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Charles II: March 1675

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Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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March 1675

March 1. Lord Robartes to Williamson. Requesting him to present the enclosed letter to his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 183.]
March 1.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Our bailiffs last Saturday afternoon, as I had desired, sent for the chief members of our great conventicle and desired them to forbear meeting at their public place, using my name as a bugbear. They then promised they would not meet, but, lest they should not be so good as their words, I went yesterday morning to their meeting-place and stood in a porch against their door. Some hundreds of them, having no notice of what their leaders had promised, came there, and, as they saw me, passed by. This work may with ease be done in the country, where the gentry live and the people have a dependence on them, and not they upon the people, but in corporations it will never be carried through by the magistrates or inhabitants, their livelihood consisting altogether in trade, and this depending one upon another, so that, when any of these shall appear to act in the least measure, their trade shall decline, and not this alone, but their credit with it, by representing them low in estate and deeply engaged to others, and, if they are indebted as few men in trade but are, they are industrious to learn to whom, and, if it be possible, to bring their creditors upon them. This has been their practice in these parts, and doubtless the like is done elsewhere, but I never was engaged to any of them, but have suited myself according to my cloth, and have made shift by that little employ I have had in public affairs to stand upon my own legs and to help them, which I have several times done without respect to their principles. I have lived about 20 years here, and there is not a man that ever I had a controversy with but on the store of the public, and I challenge all the fanatics to lay a just accusation upon me. [Ibid. No. 184.]
March 1.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. To-day was in sight of this harbour Sir John Narbrough with the Straits fleet homeward bound. The wind being bare for them, the Bristol, which had many redeemed captives on board, anchored, but the wind proving presently more favourable set sail. Postscript.– The fleet seen off this are merchantmen and not Sir John Narbrough. [Ibid. No. 185.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 185i.]
March 1.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Since my last about 60 sail have entered here, many from several parts of France with salt, wine, fruit and brandy, most bound for London. The Dutch frigates and merchantmen are still here. Thursday came in a man-of-war of Ostend of 36 guns, with two other vessels, as they pretend, of London, laden with Count Monterey's servants, goods, horses, dogs, &c., bound for Santander. Last Friday came in an Ostend privateer of 4 guns, and went out to-day. There is a report that three French men-of-war have taken four Ostenders, one of 24 guns, one of 20, one of 16, and one of 10, and carried them into Brest. Last Thursday went out, the wind being N. and N.W., several sail from here for London and France. The wind next morning being E. brought in several vessels. Just now the Ostend man-of war is going out. Wind at present N.W. Other shipping news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 186.]
March 1.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The wind coming about at N.W. the 25th, the ships bound homeward and for France put to sea, but the next day, the wind coming about to S.E., as many as could fetch the harbour put in again. The 26th came in the Trial of London from Barbados with sugars for London. She came alone from thence eight weeks since. She has many passengers on board, some that came from Guinea and were landed there. They report there is great like of good crops of all sorts there next season. The Peter of Dieppe came in, bound for the Bank. She came out with 17 more, but lost them in foul weather. They had no convoy, but were ships of good force from 20 guns and under. Having lost her company she will not proceed on her voyage. I am advised from the west that the 20th a French vessel of 100 tons laden with wines and brandy was taken by a Dutch caper of 12 guns off the Land's End. The wind is now N.W., so, if it holds, most of these ships will put to sea. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 187.]
March 1.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 188.]
March 1.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. By a passenger arriving here I am informed, that about 10 Feb. the Johanah and Sarah of Boston in New England of about 120 tons and 4 guns laden with tobacco for London was cast away on the Deadman near Foy, but all the men, being eleven, were saved, he being one of them. Last Saturday arrived in this road the Mary of North Yarmouth laden with wines and brandy from Bordeaux bound for London, being put out of her course. She had certainly perished on the Welsh shore, if a small vessel of this town laden with salt from Croisic had not providentially sailed near her, and perceiving them to be strangers by their putting out a whiff made towards them and brought them safe into this road, where she only waits for a fair wind to proceed on her voyage. [Ibid. No. 189.]
March 1.
Whitehall.
Commission to John Baron to be ensign to Sir Francis Leeke's company in garrison at the forts near Gravesend. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 10.]
March 1.
The Council Chamber, Dublin.
Proclamation by the Lord Lieutenant and Council, publishing the King's letter of 10 Feb., calendared in the last volume, p. 579, concerning the abolition of the sheriffs entertaining the judges, &c. [4 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 309, p. 407.]
March 2. Request by the Earl of Suffolk for a caveat that no grant pass concerning the reversion of the place of Underhousekeeper of Audley End, without his being acquainted with it, it being in his right to dispose of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 190.]
March 2.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind N. W. [Ibid. No. 191.]
March 2.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Here are 20 light colliers at anchor expecting a fair wind to the North. The wind is now N. With postscript to Mr. Ball, inquiring how he should direct a letter to Capt. Thomas Thornton. [Ibid. No. 192.]
March 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Mine of Sunday last did not, as I intended, go by the Holland mail, because that was too quick for me, but yesterday by the every day's post settled at Colchester. In the last packet-boat came over but two soldiers and several seamen, to whom I had little to say, observing the letter of your orders. By it came no news that I could hear of. A friend in Holland writes to me thus "'Tis with us as if no war. No preparations by sea or land appear, it's as tho' a sudden peace or cessation of arms were at hand." All Sunday the wind was southerly and continued so till noon yesterday, but at present it is westerly. [Ibid. No. 193.]
March 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. Yesterday morning sailed hence the Merlin yacht and Weveno (Wivenhoe) to Southampton River to convoy some horses for Cherbourg. [Ibid. No. 194.]
March 2. Warrant to William Ramsden, Lord Mayor, and the Justices of York, to forbear the prosecution of William Maskall, of York, goldsmith, till the Midsummer Assizes, and to take no advantage of the security whereby he is bound to answer at the next assizes the charge against him of clipping, he being able and willing to make considerable discoveries against other clippers and coiners. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28,f. 125.]
March 2.
Whitehall.
The King to Lord Robartes. A petition has been lately presented to me by one Cressett, setting forth that your son and his wife take sanctuary in the Court, to secure them from executing a decree and sealing a conveyance appointed by it, with an argument that they ought to do so, because you and their other trustees had already done it. However, I have given them till the end of Easter Term to accommodate the matter with Cressett, expecting to hear from you in the meantime, if there is any reason for their refusing to follow your example. I have heard nothing of the merits of the cause, the complaint being only as to the law not having its course against them, by reason of their residence in Whitehall. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 12.]
Draft thereof. [S.P Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 195.]
March 2.
Whitehall.
Pass for Richard Bulkeley, son of Robert, Lord Bulkeley, with two servants, 20l. in money and their apparel and other necessaries, to travel beyond the seas, provided that he do not reside in any Popish college or seminary or use the company of any Jesuit, Romish priest, or other evil affected person, and that he return immediately if recalled. [Precedents 1, f. 54.]
March 2.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chamberlain for swearing Sir John Pettus of Rackheath, Norfolk, as one of the cupbearers in ordinary in place of Sir C. Lyttleton. [Ibid. f. 56.]
March 3.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Abraham Stock of Dover, merchant, and others concerned in the Elizabeth and Mary of Brighthemstead, showing that she was about August last taken by Zealand privateers on her voyage from Bordeaux to Newhaven (Havre) in France, and carried into Middleburg, where last January by a sentence of that Admiralty all her lading, which all belonged to his Majesty's subjects, was condemned for prize, and accordingly disposed of, but the ship was released and the freight due to the master paid, which proceedings being contrary to the Treaty Marine between his Majesty and the States General and the articles giving leave to his Majesty's subjects to trade from one of the enemy's ports to another in the same enemy's country, the petitioners prayed for relief:–that Secretary Williamson prepare a letter for the King's signature representing the petitioners' case to Sir W. Temple, Ambassador at the Hague, and requiring him effectually to interpose with the States General that the goods taken as aforesaid be restored forthwith to the petitioners, or satisfaction given them for the same, and further that Secretary Williamson effectually recommend this case to the Ambassador Extraordinary of the States General, that he may transmit it to them as a matter in which his Majesty particularly desires the petitioners may be righted. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 196.]
March 3.
Rydal.
Daniel Fleming to Williamson. Thanking him for his last and for his continuing daily his great kindness to him, and sending a char tin pie. [Ibid. No. 197.]
March 3.
London.
Thomas Woollhouse to Williamson. As it is your favour to receive my son into your service we are ready to receive your commands for his coming to give himself wholly to your pleasure. Though he has not that complaisant humour the City brings forth, being always bred near Colchester till these two years, I hope you will find more genius in him to receive your commands than it is expedient to express, he being my son. He has had the experience of the want of learning. How unhappy I have been for want of it. My father, being the first minister in Essex that was sequestered and the first that was plundered of any person whatsoever in Essex for his loyalty, was made incapable of giving me any other learning than reading the Bible for this little writing obtained from many boys the experiences of misfortunes I have endeavoured to make him sensible thereby to quicken up his genius not to lose any opportunity. [Ibid. No. 198.]
March 3.
Dover
John Reading to Williamson. Giving an account of the arrivals and departures of the packet-boats. About 11 last night the Cleveland yacht went to Dieppe with Lord Hamilton, Count Gramon[t] and others with them, the wind being then W.N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 199.]
March 3.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Last Monday night arrived the Dolphin of this port, which came from Patopon river in Maryland five weeks ago last Sunday. She brings news of the scarcity of tobacco there, worth 3d. a pound in the country by reason of the great drought last year there. They also bring news that the Patopon Indians, having plundered several hogs and other things from the planters in the head of Patopon and destroyed four or five families of them, though they would make the English there believe it was done by the Senecas, their enemies, yet the English by the Governor's order were raising a company to go against them, and intended to go against a town of theirs, but what was the name of it I cannot learn, so that there is a war beginning between the English in Maryland and the Patopon Indians. [Ibid. No. 200.]
March 3. Caveat that nothing pass concerning the reversion of the place of Underhousekeeper of Audley End till notice first given to the Earl of Suffolk. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 7.]
March 3. Caveat on behalf on Lord Newport, that no patent pass concerning the Knight Harbinger's place till notice given to the Greencloth. [Ibid.]
March 3. Grant of the office of Master of the Buckhounds to John Nevill, in reversion after John Cary and Thomas Eliott. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 49.]
March 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland for payment to James Mowbray of 100l. sterling, the arrears of his pension for Whitsunday and Martinmas, 1673. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 217.]
March 3.
Whitehall.
After reciting that Sir John Home of Rentown, late Justice Clerk, set a tack of his estate to his second son, Patrick Home, for payment of his debts, and that, though his eldest son, Sir Alexander Home of Rentown, is endeavouring to bring the said Patrick to an account for the satisfaction of his father's creditors, yet the said Sir Alexander is being rigorously prosecuted by some of them for several sums that ought to have been paid by the said Patrick, and that the freedom of the said Sir Alexander for some time will tend to the greater benefit of such creditors than his imprisonment can produce; grant to the said Sir Alexander of protection for — years from the date thereof. [Ibid.]
March 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Several passengers went for Holland last night in one of our packet-boats. Wind N.W., very fresh. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 201.]
March 4.
Lyme.
A[nthony] T[horold] to Williamson. Mr. Throwgood, a merchant of London, came here yesterday from Morlaix, who says that, coming thence in a vessel of Looe, he met a small Ostend man-ofwar of three guns, who boarding them stripped them stark naked and took 40l. in money from them and all their linen and woollen to the value of 100l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 202.]
March 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The two Dutch men-of-war that lay 6 or 7 days here to convoy the two St. Tubus men here have received orders overland to go for the Straits, and yesterday they put to sea, the wind N., so that these two ships may lie here a long time for want of convoy, one being not able to go without, having spent all her masts and not able to fit herself here. The 3rd came in here the Success of Falmouth, from Swansea, which reports that six weeks ago a great vessel of Stockholm of 16 guns and 40 men laden with salt and sugar from Lisbon was in foul weather driven up the North Channel and there struck upon a rock at sea. All the men, ship, and goods were lost except one man that saved himself on part of the forecastle, and was a day and night upon it, and was cast on the Welsh shore and so preserved. The man is now in this vessel looking for a passage home. Last Friday, coming to the pier of Penzance was cast away an Irish vessel of about 60 tons laden with tallow, beef and hides for Ostend. All the men were saved and most of the ship and goods but much damnified. The Mayor of this town has received your letter concerning Newfoundland, and will give you an account by the next. [Ibid. No. 203.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
Restitution of temporalities to the Bishop of Ely. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 64.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to M. de Louvois. I have received your letter of the 4th. I will not fail to obey his Majesty's orders concerning M. Staniers, and will send you as soon as I can the names of those I should like to be at the head of the regiment. M. de Ruvigny has spoken to me about the half pay, and told me you would have it placed in the hands of M. Lockhart to be disposed of by my order. I thank you for having given this satisfaction to our officers, and I have written to M. Lockhart to receive that money, and to forbid those who are in Paris for that purpose to trouble you further on this subject. [French. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 24.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir W. Lockhart. I am very sensible of your care and success in soliciting the business of the half pay. I am now informed it is resolved that the total sum shall be put into your hands to be issued to the regiment by my directions, they being desirous to avoid the importunities of the officers. I desire you therefore to give yourself the trouble of the receipt of it, and to keep it till I have seen the accounts of the regiment, which I write to the Major to make up forthwith and send me a copy, if he be not coming over himself. In the meantime you will order the officers that may be at Paris on this account to forbear troubling M. de Louvois any longer, but to expect their satisfaction from me, for that I understand to be the King's pleasure.
If M. de Louvois mentions anything to you concerning the recruits, you will take the occasion to let him know I have taken the best order I could, by appointing every officer to make his own recruits, which is the only way left me in the nicety of these times. [Ibid. p. 25.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir T. Chicheley and the Lieut.-General and other Officers of the Ordnance to pay a salary of 100l. per annum, to be charged on the quarter-books of the Ordnance Office, and to be paid quarterly, the first quarter to begin from Michaelmas last, to John Flamsted, M.A., who has been appointed the King's Astronomical Observator forthwith to apply himself with the most exact care and diligence to the rectifying the tables of the motions of the heavens and the places of the fixed stars, so as to find out the so much desired longitude of places, for the perfecting the art of navigation. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44,p. 10.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 204.]
