of Buckingham's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 88.]
Aug. 16. Commission to Michael Beaufoy to be quarter-master to Sir Edward Brett's troop in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 77.]
Aug. 17.
Spring Garden.
Sir R. Southwell to the Ambassadors at Cologne. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 168, where "Excellency" should be "Excelleneys" throughout, and p. 148, 5 lines from bottom "hears" should be "have," and p. 169, line 8, "hope" should be "suppose," and line 22 "equall" should be "great.") [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 258.]
Aug. 17.
14 leagues S.W. of Yarmouth.
Prince Rupert to the King. In my last by Sir W. Jennens I gave you an account of the hopes we had of Sir W. Reeves' recovery, but in the storm we had since he grew very ill and died this morning. My humble request is that Potts, who now commands in his absence, may have his places at Windsor, and Capt. Beckman his company of dragoons. The weather hitherto has been so ill we could not get up our anchors till this very minute. I shall first see our lame geese in, and then steer over for the coast of Holland, making use of this clear moon, which I doubt will be the longest time we can stay abroad. I am, as my duty binds me, to acquaint you that both officers and mariners of the French are extremely unsatisfied with their generals not bearing in, by name the Chevalier de Tourville, more than your Majesty can imagine about. As soon as I shall see you I shall tell you more of it than at present I write. Only I shall add we have a Dutchman on board, who saw the whole fight, and assures us that Tromp lost 150 men in his first ship, that one ship is missed. that the French are condemned for damned cowards. I send you our last station, and, when I wait on you, I'll tell you their names. Your Majesty in your wisdom will judge the occasion that was lost, and that, when a commander-in-chief has brought his fleet, I mean 30 fresh ships, to windward of an enemy, he worked according to duty. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 259.] Enclosed,
Sketch of how the fleet lay at 5 or 6 p.m. Showing the French a long way to windward, the foremost ships of the Red squadron engaged with the Dutch, and the Blue squadron to leeward at some distance from the Dutch. [Ibid. No. 259 I.]
Aug. 17.
1 p.m. The Royal Sovereign, under sail, 17 or 18 leagues S.W. and by W. from Yarmouth.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Wind W. I gave you by Col. Howard a full account of all concerns here. I have little more to say except that tempestuous weather has kept me here longer than I designed. I have one thing of concern to acquaint you with, that our ships' provisions will not hold out above ten days longer, and it must be very thriftily managed to hold out so long, by reason we have much damaged and spoiled by shots under water in the last engagement, by which I must be necessitated to come in with the fleet. I think it my duty to let his Majesty know this. Sir W. Reeves being to-day dead of his wound, I desire you to move his Majesty from me for a new commission for that troop of dragoons for Capt. Martin Beckman, and that I may have a commission as before for the foot company at Windsor, and that Charles Potts, now lieutenant to that company, may be capt.-lieutenant as Sir William was to me, before I gave him the company. [Ibid. No. 260.]
Aug. [17.]
The Savoy.
A Relation of the engagement of his Majesty's fleet with the enemies, on the 11th of August, 1673, as it has been represented by letters from the several squadrons, being relations from the Red, White, and Blue Squadrons. Printed by T. Newcombe and published by authority. [See Yard's letter of 18 Aug. 12 pages. Ibid. No. 261.]
Aug. 17. The King to the Warden of New College and the Electors of Winchester College. Recommending Thomas Thornton, chorister of Winchester College, for election to a scholar's place in Winchester school at the request of Lancelot Thornton, one of his domestic servants. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 173.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 170, where line 7, there should be a full stop after "Excellency.") [7 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 262.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 173, where p. 174 in the note "the P." is wrongly explained as Prince Rupert, it should be "the Parliament," and where p. 175, line 8, "Howard" should be "Haward.") [4 pages. Ibid. No. 263.]
Aug. 18/28.
Whitehall.
Henry Coventry to Williamson. I have not been wanting in thanking you for several from you from any neglect. My sickness a long time rendered me uncapable, but since that, some ten days ago, I wrote to you and your colleague, but Mr. Carleton has been delayed from day to day, and was to have parted to-day, but is again stopped in expectation of another letter from you, which we hope will bring us word you have received something from France you wanted at your last writing. Whether the States' Plenipotentiaries spoke as merchants, or as men that meant to be believed, you can best judge, but, if the latter, according to what you send us of the 8th/18, they are resolved not to lose by a peace, and I can hardly see what they will get by a war. Capital must spend at last, and the House of Austria cannot give them freedom of trade, and without that no rente will come in. They doubt our patience, and build vain hope of the Parliament, but I am confident both will deceive them. I have sent your colleague all the confused news we have, no exact authentic relation as to particulars being yet come. Lord Ossory did marvels, and at one time of 25 men on the quarterdeck, but three were left, himself, Capt. Narbrough, and his page. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 264.]
Aug. 18.
Whitehall.
J. Richards to Williamson. It is scarce to be believed how the town talks of the behaviour of the French in this last engagement attributing our little success to them only, and some come from the fleet dare vouch it to be true, but the relation the French give themselves is very different. Mr. Yard is told by Mr. Lloyd of the Treasury that you need not be at the charge and trouble of a Privy Seal for your extraordinaries, and that it may do as well if my Lord sign your bill as is usual in such cases. In confidence of its succeeding that way my Lord has done it so. [Ibid. No. 265.]
Aug. 18.
London.
Thomas Newcombe to Williamson. Concerning the bills for 200l. and 300l. drawn upon him by Williamson, which he promises shall be punctually paid. [Ibid. No. 266.]
Aug. 18. Commission to Charles Robinson to be ensign to Sir John Osborne in Col. John Russell's regiment of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 77.]
Aug. 18. Commission to Sir John Berry to be captain of Capt. Comnley's (Crownley's) former company in the Holland regiment commanded by Sir Walter Vane. Minute. [Ibid. f. 78.]
Aug. 18. Commissions to Francis Sterling to be ensign, and to Humphrey Thomas to be lieutenant, to Capt. James Sterling in the same regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 78.]
Aug. 18. Grant of the officers of Governor or Principal Master Leader of the Deer of the Park called the Broyle in Sussex, and of Ranger of the woods, late parcel of the manor of Ri[n]gmer, in the said county, to the Earl of Dorset and Lord Buckhurst for 99 years. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 40, p. 93.]
Aug. 18. Warrant to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster for a grant to the Earl of Dorset and Lord Buckhurst of the several offices of Master of the Forest of Ashdowne in Sussex, of Governor or Principal Master Leader of the Deer of the above forest, of Steward of the Honour of Aquila in the said county, and of the Forest of Ashdowne and castle of Pevensey, and of the Court of the Port Reeve of Paventry (Pevensey), and of the Court Baron of Euesfald, woodmote, swanymote in the said forest, and of the sheriff's tourne in the said county, and of all the honours, lands, &c., parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster in the said county, and the office of fœdary and bailiff of the liberties of all the lands, &c., parcel of the said Duchy in the said county. [Ibid. p. 94.]
Aug. 18.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. This morning I received the good news of the recovery of St. Helena, and our taking three of the Dutch East India ships and one of their men-of-war. The enclosed will inform you into what part of this kingdom they are come, and in regard our own fleet of merchantmen at Kinsale with these prizes are of extraordinary value, I dispatched a post immediately before their usual day, that you might have early advice where they were, not knowing but what his Majesty may judge it necessary on so important an occasion to move the station of the fleet for the security of so great a treasure as these bring, though they seem to be pretty well guarded as they are, having six men-of-war and a fireship with them. I believe so much riches never came into England at once. I wish them safe at the end of their voyage. I have ordered 60 musketeers to supply these ships as Capt. Munden desired. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 33.]
