BHO

Charles II: April 1675

Pages 48-93

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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April 1675

April 1.
The America, in the Downs.
Edward Cranfield to Williamson. This morning I arrived in the Downs, and finding all our ships in a seafaring posture, when an easterly wind presents, I hope you will send to Mr. Peapes (Pepys) that Simon Orton be forthwith commanded down, if he goes the voyage, and that copies of the sailing orders be sent me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 139.]
April 1. Certificate by Sir William Peake that Peter Bart, of St. Botolph Aldgate, mariner, took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [Ibid. No. 140.]
April 1.
Sunderland.
Samuel Hodgkin to Williamson. These two or three days several light and laden colliers have passed by this. Lord Lumley with several gentlemen has been here to view this harbour in order to make it deeper at the entrance and safer for vessels of draught. What the design may produce time will demonstrate. Wind and weather various. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 141.]
April 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No news. Wind very various yesterday, this morning N.W. [Ibid. No. 142.]
April 1.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 143.]
April 1.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 144.]
April 1.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Last Sunday put to sea the Welcome, of Hull, and with her the Post, of Amsterdam, a great Dutch vessel with wines from Cadiz. Wind N.W. This vessel put back here again Monday, and reports that in his sight there came up with this Dutchman two men-of-war, and they saw them fire some guns, so they believe they were taken. [Ibid. No. 145.]
April 1. Bill of John Thompson for curtains, &c., amounting to 4l. 13s. 6d. [Ibid. No. 146.]
April 1. Careat that nothing pass of the grant of the place of Underhousekeeper of Audley End without notice to the Earl of Suffolk. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 8.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. We have received yours of 12 March enclosing a petition presented to you by 18 of the outed advocates, concluding with a submission to our justice and clemency, with three separate petitions from three other advocates. The enclosed petition has been presented to us here, signed by Sir George Lockhart, Sir John Cunningham, George Bannerman and Hugh Wallace for themselves and others of the outed advocates, also submitting to our justice and goodness. We authorize and require you to continue the process against them for signing the address lately presented by them to the first Council day in June, when we will signify our further pleasure. In the meantime we authorize and require you to take off as to those that submitted, and the three who petitioned separately, and Thomas Lermont who petitioned before, the restraint on them from going to Edinburgh, but the advocates mentioned in the petition presented here, who have not yet signed it, if they refuse to do so, shall not have the benefit of the admission to Edinburgh. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 226.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter of remission pardoning James Eliot in Jedburgh Forest who has been sentenced to death for stealing two sheep. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 228.]
April 1.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection to William Dykes, sometime of Johnstoun, for two, and to James Wood for three years. [Ibid. p. 229.]
April 2.
Midnight, Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I received your commands this evening, and understanding at about 11 that one of the packetboats was coming in, I went to inform myself of what you desired, and received this account from two gentlemen that were at the Hague last Tuesday. The Prince of Orange was out of danger of the smallpox by the report of all, and had none to attend him during his sickness but only his Excellency Temple, his lady and sister, with the Duchess of Simmern, without so much as a Dutch page. This they tell me confidently and it certainly was reported to them at the Hague. Your orders being pressing, I thought it most of all to answer my obligation to send this by express. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 147.]
April 2.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Here is advice that 3 or 4 days since, three French men-of-war being in Torbay, a Dutch merchant ship of 16 guns came in there. To escape the men-of-war she ran into a dry pier there, after which the French sent in their boats and fetched her off. [Ibid. No. 148.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 148 i.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Having considered in Council your letter of 23 Jan. to Secretary Coventry representing some difficulties in complying with the directions formerly sent for renewing the charters of corporations, whereby you were required to take a surrender of all old charters before granting any new ones, and to reassume the benefit of fines, issues and amercements granted to divers corporations by former charters, we hereby direct that, as it appears that the corporations are unwilling to surrender their old charters because they contain several testimonies of the loyalty and services of their predecessors, and that they apprehend such a surrender may be attended with lawsuits and other inconveniencies, you and the Council, where you find any privilege or franchise heretofore granted unreasonable, and unfit to be continued, oblige such corporations by an instrument under their common seal to surrender and release only such privileges, which surrender or resignation is to be enrolled in Chancery and to be mentioned in the new charter to be granted for the confirmation of their remaining privileges, and concerning the reassuming of the benefit of fines, &c., though we much desired the former directions might have been pursued, yet as the City of Cork and a few other trading towns in Ireland would thereby lose the whole income of their corporation, we leave that to the judgment and discretion of you and the Council to allow or disallow that privilege to such towns as you think fit, and we further authorize you and the Council to grant to such corporations whose trade has considerably increased since their old charters, as the corporation of Belfast, such new and additional privileges as you shall judge most advantageous to their trade, and in all other particulars our pleasure is that you observe and pursue the directions heretofore sent of 17 Aug., 1670, 16 Aug., 1671, and 26 Sept., 1673. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 304.]