March 4. Memorandum that the Duke of Monmouth signified the King's pleasure to Mr. Rosse, that George Rawleigh, now capt.-lieutenant of the Governor's company in Jersey, should be captain of the first company that shall be void in the island, or shall be raised for the service of that island. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 7.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Richard Yates, whose father having conducted the King from Worcester to Whiteladies was afterwards hanged because he would not discover where he last saw him, praying a sum of money, recommendation thereof to the Lord Treasurer, to provide in some measure for the petitioner in such manner as has been done for other persons that were instrumental in his Majesty's happy escape. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book46, p. 17.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John Hall, praying a lease for 99 years from Lady Day, 1675, of certain acres of common in the Hundred of High Peak, Derbyshire, answering to her Majesty during her interest the present rent, and afterwards 5s. per annum. [Ibid. p. 18.]
March 4. Pass for transporting 14 horses and geldings into France for Sir W. Lockhart's use. [Precedents 1, f. 56.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
The King to Henry Wilkie, Conservator of the Scots privileges in the Netherlands. After reciting that on occasion of the unsettled condition of the Scots staple in the United Provinces (partly occasioned by the removal thereof from Campveer to Dort, and partly by the late wars between the King and the States General) the merchants of Scotland have suffered great prejudice in their trading to the Netherlands, empowering him to treat with the magistrates of any town in Holland or Zealand, where he shall find it most convenient and advantageous for the merchants and trade of that kingdom to have the staple settled, and desiring him to report the best terms and conditions that can be expected for that effect, before he concludes or signs the articles of agreement. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 219.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form to John Morison, younger, of Dairsie, for three years, and — Lindsey, younger, of Paystowne, for six months. [Ibid. p. 220.]
March 5
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. I have so little at any time worth your notice that I forbear giving you needless advices. We have about 60 loaden colliers for the coast, but the wind is N.E., which makes our bar up, and keeps them from sailing. The 3rd we had a high spring tide, and the wind being then northerly brought in the sea with such violence that it has much damnified the stone work of Clifford's Fort. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 205.]
March 5.
Southampton.
Thomas Farr, Mayor, to Williamson. Requesting him to acquaint his Majesty and the Privy Council that not long since have been exported from that port several stone-horses and mares of considerable value contrary to the laws, and that now about 32 more are there ready for exportation, some being stone-horses and mares valued at 70l. or 80l. apiece, and that he is informed more are providing for the same purpose. [Ibid. No. 206.]
March 5.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 207.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 207i.]
March 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Principal Commissioners of Prizes. Captain George Canning of the Portland seized in the West Indies a Dutch privateer, the Vrede, of Amsterdam, laden only with the plunder of nine English ships taken by her. She was adjudged prize in the Jamaica Admiralty Court, sold, and the proceeds given as the King's bounty to Canning and his crew as her captors. Since his return the vessel, by a new process in the English Court of Admiralty, has been condemned to the King's use; but on the petition of the said captain, they are to remit to him and his company the proceeds of the said prize and goods, as the King's free gift. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 191.]
March 5.
Whitehall.
Commission to William, Earl of Inchiquin, captain-general and commander-in-chief of Tangier, to be colonel of the foot regiment raised or to be raised in Tangier and captain of a company in the said regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 126.]
March 5. Commission to Basil Fielding to be lieutenant to Major Walters in the King's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44,p. 11.]
March 5. Caveat that no grant of the estate or pardon pass to — Aston, linen draper in Covent garden (brother to John Aston apprehended for clipping), who is supposed to be confederate with his brother, till notice given to Mr. Wyndham or Mr. Howard. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 7.]
March 5. Memorandum that Alexander Frazer signified to Mr. Secretary that the King had promised to Mr. William Naylor, chaplain to the Countess of Devonshire, a prebend of Worcester or some other which might fall vacant. [Ibid. p. 8.]
March 5.
Whitehall.
Recommendation to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Rowland Laugharne, praying payment of arrears on two letters patent, one for 3,000l. to be paid him, and another for 500l. per annum to him, amounting to about 4,000l., that he may find out some way for the effectual putting in execution of the within mentioned order in Council in the petitioner's behalf. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 18.]
March 5. Warrant to the Clerk of the Signet to prepare a bill to pass the Great Seal requiring the Chapter and Prebendaries of Salisbury to institute and invest Thomas Pierce, D.D., who has been appointed to the Deanery, in the same dignity with all the rights and privileges belonging thereto, and to admit him to his voice in Chapter and to assign him his seat and stall. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 4.]
March 5. Warrant for a grant to George Gosselin of all the King's title to the real and personal estate of his brother James in Jamaica which might accrue to the King by reason of the said James being an alien. [Precedents 1, f. 57.]
March 5.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting that Alexander Cosby has by his petition stated a grant by King James to Richard Cosby, his ancestor, in tail male of the lands of Tymachoe (Timahoe) and other lands in the barony of Cullenagh, Queen's County, with a restriction not to alien or let the same for life or for any term exceeding three years, and that, the said lands having descended to the petitioner, he is thereby disabled from making such an estate to a tenant as might encourage him to improve, they having been wholly laid waste during the troubles in Ireland and all buildings thereon having been ruined and burnt, and praying a licence to let them for a greater term, and a reference thereof to the SolicitorGeneral with his report thereon, requiring him to cause letters patent to be passed granting licence to the said Alexander Cosby and his heirs male to make leases of any of the said lands for three lives or 21 years, in such manner as a tenant in tail may grant. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 295.]
March 6.
Newmarket.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. Though I did not meet you before I left town, that shall not excuse your sending me your commands whilst the King is here, where I resolve to attend constantly. Lord Arlington is your servant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 208.]
March 6.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats came out of the Brill yesterday morning and arrived here about 9 that evening. The master was ready ever since Wednesday, but the weather was too hard for him. He brought over one that is reported to be an envoy, and he believes he is a Swede. He says Vice-Admiral Tromp arrived in Holland last week. He assures me there was no work of any sort doing about their ships at Helvoetsluys, and he heard not of any yet intended. The Kitchenyacht came into the Rolling Grounds last Thursday afternoon, not liking the weather, which growing worse yesterday caused him to weigh and come into the port. It is reported he has a prisoner on board with whom he is bound for Leith. The wind is easterly, but subject to many gusts. It is foul weather. I have had some frivolous accounts of Prince Taffaletta's deportment since he went hence, being, as we are informed, entertained by the Jews, but they are not worth your knowledge. I humbly request your commands concerning these letters that with so much earnestness Mr. Hutchinson of Rotterdam presses in covers on me, and writes that it is your pleasure and order they should be thus sent. [Ibid. No. 209.]
March 6.
Bristol.
Thomas Cole to Williamson. Our Bishop has been very vigorous in his proceedings against the conventiclers and with a probable good success, the principals of the Independent, Presbyterian and Anabaptist factions being legally convicted and committed to custody, but not without some riotous and insolent carriages even in the Council House and at the Tolzey. But within these two days Thompson, a very eminent Independent, fell sick of a fever and died in prison, which has opened the mouths of all the dissenting party so wide, that they complain of the severity of the civil and tyranny of the ecclesiastical laws in so much that yesterday night, shortly after Thompson's burial, a libel was found in the Mayor's house with these threatening expressions or to this purpose, that, if they must be subject to these persecutions, as they term it, there were many eminent and sufficient men, and numbers of apprentices and inferior rank would venture their lives and fortunes for their freedom, and 'tis probable that of this city two parts of three may be that way inclined. Such is the constitution of this place, and now, what the consequences of this may be I leave to your wisdom to judge. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 210.]
March 6. Commission to Palmes Fairborne to be major in a regiment of foot raised or to be raised in the garrison of Tangier, and captain of a company of foot in the same regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 125.]
March 6. Commissions for Timothy Mahan to be quarter-master and provost marshal to Lord Inchiquin's regiment at Tangier. Minute, with note that the Major's commission was of the same date. [Ibid. p. 127.]
March 6.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Southampton. Having communicated his letter to his Majesty, he is graciously pleased to commend his care in not suffering any stone-horses or mares to be transported beyond the seas without his pass. As to those now passing, his Majesty supposes he will find they are of those for which his Majesty gave his pass of 31 January, being most of them for the immediate use of the King of France, and the rest for Marshal de Bellefonds. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 18.]
March 6. The King to the Warden and other electors of New College, Oxford, and of Winchester College. After reciting that at the last election he had recommended Samuel Palmer, a scholar of Winchester College, on account of the loyalty and good services of his father, John Palmer, to be preferred to New College, and that by reason of former letters in favour of some other person he was not so preferred, renewing the former recommendation in Palmer's favour, and requiring them to choose him at the next election to New College. [S.P Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 4.]
[1675.]
March 7.
J. A. to —. As to what occurs in these parts 'tis little but what I suppose you may hear of by one friend or other. I suppose you have heard the whole story of Mr. Jaques and the Bishop of Bristol about persecution and other things. This is much discoursed at present in these parts and how notably the young conforming priest preached and discoursed the old angry b b (?the Bishop of Bristol) as also the young man's father. There is much ont which, if you desire it, by the next I may let you know more, but in short I hear 'tis all, and the sermon also, very like to be printed. There are many fears, jealousies and complaints amongst friends about persecution and some of a strange high nature, if true, of which more if I see you. Many officers that went with soldiers into Holland are returned, as 'tis like you know, but some of them complain much of their usage there and of Od [yke] that sent them. Many are indifferently pleased to hear the P[arliamen]t are like to sit. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 211.]
March 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. The Adventure is to be fitted to go to sea out of hand, and she's accordingly preparing for it. [Ibid. No. 212.]
March 7.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to Williamson. Repeating the request in his letter of 12 Feb. calendared in the last volume, p. 582, that the John may be made a free ship. [Ibid. No. 213.]
March 7.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. I have no list of ships and no news. [Ibid. No. 214.]
March 7. Copy of the preamble of the patent to Cornelis Martinus Tromp calendared in the last volume, p. 619. [Latin. Ibid. No. 215.]
March 7.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Culpeper. His Majesty having considered the enclosed draft of an article for the amicable decision of all controversies and disputes which may hereafter arise between the two East India Companies of England and Holland, as it stands amended by the Dutch Ambassador and the Bewihthebbers (Bewindhebbers, i.e. Directors), allows of it, and directs you and the rest of the Commissioners (his Majesty having had the liking of the English East India Company to it) forthwith to conclude and sign it with the Dutch. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 18.]
March 7. Commissions to Piercy Kirke to be captain-lieutenant to the Earl of Oxford's troop in the King's regiment commanded by the said Earl and to Harry Bridges to be lieutenant to Capt. Edwin Sandys in the same regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, pp. 11, 12.]
Duplicate of the commission to Bridges, but dated 13 Sept., 1675. Minute. [Ibid. p. 16.]
March 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting letters patent of 1661, which directed the Lords Justices to grant to Capt. Charles Twigge the command of the first foot company that should be vacant, from which he hitherto received no benefit, directing that he should be preferred to the first foot company that shall be void in the Irish army immediately after such persons as have any preceding grant. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 285.]
March 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Authorizing him, if on a writ of ad quod damnum such a grant should not appear to be to the prejudice of the Crown or of any others or of the neighbouring fairs or markets, to cause letters patent to be passed containing a grant of a weekly market and two yearly fairs on 25 July and 6 Dec. at Freshford, co. Kilkenny, to Robert Maude, who has purchased that town, and several lands and tenements in and near the same, and has since procured many English families to inhabit that part of the country, which before, ever since the troubles, was almost destitute of inhabitants. [Ibid. p. 292.]
March 8.
Euston Hall.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. I give you many thanks for yours of the 6th with the enclosed news. I am glad the affair of the East Indies is now near an end. Nobody must flatter himself with a belief that Mr. Van Beuning will oversee the making it final by the declaratory act of his Majesty, or suffer any ambiguous terms in the preamble that may give a construction of its being otherwise. A rumour goes about that his Majesty has put off his journey to Newmarket for some days, but, your letter giving no countenance to it, I will not fail to render myself there on Wednesday to do my duty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 216.]
March 8.
Euston.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. From Newmarket I gave you assurance of my resolutions to attend diligently and so I will, and that I may perform the better I have taken your lodgings, but I doubt the woman of the house has no such hopes, for she told me she hoped the Secretary would come, and then I promised to resign. By 10 on Wednesday I resolve to be at Newmarket, where your commands shall be exactly observed. [Ibid. No. 217.]
March 8.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. To-day 50 light colliers loosed out of this Bay and are plying northwards, the wind being much easterly. [Ibid. No. 218.]
March 8.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. In the Bristol and other vessels were brought home 150 men, late slaves in Algiers, who were landed here Saturday and yesterday. They say they were in all 450 redeemed, and that no English slaves are now left there but runagadoes. They make haste to London and altogether intend to pay their obedience to his Majesty. They give Sir John Narbrough great commendations for his care, and are stout and lusty. Our people well received them, and everybody gave them money. Last week I told you of a French sloop of about 8 tons which pretended a commission from that King, whose master was an Englishman and all the rest except one Frenchman, which ran aground, and our Deputy with the Lieutenant of Deal Castle seized her and put the master and one man in Deal Castle under suspicion of piracy, having no commission, and brought the ship upon Deal Beach. Last night his Majesty sent order to clear the vessel and Frenchman, and to let him go on board and dispose of her. The English are also clear but not admitted to go in the Frenchman. It blows fresh at N.E. These four days past there have been great gusts and storms. [Ibid. No. 219.]
March 8.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Giving an account of the arrivals and departures of the packet-boats. This morning at 2 was transported to Calais Mr. Alexander Burnett. [Ibid. No. 220.]
March 8.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Last Thursday there happened a very sad accident at St. Colomb, about 10 miles from here, where some masons were mending the church, in which they had three barrels of powder for their parish store, of which one of the heads being loose and the doors open, several of the children got in and were making poppers with some of the powder. At length three lesser ones, observing the actions of the bigger boys, got fire and set the whole on fire, which blew up themselves and a great part of the church, but did little other hurt, the masons being at dinner and just on their return to their work. Wind N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 221.]
March 8.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 222.]