[Aug. ?] Elizabeth Wybrants, relict of Alderman Daniel Wybrants, junior, late of Dublin, deceased, to the King. Petition, stating that Daniel Wybrants, senior, Alderman of Dublin, being a subject to the States of Holland, obtained an Act of Parliament in Ireland to naturalize him and his children, where he lived many years in obedience to his Majesty and traded, and had several children born natural subjects to his Majesty, whereof Daniel Wybrants, junior, was one, that Daniel Wybrants, senior, some time before his death, removed himself and his family into Holland, and there died, leaving a considerable estate there, and some chattels both real and personal in Ireland, and devised the same to his wife and children, that his wife soon afterwards died in Holland, who left an estate of about 20,000l. there, and by will devised the same to all her children equally, so that now the whole estate of the said Alderman Wybrants, senior, and his widow was to be equally divided among their children, viz., the said Daniel, junior, lately deceased, Peter and Henry, their sons, and their four daughters, that all the said daughters and their husbands and Henry Wybrants have during the present war lived in Holland subjects to the said States, notwithstanding the proclamations to call them home to their obedience, and have there put the proportion of the said estate that belonged to the said Daniel, the younger, and now belongs to his children, into the hands of the said States, to assist them in their war, and will not give the petitioner or her children any account or share of the same, that the said Henry, executor to his mother, since the time limited by the said proclamations for returning is passed, has lately come from Holland to Ireland without his Majesty's leave or removing his concerns from Holland, and is suing the petitioner for what the father left in Ireland, but will give no account nor share of the estate in Holland to the petitioner or her children, but suffers much of it to be destroyed by water, refusing to dispose thereof when well offered for it, and that the petitioner is informed that the part of the said estate in Ireland, belonging to the persons so living in Holland against the said proclamations, and consisting wholly of debts and chattels, is forfeited and by the Court of Prerogative there is sequestered to his Majesty's use, and therefore praying a grant to the petitioner and her four small children of the part of the debts and chattels of the said Alderman Wybrants, senior, devised to the said Henry Wybrants and the four daughters or their husbands or any of them in recompense for their proportion of the estate in Holland so given and detained from them, inasmuch the said Daniel, the younger, continued always with his family in his loyalty and obedience, when all the rest of the family (except Peter, who has his proportion of the estate in Holland, and joins in suing the petitioner) removed into Holland, and continue there during the present war, and also because the said Daniel, the younger, and his children have sustained great loss by great sums lent to serve his Majesty in Ireland by the said Daniel, the elder, and never repaid. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 34.] Annexed,
Aug. 18. Report by the Attorney-General that he conceives it reasonable to grant this petition, and that the petitioner's estate being seized in Holland should be made good by the estates in Ireland of those who caused that seizure so far as they are in his Majesty's power. If the children were born in Ireland their adhering to the Dutch is treason; if in Holland, they are aliens and enemies. In both cases all their estate will be in his Majesty to dispose of. In the first case to make the forfeiture there must be a legal proceeding to conviction or outlawry. In the second to ascertain his Majesty's title there must be some office or inquisition found. The King's Counsel in Ireland will take care of all previous circumstances, if a grant be directed. Sir E. Sutton's letter is very imperfect, and, if the petitioner's request be granted, they may be too hard for him. But it must be left to his Majesty to consider how far he will prefer the widow and her children in this very hard case. [Ibid. No. 34 I.]
Aug. 19.
Farmingwoods.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I wrote to you at large before my departure from London, but find not by yours of the 5/15th that it is come to your hands. I most heartily thank you for being concerned for my health. I was very ill before I left, but the ten days I have been now here with exercise, air, ease, and rest I have in great measure recovered my health and strength. I am heartily glad to hear of your good health. I shall have Sir J. Sheldon, Snow, Sir T. Player and the Common Serjeant with me. I sent to Billing and Rushton to Lady Katherine that I would wait on her, that she might command what venison she pleased, but she was gone for London a few days before, and Lord Cockayne into Nottinghamshire. [1½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 267.]
Aug. 19.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. Some months ago I gave you an account how far the concordatum moneys here were charged with constant payments as also my opinion that some few of these payments might be spared, hoping his Majesty might yet have resolved the cutting off of some more of them, for the small remainder left of these moneys I find very disproportionable to the necessary occasions of the Government, but having received no order, I presume to mind you of this matter, and the rather because Lord Orrery presses much for a sum allowed him for the hire of a house as President of Munster, being one of the payments I concluded might cease, since the Presidency itself was taken away. It is 66l. per annum, and he urges it on the ground, that, though he be no longer President, he is to receive all the pay he had during that employment. How reasonable his argument may be I shall not judge, but shall comply with whatever is determined, yet I conceive I cannot without an order dispose of the public money in this manner. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 35.]
Aug. 20.
Lowestoft bearing W. and by N.
Prince Rupert to the King. Beseeching him to let the bearer, Capt. Beckman, have the company of dragoons of the late Sir W. Reeves, who has with him the drafts of the last engagements to show his Majesty when at leisure. [Holograph. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 268.]
Aug. 20.
Lowestoft W. and by N. 8 leagues off us.
Prince Rupert to the King. When I wrote last I was in good hopes to have been able to have gone over to the Dutch coast again, but the weather proving so bad and our provisions so short, it is not thought safe for us to venture over upon a lee shore. We intend therefore to keep this shore on board, and have sent the bearer, Sir Thomas Daniell, to give you a further account of our condition. I beseech you to give credit to what he shall say in my behalf, and I doubt not but you will be satisfied with two divisions of the Red, which did you good service. I also send Beckman with the drafts, by which you will see plainly how all things passed, and then I shall leave to your judgment if more could be done by such a handful of ships as stuck by me. The Sovereign is the best ship you have for riding as well as sailing. Her head is something loose, but she is else very tight. Just now is come the Country's Welfare, which I had sent towards Bergen. She could hear of no East Indiamen come in. The Pearlcame from the Texel, saw eight maimed ships go in. Fifty-six sail lie between that and the Vlie. She met a Spaniard which came out, who assured him the Dutch lost 13 captains. I beseech I may receive your pleasure with all speed. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 269.]
Aug. 20.
6 p.m. The Royal Sovereign, at anchor about 7 leagues from Lowestoft E. and by S.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Wind S.S.W. a very fresh gale. I had resolved to have appeared again on the coast of Holland, but the great storms since the last engagement and the damage our ships received by their coming so suddenly after it, with the great want of victuals, have necessitated me to this coast and to alter that resolution. The whole fleet having not above seven days' provisions and several ships being not in a condition to keep the sea, I think it neither safe nor prudent to expose the great ships to want, or to the storms this season usually brings. We have here a very fresh gale or rather a small storm, and it blows so in our teeth that we can make but very little way. I intend my course, as fast as wind and weather will give leave, to the Gunfleet. I desire you to inform the King, and send me his positive order, and, if he has thoughts of commanding me out any longer with the great ships, victuals must be immediately sent, the season being so far spent. [Ibid. No. 270.]
Aug. 20. Inland advices received that day. Bristol, 10 Aug.—To-day arrived 8 merchantmen of this place from the Barbados. They left the rest of their company at Kinsale, expecting convoy. Portsmouth, 19 Aug.—Yesterday came to Spithead the Guinea from Jersey, which is to convoy the victuallers here for the Buoy of the Nore. Harwich, 19 Aug.—No news. Yarmouth, 18 Aug.—150 laden colliers, convoyed by the Portsmouth pink, coming from the Northwards this morning fell in with four capers off Mundsley of 20, 10, 8, and 6 guns apiece. To-night near 100 of them are got into this road, about 40, it is said, are put ashore. The Portsmouth pink with three ships of this town lie by, whilst those ashore are getting off. Several guns passed between them and the capers at a distance. The Greyhound is now going out from hence to their assistance. Sheerness, 19 Aug.—Last night the Advice anchored below the Buoy of the Nore, and goes up the Thames to-day to refit. The Prince, Cambridge, Mary, Staveren and some others are likewise coming up. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 271.]
Aug. 20. The King to [the Provost and Fellows of King's College, Cambridge]. Dispensing in favour of John Ros[e]well, Fellow of the College and Master of Eton, with all statutes, &c., of the College, and commanding that notwithstanding his non-residence he should continue in his Fellowship and the full enjoyment of the profits thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31,f. 115.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of the yearly sum of 600l. to Col. Francis Wyndham in tail male out of the excise of beer and ale, with a proviso for cesser if lands of the same yearly value be settled on the grantees, or if 10,800l. be paid them in one payment, as the sum of 10,800l. granted him 30 Nov. 1670, in consideration of his services in preserving the King after the battle of Worcester, and registered on the money to arise from the sale of fee-farm rents had not been paid. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 98.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
Memorial of a protection for three years in the ordinary form to John Graham of Dewchray. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 274.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that John Shadwell, Attorney-General for Connaught, and AttorneyGeneral for Ireland to the Duke of York, was chosen Recorder of Galway in 1665, and in 1666 was specially recommended by the Duke of Ormonde, then Lord Lieutenant, to be elected and continued in that office, as he accordingly was by the approbation of the several Chief Governors of Ireland and of Lord Kingston, then President of that Province and Governor of that town, and that the said Shadwell has represented that William Sprig in 1670, taking advantage of some divisions in the said town, incited them to make a new election, notwithstanding their charter was delivered up to the Attorney-General, and a judgment passed against it in the Court of Exchequer, and a writ of seizure pursuant thereto was in the Attorney-General's hands, so that they enjoyed their privileges and exercised their jurisdictions by the King's permission and sufferance only, and that the King's letters having been granted to the then Lord Lieutenant for constituting the said Shadwell to be Recorder of Galway, yet he has received no benefit thereof, but the said Sprig has unduly obtained letters of 11 Jan. last, with intention to avoid the former letters on Shadwell's behalf:—that, without regard to the said letters of 11 Jan. last, or anything done thereupon, he should consider the matter, as it stood before the date thereof, and that if it shall appear that the said Shadwell during his continuance in that office behaved faithfully to the King's service and to the satisfaction of the chief inhabitants and sober persons of the town, he shall cause the said Shadwell to be reinstated in the said Recordership, as directed by the former letters in his behalf. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 488.]