April 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Directing that in renewing the charter of Kinsale a proviso should be inserted in favour of Robert Southwell, confirming the indenture of 24 April, 1668, by which a grant was made to him in fee-farm at the rent therein mentioned of a certain parcel of land known as the Common Hill or Drowmderrig, on which he has erected a large plantation of houses, wharves and quays to the improvement of the harbour, the conveniency of trade and the augmentation of the inhabitants. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 306.]
April 3. Certificate by Sir John Frederick that Martin Bruer took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 149.]
April 3.
Tixall, near Stafford.
Walter, Lord Aston, to Williamson. If you shall please in memory of Lady Anderson, my near relation and most true friend, to read this, and, as far as it is reasonable, to procure his Majesty to grant what I humbly beg,—but, if I desire any thing not fitting, on your advising me so, I shall acknowledge as an equal favour your denying it as your procuring it. By Jerome, Earl of Portland, I was first known to Lord Chancellor Clarendon. After his going away, on many occasions I had the honour by you to be introduced to Lord Arlington, both of whom I found my very obliging patrons, and so much my friends as to pardon my indiscretions and impertinences. Will your Honour now do the like, for I have not the vanity that I can by any service deserve the least of your favours?
The judges, according to his Majesty's late orders, pressed their instructions so effectually that they have not, I believe, left any one man unindicted, nay, it falling into a grand jury's hands, and many of them, I have too many reasons to believe, not faithful subjects to his Majesty or his father, nor cordial to monarchy nor to the Church of England, they, having taken advantage of the word "Suspected Papists," have presented some that have been absent from England six months and are so still, and they have likewise indicted me, though some eminent justices, my neighbours, assured them I was no such man, nor had they any sufficient ground to suspect me, and I was not by any one on oath or otherwise presented to be such, and, where others urged in my behalf that, when his Majesty granted the late Indulgence, I never declared myself, nor acted nor joined with any particular way of worship, I never went to Mass, I never was present nor joined in any worship particular to the Church of Rome, nor never went to nor was present at any conventicle or meetings of Presbyterians or Fanatics, or any other particular way of worship, but some of them said they had never seen me at church, and they were sure I had been colonel in the late wars and a commissioner for the king in his garrison at Lichfield, and therefore they might well suspect me to be a Papist, so they have made me what I could never find in myself, and for my loyalty to my king (though they know well enough I shall clear myself) they satisfy their malice to put me to trouble and charges, or at least give me an ill name, which they intend to fix on many others, and which they express as near treason as they dare venture, for some have already made a division between the Church of England men and Protestants, calling the cavallers Church of England men and episcopal ordained ministers, but classical ministers and other fanatics, Protestants. Lord Conway sent my father this instruction, "You will find it happly now urged by some ministers of State where you are that the penal statutes, too severe against Roman Recusants, might be abolished. Give this answer; they were made when reason of state required it. It is a bow strung, bended and an arrow put into it, but none could shoot but his Majesty." The times then required that severity concerning the then Papists. Mariana, Bellarmin and others had then written wicked pernicious doctrine, exalting the Pope's monarchy and lessening kings, but, now these wicked opinions are condemned as they ought, burnt in many places and laid aside by all good men, must they now be shot against such that have not only verbatimly abhorred them, but have, by venturing their lives and all they had in the late rebellious wars, like good subjects, made manifest to all men their actions and professions went together? Must they now be shot against them and by such as have taken up the opinions and follow the doctrine of Calvin and Knox, who not only rebelliously treat every king in their way, but even monarchy itself? It was dangerous and wicked when in the Pope, but much more when it is brought home and placed in the multitude. How can any prince be safe, or any government steady where these principles are too much embraced? Pray God, I may never see them practised by many of these too violent persecutors here, who, where they go once to church, go five times to conventicles, are unwilling to maintain or countenance their duly ordained ministers, but are forward enough to classical ministers or gifted men, nor do they renounce the Covenant, or that ever to be condemned opinion and practice of taking up arms, let the pretence be never so specious, against their lawful king. God's anointed and his vice-gerent over us, whose command solely and no other authority whatsoever is of duty to be obeyed, nor can I to my satisfaction pay it to anyone else, for, whenever his Majesty shall command, I believe God speaks to me, when otherwise, it is man. Counsellors are good note-books, but the King is God's vice-gerent. My father and I have spent in his service and in his father's and grandfather's above 5,000l. a year in land, and there is yet due to me of what his late Majesty intended my father 7,000l. I have often ventured my life and all that was dear to me in expressing my loyalty. I have under his late Majesty's hand these words, "Lord Aston, the greatest of my misfortunes is that I cannot reward so gallant and loyal a subject as you are, as I would and ought."