March 8.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Monday, the wind being E., came in several small vessels, mostly outward bound. That day the two Dutch men-of-war by order went a cruising about the Bay of Biscay, and left three Dutch merchant-men here till their return, who are to convoy them to Holland. Tuesday and Wednesday the wind being N. and N.W. made a clean harbour, only those three Dutchmen. Thursday the wind blew all E. and so continues, which has brought in at least 50 small vessels, many from Milford laden with culm for Dartmouth and other ports, and several for France, and several from and to Ireland. Other shipping news and news of the explosion as in Acland's letter. [Ibid. No. 223.]
March 8.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Giving an account of the explosion as in Acland's letter, saying all the church was blown up, the tower only standing. The 6th came in the Thomas and John of London, with rice from St. Remo, and the Dispatch of Dover from Genoa with oils, and the Morning Star from Leghorn with oils. They report there came out with them from the Straits about 14 sail, four being merchant ships richly laden from Turkey, and that there are in the Straits three or four Sallee men-of-war and that they had taken an Englishman lately. Sir John Narbrough has been at Argier, where they tell him the Sallee men-of-war shall not victual in their harbours, but that they cannot hinder their coming in and their prizes, but say they will do all they can to keep peace with England. He is gone to Tunis to negotiate with them also. [Ibid. No. 224.]
March 8.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 225.]
March 8. Certificate by John Bromstone, deputy searcher, that John Wickham, messenger, that day shipped Alexander Burnett on the Postilion of Dover, bound for Calais. [Ibid. No. 226.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance, to dispose of the moneys arising from the sale of gunpowder by virtue of the warrant of 1 Feb. last towards payment to the many great and pressing debts owing to the creditors of the Ordnance Office which cannot be satisfied out of the moneys hitherto assigned to the office. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 138.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
Reference and recommendation to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Mary Ray, praying a grant of his Majesty's title to her father's forfeited estate, that he may give order for a grant to her of his Majesty's right and title to the within mentioned inn and closes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 19.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Being informed that the King has a legal title to the lands of Killien and other lands in the barony of Eglish, King's County, and to other lands in the same county, which have been hitherto unjustly detained by Nicholas Herbert, late of Killien, who forfeited the same for being active in the late rebellion, and never claimed the same or came on any trial of innocency before the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, requiring him to issue commissions of inquiry into the King's title to the said lands, and, on the return thereof, to cause letters patents to be passed of all or such part thereof as he shall appear to be so entitled to unto Viscount Grandison and Edward Villiers in fee-simple, they placing such deficiencies thereon, as by the rules of the Acts of Settlement and Explanation the said lands are sufficient to satisfy, and paying such quit-rents as by the said Acts would have been payable had they been set out to adventurers or soldiers. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 286.]
March 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting letters of 19 Jan., 1663[-4] for a grant to Sir John Temple, Solicitor-General of Ireland, of lands amounting to the clear value of 300l. per annum, and that he had not yet received any benefit thereby, and that the present Lord Lieutenant is not empowered to pass any lands to him in pursuance thereof as they were not directed to the Lord Lieutenant for the time being, authorizing and requiring him to cause letters patent to be passed to the said Sir John or to such persons as he shall appoint in fee-simple of lands amounting to the clear value of 500l. per annum above all rents and other charges payable thereout, under such yearly rents as are payable by adventurers or soldiers by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation in the provinces wherein the said lands shall lie, and further authorizing him to admit the said Sir John and his heirs, if they shall desire it, to place deficiencies of any interests satisfiable by the said Acts on any lands or hereditaments forfeited to or vested in the Crown by the said Acts that shall be presented to him to be passed, pursuant to these letters. [2 pages. Ibid. p. 293.]
March 9. Charles Bertie to William Bridgeman. Informing him that the Lord Treasurer desires that Mr. Deerham's bill be amended by inserting Essex, and the towns of Colchester, Maldon, Harwich and the liberty of Havering, the city and county of Gloucester and the liberty of the Duchy of Lancaster. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 227.]
March 9.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The continuance of northerly winds keeps here several vessels fitted for the East to load with rye and flax. [Ibid. No. 228.]
March 9.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The easterly wind which still continues hindered one of our packet-boats from sailing on Saturday night, but they sailed about 3 Sunday afternoon with several passengers, though they left some that would not venture. We have no news by the last packet-boat, which arrived Sunday morning. Several of the English Company of Dort came over in it. 'Tis generally received in Holland that a peace will ensue this very agreement of the place of treaty, which is there also said to be Nimwegen. [Ibid. No. 229.]
March 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N. The Guernsey is come in here to be new fitted to go with the Adventure, which is likewise fitting here, to Tangier, with Lord Inchiquin, the new Governor. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 230.]
March 9.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 231.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 231i.]
March 9. Commission to Capt. Whaley for Cole's company. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41,p. 20.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lieutenancy of London. As he understands that the militia of the City is become indebted and less able to serve in the necessary duties to which they are obliged for the safety of the King's person and the preserving the peace and quiet of the government, authorizing and requiring them in pursuance of 14 Car. II. c. 3 to levy for one whole year from Christmas last so much money as they shall find needful for defraying the necessary charges of such extraordinary duties of those forces, according to the authority and rule prescribed by the said Act, not exceeding the proportion of one month's tax which the City paid towards the tax of 70,000l. per mensem. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 12.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Southampton. With reference to his former letter of the 6th, calendared ante, p. 10, about the horses, enclosing the original pass from M. de Ruvigny, the French Minister in England, to be delivered to the person who has charge of them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 19.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Commission to Col. John Russell to command in chief during the King's absence at Newmarket all the forces left behind for the safety and peace of the government, as are or shall be quartered in and about the cities of London and Westminster. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 11.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Commission to Major John White to be captain of the company whereof Major Palmes Fairborne was captain in the Governor's regiment in garrison at Tangier. Minute. [Ibid. p. 12.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Keeper of the petition of Folliott, Viscount Powerscourt, praying further letters patent to be passed of the lands in Ireland enjoyed by his ancestors before the late rebellion. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 19.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to Ralph, Bishop of Chichester, to hold in commendam a prebend and canonry of Windsor, and the rectory of Standish, Lancashire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 5.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners appointed to treat with the Commissioners from the States General about the settlement of trade and navigation, directing them, since that negotiation has been put an end to, to give order for the payment of the expenses of the said commission, including the remuneration of the secretary, clerks, and messenger, out of the 2,000l. ordered 30 Sept. last, to be paid to Thomas Bedford, their secretary, for that purpose, and to divide equally among themselves any balance remaining, to be bestowed by each of them in a piece of plate for their own use, as a mark of the King's gracious acceptance of their service. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 49.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Patent for 14 years to Thomas Togood of an engine with pipes and bags for raising water, all friction taken away, and also of a new art for tingeing silks and other stuffs by way of impression and otherwise to the liveliness of painting in all kinds of figures and landscape for the use of hangings and other furniture of the like nature. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 50.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Pass to Ignatius White, Baron de Vique, to transport himself to any part beyond the seas. [Ibid. p. 51.]
March 9.
The Chapter-house. Chichester.
Certificate by the Dean and Chapter of Chichester of the election by them of Dr. Ralph Brideoke to be bishop of that see, void by the translation of Dr. Peter Gunning to Ely. [Latin. On Parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II., Case F. No. 66.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant for letters patent creating Lord George Douglas, colonel of the Scots regiment in the French service, Earl of Dunbarton and Lord Douglas of Etrick in Scotland, with remainder to the heirs male of his body. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 220.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant, after reciting that he had thought fit that Lord Halton, Treasurer Depute, be lodged in Holyrood House for his better accommodation in his constant attendance on the King's service, and the warrant next calendared to the Duke of Hamilton, requiring them to give orders forth with that these lodgings be put in sufficient repair as to all things necessary for his convenient accommodation. [Ibid. p. 223.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Duke of Hamilton, Keeper of Holyrood House. Warrant to take care forthwith that the said Lord Halton be settled in the lodgings appointed him there, viz., the north quarter in all the stories thereof, which has been lately built and repaired from the ground, with two bedchambers and two closets in the ground story of the east quarter adjacent thereto, and two little rooms beneath the back staircase of that east quarter, and also that he be provided in stables and coach house of those that were last built and repaired. [Ibid. p. 224.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection in the ordinary form to George Dickson of Hedderwick for two years. [Ibid. p. 225.]
March 9.
Dublin.
Sir G. Talbot to Williamson. I never thought my business in any safety, till I understood from Mr. Grenville that his Majesty had referred it to your determination, for, since you have already condemned the illegality of Col. Dillon's grant, I cannot doubt of your justice to relieve us against him and the undertakers with him. This Lord Chancellor has quitted the partnership, and Lord Conway being made acquainted by what steps Col. Dillon obtained his grant has persuaded the rest of the partners here to let me quietly go on upon money and mortgages, lest, by their pretension to all, they lose all, and I am told he has written the same advice to Lord Ranelagh. If so, we shall meet with no further opposition to have our letter signed in the same form I sent it penned by advice from hence. But, whereas Mr. Dillon's grant entitles him to mortgages (which are money security), I must beg that in the instructions to the Lord Lieutenant, Mr. Dillon may be particularly debarred from proceeding on mortgages, otherwise those, who have brought discoveries to me, will carry them to the partners who will give more for them out of their unlimited grant than the Exchequer will permit me to allow them. When our letter shall be thus obtained, I beseech you send it away with the first under your cover that I may have time to pass a new patent before the term.
I hope you will have the same kindness and procure a non obstante for Sir E. Sutton. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 149.]
March 9.
Longford.
Lord Aungier to Williamson. Expressing his gratitude for his great goodness and generosity in thinking of so inconsiderable a person, out of all business, and almost out of the world. [Ibid. No. 150.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the petition of Mary, relict of Edward Adderly, in behalf of her son, Thomas, a minor, which stated that Thomas Adderly of Downderow, the said minor's great grandfather, many years before the late rebellion paid to Florence McCarty More and Charles, his son, (neither of whom or their heirs have been declared innocent) 900l. sterling by way of mortgage for the three plowlands and a half of Dromkeene, Currine (Curraheen), Classifre (Clashafree) and Ballylangley in the cantride of Kilbrittain, co. Cork, and also 50l. by way of mortgage for the half plowland of Lasterinfreneen (? Laherfineen) in the barony of Kinalea, co. Cork, which was before incumbered, so that 6l. per annum has ever since been paid by the mortgagees for the same, but the said lands amounting to near 2,000 English acres have ever since been in the mortgagees' possession and so continue, only during the late rebellion they yielded them little or no profit, that the said Mary does not certainly know whether the said mortgagors ever released their equity of redemption therein, but such a release was so far believed in that on the distribution of the '49 interest no notice was taken of these lands, it being supposed they were held in fee, though the benefit of redeeming such mortgages as on 23 Oct., 1641, belonged to Papists is by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation vested in the Crown towards the satisfaction of the arrears of the '49 officers, that Capt. Thomas Adderly, the minor's grandfather, served with great fidelity in Ireland before 5 June, 1649, and that his arrears have been stated at 1,000l. whereof only 150l. have been received, and the petitioner therefore prayed that the King, towards the satisfaction of the remainder of the said arrears, would release to the said minor the right and benefit of redeeming the said lands and pass to him the estate and inheritance thereof, authorizing and requiring him, in case he finds the said allegations to be true, to cause letters patent to be passed containing a grant of the absolute estate and inheritance of the lands above mentioned, and a release of the right of redemption to the said minor in fee simple in full satisfaction of the '49 arrears yet unsatisfied of the said Capt. Adderly, at the rent of 5l. per annum in addition to all the old Crown rents payable thereout, with a proviso that all estates made or granted by the father, grandfather, or great grandfather of the said minor relating to any of these lands shall continue in full force. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 288.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Recommending Capt. Gustavus Hamilton to be captain of the first foot company that shall fall void in the Irish army, with regard to former letters of recommendation. [Ibid. p. 291, and S.P. Dom., Entry Book 21, p. 169.]
March 9.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for swearing Sir Richard Gethin of Ballyfimiter (Ballyviniter), co. Cork, of the Irish Privy Council. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 291.]
March 10.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Our Nonconformists as yet keep their promise to our bailiffs, having foreborne meeting hitherto. Our constables having had warrants to take distresses on some that were long since convicted would not do their office, pretending they could not get into their houses. Our sessions being at hand I threatened to prosecute them for the neglect of their duty, on which they met yesterday at my house and went to Mr. Sheldrick's, one of their teachers, who was convicted for 20l., and on his denying them entrance broke open his hatch, and took a distress, on which he paid them the 20l. There are different opinions about it, some alleging that they have done more than they can answer, others justify the act, so that there is like to arise some trouble about it. The house I live in is already bought over my head, my dwelling being, as they judge, too near their meeting-house, where they cannot preach but I must hear them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 232.]
March 10. Commissions to Capt. Clifford for Sandys' company and to Lieut. Edmond Burke for Aid Major. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 20.]
March 11.
1 o'clock.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. Just as the King was sitting down to dinner I received yours, and gave him the news, which he told me he would read as soon as he had dined. The post being now going, I asked if he had any commands for you? He said, none at present. If he gives me any, I will send them to-night, if another post goes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 233.]
March 11.
Queen's College, Oxford.
Dr. Timothy Halton to Williamson. Mr. Provost and the Company have considered how to dispose of Oakley, and, though several of the society had a very great kindness for Mr. Brathwaite, yet it seemed somewhat hard to pass by one of the present Fellows, who desired it. But, after I had acquainted them that you had a respect for Mr. Brathwaite, and that you would take it kindly if that place were conferred on him, those who formerly opposed it readily submitted, and we have found another expedient for his competitor. To-morrow Mr. Brathwaite will have the grant of the place, and I hope it will pass nem. con. [Ibid. No. 234.]
March 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday evening one of our packet-boats sailed with few passengers. The wind continues easterly, so we hourly expect the return of one of our packetboats. [Ibid. No. 235.]
March 11.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. No news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 236.]
March 11.
Southampton.
Thomas Farr, Mayor, to Williamson. Before your letter came, the men and horses were all shipped and gone, so I have returned the enclosed. The vessel went on the 5th. [Ibid. No. 237.]
March 11.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 238.]