Two drafts thereof dated July and August. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, Nos. 36, 37.]
Aug. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that by letters patent of 1 Oct., 1662, the Earl of Orrery and Viscount Massareene and the survivor of them had been appointed collectors and receivers of all sums payable by the declaration of 30 Nov. 1660, with power to pay over all moneys so collected to the Vice-Treasurer and Receiver General of Ireland to be disposed of according to the King's orders, that the said Earl and Viscount appointed Sir Daniel Bellingham, deceased, their deputy for receiving the said moneys, who was at the same time deputy to the Earl of Anglesey, ViceTreasurer and Receiver General of Ireland; that the said Bellingham, being deputy of the said Earl of Anglesey, omitted to charge himself with the receipt of 4,208l. 15s. 3d. paid by him into the Treasury as deputy of the said Earl and Viscount, and that for want thereof the said Earl and Viscount cannot be properly discharged of so much on their accounts, though the said Bellingham by order of the King and the Lord Lieutenant had paid the said sum by the payments therein mentioned which amounted to the said sum of 4,208l. 15s. 3d., and that no allowance could be given to the said Earl and Viscount without the King's order and direction:— to examine the premises, and, if he finds the said payments to have been made as above specified, to cause immediate allowance of the said sum of 4,208l. 15s. 3d. (or of such part thereof as shall appear to be paid and discharged by the said Bellingham) to be given to the said Earl and Viscount. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 494.]
Aug. 21. Commission to Thomas Foster to be ensign to Capt. Francis Hamon's company in the Duke of Buckingham's regiment of foot. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 88.]
Aug. 21/31. Licence to Gerard Peterson to fish in any part of the King's seas and to carry to Holland any fish he may take. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 102.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 175, where p. 177, line 2, "streight" should be "streights," line 5, "Geneva" should be "Genova," i.e., Genoa, and p. 178, line 12, "serve" should be "secure," line 16, "spare" should be "secure," and line 19 "his" should be "this.") [8 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 272.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 179.) [2¼ pages. Ibid. No. 273.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 181, where p. 182, line 16, "I heare" should be "There.") [4 pages. Ibid. No. 274.] Enclosed,
Aug. 22. Inland advices, parts of which are calendared ante, p. 503. Lynn, 18 Aug.—The master of a Dane from Norway says that when he came from thence they had not there any news of the Dutch East India ships. Whitby, 17 Aug.—This morning passed by 140 laden colliers for London. Kinsale, 15 Aug.— Yesterday arrived Capt. Munday in the Assistance with two more men-of-war and a fireship and five English East India ships. Capt. Hobbs in the Levant is come with three Dutch East India prizes into Baltimore and will be here to-night. They are called the Europe, the Elephant, and the Arms of Friezland. Pendennis, 17 Aug.—Last Friday the Hunter sailed with several vessels for France. She brought in two prizes, though they pretend to be Ostenders. Portsmouth, 21 Aug.—Tuesday evening came to Spithead two French men-of-war, bound for Brest. The Guinea is still at Spithead attending the victuallers. Southwold, 20 Aug.—About 3 to-day the Prince with three more frigates and some tenders anchored 3 leagues E.S.E. of this. Harwich, 21 Aug.—A ketch is come in, which reports our fleet was last Sunday about 10 leagues off the Texel. This morning appears before us a very considerable fleet of laden colliers for the Thames. We hope things are not so bad with them, as was reported yesterday, for several of those said to have been forced ashore were seen this morning with the rest. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 274I.]
Account of the retaking of St. Helena and the capture of three ships of the Dutch East India Company.
The 4th of May last we arrived at dawn in sight of St. Helena, and two hours later decided what we had to do to retake it. For this purpose 200 of the land forces were ordered to embark under their flags on board a vessel, from which they could be put ashore, while we attacked any ships that might be in the road. At 11 a.m. the Assistance made sail, in order that the following night we might approach near enough to reconnoitre the forces that might be in the road, and all our other ships furled all their sails, and so remained till the evening, and came to join us in the night. At 7 next morning all our ships being about 5 miles to windward of the island, our shallop came on board, and having informed us there were no ships in the road we put 200 more men on board the Castle fireship, and left her with another ship to land our 400 men to the windward of the island in Prosperous Bay. Our four men-of-war made sail towards the forts, under which we anchored at about 1 p.m., and, after engaging them for four hours, we ran to the West, where we anchored again, not doubting that our men had before that time been landed and had gained the hills in order to appear behind the forts the next morning, at which time we had decided that the William and Thomas and another ship should go in against the fort. The Dutch the moment they saw us returning capitulated and surrendered the island, on condition that they should not be plundered. This was accepted by us, they being not yet informed that we had any forces on shore. At sunset we took possession of Fort James, and dispatched a trumpet to Capt. Keigwin, who commanded our forces on shore, to inform him of what had passed, and to prevent our people carrying on any hostilities against the inhabitants on their march to the fort.
The 11th between 7 and 8 p.m. a ship appeared on the horizon, which we cut off, and about 11 got so near her that we captured her, and found she was a ship of the Dutch East India Company, which had been sent on before, with a new Governor of the Island.
Very early on the 26th those on the hill saw ("virent," probably a mistake for "mirent," "put") our flags at half mast, which let us know that six sails were in view. At 10 a.m. we were informed that four had taken one course and the other two another, which appeared at the same time in view from the two ends of the island. As soon as they saw us, they sailed close to the wind, and we immediately pursued, that is the Assistance, William and Thomas, Castle fireship, and another merchant ship on the Eastern side after the said four ships, and the Mary and Martha and two other merchant ships on the Western after the other two but, as the wind was strong, we could do nothing with them. In the night the Assistance came up with their Vice-Admiral and the William and Thomas with their Admiral, and kept close to them all night, and the morning of the 27th mastered them separately, each ship having separated from the other, believing they would thereby escape us. The said four men-of-war, the fireship and three prizes of the Dutch East India Company are since safely arrived in our ports with five ships of our East India Company which came along with them. [French. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 274 II.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. In my last I gave you an account that I had put your bill of extraordinaries signed by Lord Arlington into Mr. Floyd's hands, on his assurance that the Lord Treasurer would allow it without a privy seal. Hearing nothing from him since I presume he has taken care in it, and has given or will give you an account of it. I have little news to add to my Lord's letter. Indeed the news of St. Helena and the three East India prizes is so considerable, that I hope it will produce good effects at Cologne as well as here. Besides those prizes nine English East India ships are come home, and a fleet of above 40 ships from the West Indies and Guinea, not one of them that we can yet hear of being lost. The Prince is still at sea with the fleet. Only three or four disabled ships are come in. The narrative of the last engagement was sent you by the last post. However I thought it not amiss to send you some more of them in French. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 275.] Enclosed,
French translation of the relation of the engagement, calendared ante p. 498. [Ibid. No. 275 I.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
J. Richards to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter of the 12nd./22 About 150 colliers were chased a few days since by four privateers, and 100 getting into Yarmouth, the rest were forced to run themselves aground whilst their convoy disputed it. I do not hear that any one is taken or lost. [Ibid. No. 276.]
Aug. 22.
London.