All these particulars and many more considered, I, being now past 67, beg that his Majesty, rather than that I should be left in the hands and power of these men, would give me his licence to remove myself and family and to sell my estate to pay a great debt, and that I may carry the remainder with me, that I may not in a strange land be forced to live on charity. I can bend my knee to none on earth but the King, and I have that pride not to bear with patience abiding in a country where my family has been eminent twenty descents, and bore always places of trust under their kings, now to be trampled on and falsely accused by such as, till their fighting against the King and buying the estates of his loyal subjects, were not the least known. If his Majesty will grant me this request, I will between this and Michaelmas dispose of myself to depart. If I have desired anything not fitting, or if his Majesty will not grant it, if you will honour me with but one line, it shall be obeyed by me with all submissive obedience to his Majesty.
The bearer, my kinsman and friend, knows nothing of my suit herein, nor any of the contents of this, nor anyone else. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 150.]
April 3.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I have nothing more since my last by express. I know not whether what I did will be excused, the news being received only from strangers though Englishmen. I have to add this as a seeming probable deduction. The master of the packet-boat tells me there is no discourse at the Brill of any sort, which may intimate that it is not amiss with the Prince, for ill news would run wonderfully swift in Holland. The wind is easterly; if it continues so till this time to-morrow, we may very probably have another packet-boat. [Ibid. No. 151.]
April 3.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Your three packets received. Here were two ships on the list bound for Algiers and so cleared at the Custom House, but the masters say they were bound for Barbary, so the packets for Algiers and Tripoli are in my hands. The master would give me no receipt for that for Barbados. The wind being fair, I delivered it before witnesses to John Lingham, a Barbados merchant, who promises to deliver it safely, but would give no discharge for it. That and all the other ships sailed this noon with a fresh gale at N.E. One Capt. Andrews is coming down bound for Algiers. I shall send that packet by him when he comes if not commanded the contrary, and that for Tripoli as soon as any ship comes in. [Ibid. No. 152.]
April 3.
Whitehall.
The King to [the Corporation of Newport, Isle of Wight.] At their request appointing Giles Eyre as their Recorder, according to the provisions of their lately granted charter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 14, p. 135.]
April 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. The Guernsey is at Spithead waiting for Lord Inchiquin, the Adventure is also victualled and will be ready in a short time to sail. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 153.]
April 4.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. I have no list of ships, and there is no news. [Ibid. No. 154.]
April 5. Robert Brady to Williamson. I think without arrogance that I may deserve as much encouragement in the affair wherein I begged your favour as some undertakers have had in such things, as being more serviceable to his Majesty and more tending to the right information of the people. I hope my loyalty cannot be suspected. The Crown never did nor can receive injury from a complete impartial history, written without reflections on persons or things. Some brave men and such as have done it and their country eminent service have perished by fragments and partial story (picked out of mouldy parchments and obscure authors which perhaps they never knew of), improved by the artifice of cunning abettors of popular envy, malice, fury or mistake. The task is great and difficult, yet, if I perform it not to the general satisfaction of judicious men, let me be marked as an idle silly undertaker. Were I able to accomplish it myself, I should not so far importune you. Your assistance in this will, I hope, neither lessen your honour nor blast your reputation. If you think fit to let me receive your commands by the meanest of your servants, he will hear of me at Mrs. Brace's, next door to the Crown Inn, Holborn. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 155.]
April 5.
The America.
Edward Cranfield to Williamson. Last night Capt. Orton came to Deal, but the vessel which brought him and his things could get no further than Sandwich haven, because the wind took her short. I have dispatched a boat to bring his things on board. In the meanwhile the ships are unmooring and preparing to sail, therefore expect to hear no more from me in this place. [Ibid. No. 156.]
April 5.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Seventeen small light vessels are at anchor in this bay, waiting a fair wind for the northward, the wind being now N.N.W. Our conventiclers have their constant meetings as formerly. [Ibid. No. 157.]
April 5.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last week at our sessions a Nonconformist that was formerly convicted for being at the meeting and fined 5l. appealed, alleging he was not there, but for want of his appealing in due time after a distress taken he was forced to pay treble costs. They have hitherto performed their promise to our bailiffs in forbearing meeting. All their hopes now are in the Parliament, from whom to support their faction they promise themselves great matters, now they say there is no trust in princes. Here are great endeavours to make Sir Robert Kempe knight for this county, Lord Townshend and Sir John Hobart who was here making their interest for him, but the people are more inclined to Sir Knevett Catlin, saying they will not always be imposed upon. The clergy in general are for anybody but Sir R. Kempe, he giving out, as it is reported, that he feared none but the drunken clergy. [Ibid. No. 158.]
April 5.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last week came in eight or nine small vessels, a Scotchman from Bordeaux with wines and brandies for Amsterdam, one from Ostend belonging to Cork bound home, who tells me there are many privateers, but few prizes. Here continue the two Dutchmen expecting convoy, and a Frenchman bound for the Bank who lost his company and some time since came in here, and now fears to proceed. [Ibid. No. 159.]
April 5. Memorandum that the Duke of Albemarle, about the beginning of January last, signified to Mr. Secretary that he had moved the King in behalf of William Hoare for the next prebend of Worcester and that the King promised the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 8.]