March 11.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. A French merchantman of 80 tons, the Leander, of Bordeaux, bound for Dublin with wine and brandy, was lately taken off Scilly by two Dutch capers of 14 and 10 guns. There are some things observable in the blowing up of the Church at St. Colomb, first that the pulpit was never started out of its place, nor in the least defaced, secondly, that the King's arms being blown away from where they stood fell flat on the Church Bible, so that both were preserved. It is believed that 2,000l. will not repair that church. The wind remains N.E., so that about 30 merchantmen are now in this port bound for several places in France, expecting a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 239.]
March 11
Newmarket.
Warrant to the Sheriff of Hertfordshire to reprieve Judith Ansell, condemned at the Hertford assizes for the murder of her child, divers circumstances having appeared which made it probable that the child was stillborn. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 126.]
March 12.
Newmarket.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. I am somewhat late in acknowledging yours of the 9th with the enclosed news, because I have been expecting something to accompany my humble thanks to justify the trouble they may give you, but nothing has happened, or is like to do so, but the successes of the races, which I take but little pleasure in seeing, and you would take as little in reading, but I am abundantly comforted by the good air, of which I have my share, which I hope will prove as beneficial to his Majesty's heath as it is to mine. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 240.]
March 12. Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I asked the King and Duke what commands they had for you. Both answered, none at present. They both read your letters yesterday, and I afterwards showed them to the Lord Chamberlain. The post will not come in to-day till four and resolves to go out by one, and so constantly every day, so that you must not expect an account of the receipt of letters till the day following. Mr. Wiclife cannot live, and a Fellow of Jesus College crossed the way, and flung Mr. Felton and the Scotch horse down, who had otherwise beaten Diamond, on whose side great odds were laid. By this accident Mr. May suffered some 100l., many others, and myself to the value of 110 guineas. [Ibid. No. 241.]
March 12. William Hinton to Williamson. Requesting him when writing to Sir W. Temple to desire him to be concerned for Mr. James Boeve's business and to move both the Prince and the States for a dispatch thereof before the Prince goes into the field, and also requesting him to take notice, if he thinks it convenient, of the King's letter to the Prince and of the Prince's thereupon to the States. [Ibid. No. 242.]
March 12.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 243.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 243i.]
March 12.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to M. de Louvois. In recruiting my regiment two gentlemen have offered to engage themselves each to raise 300 men and to transport them to France on condition that I give them a company of only 100 men, and that the other 200 be distributed among the other companies. I have believed it to be for his Majesty's service to employ them, but, as the proposal will augment the regiment by two companies, pray procure the King's approval thereof, and send me his orders about it. [French. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 24.]
March 13?)
12 o'clock.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I received yours yesterday and in less than a quarter of an hour after the post came delivered the enclosed to his Majesty and acquainted him and the Duke no foreign letters were come in. The King has commanded Secretary Coventry to write about the yate (yacht). He and the Duke have no other commands. Johnny Wiclife died yesterday. The Lord Chamberlain went early this morning to Euston to return to-night. Pray pardon the great packets being directed to you. It is the King's business and I feared would not go so safe with any other direction. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 368, No. 244.]
March 13.
Christ's Hospital.
William Parrey, clerk of the Hospital, to Williamson. Informing him of the resolution of the Court, that he may present a child duly qualified, either male or female, to be educated in the Hospital. [Ibid. No. 245.]
March 13.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I immediately acquainted his Majesty with yours of the 11th, who very readily agreed to it, and commanded me to write his order to Mr. Pepys about it, which I have done. We have no news here, but March dust in abundance and December ice. I am in great haste with coming from hunting and going to dinner. [Ibid. No. 246.]
March 13.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. It has of late blown such storms and gusts of wind from the E. that we believe the packet-boat, that sailed hence on the 7th, hardly got by the 10th or 11th to the Brill, whence none of our packet-boats are as yet returned hither. The Kitchen yacht with her prisoner sailed yesterday morning, wind N.W. This morning it blows briskly again at E. [Ibid. No. 247.]
March 13.
Dover.
James Houseman to Williamson. Last night after the French mail was gone came a small box from Mr. Delaberbre, of Calais, directed to me with order to dispatch it to you. I have sent it this morning by the post with the Flanders mail. [Ibid. No. 248.]
March 13.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Last Wednesday afternoon near Milburne between Dorchester and Blandford, John Mathew, the Exeter carrier, coming from London, was robbed of above 800l. by four persons, the judges having passed along not above half an hour before. Mr. Mathew dogging them, one of them told him he should leave them unless he would lose his life before his time. I hear of none of the robbers taken. The assizes at Dorchester are not yet ended. A full grand jury not appearing there, three justices of the peace were returned and served. [Ibid. No. 249.]
March 13.
Whitehall.
The Lord Keeper, the Earl of Danby and Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. This morning the Lord Mayor and Aldermen have been with us to inform us of the late passages in the Common Council, which by their representation not only appear to have been very tumultuous, but as if they were designed to give a trouble in the Parliament as they have already done in the City. They left the enclosed papers, as some short account of what they then discoursed more at large, and upon the whole we find it of that infinite importance to have this settled by his Majesty before the meeting of Parliament that we humbly request his Majesty to return hither by Thursday the 25th at farthest, and, if it were possible, by Tuesday the 23rd, because the week following is Passion week, and the week after is Easter week, when most of the good members of the Common Council will be absent, and we think it necessary that time should be given for a Common Council to be called after his Majesty's resolution in Council taken, and before those weeks come on, wherein no business will be done, which consequently will drive the meeting of that first Common Council to the time of the Parliament's sitting, which will probably be highly inconvenient. Therefore we cannot but again repeat that his Majesty would seriously consider this, so as to enable us to assure the Mayor and Aldermen that he will hear this matter time enough to give effectual orders in it. In the meantime the Lord Mayor means not to call any Common Council till he have better assurance of their temper, which resolution may be worthy of his Majesty's approbation. The Mayor and Aldermen told us that some of the Common Council, or some employed by them, are already sent to give some representation of this matter on their part, but, since no application has been made to us by them, we desire his Majesty will suspend his belief of anything of that sort, which may be brought him, till his return to hear both parties. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 19.]
March 14.
The Tower.
Sir J. Robinson to Williamson. The Lord Mayor yesterday kept us till four. You might perceive I had a very great distemper on me last night. I came home mightily out of order, slept ill and this morning am rather worse than better, else I was resolved to have waited on you, but I dare not stir abroad. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 1.]
March 14.
Pall Mall.
H. Oldenburg to Williamson. This is the small collection of philosophical fragments I lately mentioned, and have taken the confidence of addressing to you, being fully persuaded of your goodness in accepting this mite. I enclose a paper formerly printed in vindication of the Royal Society against a hectoring writer, which I believe you have not seen, and will not be displeased with. [Ibid. No. 2.]
March 14.
Newmarket.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I am very glad you now and then keep so good company as honest Sir John Daunie and Sir Kit [Musgrave]. I received the minutes of Council and showed them both to the King and Duke and acquainted them no foreign letter was as yet come in. [Ibid. No. 3.]
March 14. Dr. John Fell to Williamson. I hope I have concluded Mr. Elzevir's affair concerning Grotius to his satisfaction. At his return to London he will wait on you for your order for the dismission of those copies he imported. I enclose a rude draft of an inscription for Dr. Beeby, which, I shall either shorten or lengthen or otherwise amend as you direct. Noted on the back, that the epitaph was delivered to Dr. Halton, 8 Oct. 1675, to be engraved, and not returned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 4.]
March 14.
Christ Church.
Dr. Richard Allestree to Williamson. At present, that I know of, there is no place in our chapel void. 'Tis probable I shall make half one void as I come up to London, but whether Mr. Westcomb's part be that which will be void or whether half a place will gratify him I know not as yet. I go by Eton up to London, and shall inform myself of the whole state, and make myself as able as I can to gratify him in this. [Ibid. No. 5.]
March 14.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Giving an account of the arrivals and departures of the packet-boats. About seven on Friday night Lord Douglas with Mons. Revenette and some others went for Calais in a yacht. [Ibid. No. 6.]
March 14. Bill for thread, tape, &c. bought that day from Robert Sopton, amounting to 1l. 4s. 7½d. [Ibid. No. 7.]
March 14.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to William Ramsden, Lord Mayor of York. I have received your account of your re-imprisoning Maskall, as some letters say in the common gaol, and that he has been threatened with irons, in order to make him incapable of giving evidence according to the King's intentions; also of your releasing on bail those (except one) whom you had the King's order to commit, so that in both respects you have disobeyed his commands. Besides, you are alleged to have yourself taken away the King's warrant for not prosecuting Marshall. The King will not patiently endure his orders to be slighted and the country deprived of evidence against such notorious miscreants as clippers. Maskall will not be pardoned unless he reveal all he knows; he is not to be prosecuted this sessions, but left in the condition of being a witness; for the King will not have you indict the men accused and then clap up their accuser. He is so sensible of the prejudice to trade and to the whole kingdom by these clippers, that he will allow no officer to divert the sentence of law from any of them, on peril of his utmost displeasure. Should Maskall be thus disabled from giving evidence, and so the accused be cleared, or if they make their escape by your connivance, his Majesty will be highly offended. I hope these things have been misrepresented, for foreing away the King's warrant in a case of life and death, is no petty affront to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 128.]
March 15.
Newmarket.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I am very sorry for what you mention in yours. I am sure it is a very ill juncture of time, and, as you think I lean too much one way, I wish all you three, that are to set things straight, lean not too much the other. I obeyed your commands in the postscript, and said not one word. I find it wondered at none of you three made any mention of it. Last night many letters came to several, one, as I hear, from Sir J. Robinson to Secretary Coventry, one from Sir J. Sheldon to Sir Allen Apsley, one from Sir T. Player to the Lord Chamberlain. I had likewise an account at large, which is so particular that I cannot but believe it true, and then I know who are in the wrong. When I heard things maintained out of letters, I likewise produced my City letter, but not one word of anything else. I delivered the enclosed to the King and Duke within half a quarter of an hour after the post came, and will not so much as dine out of town because your letters shall be first. The Lord Chamberlain is gone to dinner at Saxham. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 8.]
March 15.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. We have had very little to advertise for a long time, only of late several quantities of rye have been imported, notwithstanding which the price keeps up above 40s. a quarter, and now that the spring puts in, trade begins to flourish, several ships being now here outward bound, viz., two for Hamburg, and several for Eastland and some for Rochelle and thence to the East. Yesterday came in the Merchants' Desire of Hull from Cadiz with sherries, oils, fruits, &c., who came with the Bristol. She brings very little news, only while she rode in the Bay there they saw two Argier men-of-war, which came into the Bay with English colours, but about two hours after set sail and then put out their own, but did no harm. This is the first ship that is gone from here to that place these several years. [Ibid. No. 9.]
March 15.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to[Williamson]. A Danish ship arrived on Saturday from Grimstat in Norway tells us there wintered at Mardo and Ferkevy 300 Hollanders, 20 whereof were lost on that coast. They caused victuals to rise to an excessive rate, so that a bar of fish was sold for 10 rivdollars and a firkin of butter for 12. Since his Majesty recalled his Indulgence to the Nonconformists there have been no public meetings, but I am informed they meet in private. As to Roman Catholics there are none in this town. Several Nonconformists in the country hereabouts are prosecuted in the Exchequer. [Ibid. No. 10.]
March 15.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.N.E. We are fitting out only the Adventure and Guernsey for Tangier. Yesterday came two quarters' pay for the dock and ordinary. [Ibid. No. 11.]
March 15.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. There was a great meeting of Quakers in a parish adjoining this town about seven last Friday evening, where there were a great many others of young people that were not of their opinion, but went out of curiosity. The room being full one of the most eminent among them began to speak and told them that God's children were quiet and peaceable and advised all to walk in the ways of God, for they should all come to judgment before Him, and, as soon as he had spoken these words, before he could proceed any further, the planchion fell under them, and they all fell one on another, only some few, who were by the windows, escaped the fall. In this fall divers children and others were much bruised but no other hurt. It is reported they are to meet again to-morrow to consecrate a meeting house they have erected about a musket shot from this town, if his Majesty's proclamation, which was proclaimed here last Saturday, do not prevent them. Wind N.N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 12.]
March 15.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Since my last 40 or 50 sail are come in here, mostly outward bound. There are at present near 100 sail in all. Yesterday came in a Dutchman from France with French goods, who some leagues to the East of this met three French men-of-war, a rear-admiral of 60 guns and two of 40, who came on board him and, understanding he had French goods and was bound for Amsterdam, charged no man should take a farthing from him. The other day an Ostender, meeting an English vessel from Rouen, plundered him severely. Other shipping news. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 13.]
March 15.
Newmarket.
Royal assent and confirmation of the election of Dr. Ralph Brideoke to be Bishop of Chichester. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 5.]
March 16. Sir R. Carr to Williamson. As you desired, I delivered the letters to the King, and after to the Duke, and then to the Lord Chamberlain. I likewise spoke to Secretary Coventry about the Dutch East India deputies. He tells me he has already sent you the King's pleasure in that. We have no news, no horse match yesterday or to-day. To-morrow Lusty runs. Two or three thousand pounds are betted on that match. Ned Rower, Walden and your humble servant now and then drink your health. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 14.]
March 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Since my last the weather has been and continues very stormy, the wind betwixt N. and E. Sunday forenoon in a very short time one of our packet-boats arrived from the Brill. I had by letter from Holland this account. A Holland man-ofwar going homewards from the Thames took a small Dunkirk caper of eight guns and brought her to the Brill on the 10th. Sunday sennight the soldiers who were quartered in the Brill marched thence, being the regiment of Grave Jan Van Horne, formerly Col. Palmes', who marched with five more regiments for Antwerp, where they are to join five other Holland regiments, to strengthen, as he writes, the Spanish forces, to attend the motion of the Prince of Condé in Brabant and Flanders. An East Indiaman of 40 guns, not far from Helvoetsluys, is making ready, and will suddenly be laden for the Indies. [Ibid. No. 15.]
March 16.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 16.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 16i.]
March 17.