James Hickes to Williamson. I had owned the receipt of yours of the 5/15th sooner had we not daily and hourly expected a fuller and clearer narrative of the fleet's engagement, and to write town talk it is too dangerous for me to meddle with, therefore I must credit what is printed and believe the French fought bravely. Our fleet keeps the sea, and, we believe, is on the Holland coast, for they are not on any parts of our coasts, that I can hear of by any letters coming in to-day. What success you have or may have in the treaty you only know or may guess, but I cannot apprehend here by any person but their judgment is it will come to nothing by the insolence of the Dutch, &c. However you have the prayers and well wishes of all friends for your health, good success and safe return. To-day's letters from Dublin of the 18th and letters from Kinsale of the 15th relate that the 15th came in four men-of-war and one fireship, viz., Capt. Mundy, Admiral, in the Assistance, Capt. Butler in the Mary and Martha, Capt. Piles in the William and Thomas, and Capt. Hobbs in the Levant fireship, and East India ships of ours with them, Capt. Fisher in the Burtley (Berkeley) Castle, Capt. Bendell in the John, Capt. Goodlad in the Loyal Subject, Capt. Baker in the Barnardiston, and Capt. Mariner in the Rebecca and East India prizes taken at St. Helena, the Elephant, Europe and the Free Arms of Friezland, all laden with pepper, saltpetre, calico, and silks. The said island being taken by the four men-of-war they left 300 men and 50 cannon with provisions for several months there. They have brought with them into Kinsale 250 Dutch prisoners. The island was taken by the Dutch, 1 Jan., and retaken by us 6 May. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 277.]
French translation of a letter from Kinsale of 15 Aug., concerning the taking of St. Helena and of the Dutch East India ships, and their arrival at Kinsale, to the same purport as the last. [Ibid. No. 278.]
Aug. 22.
London.
Col. Roger Whitley to Williamson. Presenting the enclosed, recommended to his care by the East India Company, with his most humble service. [Ibid. No. 279.]
Aug. 22.
London.
Thomas Newcombe to Williamson. Informing him that he had that morning paid Mr. Terrell the 300l., and desiring him to inform Mr. Shaw that his 200l. has been for some time ready for him. [Ibid. No. 280.]
Aug. 22.
London.
Samuel Terrell to Williamson. Informing him that he had received the 300l. mentioned in the last letter. [Ibid. No. 281.]
Aug. 22.
Yarmouth.
Sir Lionel Walden to Williamson. Thanking him for his great kindness to his son, and begging that, when he has so far done his duty as to wait on him on ship-board, to give him leave to go to Paris, where he intends he shall stay till he understands the language, and asking him to favour him with a letter of recommendation. [Ibid. No. 282.]
[Aug. 22.] Mary O'Brien to Williamson. A child's letter, thanking him for his letter to her by the name of John Tredeskens. Dated "the fairest day that hath been this harvest." [Received 27 Aug., the same day as the above letters of the 22nd. Ibid. No. 283.]
Aug. 22. Lord Ossory to [Lord Arlington]. I refer you to the bearer for news. If we are like to have no more blows I should be glad you would procure me a command to go home, not that I love them, but that I would not willingly thus late make a wrong step by quitting too soon, though my health much requires a little looking after. I wrote to the Duke concerning Capt. Narbrough's promotion, (?) not that in the least I doubt the promise or justice of the Prince, but to prevent any forestalling. If my ship has served without much blame I must attribute it to Capt. Narbrough's good advice. If I want skill, I want not so much ingenuity as not to acknowledge it, and scorn not to own the assistance I may several times have received from my officers. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 284.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Gloucester. As Nathaniel Hodges, M.A., prebendary residentiary, being domestic chaplain to the Earl of Shaftesbury, Lord Chancellor, is unable to reside 21 days as required by the statutes, dispensing therefore with his residence during the said employment, and desiring them to let him enjoy all the benefits of his place. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 49.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir T. Chicheley, Master-General of the Ordnance, for allowing Prince Rupert sixpence in the pound for all Iron Ordnance that shall be neyled, turned and polished and the honey combs or other defects amended according to the new invention of the Prince; with memorandum that this warrant was afterwards altered from sixpence in the pound to threescore pounds the ton. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 100.]
[Before Aug. 23.] The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing him to cause letters patent to be passed creating Murrough Boyle, son of Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, Lord Viscount. Blessington, to hold the same to him and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to the heirs male of the body of the said Michael Boyle, in consideration of the many good services of the latter. [Draft, in which Lord Baron was originally written and Lord Viscount substituted. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 38.]
Aug. 23.
Windsor.
Lady Rachel Hascard to Williamson. Congratulating him on the King's kindness, which he is to receive on his return in the Secretary of State's place, and presenting the desire of Mr. Whittaker's eldest son, Charles, who begs him to accept his services in any of the Secretary's places. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 285.]
Aug. 23.
4 leagues off Sole.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Since my last we have had as much wind as ever I found in these seas, yet I hear of no great damage among our ships. From the French I can hear nothing as yet, but I find that Monsr. d' Estrées intends to make great excuses for not bearing into the enemy, not understanding the signs and many other fine things. I only say this, that whenever it comes in question I will satisfy his Majesty and the whole world that his squadron was to windward of the enemy, drawn up in very good order, and never bore within cannon shot of the enemy, leaving their whole fleet upon me and some few of my squadron. My witnesses shall be his own officers and mariners, and the rest of both fleets, friends and foes. This I hope will not be interpreted as an intention to breed an animosity between the nations for accusing the commander of a fleet of not doing his duty, when at the same time I am satisfied that most of the commanders are as forward as our own in the service, and are ashamed of what was done. I could say more, but it being a subject not very acceptable I shall end, assuring you that, though I was not beaten and the enemy received more damage than we, I hope never to be put to such shifts again as I was, by reason of Spragg's fighting by himself and the French not assisting me. [Holograph. 2 pages. Ibid. No. 286.]
Aug. 23.
4 leagues off Sole.
Prince Rupert to the King. Since I wrote last by Sir T. Daniell, we have had a very great storm, which I endured very patiently, hoping the Dutch at their coast had much more sea. I hear of no damage, only our provisions grow short, and, if this wind hold, will hardly carry us into the River. The proportions now at Harwich are but a day and a half for our whole fleet, so we daily expect your commands, which I hope to receive before we get thither. By one of our tenders, which saw the Dutch fleet last Sunday at anchor W. by N. from the Texel, I am informed they were 60 sail, and many shaken ships without topmasts. Among them also was one of your yachts, which, by the description, I guess to be the Henrietta. They went out from Harwich yesterday sennight. The rest of our news you will receive from the bearer, who can give you a particular relation of Lord Ossory's behaviour, which certainly was as gallant and as full of honour as can be imagined. [Holograph. 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 287.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to George Thornburgh of the offices of Chief Clerk and Registrar of the Court of Chancery, Barbados. (Calendared in S.P. Col. America &c. 1669–74, p. 519.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 36, p. 273.]
Aug. 23.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. This morning brought us a packet with an account of the engagement, but being the first after the fight it is not so particular that we can know the certainty of the success, only it seems a very good sign that in the conclusion the Dutch retired, and the Prince was looking after them. That his Majesty may be acquainted in what state the moneys designed for the Marine regiment now are, I transmit a copy of an account from the Commissioners of the Treasury of such moneys as are already charged on it, by which it will appear that very near two years' payments are affixed to this fund, and but one year's due from them last Midsummer. I hear the three Dutch East India prizes, which were at Baltimore, are come to Kinsale. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 39.]
Aug. 24.
The Gunfleet.
Prince Rupert to the King. It is pure necessity which compels me to do contrary to your desires for, were our great ships in a condition to keep the sea, our victuals are so scarce and many ships leaky besides, as you will see by the list I send Lord Arlington. It would certainly be the best station and it goes to my heart that it cannot be done without too great a hazard of the fleet. I hope the remedy I propose will be with your liking, and in a few days be executed, but my humble desire to you is to send Sir R. Holmes with the next squadron that goes out, for Harman and Kempthorne being sickly, none is able to do you that service but himself. As for the animosity, which, you hint, is to be feared between the English and French, I assure you both nations agree so well in one tale, laying all the fault upon the commander of the French (as in truth it was) that there is no fear of any, of which your Majesty by this has had satisfaction by Sir T. Daniell and Beckman. When you give me leave to wait on you, I hope to give you a full satisfaction that I have fully obeyed all your orders and done the duty of your most humble and obedient servant. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 288.]
Aug. 24. 10 a.m.