April 5.
Whitehall.
Pass for Mr. Dongan, going to the ambassador at Paris, to transport himself to France with two servants and four horses. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 55.]
April 6. The information of John White, taken before Secretary Williamson. An unknown person, whom he thinks a solicitor, coming to see Mr. Witham, a prisoner in the Fleet, about some particular business, and Mr. Witham's wife and he falling out, he called her a whore, whereupon she said he was a pitiful rogue, and that not long since his father held up his hand at the bar for picking a pocket. The solicitor answered in great passion, "Hang you, you Papist dog, I can hang you for the letter I read tother day sent you out of the country concerning the great plot designed against the Parliament, of which you advertised your cousins and desired them to absent themselves." About the same time the informant went to Mr. Witham, as he was walking alone in the cellar in the Fleet, and repeated what he had heard the solicitor say. Mr. Witham told him he knew nothing of it, but, having asked his wife what the letter she lately received from his or her mother contained, she said, it was to advise her relations not to be present at the Parliament, when the plot was intended to be put in execution. The informant further says that she afterwards confessed to him and her husband that her relations in the country could not rest in their beds till they had sent them word. This passed between 9 and 10 last night. This morning the informant acquainted his father with it, by whom he was brought to Col. Gray to make discovery of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 160.]
April 6. The examination of Henry Witham taken before the same. Being asked concerning a letter speaking of an intended plot, he answered he saw none such, but that one Rock last night in the open hall of the Fleet said he had seen such a letter written by the examinant's wife's mother to her, advising her, if her husband had any friends in the Parliament, to give them notice to have a care of themselves or something to that purpose. That Rock had seen this letter in the examinant's house in Whitecross Street in part of Sir Reginald Forster's house and that he was sorry he had not taken it up. Rock threatened the examinant to bring him into trouble about the letter. The examinant questioning his wife about the letter, she confessed having received several letters, but he could not remember that she owned the substance of any of them to be to the said effect, and particularly she did not say that her relations in the country could not rest in their beds till they had given her this information. He knows not where Rock lodges, but his wife does, and she was not in the way when the warrant was served on him. Rock indeed said that the examinant's wife's relations in the country could not rest in their beds till they had given this notice. [Ibid. No. 161.]
April 6.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 162.]
April 6.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 163.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 163 i.]
April 6. Warrant to the Warden of the Fleet from Sir J. Williamson to bring before him Mr. Witham, a prisoner there, and his wife. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 54.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to William Smith, messenger, from Sir J. Williamson to take into custody the wife of Henry Wytham, prisoner in the Fleet, and to bring her before him. Minute. [Ibid.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the same from Sir. J. Williamson to search for [Thomas] Rock and to bring him before him. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book1, p. 54.]
April 6.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. This morning Capt. London in the Norwich brought in here a Dutch vessel laden with several rich goods, which Mr. Fox of this country ran away with, out of what place I know not. This Fox killed the master and two men and heaved a boy overboard, and he is run away with all his confederates before the frigate could come to them in the river of Waterford. The prize was a galliot hoy laden at Amsterdam and bound to France. Here are two of the French King's ships, as I formerly advised, to take in soldiers. The Lord Lieutenant has given orders that none be transported, but the said ships are gone out of command of our fort, and take in men contrary to orders. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 153.]
April 7. The examination of Elizabeth Wytham taken before Secretary Williamson. Asked what the letter was, concerning which is this question, she acknowledged it. The substance of it was to desire her to acquaint her friends in Parliament to have a care of themselves from the Catholics, as they were numerous in the country. She denied her mother mentioned any design or plot that she knew of, or any threatenings given out by the Catholics, but what she there wrote, she says, was of her own head. She received this letter about 9 weeks since, and knows not where it is now, not having seen it since. Rock saw this letter two days before she saw it. Rock is a soldier in Capt. Eaton's company and formerly lived in George Yard, Westminster, by profession a cobbler. Rock's sister lives at the Bottle of Hay near Islington. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 164.]
April 7. Colonel T. Blood to Williamson. I send according to your command the enclosed petition and the name and circumstances of the person for whom a pardon is asked, viz., Capt. Humphrey Spurway, late of Tiverton. He was one of the absconded persons I took charge of to reduce or disperse, who chose to remove to a remote plantation, being persuaded thereto that he might be incapable of endeavouring to promote sedition or disturbances to the government. His crimes were the same with the common drove of those his Majesty pardoned at my coming out of the Tower, and no other. He is employed by Nelthrop and other merchants in a remote plantation, where he resolves to settle and never to return, but become a loyal subject, if he may be delivered from his fears by a pardon. I suppose his merchants will engage for him, if there be any occasion. [Ibid. No. 165.]
April 7.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. I had only time to copy the enclosed, before the post was ready to go. [Ibid. No. 166.]
April 7.
Whitehall.