Newmarket.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I received yours of the 15th, and showed the King the enclosed papers, which are still in the hands of his Royal Highness. His Majesty conceives nothing more to be sent to Sir W. Temple at present, it being conceived he has already orders to procure the States to persuade what they can with the Emperor to adjust the matter with Prince William. Monsr. Ruvigny declares the Most Christian King will accept of his being put into a third hand. We are here hot in our wagers, but cold in our carcasses. I have felt since my being here as much cold in an English spring as an Italian winter. Sure Monsr. Van Beuninghen is in the right; the States either do not think of peace, or not of those terms. I find by Mr. Bulstrode Don P. de Ronquillo has no order as yet to come over, the Count de Monterey having assured them that the Parliament will not sit, so it seems the Spanish Ambassador is to come to wait on the Parliament, not the King. I will not delay you longer, being to see the issue of the great affair betwixt Lusty and Nutmeg, wherein Mr. Frampton, a gentleman of some 120l. rent, is engaged 900l. deep. I hope the world will see we have men dare venture as well as Monsr. de Turenne.
We have had no particulars here of the affair of the City, at least the King told me so yesterday. Sir T. Player and that party have sent their case and their reason, but none come from the Lord Mayor and Aldermen. One I had from Sir J. Robinson, but no state of the business, only words in general. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 17.]
March 17.
Newmarket.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I received yours yesterday. We have not at present so much as news of horsematches but this afternoon there is to be a famous one, and I have made two, and am about another against the next meeting, and then I hope we may have your company, for I think, without overvaluing ourselves, we may say here, we are as good as those you were left with. [Ibid. No. 18.]
March 17.
Belford West Hall.
Thomas Carr to Williamson. I have made bold to give you notice of the sad and deplorable condition of most of the poorer sort of the inhabitants of this country, who now through want, though formerly householders and farmers, are constrained to go abroad, and beg for a livelihood for themselves and their families, which proceeds not so much from a scarcity or want of corn as from the cunning and uncharitable practices of a sort of people both in several corners of the country and also in the best of our towns, who at the most advantageous seasons for themselves buy up all the corn in gross, the one sort to transport it by shipping to other places, the other to lay it up till scarcer times, and then to retail it at intolerable rates for the poorer sort, to the utter depression and decay, if not timely prevented, of the yeomanry of these northern parts, which, with the rest of the yeomanry of England, have always been accounted the best seminary for soldiers in the whole world, and whereof his Majesty might have been well served on all emergencies, the consideration whereof may be more nearly pressed by this, that these people, having once got a habit of going idle and begging, will hardly, even in more plentiful times, be reduced from those lazy and vagrant courses, and so the nation shall more and more swarm with them, as they now do in most places. Therefore I have made this known to you, that some remedy by the Privy Council may be put to this growing inconvenience, which perhaps is not unfitting to be represented to you before the next meeting of Parliament, wherein if any restraint be put to such undue practices, though it may be disgusted by those that use them, yet particulars are to yield to generals, according to that of Seneca, nulla res satis commoda est omnibus, id modo quæritur, si majori parti et in summo prodest. It only remains that I crave your pardon for this and the trouble of another paper I gave you formerly on another subject, and I would take it as a favour to know by a line from you, whether I do not offend in giving you these diversions from your other more public cares. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 19.]
March 17.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The light fleet that were at anchor in this bay, are, we judge, got down to their loading ports, the wind being fair when they loosed. We expect the laden fleet from Newcastle the morning tide, the wind being W. Pray give me a line, when you hear anything concerning the farm of the Customs. [Ibid. No. 20.]
March 17.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. These 15 days past the winds have blown very violently, so that boats scarce came on shore or went off without sinking. Notwithstanding, no harm was done to any ship in the Downs. The East India ships have rid the whole time between Gravesend and this, expecting westerly or N.W. winds to bring them into the Downs, being outward bound. Now only a topsail gale, and pleasant weather at S.E. [Ibid. No. 21.]
March 17.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About noon to-day the packetboats for Calais and Nieuport went to sea with the mails that came from London last night, the wind fresh at E. Several passengers went over, but none of any quality. [Ibid. No. 22.]
March 17. The Mayor and Jurats of Dover to Williamson. According to his Majesty's command the bonds taken of aliens that came to inhabit here were sent up last December, and delivered to Sir Philip Lloyd, then clerk of the Council. The conditions of them were that they should pay scot and lot and discharge the parish, and, when they left their habitations, deliver up their certificates of habitation, and many were obliged to deliver up their certificates when required. Since then several of them are removed, others cast away and some of the families likely to be chargeable to the parish, and others have not paid the poor and Church cesses. We humbly desire you to move his Majesty to let us have the bonds to compel all the parties bound to deliver up the certificates, which if his Majesty thinks fit, we shall use our utmost endeavour to call them in. We have granted no certificates to strangers since the Mayor's appearance before his Majesty in Council. [Ibid. No. 23.]
March 17.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 24.]
March 17.
Whitehall.
The Lord Keeper, the Earl of Danby, and Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. You will see by the date of the other letter it was intended to be sent by the ordinary of Saturday night. The reason it was not was, because, after it was prepared, four principal members of the Common Council, viz., Sir T. Player, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Nelthrop, and the Common Serjeant, Mr. Jeffreys, came late that afternoon to me, the Lord Keeper, where they found me, the Lord Treasurer, and there acknowledged their error, that they had put any question after the Lord Mayor was risen, and excused it upon the heats and passions raised by the debates, and further acknowledged that the sole power of calling Common Councils and dissolving them rested in the Lord Mayor, and renounced all pretences to precedents in the late ill times, desiring only to try their rights by the law and the precedents of the best times, whereby the main things in controversy seemed to us to be in a fair way of accommodation by this kind of submission. Which being done, I, the Lord Keeper, sent for some of the Aldermen to come to me on Tuesday morning, but, their number not being so full as they wished, they desired to come again this afternoon, when we were all three present, and are now informed that yesterday they held a Court of Aldermen, where they questioned the Common Serjeant for his misdemeanour in the last Common Council. The Lord Mayor expected such a kind of submission from him, as had been made before, and would have gladly received it. But on the contrary the Common Serjeant justified what he had done, as being his duty, and, being ordered to withdraw and afterwards called in again, refused to give any other satisfaction. Whereupon the Court of Aldermen have suspended him from his office, sequestering in the meantime the profits thereof and depositing them in safe hands, till a further proceeding be had. This very much surprised us to see the matter break out afresh, which being the case, we desired the Lord Mayor and Aldermen to come and speak with us at 10 on Saturday morning, and to bring their counsel with them, to prevent all heats of discourse, and we likewise desired the four gentlemen above-named with some others of the Common Council men to be here at the same time, and to bring counsel with them, intending to interfere as far as we possibly can to accommodate the matter, without offering in the least degree to determine anything judicially. But, lest our endeavours should not succeed, we could wish for the reasons mentioned in the former letter, his Majesty would shorten his stay there, for, if there should be no agreement, it seems to us of absolute necessity there should be one Council day, and time for one Common Council after that day, before the middle of the Passion Week. Our great care has been to preserve ourselves indifferent in the matter, being of so great importance, and we hope his Majesty will do the same, in case any representations be made on either side, till he shall have heard both parties. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 23.]
March 18.
Newmarket.
Lord Arlington to Williamson. I acknowledge two of yours of the 13th and 16th. In the former was an account of your having signed with the Dutch Commissioners, in the latter the discourse Monsr. de Ruvigny had held with you touching the article of Prince William of Furst[enberg], wherein you had anticipated his Majesty's commands by writing the first post to Sir W. Temple about it, for which you craved his Majesty's allowance, which I asked pro forma for, though I could have told you the King had some days before directed me to write to Sir W. Temple in that point. At noon to-day I expect my wife here, and have his Majesty's leave to accompany her to Euston, whence I will return Sunday morning, and wait out the rest of my time here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 25.]
March 18.
Newmarket.
Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I received two of yours of the 16th yesterday with two enclosed to the Duke, but have not had any news from you these two posts. I delivered Lord Robartes' letter to his Majesty who showed it to the Lord Chamberlain. I will not fail to remind him of keeping it. I thought fit to let you know the expectations that was of the Cucumber, knowing what leger-de-main you may come to meet with. My intimation of partiality was not so much to you as your comrade. As I hear the matter it sounds oddly. We were all undone yesterday, Lusty, Lord Montacute's horse, being sadly beaten, but the King has no thoughts of stirring till Saturday sennight. [Ibid. No. 26.]
March 18.
Newmarket.
Jo. Field to W. Bridgeman. Requesting that the careat concerning a share in the New River, calendared post, p. 37, be entered. [Ibid. No. 27.]
March 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boat which sailed on Sunday was driven back, and came in Tuesday afternoon. Yesterday she sailed again about 2 p.m., and another this morning betwixt 2 and 3, but the weather continues stormy and the wind blows hard easterly. [Ibid. No. 28.]
March 18.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 29.]
March 18.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.E. [Ibid. No. 30.]
March 18.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The wind continuing for at least 20 days together at E. and S.E., there are now here above 60 English merchantmen, most from France, Bilboa, Lisbon, &c., homeward bound the next fair winds. Yesterday came in the Biscay Merchant and the Bonarcnture from Bilboa, and the Ann of Ely from Bordeaux with wines homeward bound, which say that the report there was that the French King would begin his progress for the army in the Low Countries on the 28th and that they are making great preparations both by sea and land for the next summer's expedition. [Ibid. No. 31.]
March 18.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 32.]
March 18. J. B. to —. I was to have spoken with you last night, but had not the opportunity, wherefore I come again this morning, having, as I suppose, some things of consequence in that affair to discourse. If you will let the bearer know when and where, he may call me presently to you, unless you will meet me at your old lodgings from which I shall not be far. [Ibid. No. 33.]
March 19.
Whitehall.
Minutes of the proceedings of the Privy Council. Affidavits of three of Lady Portland's servants of their being beaten in Charterhouse Lane read. Ordered that the parties complained of be summoned to attend the Board next Friday. The business of arresting Michael Hale and Thomas Flood of the Queen's Troop heard and dismissed. Petition of the owners of two ships built with two decks for abatement of Customs read and respited till his Majesty's return. Petition of Nathaniel Tilly, &c. against building in Spitalfields by the trustees of Mr. Wheeler's children read and respited till his Majesty's return. Petition of Peter Gale about cordage seized by him and rescued from him. The parties complained of to be summoned to attend. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 34.]
March 19. Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I enclose a letter from his Majesty and also Lord Robartes' letter, which the King was very glad to part with, it being a very dry one. I every post ask the King and Duke what commands they have for you. The weather is not so seasonable as we could wish, but matches are so ordered that there is now no thoughts of the King's stirring till to-morrow sennight. No one wishes an end of the unlucky difference more than myself, but I find such violence used that I fear it will not be ended so soon as it were convenient. [Ibid. No. 35.]
March 19.
Newmarket.
Request for a carcat for Mr. Maximilian de l'Angle for the prebendary's place first vacant at Canterbury, the King having promised it to him. [Ibid. No. 36.]
March 19.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to James Hickes. We have upwards of 200 colliers now in this port, some of them laden, but the wind is out of the way. [Ibid. No. 37.]
March 19.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 38.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 38i.]
March 19.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. I received this afternoon yours of yesterday with the enclosed for my Lord Keeper, my Lord Treasurer and myself in answer to ours about the business of the City. To-morrow morning my Lord Keeper means to try what can be done as a private friend for accommodating the matter between them. I would willingly hope well of it, but, I confess, I dare not presume so far, knowing well how deep that humour lies with some, how long it has been breeding, and what far views and designs there may be reason to suspect they have framed to themselves as to the future. My Lord Keeper means to handle it with all possible gentleness, far from the least partiality or inclining to either side, whatever appear upon the enquiry into it, aiming only at the allaying of heats, softening the minds one towards another, and, if it cannot be brought to a friendly end of themselves, then to leave it fair for his Majesty to hear at his return.
I have been told by M. de Ruvigny the declaration of the Most Christian King of his accepting of Nimeguen, and have taken leave, though I could not have a particular express order for it from his Majesty, to signify it by the last ordinary to Sir W. Temple. One thing, methinks, was very remarkable in it, that absolutely that King from henceforth owns and declares the Crown of Sweden for his open and formal ally in the war, in that he declares he cannot do this or anything else in this whole work sans son seen et consentement, and in another place that he is ready to send his plenipotentiaries, &c., to treat at Nimeguen, &c., conjointement avee ceux de la Couronne de Suede, which, methinks, has thrown the Swedes as formal parties into this war, whether they will or not, and so Holland will certainly from henceforth take the case for judged even out of their own mouths, that is out of the mouth of their ally, the Most Christian King, and, this being so, it is plain how slow every step is like to be made in this work of the treaty, when the consent of Sweden must at every time be sent for to Stockholm, &c. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 21.]
March 19. Careat that no grant pass of a prebendary's place in Canterbury, the King having promised the same to Mr. Maximilian de l'Angle. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 9.]
March 20. Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I delivered the papers to the King and Duke who has them still. I intend to-day to send them to the Lord Chamberlain, and have desired Mr. Richards to keep them together, that at our return they may be delivered to you. I should be heartily glad an expedient were found for the ending the unhappy difference. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 39.]
March 20.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About noon the 14th one of our packet-boats sailed and was forced back again the 16th, yet ventured out the 17th. Early on the 18th another sailed, but yesterday both together were forced back and put in again about 5 in the afternoon. The wind continues a very fret from the E. so that no vessels venture so much as to cross within our harbour. However yesterday afternoon arrived a small hoy from the Brill in a very short time, but with very great hazard. She brought over several passengers (the women especially have scarce yet quitted their affrights), no packet-boat being there to receive them. I spoke with one of them last night, who told me he was at the Hague on Tuesday, and the Prince of Orange, as he was informed, returned two or three days before. [Ibid. No. 40.]
March 20.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Last night arrived here from London the French mails, but the wind blowing hard at N.E. the packet-boat remains here still. Lord Howard, the Queen's almoner, came here last night with several other gentlemen, who remain here, expecting a yacht to carry them over. Last night arrived the French mail from Calais. The packet-boat brought over several English soldiers that came out of the French service, with whom came a person from Zealand. He reports that several privateers of that place have brought and daily bring into Middleburg and Flushing several ships of subjects of the King of Sweden, already to the number of above 20, by virtue of commissions from the Elector of Brandenburg, which vessels with their ladings are condemned at Trevere (Terveer). Last Thursday a Zealand caper with a Brandenburg commission took two Swedes vessels laden with deals bound for France. The wind blowing hard they were dispersed and one of the Swedes came into and remains in this harbour in the possession of the Zealander, who put his own men on board and took the Swedes out. We expect the Flanders mail every hour. [Ibid. No. 41.]