The Royal Sovereign, about one league N.E. from the Buoy of the Gunfleet.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Wind W. and by S. Being, after very foul weather, arrived here, and the victuals of some ships being totally spent, and the rest very near at an end also, and having no intelligence of a recruit, I have called upon the Flag officers, and their opinions are that 'tis absolutely necessary to go in with the fleet to the Buoy of the Nore. This considered, with the very great storms we have lately had, and the little probability of better weather at this season, I intend, as soon as wind and weather permit, to sail in with the fleet, and shall there expect his Majesty's further commands. The last intelligence of the enemy was, that they were at anchor off the Texel. I have sent two ships over thither to bring me intelligence of them. What I shall receive I shall immediately dispatch to you. I most earnestly desire you to hasten away his Majesty's commands. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336. No. 289.]
Aug. 24.
7 p.m. The Royal Sovereign, within the Buoy of the Gunfleet, at anchor.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. I sent away to you to-day a packet by way of Harwich (Recapitulation of the substance of the last letter). Just now as I was turning in I received the duplicate of his Majesty's commands, but not yet the original. The truth is no first-rate but the Royal Charles is now fit to keep at sea, they being so damaged by the late violent storms both before and since the battle, and many other ships, as you will find by the list sent herewith, are in the same ill condition by leakage and loss of cables and anchors, so that my turning in is of absolute necessity. Besides the sea goes here so high that, were our ships capable, we could not take in our provisions.
That I may, as far as possible, comply with his Majesty's commands, my opinion is, that the French squadron may immediately be dispatched away into the Channel to secure the East India and other ships to their ports. I shall give order also immediately for a good winter guard to be refitted and revictualled to cruise on our coasts here.
This considered, that 'tis impossible for our great ships to stay any longer abroad, and little probability at this season of good weather, I presume his Majesty will be satisfied with the Flag Officers' opinion (that being also accompanied with the opinion of the best seamen of the fleet), and I hope he will believe I have obeyed his orders as far as possible, and also that nothing but an unavoidable necessity should compel me to it. The storms have been so excessive that the Dutch riding on a lee shore at the Texel have doubtless been most extraordinarily damaged, so that necessity will force their great ships also into harbour. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 290.]
Aug. 24. Commission to Thomas Mayowe to be chaplain to the Marquis of Worcester's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 77.]
Aug. 24. Warrant to the Lord Steward of the Household to swear and admit into the place of supernumerary Serjeant of the Poultry in Ordinary Rene Mezandere, to succeed after Simon Ager, the present serjeant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 94.]
Aug. 24. Warrant for a grant of a Charter of Incorporation to the Borough of Oswestry with a schedule annexed of the provisions of the proposed charter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 95.]
Aug. 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer in Scotland. We have considered your letter of the 6th concerning the tack of the salt bargain and of the excise of salt given by us to the Earl of Kincardine, and cannot but wonder that, after we have been engaged in that affair by the advice of some of you, and in order to it divers orders and proclamations have been published and contracts entered into with private persons, the greatest part whereof we have reason to think will be very unwilling to surrender the advantage they have, and that, after you had been wrestling with it for two years in which it yielded no advantage, you should then have been silent, and now, when we have made a bargain of greater advantage than ever the salt yielded us, besides the profit which the said Earl will make of it, which we reckon as part of the advantage we make of it, you should represent it as a thing which occasions clamour and of loss to us. As for the matter of clamour, though we are very tender of the satisfaction of our people, yet there is so little ground for it, the rates being so easy at which salt is to be sold, and the concern of salt being of so little consequence to any family, that we are confident, that, if these clamours were not fomented, they would not be heard of, and therefore we desire that in future you may take notice of them, and, as we know the said Earl will be careful that the management of it will be free of abuses, so we require you to take strict care that the prices established be not exceeded and that all ways be gone about for the accommodation of our people and the encouragement of that bargain. Therefore it is our will and pleasure that you forthwith pass the said Earl's tack, and give him from time to time all due encouragement as occasion shall require. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 274.]
[Aug. ?] Thomas Goddard to the King. Petition for a grant under the Great Seal of the reversion after Richard Godfrey of the customer's place at Lynn, promised him by his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 291.]
Aug. 25. Reference of the above petition to the Lord High Treasurer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 76.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 183, where line 10, "Daniells" should be "Daniell.") [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 292.] Enclosed,
Aug. 25. Sir Robert Carr to Williamson. I received yours of the 15/25th to-day and am glad you are so satisfied with my undertaking. I will discharge myself like a faithful friend and servant, but there is no need of answering to my Lord for he is to you as you can wish, though what I wrote in my last has been endeavoured and I believe some trial will be made again, but I assure you all in rain. He is fixed. My wife by reason of her daughter's illness begs your pardon this post. She and my niece present their services and so does Mr. Collingwood. [Ibid. No. 292 I.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 185, where "Baukaert "should be "Bankaert," and 6 lines from bottom "seeward" should be "leeward.") [4 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 293.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 187, where 8 lines from bottom, "might" should be "must.") [3 pages. Ibid. No. 294.]
Aug. 25.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Elizabeth, Baroness of Abergavenny, desiring a grant of the arrears of 1,142l. 5s. due from Robert Smith and others. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 37, p. 77.]
Aug. 25. Warrant to the Commissioners for Prizes to restore the ship Adventure, of Bristol, lately retaken from a Dutch caper, to Sir Robert Cann and Thomas Bisse (to whom and to other merchants of Bristol she belonged) they paying such salvage as the said Commissioners or the Court of Admiralty may judge reasonable. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 95.]
Aug. 26.
Bridge.
Sir Arnold Braems to Lord [Arlington]. Mr. Thierry with your approbation treated of the fishery with his Majesty. I have ever since corresponded with him, and he has made several attempts to bring over both busses and men, but they have been obstructed by the inquisition of persons appointed there for the purpose. As long as the war lasts they are afraid of quitting their country and fishing with us, especially on account of the numerous privateers. The Hollanders value that trade as the King of Spain does his West Indies. I suggest that his Majesty should insist in the present treaty on their paying ten or twelve thousand pounds yearly for their free fishing on his coasts, and that 3,000l. thereof be divided among 100 families, who should bring over their busses and families to reside here as natives, and so in proportion to a greater or less number, as they may be prevailed to come over. [1¼ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 295.]
Aug. 26.
Buoy of the Gunfleet.
Prince Rupert to Lord [Arlington]. Yesterday by Mr. Gibson I gave you an account how necessary it was for our great ships to go to refit and those which are to go abroad again to revictual. I also proposed sending the French to secure our expected ships in the Channel, till ours be fitted here, but, because the service should not suffer by the delays of sending to and again for the adjusting this, I have dispatched Capt. Robinson with four frigates of ours and two of the French to Dover Road, who, I doubt not, will be there in three tides, and secure them against any privateering strength. In the meantime we shall doubtless hear what condition the enemy moves, refit a good part of our small wants, and doubt not to set a considerable squadron to sea. I have sent the bearer, Sir John Holmes, to give you and his Majesty a particular of every thing and to receive his commands. I therefore only add that I hope his Majesty believes I have done the part of an honest man in this engagement, though as yet I have not heard anything from him. [Holograph. Ibid. No. 296.]
Aug. 26. [Lord Ossory] to the Earl of Arlington. I am infinitely obliged to his Majesty for permitting me to return, but I intend not to make use of that liberty till I see what our fleet is to do, or till my want of health absolutely forces me. According to the Duke's commands I have sent him an account of our proceedings in the fight. When you see our journal at large you will say we have not set our best foot forward in it. That short one, however, differs from that nonsensical or malicious rascal that writes of the acting of the Blue squadron. As my health and your resolutions are, I shall govern myself as to my return. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 297.]
Aug. 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Dr. Killegrew, Master of the Savoy Hospital, to deliver up the building to the Commissioners for the sick and wounded, there being a present necessity of providing conveniences for their reception. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 99.]
Aug. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of Elizabeth Wybrants, widow, (calendared ante, p. 500) and that the King is satisfied that Daniel Wybrants, junior, continued according to his allegiance in Ireland and died there, leaving the said Elizabeth a widow with four children, and that the right and interest of Henry Wybrants and the four daughters of Daniel Wybrants, the elder, to the estate formerly belonging to the said Daniel Wybrants, the elder, in Ireland are forfeited by their adherence to the States-General:—for a grant to the said Elizabeth to the use of herself and her children of all the share of the property, real or personal, of the said Daniel Wybrants, the elder, or his widow Christina, belonging to the said Henry Wybrants and the said four daughters or their husbands, with a proviso that this grant extend not to any of the estate already granted to Sir Edward Sutton, but that he have the full benefit of the grant to him according to the letters of 4 March last. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 490.]