The King to [the Governors of the Charter-house.] Directing them to admit Captain John Marshall to a pensioner's place in Sutton's Hospital, upon the first vacancy after those who have already obtained letters, he having behaved courageously in the war with the Dutch in which he commanded a fireship in the engagement of May, 1673, and having in a second engagement received wounds whereby he has lost the use of his hands, and being 62 years of age and destitute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 14, p. 136.]
April 7. Commissions to Francis Hawley to be second lieutenant to Capt. Hudson; to Mr. Elletson to be lieutenant to Capt. Trapps, and to — Chettwin to be ensign to Capt. Langley. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 22.]
[April ?] John Gedde, William Galte and Samuel Nowell to the King. Petition praying a patent for their invention of such commodious hives and houses for the improvement of bees as shall free the owners from charge and trouble and the bees from the inconveniencies of swarming and many other casualties that attend them. At the foot,
April 8.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back, His report in facour of the petitioners. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 167.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 20.]
April 8.
Oxford.
Dr. John Wallis to Williamson. I have conferred with the ViceChancellor and others concerning what was lately intimated, but find none of them of opinion for taking a new charter in the present case, fearing it may be of very ill consequence to waive the validity of King Charles' charter, which on many other accounts we are concerned to maintain. Both Universities had in 1664 jointly asserted their right on their present charters and the proviso for salving their privileges, and satisfied the then Commissioners of the Duke of York concerning the justness of their pretensions, and did not expect now after ten years their rights should be invaded by actually setting up a tavern amongst us, without so much as hearing us. It is expressly contrary to the opinion of the then Attorney-General (Sir F. North) of 24 April, 1674, to the Lord Treasurer, viz., that the University should then first be heard before the tavern should be set up, and we are very confident it was neither his Majesty's nor the Lord Treasurer's pleasure to give us this trouble, but fear it proceeded from somebody else that was more desirous of doing the University ill offices than of promoting his Majesty's service, that so much haste was used as first to set it up and dispute it afterwards, whereby we are obliged to make our legal defence, which, had we been first heard, might have been prevented. However, we hope we shall not incur blame in the just defence of those rights which the prudence of princes hitherto has thought absolutely necessary to the discipline and good government of the University. The vintner himself, I am assured, has long since signified to the Commissioners that he is willing to relinquish his licence, if he may have his bonds delivered up to him, and those of the Commissioners I have spoken with seem not averse from it, and I hope the Lord Treasurer, by what was said at the last hearing, is satisfied of the justice of our cause, so I do not see there is any necessity of giving us further trouble. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 168.]
April 8.
Trelanne.
Sir Jonathan Trelawney to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter. My corporation of Looe joins me in presenting our humble thanks, and assures you that, in case of a new election, they will be ready to serve you and beg the continuance of your favour. As soon as I have delivered the keys of government to my son I intend to wait on you, if the session continues, otherwise I can better serve you here than there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 169.]
April 8.
Torbay.
[Edward Cranfield] to Williamson. As soon as Mr. Orton arrived at the Downs we set sail about 8 last Tuesday night, wind N.N.E. and N.E. and N. At 5 on Thursday afternoon, being on a leeward tide, we were forced to cast anchor here, the wind coming S. W. and by S. Our ships are in good condition and we shall make the best of our way, as soon as wind and weather permit. [Ibid. No. 170.]
April 8.
Harwich.
Capt. Thomas Langley to Williamson. This came by the master of the packet-boat that arrived just now, but was a little wet when it came to my hand. The Prince of Orange, I am informed, is well recovered. There is little news at this port, only the ship that was taken up at sea laden with Scotch coal and a ship of Flushing bound for Surinam who lost his convoy. [Ibid. No. 171.]
April 8.
Past 3 p.m. Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. News of the Prince of Orange as in the last letter. [Ibid. No. 172.]
April 7 & 8.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yours of the 5th received this morning. The master that denied to give under his hand was Farre, a Scot, bound for Barbados, and so on a trading voyage. He had a flyboat of about 80 tons. But the vessel that carried it was a pink, the Adrenture, bound to Barbados only; the master was on board and the ship away, only staying for a merchant, John Lingham, an inhabitant of that island, who was then going on board. I delivered it before two sufficient witnesses, and he immediately went on board and the ship sailed.
Farre, the master that denied giving a receipt, was never here before, and is supposed to be a counter skipper, that is a master in England and his Majesty's islands and a mate at sea, so we know not his owners, where he belongs to, or who his freighters are. The owners and freighters we rarely know. I had not time to go to more than him that refused, and him that carried, for the wind was fair, and in two hours all was under sail. Commanders are always unwilling to give receipts for packets. I desire to know if I shall send them without receipts, if I can get none.