March 20.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. The enclosed will give you an account of our meeting this morning with the Lord Mayor and Aldermen and some of the Common Council. The matter itself is plain and very easily accommodated, but I doubt whether the humours that set it on foot are so. It was evident, by this morning's work, there are great heats breaking out, if not speedily and warily prevented. It is very judicious what is observed there, that it is not fit to appear too much moved or concerned at such incidents, and yet at the same time this is one of that nature that seems to require and deserve a very serious care should be had of it. I hope his Majesty's own hand may in a great measure heal all, but truly I doubt less than that will not do it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 29.] Enclosed.
March 20.
Whitehall.
The Lord Keeper, the Earl of Danby and Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Corentry. To-day we had a meeting with the Lord Mayor and Aldermen and some of the principal members of the Common Council, the former four and divers others, which was the first time that ever we saw them both together. The gentlemen that appeared of the Common Council were without any lawyers, as we had appointed at our last meeting to prevent heats, declaring they had no authority to retain counsel for the body of the Commons, for they appeared only in their private capacity. When we saw that, we would not suffer the counsel for the Mayor and Aldermen to speak, that so they might be upon equal terms. Our first care was to declare, that we entered not upon the matter as judges but as mediators, and then to let them see that we desired to enter upon no questions, but such as were the questions when they first fell out. We began with the part of the tumult which happened after the Lord Mayor was risen, and the sword taken up, and therein the gentlemen of the Common Council, and particularly Mr. Jeffreys, notwithstanding what had been said by him before in the Court of Aldermen, unanimously declared that all that was done after the sword was taken up, was irregular and not to be justified, and acknowledged their error in it, and the right of the Lord Mayor to call and dissolve Common Councils, withal declaring they should never desire to insist on any rights, but such as are warranted by precedents of the best times. This we recommended to the Mayor and Aldermen present, as a great degree of satisfaction, and having obtained of Mr. Jeffreys that he would make the same acknowledgement in the Court of Aldermen, recommended them to accept of it, and to restore him upon it. This they did not seem unwilling to do, but thought this was not all, for the negative voice of the Lord Mayor, his lordship said, had been questioned. We avoided that question and the debate of it, but with a reason enough for the advantage of the Court of Aldermen, for the Lord Keeper said that, as this was not the question now, so there was reason to believe that it would never be questioned hereafter, the rather, because till Feb., 1648[-9], at which time the Usurpers passed an Act to take away the Lord Mayor's negative voice, it was never doubted, and these gentlemen had declared they would follow the precedents of the best times. So we declined the debate, though the Lord Mayor and Aldermen had brought counsel and the City books to enter upon it. Thence we entered upon the right of choosing the Judge of the Sheriffs' Court. We showed them there were but two ways of determining it, by course of law or by reference. If by course, then either another judge must be admitted by the Lord Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council to enable him to bring an action against him that was admitted by the Lord Mayor and Aldermen alone, or else there must be a way to try it by a fictitious and feigned action, neither of which we thought so proper as the way of reference, which we commended to them either to be by a committee to be chosen amongst themselves, or to three or four of the judges, whom they could agree upon. Sir T. Player and the rest said, that they could not in this case answer for the Common Council, but believed they would insist upon having a man admitted in Common Council that might be equal with the other. We showed them that would be unequal to quality a man with two rights to bring an action against him that had but one, and that a more equal way would be, that the present man should surrender, for that it would most naturally tend to a reference of one kind or other. This the gentlemen of the Common Council seemed to like well enough, but the Lord Mayor and Aldermen desired time till Tuesday next to determine of it in a Court of Aldermen, in the meantime not showing much aversion to the proposition. Thus we restrained the debates for a time to the matter, till at last some reflecting speeches on each side broke out, which we presently allayed, and both sides disapproved the speakers. So upon the whole matter we hope there are good dispositions to an accommodation, the assembly being very numerous, and the whole company seeming to part with some satisfaction. [3¼ pages. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 25.]
March 21. Sir R. Carr to [Williamson]. I received yours yesterday. The Duke was gone to Culford. I sent his letter after him, and wrote an excuse to Sir J. Worden for not sending the news, for the King was at a play and had not read it; he returns to-day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 42.]
March 21.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of packet-boats and mails. Lord Howard remains here still, and as yet has no news of the yacht appointed to carry him over. [Ibid. No. 43.]
March 21. Grant to Dr. Thomas Sherley of the place of physician to the King in ordinary. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 54.]
March 21.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the petition of Sir George Gilbert, Alderman of Dublin, which set forth the great want in Ireland of the Great Beam or Common Balance for weighing all goods in seaports, cities and towns, and prayed a grant to him and his assigns of setting up the said Great Beam or Common Balance in the seaports, cities and towns of Ireland for 61 years, the reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant and his report thereon dated 19 Dec. last, that setting up the Great Beam or Common Balance in Ireland might be useful, so as none be compelled to weigh any goods by it and that no fees be exacted except from such as desire to make use of it, authorizing and requiring him to cause letters patent to be passed containing a grant to the said Sir George Gilbert and assigns as prayed in the petition, subject to the conditions mentioned in the report. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 296.]
March 22.
Wilton.
The Duchess of Portsmouth to Williamson. "Vous maves autes (otez) de la plus grande penne du monde anmanvoyant (en m'envoyant) la lettre du roy. Sy vous annaves plus pas une pour moy, je vous conjure, monsieur, de les vouloyr garder, car je seres sans doute vanderdis (Vendredi) a Londre, ou jes pere que je vous vaires pour vous remersyer de tous vausoin, et vous asurer que personne net (n'est) plus vautre tres umble servante que La Duchesse de Portsmouth.
Postscript.—Jes pere que vous vouderes bien prandre la penne d'anvoyer toute ses (ces) lettre a leur adresse. Je vous an conjure, monsieur. Anvoy, je vous suplis, selle de Madame Scroup aussy a Madame Bauclay." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 44.]
March 22. James Hickes to Williamson. Explaining at great length how Williamson's letter to himself, saying he intended writing late on Friday night, had never reached him, so that Col. Whitley after sitting up till 2 o'clock had gone to bed.
On Saturday night in obedience to your commands I enclosed yours to the Duchess of Portsmouth at Wilton, and required Mr. Bedbury, the postmaster, to carry it or send it by a safe hand to her Grace, and desired an answer by return of post after doing so. I also let him know it was your particular command he took all care in the safe delivery of what letters came to or from her during her stay in those parts. I acquainted the colonel with your directions concerning your officers' letters, all which he strictly charged me to observe, and I desire and hope they will so merit your favour that they may have them free as Lord Arlington's servants had and Secretary Coventry's have, for they are not many.[Ibid. No.45.]
March 22.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Here has been for several days violent stormy weather, and last Friday was lost a small vessel laden with coals, which drove forth of Hartlepool pier. Two fishermen of the place were lost in her and one of the ship's company. Wind N.N.E. [Ibid. No. 46.]
March 22.
Dover
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Lord Almoner Howard remains here still, expecting the yacht to carry him over, which we have no news of yet, but expect this wind hinders it from coming down the river. The packet-boats are also still in harbour, which might have landed their mails on the other side and been here again, if they would have gone to sea, and the Calais packet-boat might have gone to sea and landed their mail at Calais this noon tide. It cannot be above 4 or 5 hours run, the wind continuing N.E.
To-day came in here a Swedes vessel laden with deals, bound for France, and sent up by a Zealand caper that sails with a Brandenburg commission. The privateer's men report there will suddenly be at sea 40 capers from Zealand with the same commissions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 47.]
March 22.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Since my last, at least 56 sail are come in here from several parts of France, mostly for London, but some for Holland, and two or three from Bilboa, and four or five from Stockholm or Norway. The wind continued E. and N.E. all last week, and is at present at North, so that the ships are endeavouring to go out to-day. Here is likewise a Flushing privateer of 4 guns bound for sea. There are in all, gone and going out, about 150 sail. [Ibid. No. 48.]
March 22.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 20th came in here the Mary of Dover with wine and brandy from Nantes, homeward bound. Two days before they met a Flushing caper, which took from them brandy and other goods. The said caper is now also come in, and the master has demanded satisfaction, and, if the captain will not give it, he will compel it by law. The wind to-day is come into the N.W., so the fleet of merchantmen for France are putting to sea. and, if it holds, those homeward-bound will put to sea also. The Flushing caper now come in has been 5 weeks at sea and met with no purchase. She saw several fleets of Frenchmen but with convoy, and keeping so close to the shore that she could do no good on them. [Ibid. No. 49.]
March 22.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. News the same as in the last. [Ibid. No. 50.]
March 22. T. B. to —. The time and night you desired, and I thought to have spoken with you, I could not. One reason was, because I intended to have had a fuller account of that concern I last hinted to you, and have now, wherefore I desire again to speak with you about that and several other things that, for aught I know, may be of consequence for the present and future in the concerns you know. This bearer will inform you where I am, and will give me notice to come to you, when you appoint the time and place. [Ibid. No. 51.]
March 23. Sir R. Carr to Williamson. I delivered the Duke his letter, and the news both to the King and Duke, and afterwards to the Lord Chamberlain. Yesterday the King had dined before the Duke came from hunting, but the Lord Chamberlain coming late to town had not dined, and his Highness was pleased to dine there, and was very merry. I never knew King and Duke in better health or better humour. [Ibid. No. 52.]
March 23.
Sarum.
Roger Bedbury to James Hickes. Stating how he had delivered the Duchess of Portsmouth the letter enclosed by Hickes, and forwarding her answer to it. [Ibid. No. 53.]
March 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About evening last Sunday, the wind moving more towards the North, was much duller than before. Yesterday it was most northerly, and to-day is much westerly. Yesterday morning one of the packet-boats sailed and another in the afternoon, being the two put back two or three days before. Most of the ships put in here by the last tedious easterly storm are sailed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 54.]
March 23.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. At 8 this morning a great ship coming into the Downs outward bound run aground on the Brake Head where she sits dry for this tide, the wind being N.W. and fair weather. It is hoped she will get off again; many of our boats being gone to her assistance, by whose help she is got off, and is gone for Dover harbour, being very leaky. She was bound for Tangier and Malaga; her name is the Chicheley frigate. [Ibid. No.55.]
March 23.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Towards night yesterday the wind veered from N.N.E. to S.W. and so continues. We have had very foul weather about 26 days past, not two days' pleasant weather all that time. Divers homeward-bound ships, we hear, are forced to Ireland or the West of England. In all these storms we have had about 40 ships in the Downs, yet no harm done. A topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 56.]
March 23.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 4 this morning the packet-boats for Nieuport and Calais went to sea, and about the same time the Mary yacht came into the road, and about 8 Lord Almoner Howard went on board and sailed with a very fair wind at N.W. The Calais packet-boat is expected back to-night if they do not go into the harbour to land their goods, for a N.W. wind keeps them there, and being out, is fair to come over, but the weather being smooth and daylight, 'tis not doubted they will land what they have in the road.
Yesterday were posted up in several parts of the town papers by the Mayor and his brethren's directions to call in all seabriefs forthwith. He tells me several have already tendered their briefs and demanded their bonds, which, he says, are at London, but he expects them to be suddenly sent down. [Ibid. No. 57.]
March 23.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Adrenture and Guernsey are now ready, only wanting seamen to the first, the other being well manned. [Ibid. No. 58.]
Mar. [23.] George Dyer to Williamson. In his master Captain Lanyon's absence enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind S.E. [Ibid. No. 59.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 59i.]
March 24. Sir R. Carr to Williamson. Yesterday his Majesty rode himself three heats and a course, and won the plate. All four were hard and near ridden. The King won by good horsemanship. Last night a match was made between Bluecap and a consealed horse of Mr. Maye's called Thumper, to run the six mile course, 12 stone weight, on Tuesday in Easter week for 1,000 guineas, and this is all our Newmarket news.
I delivered your packet yesterday to his Majesty, who told me he will write, but it growing late I write first and then intend to go to him again for his letter, if it is to be had. I constantly show the Lord Chamberlain your news. [Ibid. No. 60.]
[March.] [Daniel Elzevir] to [Williamson?]. In 1640 Jean Maire printed at Leyden Grotius' De Veritate Religionis Christianæ, of which the manuscript was given him by the author himself. About 20 years ago I bought it of him, which was pirated at Oxford by a bookseller named Webb about 18 years ago. Notwithstanding, I have never stopped sending my edition of the said book to England, nor has the said Webb ever attempted to hinder my doing so. His widow endeavoured to sell any right she might have to the London booksellers, but, as they saw they could not prevent my edition being sold, they would not give her anything. She applied since to the Curators of the Sheldonian Press, who bought it from her for 5l. as I am informed. Last March one of the chief London booksellers wrote to me that it was intended to print the book at Oxford, and he advised me to send a good number of copies to London to anticipate this, and offered me his assistance, but, as I had only about 300 copies, I had 2,000 printed, all of which I sold to John Dunsmore, merchant bookseller in London, and sent him them about six months ago. On their arrival here, the bookseller who had written to me, seeing I had sold them to Dunsmore, and besides being annoyed at my having sent some books to the Oxford booksellers, who had asked me for them, wrote to some one belonging to the Sheldonian Press, that 2,000 copies of Grotius had arrived at London, and that they had the right to have them seized at the Custom house. They consented to do so, and by this intrigue the books are still at the Custom house.
By the above one may see clearly that it is out of mere jealousy that the books have been seized and that a right is desired to be established here, which no one ever had, and which is in direct conflict with the law of nations, and the custom established all over Europe among booksellers, among whom it is considered a sort of theft for one to reprint another's books, though this happens oftener than it should, but no one ever yet had the impudence to hinder him who had first acquired the copyright from selling his edition. I know of only one instance that happened in Germany, where a certain bookseller pirated my Quintus Curtius cum notis Variorum, and obtained a privilege from the Emperor, by virtue whereof he wished to stop the sale of my book in Germany. I was obliged to apply to the Imperial Court and remonstrated on the unfairness of a man who had stolen my copyright having the boldness to demand a privilege, and, though we were not then on good terms with the Emperor, the said bookseller was fined, and I was allowed to sell my book as before.