[Aug. ?] Thomas Browne, Robert Rowles, and Humphrey Lee, of London, merchants, to the King and Privy Council. Petition stating that in May 1672, the Partridge, a ketch belonging to the petitioners, laden with cheese to the value of over 2,000l. was taken by a Dutch privateer but afterwards was rescued and restored to persons for the use of the petitioners by a French man-of-war, and afterwards put into the Groyne, and that the said vessel and lading in the said port was forced from the petitioners' servants by Philip Stafford, the consul there, and (as is supposed, in confederacy with the Dutch consul there), sold for a large sum, and that the said consul to accomplish his fraud further combined with John Parker, an English merchant there, and praying for an order that the said Stafford and Parker should in a short time appear before the Board to answer their contempt, or should give full satisfaction for the said ship and goods. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 298.] Annexed,
Affidavit sworn 19 March by John Ghorio, one of the crew of the said ketch, deposing more particularly to the facts above mentioned. [1½ page. Ibid. No. 298i.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the above petition that Lord Arlington send the said consul a copy of the complaint, requiring him to return his answer thereto by a certain day, which is to be presented to the Board, on which further order will be given therein. [Original and copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, Nos. 299, 300.]
Aug. 27. Certificate of Dr. Christopher Wren concerning widow Hoare's building adjoining the old Spring Garden, which he conceives is of no prejudice to his Majesty, though on the foundation of his boundary wall. [Ibid. No. 301.]
Aug. 27.
Tunbridge Wells.
Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh to Lord Arlington. By a letter of the 15th I perceive that the mediators are very much dissatisfied with the proceedings of the Dutch, growing very insupportable since they have had a new victory, as they brag, and have forced both the Kings' fleet to retreat for England. Baron Isola was arrived at Cologne, in all his actions complying with the Spaniards, and unwilling to dissuade the Emperor's forces from marching. But the French are alert to receive them, and may be it will have the like issue as the Brandenburgers' frolic. Meanwhile his Majesty has got that advantage that he is to be excused if the peace does not follow, and with such an integrity of action, the whole world will be satisfied and join its interest. They doubted very much the Dutch news, but expected mine, and, I suppose, as soon as they have had them, they will again endeavour to persuade the Dutch to a better compliance. From Germany I have news of a very good hand that the Lüneburgers are inclined to join their forces with the Emperor's and are able to bring eighteen or twenty thousand men into the field. I beg your leave to stay five days longer to finish my taking of the waters. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 302.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to [Edward] Sylvester of the office of Master smith of all iron works belonging to the Ordnance Office in the Tower of London. [S.P. Dom., Entry Books 21, p. 129, and 40, p. 101.]
Aug. 27. Commission to Capt. Martin Beckman to be captain of Sir William Reeves' late troop in Prince Rupert's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35A, f. 77.]
Aug. 27. Warrant for the appointment of Sir John Otway, K.C., ViceChancellor of the County Palatine of Lancaster, to be Keeper of the Great Seal of the Bishoprick and County Palatine of Durham, sede vacante. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 99.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
Presentation of Dennis Venn to the Vicarage of Holbeton, in the deanery of Plympton, co. Devon, void by death of Thomas Rous. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 49.]
Aug. 28. The King to [the East India Company]. Whereas a debt of 270l. due to the Crown by Sir Gervas Lucas, late Governor of the Island of Bombay, was after his death recovered by his successor, Henry Gary, and paid by him into the Company's cash at the delivering over of the said island, and still remains in their hands, requiring them to pay the same to Theodore Randu or his assigns as a free gift from the King. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 115.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. We received no answer from you to our letter of 31 May concerning the outed ministers (calendared ante, p. 321), till we received yours of 25 July, which tells us only that you have ordered our letter to be recorded in your books, and that you are resolved to follow the rules given therein, but you tell us nothing of your having cited those outed ministers to choose for themselves a parish for their confinement, or of those that are indulged to know, if they will accept of that favour. We think that after so long a time, this progress at least might have been made in it, seeing we required you forthwith to go about it. Seeing you tell us that the indulged ministers were commanded by you to give punctual obedience before 1 June last, on the contrary we are informed that these outed ministers continue in great numbers in all places of the country, and even in Edinburgh, where not only by their example they discountenance the public worship of God, and the order established in the Church, but in their private conventicles instil into the minds of our good people seditious principles to the prejudice of us, our laws and government. Therefore we again require you to go diligently and exactly about the prosecuting of these our commands. As to what you represent with reference to that commission which we commanded to be given to some of your number, we then thought a business of that nature was more likely to be diligently and carefully gone about by a small number than when it is left to our whole Council, and the rather because little fruit has appeared either from the endeavours of you or of those that were nominated by our Commissioner at his last being in Scotland for settling those affairs, and also we are informed about three years ago you had tried this way of yourselves with appearance of good success, if it had been followed. As to the manner or extensiveness of the commission we did not limit you by our letter, and so far were we from intending it should be privative of the power of you, our Council, that we appointed you to call for a particular account of their diligence from time to time. Neither did we command the execution of all the laws and Acts of Council made in these matters, our letter only gave power, but did not command to execute. Upon the whole matter, seeing it seems you did not incline to follow that way we then thought fit for preserving peace and order within the diocese of Glasgow, we no more insist on that commission but leave it to you to take such ways as you shall think fit, and for which you shall be answerable, assuring you that, as we look upon these concerns as that which is of greatest importance of anything in that kingdom, so we will take a very particular notice of what care and diligence you shall employ in the future for preserving peace and order in the Church and kingdom, for countenancing the bishops and orthodox clergy, for punishing scandalous conventicles, and for securing the disaffected ministers from doing mischief according to the methods proposed in our said letter. [2½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 276.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Directing them to examine the case of Robert Robertson, now a prisoner in the Tolbooth of Edinburgh for the slaughter in June of McClellan, a soldier in the regiment of Guards there, as the King has been informed it was done without malice aforethought, in his own defence, and after he was highly provoked by the defunct, and if they find the case as favourable as is represented, they may reprieve him for some time, that, on receiving further information from them, the King may either pardon him, or signify his further pleasure concerning him. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 2, p. 278.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
James Vernon to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 188, where 5 lines from bottom "certernty" should be "certeinty" and 2 lines from bottom "present," "pretend.") [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 303.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
William Bridgeman to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 189.) The part in cipher is:—
Com pl a in es much the be ha vi our 284. 245. 19. 306. 205. 488. of 345. 108. 129. 264. 573. of the French in late engage men t to 345. 906. 306. the 396. 902. 318. 86. but seems 176. bl am e prince [p]all y not one ly C. d'Estrées 362. 358. 34. 845. 359. 102. if 321. 572. 228. 813. he is se con de d Monsr. Ma r te in which 131. 304. 168. 282. 115. 31. by 1101. 145. 79. 174. l l re re Admiral the French do e we 58. 56. 165. 165. 975. of 345. 906. nor 201 34. 183. agree among our se l ve s command er s 705. 972. 573. 168. 56. 181. 83. the 984. 204. 83. com pl a in ing one of the other e ven ac284. 245. 19. 306. 475. 572. 155. 345. 844. and 34. 596. 105. cu s ing one an other. sa 195. 83. 475. 572. 274. 844. . . . . The King should 166. y he would have it ex am in ed thorough ly. 101. 131. 603. 472. 305. 291. 358. 306. 118. 693. 228. The great ship s are to be la i d up this 345. 465. 423. 83. 361. 176. 108. 141. 49. 31. 435. for 429. summe r of the rest in condition 682. 79. and as many 155. 344. 579. as are 306. a 1071. keep the sea to go e out with all speed. to 478. 345. 256. are 176. 212. 34. 496. 438. 359. 586. [2 pages. Ibid. No. 304.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
Henry Ball to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 190, where p. 191, 6 lines from bottom "Barout" should be "Baron," and p. 192, 5 lines from bottom, "Perwick" should be "Perwich.") [8 pages. Ibid. No. 305.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
Robert Yard to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 194.) [4 pages. Ibid. No. 306.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
J. Richards to Williamson. Acknowledging his letter of the 19/29th, and desiring him from Lord Arlington to forward the enclosed to Mr. Rockwood, carrying his Lordship's thanks for the present now in his care. [Ibid. No. 307.]
Aug. 29. Commissions to Arden Baggott and Morgan Jenkins to be cornets respectively to Sir Francis Compton and Captain Littleton in the Earl of Oxford's regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 77.]