Postscript. 8 April.—Yesterday, while I was writing, the Katharineof London came into the Downs. The commander told me he had no time to speak with me, for he was very full of business, for he was to stay but two hours, and he had several accounts to make up. Then I desired Mr. John Ashley, the supercargo, to take the packet for Algiers. He said he was not bound to Algiers, but to Malta, on purpose, because he would not take the packet. I hear they also go to Leghorn, from which your packet to Tripoli might be easily sent. The captain's wife, the ship's chirurgeon, and several others say Algiers is the first port they touch at. Hobson and Fenner of London, merchants, are his employers, and John Andrews commander. If Andrews had time to speak to me, he would carry it, for I know him well. The Algiers and Tripoli packets I have here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 173.]
April 8.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of mails. By a vessel from Ostend we hear that the Swedes taken by the Duke of Brandenburg's commissions and carried into Zealand are all condemned as good prizes. The wind continues N.E. [Ibid. No. 174.]
April 8.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Sir Richard Rooth is come to command the Adventure and to carry for Tangier the Governor, Lord Inchiquin. The Guernsey rides at Spithead, which likewise attends the said lord in his passage. [Ibid. No. 175.]
April 8.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 176.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to M. de Louvois. I believed I ought not to trouble you further on the subject of M. Staniers, but, having received his Majesty's orders. I only thought of obeying them, when the Major himself came to England to represent to his Majesty his grief at seeing himself removed from his employment after so many years' service in France, and that being turned out of his post affected not only his honour but his fortune, since he had never learned any employment but that of a soldier, so that the King had compassion on him and ordered me to write to you in his favour, that, if he had not committed any unpardonable fault, and it was still possible to make use of him, you would kindly let me know if his Majesty would not allow me to send him back to the regiment as lieut-colonel, putting a colonel over him and some one else to be major in his place. M. Lockhart has sent me the state of the half-pay, but there must be some mistake in it, for it has been made only according to the review of the regiment on their going into winter quarters, when they amounted to only 1,400 men, instead of which it appears to me that the reckoning ought to be made according to the reviews of the campaign, without which the officers would lose what has been furnished to the soldiers who are dead or have been killed in the service.
M. Lanier makes me hope my regiment of horse will re-establish itself, if you will have the kindness to assist them a little in their claims, as I beg you to do. [French. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 28.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
Grant of a baronetcy of England to Sir Richard Tulip of Amsterdam, and to the heirs male of his body. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 56.]
April 8.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Provost, Dean of Guild, and Bailies of St Andrews. Expressing his Majesty's satisfaction at their disclaimer of the concurrence of their Commissioner to the Convention of Burrowes at Edinburgh last August in the insolent letter to his Majesty, and adding that, on the dutiful expressions of their loyalty and zeal for his service, there does not remain with him any bad impression of them. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 229.]
April 9.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing particulars of a ship arrived. Sir Bernard de Gomme, his Majesty's engineer, is come from London in reference to the fortifications here since Monday last. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 177.] Enclosed,
The said particulars. [Ibid. No. 177 i.]
April 9. Warrant for the royal assent to the election of Dr. William Lloyd, chaplain to the King, to the bishopric of Llandaff, in place of Dr. Francis Davies. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 65.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Patent for 14 years to John Gedde, William Galte, and Samuel Nowell of their new invention of such commodious hives for the improvement of bees, as shall free the owners from charge and trouble, and the bees from the inconveniencies of swarming and many other casualties that attend them. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 55.]
April 9.
Whitehall.
Pardon to Capt. Humphrey Spurway, late of Tiverton, of all treasons and felonies and of all indictments, penalties, &c., by reason thereof. Minute. [Ibid.]
April 9. Licence to Richard Walmesley with his wife and two daughters and their servants and 30l. in money to travel for his health, with the clause of not resorting to any Popish convent or frequenting the company of Jesuits, &c. Minute. [Precedents1,f. 58.]
April 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday proving very clear, though the wind varied between E. and S., several light ships sailed and we discovered a great fleet of light colliers at sea bound North.
I intended to have sent the enclosed on Thursday with the Dutch mail, but was prevented by the over officious haste of some here.
A small smack came in here to-day. The master and vessel are said to be English, but the captain French with a French commission, who has hired her. Here is also a Flushing ship bound for Surinam on whose motion this smack is said to wait, but by what I hear may wait till he wants bread, for the Flushinger is resolved not to stir with hazard. Wind westerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 178.]
April 10.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About the arrivals and departures of mails. [Ibid. No. 179.]
April 10. Commission for Mr. Jephson to be ensign to Capt. Butler, in case FitzMaurice, his lieutenant, were dead, as was believed. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 22.]
April 10. The Duke of Monmouth to the Lord Lieutenant. I wrote to you not long since in behalf of Mr. Fielding, on his information that a lieutenant's place was vacant by Mr. Monck's absence in Holland. But, having since seen Mr. Monck here, I understand that he is absent by your leave, and upon your pass, and that he never so slighted his employment as to give the occasion to such a report, which I think myself obliged to acquaint you with, as well to prevent an injury I might have done to a gentleman through a surprise, as to let you know how little desirous I am that any should obtain their ends by misinformations and false suggestions. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 26.]