As it is very just and equitable that the right of those who have invented any manufactures should be maintained here, and in every other trade those that have been invented elsewhere are allowed, although they have been counterfeited here, it would be unjust to wish to hinder others from transporting what they have acquired by their industry, and it would finally oblige the other states to employ the same methods, which would at last ruin all correspondence and commerce.
I know that the trade in books is not so important for the kingdom as that in cloth and other stuffs, but it is no less important for the republic of letters that the trade in books, which are not forbidden by the laws of the kingdom, should be free, as it is to others that the traffic in other goods be promoted and not thwarted.
I hope not only that the reasons above given may be sufficient to cause the bale in question to be given up to John Dunsmore, but that it may be provided that envious people may not do similar wrongs without being punished for them. [French. 2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 61.]
March 24.
Doctors' Commons.
Sir L. Jenkins. Discharge of the bale of Grotins De Veritate stopped at the Customhouse at the request of the persons to whom the affair of printing in the University of Oxford is committed, with the consent of the said persons, and request to the Commissioners of the Customs that the said bale be delivered to Daniel Elzevir or his order, the customs being first paid. On the back is a note of a letter from the King to the Lord Lieutenant for a grant of the bishopric of Killaloe to Patrick Sheridan, B.D., Dean of Connor. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Wednesday
2 a.m.[March 24.] Near the Hope.
B [aron] de Viques to [Williamson.] The wind suddenly turning favourable, the ships set sail at 6 p.m., so I am like to be disappointed of my man I sent to London to your Honour. I left order he should follow me into Zealand through Flanders, and, should he bring any box of yours, leave it with the postmaster at Gravesend. [Ibid. No. 63.]
March 24.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. The Chicheley frigate, of which I gave you an account yesterday, went for Dover, but there was not water enough there for her, so this morning she is returned and goes back for London, and 30 of our Deal men go up in her for help, for they are forced to keep the pumps going and bale also, and all little enough to keep her free. The wind has come about to the South-west. Postscript.—The said vessel is gone for the Swale. [Ibid. No. 64.]
March 24.Deal. Richard Watts to Williamson. News of the Chicheley as in Lodge's last two letters. Several Deal men are gone with her in a hooker to save the shipmen's lives, if she founder. Wind S.W., a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 65.]
March 24.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About the receipt and dispatch of the mails and about the packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 66.]
March 24. Caveat that Secretary Coventry desires that no grant pass of any reversion of a share in the New River, at present in Mr. Buckworth's possession, without notice to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 8.]
March 25.
Cambridge.
Dr. T. Stephens to Williamson. Thanking him for his ready compliance (of which he had heard from his friend Dr. Knights) with a request made to him in the writer's behalf by Lord Chief Justice North, and for promising to acquaint his Majesty with the Lord Chief Justice's desires, and to act accordingly, either by moving the Lord Keeper for a prebend at Norwich or the Bishop of Ely for something in his donation, adding that he has formerly suffered for the King both sequestration and imprisonment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II.369, No. 67.]
March 25.
Sarum.
Roger Bedbury to James Hickes. Yours with the enclosed for the Duchess was delivered last night into her own hands. She comes away to-morrow, Friday, for London, and intends to ride it in one day. Horses are laid along the road. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 68.]
March 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. A little before noon yesterday came in here the Richmond yacht, wind S.W. They expected to meet Count Coningsmarck here from Newmarket who is not come yet; several of his attendants are here. Today the wind holds the same place, but blows somewhat fresher. None of the packet-boats are yet arrived from Holland. [Ibid. No. 69.]
March 25.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The five East Indiamen and Virginia, Straits, &c., outward bound, are fallen down and to-day anchored in the Downs. Wind S.W., not a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 70.]
March 25.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 3 this morning the Calais packet-boat landed the mail and came into the harbour the same tide. They brought over about 20 Frenchmen, most of them tailors. [Ibid. No. 71.]
March 25.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W. Col. George Legg, Governor of this place, came yesterday to town. No ships are stirring either in or out. [Ibid. No. 72.]
March 25.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 73.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 73i.]
March 25.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The Recovery of Fowey, a small vessel, came in here, which about a month ago took in at Plymouth goods for Topsham, and the day after they put to sea a violent storm blew them over to the French coast, and going into a port near the Green Island an Ostend caper boarded them, and took from them two hogsheads of sugar, two half hogsheads of spirits and broke open 7 or 8 seamen's chests wherein were several runlets of Canary and clothes which they carried away, also they beat the master and men very much, so that one of the men died three days after they came in. They say a French man-of-war had lately taken 9 capers. [Ibid. No. 74.]
March 26. Certificate by Sir William Peake that John Vaen on that day took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him. [Ibid. No. 75.]
March 26. James Hickes to Williamson. No letter came to hand last night for Mr. John Holford in Taunton. When you send anything for the Colonel, please let it be directed to him, which that was not, only to be delivered to him by me. [Ibid. No. 76.]
March 26.
Fowellscombe.
Sir John Fowell to Williamson. I acknowledge the honour of yours, which I had done sooner, had these parts afforded anything worth your reading. I was last week at our assizes at Exeter, when our judges gave great satisfaction to all, especially Lord Chief Justice North. We had there, by our Lord Lieutenant's directions, a meeting for the better settling of our militia, which has of late been something neglected with us, as I doubt it has been also in some other of our neighbouring counties. But. now that we have authority, I hope we shall discharge our trusts in that.
We have already sent away to the Newfoundland from our poor town of Dartmouth near 40 ships, all according to the late regulation confirmed by His Majesty in Council.
A French man-of-war, being informed of a small Dutch merchantman that was run into a little cove aground near the Start point for security, sent in her boats very insolently and carried her away about a fortnight since.
Sir W. Portman being lately here with me, I perceived he was a little troubled that, after his Majesty had signed a warrant in answer to his desires for settling a regulated corporation again in Taunton, a stop was put to it, which truly I am sorry for, for besides that I should have been glad to have Sir William gratified, I conceive, that, if the government of that town were put into the hands of such loyal and well affected persons as I perceive is intended, it would have been much for his Majesty's service, and to the satisfaction of all the neighbourhood to that populous poor place, wherefore, if you think fit, pray enquire a little after it. I understand it was stopped in Secretary Coventry's hands, after his Majesty signed the warrant. I suppose you find by this time how apt those are to give others trouble that have little to do themselves, wherefore, craving your pardon, I rest.[S.P. Dom., Car. II.369, No. 77.]
March 26.
Barnstaple.
William Wakeman to Williamson. Last Tuesday night was cast away near Ilfordcombe the Arms of Bristol bound from Bristol for the Barbados. Sixteen persons were drowned, but the rest, about 40, got to land, some in the ship's boats, and some driven in on the wreck. She was a very fine ship of about 350 tons and with 26 guns. Very little of her cargo is yet saved, and there is very little likelihood of saving much more. [Ibid. No. 78.]
March 27.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. Near 200 loaden colliers sailed hence within these last three days. Several of the loaden colliers which sailed the beginning of last week were forced by the then easterly storms to make Leith Road, but some light colliers that came in to-day report meeting them with a fair wind, bound southward. This day sennight, as I am informed, twenty armed men forced out of a house near White Shanck on the Borders betwixt Carlisle and Berwick six packs of wool, seized formerly by one of the Custom House officers for those Borders, and carried it away by force for Scotland. I need not tell your Honour of what bad consequence it is. [Ibid. No. 79.]
March 27.
Sunderland.
Samuel Hodgkin to Williamson. Colliers both light and laden daily pass by and come in here. One that broke Richmond Gaol and came here to be transported was apprehended, and yesterday sent back to where he escaped from. He is said to be a person of estate, living in that part of the country. [Ibid. No. 80.]
March 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived with two mails last night, and another with one this morning. The passengers in the last informed the master that several were imprisoned in Holland for attempting to poison the Prince of Orange, among whom was a cook, and that some had already died for it, and others had been put to the torture, but the certainty of it I know not.
Last night Count Coningsmarck, it is said, went on board the Richmond yacht, and sailed about 6 this morning for Hamburg, wind S.W. [S.P.Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 81.]
March 27.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of the packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 82.]
March 27.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. A small vessel of this town arrived here two days since from Croisic, and one from the Straits came into our road yesterday, bound for some place in France. Neither brought any news, but a small vessel from St. Malo, which was a fortnight at Guernsey on his passage home, says that at his coming from St. Malo there were about 90 sail bound for fishing near Canada, many of whom were afraid that the King of France would make them yearly pay the 60 sols per ton he made them pay this year for going out.
Yesterday Mr. John Harrington, whose father was sometime one of the serjeants-at-arms, had his boy, one Prince, baptized in our church, he being about 15, and not baptized before, and the son of a Nonconformist, to see which the church was fuller than it useth to be, he having godfathers and godmothers according to the ceremony of the Church. He was named Mico, in regard that yesterday was the anniversary day hereof, and a sermon preached by order of Sir Samuel Mico, deceased, who had given 500l. to our town, and ordered the yearly income thereof to be given to ten poor seamen here, except 20s. for the sermon. [Ibid. No.83.]
March 27.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 25th arrived the Samuel of this place from the Texel but 10 days since. The master says the States had not then begun to fit any of their men-of-war there. Some hours after his coming out, he met three, pretending to be Ostend privateers, of 10 guns a piece, but he rather thinks them Dunkirkers. Certainly many Englishmen were on board them. They took some of the merchants' goods out of the hold, but very much plundered the master and seamen, notwithstanding they had a seabrief. The same day arrived the Mary Anne of this port from Morlaix. The master says he did not hear of any fleet fitting at Brest. A ship or two of force had gone for Ireland, as was said, to fetch soldiers from thence, and make as great preparation for the field as they can. [Ibid. No.84.]
March 27.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Richard Ford. Requesting his support at a meeting of the Mercers' Company to be held that morning for the choice of a professor at Gresham College in the place of Dr. Goddard, deceased, in favour of Dr. Grew, a person of very eminent parts and worth in his way, whom very able and ingenuous men judge to be every way fully qualified for this chair, and in whose favour all that wish well to the King's foundation of the Philosophical Society in that house ought to be zealous, for the great use he is to that body. [S.P.Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 32.]
March 27.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. Mr. Graham not being returned since my last is the reason you have not heard further from me on that business; but Lord Aungier, who is well acquainted with that affair and first sent Mr. Graham to me, is himself now goingwith the Duke of Ormonde to England, and undertakes both to settle the matter between you and Mr. Graham, and to convince you that this cause is proper enough for you to protect and can no way reflect on you, so that I have no more to do till you and my lord have conferred and I receive your further commands. As for forfeited concealed lands and the like I have several discoveries by me, but I see so many others concerned in the like, and the Lord Lieutenant so averse to them all, that I judge it not seasonable as yet to put you on the like. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 151.]
March 28.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. The Guernsey, that carries Lord Inchiquin, is gone to Spithead, and is there ready to receive him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 85.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Restitution of the temporalities of the bishopric of Chichester to Ralph Brideoke, D.D., to commence from the death of the last Bishop of Ely and the promotion of the late Bishop of Chichester to Ely. Minute.[S.P. Dom., Entry Book. 47, p. 5.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General to enter a nolle prosequi on an information exhibited in the Court of Exchequer by John Fell, D.D., and Thomas Yates, D.D., touching the seizure of a certain bale of books entitled, Grotius, De Veritate Religionis Christianæ, printed beyond seas. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 51.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
Licence to John Tregonnell, his heirs and assigns, for changing the fair day from the eve, the day, and the day after the Feast of Sampson, the bishop, to 6, 7 and 8 June, and, if any of them happen to be a Sunday, then on the day after, and for changing the market day from Monday to Tuesday, and for holding the same in his manor of Milton, Dorset. Minute. [Ibid. p. 52.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for letters patent granting to John Roane, D.D., Dean of Clogher, the bishopric of Killaloe, void by the death of Daniel, late Bishop thereof. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 298, and S.P. Dom., Entry Book 21, p. 169.]
March 29.
Windsor.
Dr. Brune Ryves to Williamson. I was not a little surprised with yours of the 25th, not knowing which to account the greater, my gratitude or my wonder that, in the midst of your weighty engagements, you should fasten on any opportunity to cast a thought towards so decayed, so worthless a person, as I am. I have now almost served my generation, and I cannot but account this vouchsafement of yours as no small part of the temporal reward of it. I look on it as a precious ointment to embalm me to my burial to be thus valued by Sir Joseph Williamson, and let it be the epitaph on my grave. [S.P.Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 86.]
March 29.
Christ's College, Cambridge.
Dr. Ralph Cudworth to Williamson. I had long since have congratulated your being so deservedly preferred, had I not been about that time seized with a violent sickness, and afterward detained under long weakness. Your former great civilities encourage me to make this humble request, that, as I am certainly informed the rectory of Nor[th] church in Hertfordshire is newly become void by the death of the late incumbent, Dr. Wilford, the presentation whereof belongs to his Majesty, you would present to him the enclosed petition, and yourself further and promote the same, I being otherwise unknown to him, though I once preached before him at Lord Crofts' in Suffolk. I have no church dignity, nor other living than the vicarage of Ashwell, which my Lord of Canterbury, then of London, presented me to, but it is of small advantage, so that I should easily quit it.[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 87.]
March 29.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. We see daily ships both light and loaden pass to and again. Wind much westerly. [Ibid. No. 88.]
March 29.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. To-day Lord Townshend and Sir R. Carr are here. The greatest affair here is about electing a burgess. About 8 or 10 days ago it was thought Alderman Taylor would carry it, but since it is at most hands thought Mr. Coke will do so.[Ibid. No. 89.]
March 29.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind W.S.W. [Ibid. No.90.]
March 29.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. This last week 14 or 15 sail came in here, mostly small vessels from London for France, three of them Dutchmen pretending to belong to Dover bound for France. We have now a clean harbour, only two or three Dutchmen expecting convoy. Wind these five days N.W., now S.W. [Ibid. No. 91.]