Aug. 29. Warrant to John Potts, messenger, to apprehend Thomas Cox, Thomas Barrett and William Barrett, all of Bristol, and to seize their papers, tools, presses, &c., for coining or clipping or otherwise defacing the coin. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 100.]
Aug. 30.
Whitehall.
Presentation of John Greene, M.A., to the Vicarage of Cleybrooke, co. Leicester. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 50.]
Aug. 30. Caveat that no grant of the Deanery of Ripon or of the Rectories of Stanhope, Sedgfield or Haughton, in the Bishoprick of Durham, pass without notice to Dr. Cartwright, who has his Majesty's promise on the first vacancy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 32, p. 19.]
Aug. 30.
Dublin Castle.
The Lord Lieutenant to Lord Arlington. To-day I received yours of the 22nd, which came by an express. The messenger was early enough at Holyhead, but was three days at sea by reason of contrary winds. My last letters from Kinsale give advice of five frigates more arrived from Plymouth on Saturday the 23rd, so there are now 12 men-of-war and one fireship for the convoy of both these Indian fleets, and the West Indian ships have now at last resolved to follow my advice in setting sail with those of the East Indies. The Commissioners of the Prizes have attended to their duty, and with Mr. Southwell, Vice-Admiral of Munster, have sealed up the hatches of the prize ships. These two fleets being all furnished with such necessaries as they wanted, and 60 men, whom I ordered them from the garrison at Cork, resolved to sail altogether on Wednesday the 27th, and the wind having been westerly ever since, I cannot but conclude they must be gone. However I have dispatched the orders to Capt. Poole. It seems not at all strange that your greater business should hinder the consideration of the affairs of this country at so critical a conjuncture as this, besides, all being in a quiet posture here, there does not need any extraordinary speed in dispatch of orders. I shall attend his Majesty's pleasure in relation to the particulars recommended to you. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 40.]
Aug. 31.
Spring Garden.
Sir R. Southwell to Williamson. (Printed in Camden, Williamson, Vol. I. p. 196.) [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 309.]
Aug. 31. Warrant for a grant to Dr. Richard Colebrand, chaplain in ordinary to the King and subdean of the chapel royal, of the prebend of Westminster, void by the death of Dr. Richard Perinchief. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, p. 49.]
Aug. 31. Commission to Thomas Hussey to be ensign to Major Boade in the Earl of Peterborough's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 35a, f. 78.]
Aug. 31. Warrant to the Commissioners for Prizes to deliver the ship Neris Merchant, lately taken from a Dutch caper, to Capt. Deane or Thomas Bisse for the use of themselves and the other owners, they paying moderate salvage. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 40, p. 101.]
Aug. 31. Warrant for a grant to Isaac Basire, gent., to be keeper of the woods and parks of Frankland and Ryton in Durham for his life upon the surrender of Mr. John Davison, the present holder. [Ibid. p. 102.]
Aug. 31. Grant to Hester Hoare to rebuild her house, and to extend it on a piece of ground belonging to Whitehall Palace, where part of the wall stood which encloses Spring Garden, Dr. Wren having certified it will be of no prejudice to the King. [Ibid. p. 103.]
Aug. 31. Warrant to Dr. Christopher Wren to cause all the doors in the wall of the old Spring Garden made without leave by the neighbouring inhabitants to be shut up, and the Garden to be cleansed and paved, and posts for a footpath set up, and gates hung at the entrance, with power to him to agree with persons having doors into the Spring Garden for them still to enjoy the same, they first subscribing to such orders and rates as he shall make for accomplishing the work. [Ibid. p. 104.]
Aug. 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for an order to the Treasury Commissioners to pay to Henry, Earl of Drogheda, 1,000l. out of the money settled for maintenance of a sea regiment, as a free gift. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 8, p. 493.]
[Aug.] Major Boade to William Bridgeman. Mr. Selby, my ensign, being a Catholic has sold his place to Mr. Hussey, and I shall be very much obliged by your procuring it for him as soon as possible, for I want an ensign very greatly. (See ante, p. 518.) Some of our companies are almost ruined for want of officers, for the Catholics remain with us and receive their money, but never act, or take the least care of their soldiers, and so do the regiment great prejudice for those companies committed strange insolencies on their march hither, and most of all, the officers. Lieut. George Paynter, whose right it is, if Capt. Tuite leaves his company, or his Majesty would give a commission to, before the company be quite spoiled, would be very careful of it, and deserves it. Please inform Lord Arlington of this. [Ibid. No. 309.]
[Aug.] A brief relation, and exact map of the harbour of Newcastle, near Tinmouth Barre, since Dec., 1672, when eight ships were overwhelmed by the freshes, of which six were (as not lying difficult) removed and cleared the first month; the other two, being great and deep laden, sunk in the best of the harbour, were blown up with gunpowder a few months after, with some particulars of what change happened that harbour thereupon to this present August following, describing how the author blew up the two ships with a powder chest, to which a fireball was conveyed through a hollow mast fastened to the chest at the bottom of the sea.—London: Printed for the author, Edmond Custis, 1673. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 310.] Annexed,
Birdseye view of Tynemouth and the Tyne by W. Hollar, showing the position of the wrecks blown up, with also a view of how "the water, smoke and pieces of the ship appeared above after it was fired under." [Ibid. No. 310 i.]
[Aug.] A brief relation of the engagement by Prince Rupert. Monday, 11 Aug., at daybreak, we saw the Dutch fleet about 1½ leagues to windward, the wind then E.S.E., fair weather, and not far from the shore, at which time both their fleet and ours stood northward. About 6 I put abroad the signal for our fleet to tack to the southward, which they did. Then the French had the van, myself in the middle, and Sir E. Spragg in the rear. About the same time the Dutch bore down upon us, and De Ruyter sent the Vice-Admiral of Zealand with 7 more men-of-war and 3 fireships to engage the whole French squadron. Admiral Tromp with his squadron, being about 26 men-of-war and 7 fireships, engaged Sir E. Spragg and the Blue squadron, who had their foretopsails to the mast to stay for them, contrary to my express order and their own duty. De Ruyter and Bankaert with all the rest of the fleet, men-of-war and fireships, came on upon me and my squadron, and about 8 the fight began. Before 9 there fell a fog with small rain, which continued till 12; then it cleared up, and the wind came to the South, which put the French, being ahead, to windward of the Dutch, when all the French squadron having the wind, instead of tacking and engaging the enemy, as I expected from them, stood away to the S.E., the wind then S.S.W., and stood full two leagues away, before they tacked again, and the Vice-Admiral with his eight ships had left them, and come down upon us. At that time I saw Sir J. Chicheley, Rear-Admiral of the Red, to leeward of me a great way. The whole force of De Ruyter's and Bankaert's squadrons lay upon my division and Sir J. Harman's, and the enemy had cut off Sir J. Chicheley and his division from me, so that about 12 I had upon me De Ruyter and his squadron on my lee quarter, an admiral and two flags more on my weather quarter, and the Zealand squadron on my broadside to windward. Having fought thus some time with both my broadsides to windward and to leeward, I edged down towards the RearAdmiral of the Red, forcing the enemy to give way, and so joined them. After which, about 2, I discovered the Blue squadron at a great distance near 8 leagues to leeward, bearing N.N.E. and I not knowing in what condition they were, and finding the guns well plied made all the sail I could to them, both to join the fleet, and to help them if necessary, wind then S.S.W. De Ruyter no sooner perceived my resolution but he bore away with his whole fleet to Tromp's relief, so we ran down side by side within range of cannon shot without firing on either side, and as we were sailing down we saw a great many of the Blue squadron, which we judged had received some damage, to windward of the body and likewise some of the Red. To which I fired a gun to make them bear down to us, notwithstanding which they did not. About 4 we came near the Blue squadron, when we found the Royal Prince wholly disabled, her main and mizen masts and her foretopmast shot away, and divers more disabled, Lord Ossory, the Vice-Admiral of the Blue, lying astern of the Royal Prince, between her and the enemy, bending his new sails and mending his rigging, and two frigates by him, on which I sent immediately two frigates to take the Royal Prince in tow, Tromp's squadron lying eastward of them, some of them disabled of their topmasts and yards, part of his squadron with Vice-Admiral and Rear-Admiral standing eastward close by a wind with all the sail they could to gain it, so tacked again upon the Blue. When we came near them about 4 De Ruyter fired a gun, on which Tromp tacked. De Ruyter bore down with all the sail he could to make himself master of our lame ships, on which we lay by before to windward of Sir J. Kempthorne, to get our fleet in order to attack the enemy again, I putting out the usual signal to bring all ships into the general's wake or grain, which is the blue flag upon the mizen peak, and sent ketches, sloops and boats to the ships to windward to command them in. Whereupon we bore up, and steered in between De Ruyter and our lame ships, and fired guns to some of our own ships to windward to bear down, but none of them came near to assist me, except Sir J. Kempthorne and Lord Ossory, so I had great reason to believe that, except I had come in so happily to their relief, the Blue squadron had been totally lost, since they were so disabled, that no more of them but those two flags only gave me any assistance, after I came down. About 5, De Ruyter with all his flags and fleet came side by side close up with me, so there began a very sharp encounter. In this evening engagement I had none to second me, besides the Vice-Admiral and RearAdmiral of the Blue but Sir J. Harman, Capt. Davis in the Triumph, and Capt. Stout in the Warspite, and of my own division Sir J. Holmes in the Rupert, Capt. Legg in the Katharine, Sir John Berry in the Resolution, Sir J. Ernle in the Henry, Sir R. Strickland in the Mary, Capt. Carter in the Crown, a fourth rate, and Capt. Booth in the Pearl, a fifth rate, in all not above 13 or 14 ships. The fight was very strong and close. I forced the enemy into a very great disorder and then sent two fireships amongst them, which increased it, and if the French lying within distance to windward had obeyed my signal and borne down upon the enemy, according to their duty, I must have routed and torn them all to pieces. It was the greatest and plainest opportunity ever lost at sea. The fight continued after sunset till the day was near spent when I edged off with an easy sail, so as to carry off the disabled ships. The Dutch also laid their heads to the eastwards, and so the battle ended, when a messenger came from Comte d'Estrées to receive orders to know the meaning of the blue flag being on the mizen peak, which I wonder at, seeing there was no instruction plainer to be understood, or more necessary among the general instructions for fighting, which he had laid before him, and besides it wanted neither signal nor instructions to tell him what he should then have done, the case was so plain to every man's sight in the whole fight. When dark night came, the enemy stood off to their own coast, which I had reason to be glad of, resolving, if I could avoid it, not to venture a new engagement next day, unless I could have better assurance not only what the Comte d'Estrées, but many of our own captains meant to do, who had failed me so in this. In this battle neither French nor English lost one ship of war nor do I think the Dutch have great reason to rejoice, and, considering all things, I think it the greatest providence that ever befell me in my life, that I brought off the fleet so. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 311.]