April 10. Certificate for Capt. Hudson's 12 horses to pass custom free at Calais, and another that they were a present to Sir W. Lockhart. Minutes. [Ibid. p. 27.]
April 11. The examination of Thomas Rock, a soldier in Captain Eaton's company, taken before Secretary Williamson. Asked about the letter to Mrs. Wytham, he says he saw such a letter, but did not know whether it came from her father or mother. At the close were words to this effect:—Pray speak to your husband that he shall speak to his cousins belonging to the Parliament to have a care of the Papists, for they owe them a grudge, because they have not their liberty. He saw this letter about the beginning of March at Wytham's lodgings at Sir Reginald Foster's in Whitecross Street. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 180.]
April 11.
Weyhill.
Dr. Randall Sanderson to Williamson. Apologizing for his delay in testifying his obligations for kindnesses, and informing him that he is sending him two flitches weighing with the sack 112lbs., carriage paid, by the Andover carrier to the Saracen's Head, Snowhill. [Ibid. No. 181.]
April 12.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Yesterday there being a private meeting of about 40 of the Presbyterian gang, they were discovered by the curate and some officers of St. Margaret's parish here. On their discovery some escaped, but enough were taken notice of to make satisfaction for the rest. They will be prosecuted according to law.
To-day came hither Mr. Robert Coke of Holkham, being met two miles out of the town by above 200 freemen. He is like to carry the burgess-ship of this place from Alderman Taylor. To-day two small Danish vessels arrived from Norway in 14 days. They do not fear any rupture with the Swede, hoping to hold a good correspondence with all others. [Ibid. No. 182.]
April 12.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats coming in about noon to-day I was informed by the master that the Prince was at church yesterday sennight, and that he is in perfect health. [Ibid. No. 183.]
April 12.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 184.]
April 12.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 185.]
April 12.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 8th there put in here a small Dutch vessel in 4 days from Flushing, bound for the Groyne. The common report there is that there will be speedily a general peace. The 11th came the Hester of Neath from Rochelle, laden with salt and wine. She has been a month at sea, and met several times four Ostend capers, which have taken from them seven halfhogsheads of wine and one of brandy, with all the master's and men's clothes, so that they have not wherewith to shift themselves. Our small vessels in the west are afraid to cross the seas, for, if they meet with any of them, they lose more than they can get by their voyage. This ship and others say they have showed their seabrief, yet to no purpose; they have no respect to it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 186.]
April 12.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 187.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a privy seal granting to William Noyes 100l. levied by the sheriff of Middlesex on several houses in Covent Garden, belonging to John Higden, who was outlawed on a plea of debt due to the said Noyes, and his lands seized into the King's hands. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 193.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Capt. Ramsay at Toul. I have received yours of the 13th [N.S.] by Mr. Laws with the account of the Major's charge, whereby it appears he is yet accountable for 8,000 livres, which he says he has disbursed in the following particulars, which I enclose, that you may examine whether this be his sufficient discharge, or else give me an account of what further remains to be done in this particular. I expected that the Major at his coming over should have brought with him the whole account of the regiment, that I might have known its condition, and he tells me he had given order to Quarter-Master Wood for preparing it, which he had not yet sent to him. I can't but look on it as a great neglect that it should not be done in all this time, and I expect it to be sent over by the first opportunity, for the regiment will suffer by the delay, the half-pay being to be stopped till I have seen the accounts. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 31.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to M. de Louvois. I have just learnt from Mr. Lanier, who came to England a little while ago, how much obliged I am to you in the name of the regiment of horse, for having removed them from Metz to give them better quarters. They only ask to remain there some time longer, without which they would be obliged to go on the campaign before they have provided themselves with horses and other necessaries. French. [Ibid.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Aston. I take it for a most particular honour that you still give me a place in your memory and kindness and beseech you to believe I will in all occasions endeavour to deserve it as I ought, but in anything much rather than what you are pleased to put me upon in your letter of the 3rd. I would be very sorry to see any of your Lordship's loyal and honourable principles take resolutions of leaving us. I am sure you have experience and temper enough to digest all those little checks that may be met with from neighbours. I have discoursed the matter as far as I can with Mr Jeffe, the bearer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 33.]
April 13. The speeches of the King and the Lord Keeper to both Houses of Parliament. (Both printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 653.) [Printed. Two copies of 24 pages each. S. P. Dom., Car. II. 369, Nos. 188, 189.]
April 13. A manuscript copy of the above King's Speech. [Ibid. No. 190.]
April 13.
June 9.
Copies of the King's messages to the House of Commons during the session, all of which are printed in Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 314, 316, 317, 319, 321, 323, 325, 326, 328, 332, 355, 357. [Ibid. No. 191.]
April 13,
21, 27, 29.
Four protests of Peers. (All printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., pp. 656, 664, 669, 671.) [Ibid. No. 192.]
April 13. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day. (The substance fully appears from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 314–316.) [Ibid. No. 193.]