March 29.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. By a small vessel from Scilly I hear that last Wednesday there came out with him from there above 100 English merchantmen, some bound home and some for France. Wind N.W. The 26th the Bell of London came in here from Rotterdam, which says that the Brandenburg has declared war against the Swede, and that several capers are fitting out at Flushing with Brandenburg's commission to take the Swedes. The 27th the Joseph of London put to sea for Bilboa, with several other vessels for France. The masters of the right English vessels say that the English merchants and seamen would have a brave trade if there were not so many alien ships made free, which much abates the freight and seamen's wages, and it is the country's counsel that it is better for our trade that the war continues, than that we should mediate for a peace, except feignedly.
The 28th a great Dutch vessel put to sea, which came from Cadiz, loaden with wines. It is supposed she is insured, or else she would not have run the hazard without convoy. [Ibid. No. 92.]
March 29.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 93.]
March 29.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Last Wednesday the Mary yacht left Dublin for this port with a fair wind, having the Earls of Meath and Ardglass and many others of good note on board, but, by what unhappy accident we know not, she sank. She was about 2 last Thursday morning on the north side of the Skerries, that lie eastward of Holyhead bay. A Welsh vessel saw her under water, but about 40 persons on the Skerries which is an island about a league from shore, some part of which is never overflowed. [Original and Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, Nos. 94, 95.]
March 29. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters all previously calendared. [Ibid. No. 96.]
March 29. List of the printing-houses taken that day. J. Bill and C. Barker, his Majesty's printers in English, Roger Norton, his printer in Latin, Greek and Hebrew, Thomas Roycroft, his printer in the Oriental tongues. Richard Hodgkinson, Robert White, Evan Tyler, John Maycock, Thomas Newcomb, William Godbid, Andrew Clark, Thomas Ratcliff, James Cotterell, Thomas Milbourne, Henry Bridges, Edward Crouch, John Redmayne, John Streater, Henry Lloyd. Widows, Fleshier, Griffin, Symons, Maxwell, Purslow, in all 23 houses.
Printing-houses bought in by the Stationers' Company since 1672:—Edward Oakes, John Winter, Peter Lillicrap, all deceased.
Printers set up since the Act was in force:—John Darby, William Rawlins, William Downing, Francis Kirkman, — Dawks, Matthew Drew, Josias Bennet, John Richardson,—Bowtell, Andrew Sole, a Quaker. [Ibid. No. 97.]
March 29.
Whitehall.
Passport for Sir Thomas Longueville of Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, to travel beyond the seas with his wife, Mary, and his daughter, Margaret, for recovery of his health, provided that he do not frequent the company of any Jesuit, seminary priest or other disaffected person, and that he return on summons. [S.P.Dom., Entry Book 14. f. 134.]
March 29.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Andrew King praying a lease for 31 years after his lease in being of the office of clerk of the bills of the Customs, recommendation to the Lord Treasurer to give order for passing such a grant as is desired, and that he take care at the same time for the acquitting of the within mentioned debt due to the petitioner from his Majesty. [S.P.Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 20.]
March 29. Presentation of Joseph Sayers to the rectory of St. Mary's alias Northchurch, Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, void by the death of Dr. Wilford. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 5.]
March 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Keeper to constitute Edward Peck one of the King's serjeants-at-law. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 51.]
March 29. Warrant to the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Steward, and the rest of the officers of the Board of Greencloth from 1 Oct. last, out of the present assignment for the Household, to pass, allow and pay all such sums as shall grow due to the several persons and purposes specified in a certain paper they will receive from the Master of the Horse, which has been signed and sent by the King, containing certain additions to the establishment for the stables. [Home Office, Warrant Book1, p. 52.]
March 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting letters patent of 2 Feb., 1665-6, directing that 3,155l. 2s. 6d., which the King was informed was due to Sir Paul Davys, deceased, late Principal Secretary of State, or so much thereof as should be found due, should be paid him out of the remaining 27,000l. of the 30,000l. which was by the Act of Explanation to be paid to the Crown in lieu of the lapsed money, or out of the moneys payable on account of the year's value, excepting the 50,000l. payable to the King thereout, and that an account should be stated of what remained due as aforesaid to the said Sir Paul, that on such account being stated it appeared that the whole of the said sum was due to him, and that the Duke of Ormonde, then Lord Lieutenant, issued his warrant dated 4 May, 1666, for payment thereof, but that notwithstanding he had received no part thereof, by reason that all the said moneys raised on account of the year's value had been otherwise disposed of, and the said sum of 30,000l. had not yet been assessed, and that by letters of 1 Feb. last (calendared in the last volume, p. 567) the King had directed the Lord Lieutenant to give order for assessing and levying the said 30,000l., ordering him thereout to cause to be issued and paid to the executors, administrators or assigns of the said Sir Paul the said sum of 3,155l. 2s. 6d., care being taken that on their receiving the same such concordatumsor other warrants as they have for the same or any part thereof be given up. [2½ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 299.]
March 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Similar letter to the last, directing payment of 500l. out of the same fund to Caroll Bolton, he having received no benefit from letters of 19 July, 1663, which directed payment of that sum out of that fund, immediately after 9,000l. should have been satisfied to the Earl of Orrery out of that fund.[Ibid. p.301.]
March 30.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Fair weather. Wind S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II.369, No.98.]
March 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Betwixt 3 and 4 yesterday afternoon arrived one of our packet-boats from the Brill. The master says that Mr. Paine of that place told him that the Prince of Orange was taken sick with the smallpox, that he had been let blood, and that they were come out very full.
About 11 last Sunday forenoon the Pearl came to anchor outside Landguard Fort. Wind southerly and weather fair. [Ibid. No. 99.]
March 30.
Deal
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday evening arrived in the Downs the Eagle from Bantam. Pleasant weather, wind S. and by E. [Ibid. No. 100.]
March 30.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Last night arrived the packetboat from Calais with the mail and several English gentlemen, but they report no news. About 3 this afternoon arrived the packet-boat from Nieuport with the mail. The master reports that they talk of great preparations making to reinforce their garrisons, and that they fear the French will attack that place this summer. [S.P.Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 101.]
March 30.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. The Merlin yacht and the Wirenhoe are both returned from convoying a ketch which carried over horses to France. [Ibid. No.102.]
March 30.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to Williamson. Yesterday a Dutch merchantman of Horn, of about 300 tons, which came from Cadiz with salt and 164 butts of wine, &c., being pursued by 4 French men-of-war made for the pier at Torbay to run his ship in there, but for want of water, it not being then half flood, she came aground within half a small pistol shot of the pier, and sent an end of a hawser ashore to fasten her. But the Frenchmen pursuing her, and one of the smallest getting somewhat near her, fired several guns at her, and the Dutchmen one at them, and, as soon as they had fired that one gun, they all left their ship, and the Frenchmen with their boats entered her and brought her off, and have her in possession. [Ibid. No. 103.]
March 30.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 104] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 104i.]
March 30. Receipt by Sir Robert Southwell for papers received from Secretary Williamson's office relating to the dispatch for Surinam, being some of those mentioned in S.P. Col., America, &c., 16751676, p. 199, No. 501. [Ibid. No. 105.]
March 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant appointing William Killegrew for his life surveyorgeneral of Jamaica, void by the forfeiture of — Burford. (Calendared in S.P. Col., America, &c., 1674-76, p. 197.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 14, f. 134.]
March 30.
Whitehall.
Caveat that no grant pass of the Rectory of Tempsford, co. Bedford, diocese of Lincoln, the King having promised the same a year ago to the Bishop of Lincoln. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 8.]
March 30.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Sir Strafford Braithwait for a patent to keep a market every Thursday, and a fair every 15 April, 15 August and 15 December at Catterick, Yorkshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 20.]
March 30.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Earl of Rothes, Lord Chancellor of Scotland. Whilst the King was at Newmarket I received the Council's letter signed by you with one enclosed for his Majesty and with the petition of 18 of the outed Advocates, who submitted at the Council's bar, with some single petitions, all which I immediately dispatched to the King. Now upon his return I am commanded by him to signify his pleasure that you call an extraordinary Council against Thursday, 8 April, against which time he will declare his pleasure concerning that petition and another he has received here to-day from Sir George Lockhart, Sir John Cunningham and others. I shall receive his Majesty's particular directions, and not fail to dispatch them hence next Thursday. You need not call any of the Lords of the Council that are far from Edinburgh, for you can find enough near the town to make a sufficient quorum and the business will not be very extraordinary. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 225.]
March 30.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to Williamson. Recommending the bearer, Mrs. Frances Lambert, formerly Mrs. Sanders of Bristol, where her services to the King in the usurpers' time are well known, who is now on her journey to Court to petition his Majesty once more. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 152.]
March 31.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. On the petition of the Undertakers for erecting a fishery at Holy Island, showing that they have bought 4 doggers in Holland for carrying on the fishing trade, and have procured sufficient seamen for managing them, and praying that the said vessels may be made free, that Secretary Williamson prepare a warrant for the King's signature for naturalizing the same for the fishing trade, but for no other purpose whatsoever. [S.P.Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 106.]
March 31.
Euston Hall.
The Earl of Arlington to Williamson. I acknowledge two of yours of the 27th and 30th, with the accounts and extracts of all your news. This last of the Prince of Orange's sickness afflicts me much, and makes me remember with apprehension how fatal the same disease was to his father and the interests of his family. God protect and keep him. Wednesday night I shall be at Whitehall to receive your commands. [Ibid. No. 107.]
March 31.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 29th arrived the Arms of this place from St. Malo. The master says no fleet of war is fitting out for the season, other than some to guard the coast and for the security of their traders, that a great fleet is already gone for Newfoundland and the Bank on the fishery, and many more are making from that place and thereabouts, in all supposed to be 150 sail, many of them of 20 guns. They have their King's leave, but pay 60 sols per ton to him, and have measurers and receivers appointed for that purpose. Those merchants and people look on it as a hard imposition on them and grumble much. The Mercy of Bantry also arrived from Ireland. The master says the forces were drawn northward on some occasion, and that the Governor was well. [Ibid. No. 108.]
March 31.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. That the Mary yacht is certainly ship-wrecked I have from the mouths of two gentlemen that escaped, who relate thus. About 2 last Thursday morning, foggy weather, the ship touched on a rock N.W. of the Skerries that lie to the eastward of Holyhead Bay. The seamen and passengers were for the most part snug under decks. The first touch roused the seamen, who cried, all was well, but immediately the ship struck on another rock and stuck there. The Skerries is a small isle, an appendage to Anglesea, about a league from shore. The rock on which the ship struck was so near land that, when the sea made her roll, the mast touched land, by which only means those whose lives were preserved escaped. The Earl of Meath and about 34 more perished, whereof were Capt. Burstow, the boatswain, and two more sailors. The master and 23 mariners and 15 passengers got on the isle and so were preserved. Among the 15 were the Earl of Ardglass, and Lord Ardee, son and heir to the Earl of Meath, and now his father's successor. It was noon on Thursday before the mast gave way. The captain to save the Earl of Meath and the rest lost himself. The preserved were on the isle from Thursday morning till Saturday afternoon, and had relief by a flask of gunpowder by which they struck fire with a steel and of the wrecked boards of the ship made a fire, where they roasted some mutton, but had no bread nor any liquor but salt water, till a runlet of usquebaugh was cast ashore, which they divided proportionably among them. A Wicklow vessel from Beaumaris went as near the isle as she durst, and took in the 15 passengers and 24 seamen and landed them last Sunday at Beaumaris.
Sir Gilbert Talbot went hence yesterday towards London. This day sennight Sir G. Shakerley and Mr. Cholmondeley purpose to go hence to be in London the Saturday following. [Original and copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II 369, Nos. 109, 110.]
March 31. Warrant to the Principal Commissioners of Prizes to put in execution the privy seal of 27 Feb. last, to Richard Mountenay, receiver-general of prize-money, authorizing him to pay to James Bridgeman 511l. 6s. 0d., the proceeds of the ship lately adjudged prize by the Commissioners of Appeals, as Mountenay cannot dispose of prize-money without their order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 192.]
March 31.
St. James'.
The Duke of York to the Prince of Orange. I was so much troubled by the news that came yesterday from the Hague of your having the smallpox, that, though it gave an account of their coming out well and of your being in as good a condition as could be expected, yet I could not hinder myself from sending the bearer, Ashton, to assure you of it and to know how you do, and I shall be in very great pain, till I hear of your being quite out of danger. Holograph. [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 3, No. 7.]
March 31.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the letter of 1 Feb. last (calendared in the last volume, p. 567) which ordered the assessment and levying of the 30,000l., directing him for the better securing to the Earl of Orrery the 9,000l. granted him by the letters of 3 June last, to give effectual orders to all persons concerned in levying the said 30,000l. to pay in the same at the end of every 3 months to the receivers appointed by the Act of Explanation, who are forthwith to pay the same into the receipt of the Exchequer, and also to give orders that all such moneys be paid from time to time to the said Earl or his assigns till he or they be fully satisfied the said sum of 9,000l. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 303.]
March.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 369. No. Date. King's Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
111 March 1 3 3 0 N.W.
112 " 2 3 10 0 E.
113 " 3 3 10 0 N.W.
114 " 4 3 0 4 N.W.
115 " 5 2 2 0 E.
116 " 7 4 2 0 N.E.
117 " 8 2 2 0 N.E.
118 " 9 3 2 0 N.E.
119 " 10 2 3 0 N.E.
120 " 11 3 3 0 N.E.
121 " 12 3 5 0 E.
122 " 13 3 7 0 E.
123 " 14 3 2 0 S.E.
124 " 15 3 2 0 E.
125 " 16 3 2 0 N.E.
126 " 19 3 2 0 E.
127 " 20 3 2 0 E.
128 " 21 3 2 0 N.E.
129 " 22 3 2 0 N.E.
130 " 23 3 8 0 N.W.
131 " 24 3 7 0 S.W. (fn. 1)
132 " 25 3 8 0 W. Several other ships homeward bound stopped not.
133 " 26 2 26 4 W.
134 " 27 2 27 0 S.W.
135 " 28 2 31 2 N.W.
136 " 29 2 32 13 S.W.
137 " 30 2 29 5 S.W.
138 " 31 2 29 0 S.W.

Footnotes

  • 1. Misdated 27 March, but the postmark is 25 March.