[Aug.] Description of the engagement. The Dutch having the wind of us, and being close under their own shore, wind S.E., and our fleet standing towards the entrance of the Texel, the Prince about 6 made a sign for the van and rear to tack, and, as soon as all the fleet were about, the enemy coming very near us, almost within shot, Sir E. Spragg had some ships of Lord Ossory's division betwixt him and the enemy, so he stayed till they had stretched out into a line ahead of him. About 7 the fleet began to engage, our line being of great length, so De Ruyter engaged with Prince Rupert, and Bankert's division fell to the share of Comte d'Estrées, who in two hours got the weather gage of that part of the enemy, and Tromp's engaged the Blue Squadron, whose Rear-Admiral engaged with Lord Ossory, Tromp himself with Sir E. Spragg, and his ViceAdmiral with Sir J. Kempthorne. Tromp with his whole division fired at Sir E. Spragg, not regarding his seconds, so that in four hours he was forced to change his ship and go on board the St. George, and after the disabling her and going into a third rate was unfortunately drowned. Before this the wind shifted, and a great shower of rain fell. The general was then beset by the enemy on both sides, De Ruyter being right astern of him, and the French to windward of the enemy and but Martell and his division engaged. Then Sir J. Chicheley was forced out of the line by some damage he received, and was followed by a Dutch Vice-Admiral and nine other ships, Tromp all this while lying upon Sir E. Spragg's maimed ship, striving what he could to destroy her, but she was relieved the first time by Sir J. Kempthorne, after which Tromp attempted her with his whole division again, and brought fireships on her, but could not prevail. At which time the General bore down for the rescue of Sir J. Chicheley, and to see what condition the Blue Squadron were in, so the Dutch and English came down within half shot and did not fire. About 6 De Ruyter bearing down, thinking to destroy the disabled Royal Prince, and coming a great way ahead of his own fleet, was bravely hindered of his design by Lord Ossory, who clapped between the Royal Prince and De Ruyter. At which time some of the Red Squadron were endangered, being in the crowd of the enemy, so that the General was forced to send fireships for their relief, which using their endeavours by setting their ships on fire made the enemy give way, and the General bearing down to get his fleet together, the Dutch lay by, and so we parted that night. [1¼ page. Ibid. No. 312.]
[Aug.]
Henrietta yacht. Capt. Guy.
An account of the engagement. About 4 a.m. we had the Dutch fleet S. E. of us, and Camperdown over them, two leagues off, wind E.S.E., the land bold and high. We stood into the shore till 7, then the Hollander bore upon us flag to flag within half shot, we lying ahead. The St. Michael about 8 received several shot in sails and rigging. About 9 we received two shots, one forward, the other abaft under water, so that we could not come to stop it, which soon sank us, but we got aboard the John's Advice. Two of their squadrons took our Red and White to task, whilst the other fought us, being separated at least a league from the fleet. At 10 the St. Michael lost the clue of her maintopsail and bore up (soon fixed and in to Sir E. Spragg again). At 11 Tromp's flag came by the board. At 12 Sir E. Spragg lost his main and mizen masts, but soon spreads his flag on the St. George, which in an hour lost her foretopmast, and he removing in his barge to the Bristol, the boat was staved and he drowned. The wind at S.W. we stand N.W. a league or two to windward of the Blue, the French to windward of both fleets, neither have they done anything worth speaking this day, whilst the Blue and Tromp were intermixed. About 2 our General and the Dutch bore up N.E. to be spectators of the Blue and Tromp, who still fight desperately. Side by side they come not firing a gun, though in shot. Now the Royal Sovereign lost her foretopmast. One Dutchman was burnt by a fireship of the Red. The Royal Prince is got in tow of 3 or 4 frigates, and about 5 the Red and Dutch begin their firing afresh. At 6 the French bare away, being at least a league to windward, on the Hollander, but, before they came in shot, brought to, and lay there firing to little purpose. At 7 I saw two ships on fire, but know not what they were; nor did they fight afterwards, but laid their heads to windward with sails to mast, we going off W. by N. We have lost Sir E. Spragg, Sir W. Reeves mortally wounded, the captain of the Edgar slain, Capt. Howard's arm gone, Sir J. Kempthorne wounded in the hand and several others as yet not known. Tuesday they lay by to fit and mend their shattered rigging, and at 4 Wednesday morning bore away for the Holland coast, we in sight. Not one man-of-war is lost on our side, but fireships, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 336, No. 313.]
Aug.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas the Earl of Westmeath, Thomas Dease, titular Bishop of Meath, and seven others about 1641 put several sums of money out on mortgage of lands in the baronies of Clanmogham (Clanmahon) and Castlerahan, co. Cavan, in the name of the late Countess Dowager of Westmeath or some other person or persons in trust for them, which said mortgage for nonpayment soon after became forfeited, and so has long remained, and yet neither the said Earl nor any of the said persons nor the said trustee or trustees nor any deriving title from any of them has been adjudged innocent in the late Court of Claims so as to take advantage thereof themselves, and therefore by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation the said mortgage and the moneys lent thereon is due and right belonging to us and in our disposal to the uses of the said Act. And whereas Henry Brouncker has made known to us the said concealment, praying a preference of placing on the said mortgaged lands debentures of arrears due to the '49 officers, that being one of the uses designed by the said Acts, we therefore grant and empower you to cause letters patents to be passed of the said lands or the sums thereon lent to the said Henry Brouncker in fee-simple, with full power to sue for, enter on, and receive, and release the said lands or moneys to his own use, so that he, before the passing of the said letters patent, deliver to you or other the Lieutenant for the time being so much good and satisfiable debentures of '49 arrears as will, according to the rules of the said Acts, amount to the value of the premises hereby granted, and we further require you on application of the said Brouncker to cause a commission or commissions to be issued for the better discovering and securing the said sums, or lands so mortgaged as aforesaid and arrears or interest due thereon. [Draft. 2¼ pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 334, No. 44.]

Footnotes

  • 1. Perhaps Philip Bickerstaffe, a lieutenant in the regiment in which Sir C. Lyttelton was colonel.
  • 2. Mistake for 213 = gn.