April 13.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The Dutch ship and the French privateer, of which I gave you an account, are at last parted. The Frenchmen belonging to the privateer last Saturday evening manned a pinnace with intention to cut the Dutchman's cables and so cause her to drive to sea, but Capt. Dumerre, their commander, rowed after them, and threatened, if they attempted any molestation to any in his Majesty's harbour here, he would straight row away to the fort, and engage the governor against them, so that, what by their captain and the readiness they perceived the Dutch were in to receive them they desisted. But several of both vessels meeting one another on shore last Sunday evening the Dutch affronted the French with their old accustomed freedom, viz., of their scurrilous tongues, so high, that some were jealous the French would have sought satisfaction for it in the port. However, nothing was done, the French sailing away yesterday morning, but the Dutchman is here still. The wind is and has been for the most part northerly and blows fresh. [Ibid. No. 194.]
April 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Adventure and Guernsey are both at Spithead ready to sail, waiting only for Lord Inchiquin's coming from London to carry him to Tangier. [Ibid. No. 195.]
April 13. Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. No news since my last, only some French men-of-war chased a Dutch ship ashore in Torbay. [Ibid. No. 196.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 196i.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Lord Lieutenant. On my request to you, you were pleased to contrive the means that Mr. William Sarsfield might be restored to his father's estate, and that Sir Theophilus Jones should accept a compensation instead, and thereupon I expected that he should have settled that estate on his wife and children, according to his offer to me here, for whom I was desirous to procure that advantage. But, I am since informed, he was no sooner put into possession of part of the said estate, but that he forgot his agreement, and has taken up considerable sums on the said part and passed a fine for the same. I cannot but think myself unfairly dealt with in this manner of proceeding, and therefore, if there be no remedy for what is past, I should be very willing to prevent what further prejudice he may bring to those persons, whom he is doubly obliged to provide for. For this reason, I desire, that, if Mr. Sarsfield be not already possessed of the whole estate, a stop may be put to investing him in any more of it, till I shall be satisfied by him as to the performance of those conditions, which he voluntarily obliged himself to, and which were the only motives that induced me to appear in his behalf.
Postscript.—Since finishing my letter, the news is brought me of Mr. Sarsfield's death, therefore I recommend to you the interest of his children. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 27.]
[April ?] "A libel counterfeiting a speech of the King's." I told you last meeting that winter is the fittest time for business (see Lords' Journals XII., p. 649), and I thought so, till the Lord Treasurer assured me spring was the fittest season for sallets and subsidies. I hope therefore this April will not prove so unnatural as not to afford liberty of both. Do not fear to make me too rich, for I promise whatever you give me I will always take care to want, for which you may rely on the word of a King. I can bear my own straits with patience, but the Lord Treasurer protests the revenue, as it stands, is too little for us both, for one of us must pinch, if you do not help us. We are under great incumbrances, for, besides my W. in private, my reformadoes lie heavily upon me. I have a pretty good estate, I confess, but I have a great charge upon it. The Lord Treasurer can tell you that all the moneys designed for this summer's guard must be applied to next year's cradleing and swaddling clouts. What shall we do then forships? That's your business, not mine. I know by experience I can live without them, I did so 10 years abroad, and was never in better health in my life, but how well you can live without them you best know. I leave it to yourselves to judge, and do not intend to insist on it. Another thing I press more earnestly is this: it seems a good part of my revenue will cease in two or three years, except you continue it. Pray why did you give me so much, except you had resolved to go on? The nation hates you already for having given me so much, and I will hate you now, if you do not give me more, so your interest obliges you to stick to me, or you will not have a friend left in England. If you continue the revenue as desired, I shall be enabled to perform those great things for your religion and liberty which I have had long in my thoughts, but cannot effect them without this establishment, therefore look to it. If you do not make me rich enough to undo you, it shall lie at your door. I can say with a safe conscience I have done my best, and shall leave the rest to my successors, but the best way to gain your good opinion is to acquaint you with what I have done to deserve it out of my royal care for your religion and property. For the first my late proclamation is a true picture of my mind. He that cannot as in a glass see my zeal for the Church of England deserves no further satisfaction. Some perhaps may say, how comes this sudden change? I reply, I was ever used to it, but to convince you further, first I tell you so, and you know I never broke my word; secondly, my Lord Treasurer tells you so, and you know he never told a lie; thirdly, Lord Lauderdale will undertake for me, and I should be loth by any act of mine he should forfeit the credit he has with you. I have further instances of my zeal, if you desire them; for example, I have converted all my natural sons from Popery, and it was my own work, and as much peculiar to me as the getting of them. It would do your heart good to hear how pretty little George can read his Psalter. They are fine children, and so like me in their understanding. To please you I have given Lord Lauderdale a pension of 4,000l. a year, not so much as I thought he wanted it, as that I knew you would take it kindly. I have made Carwell a duchess, and married her sister to Lord Pembroke, and at my brother's request have sent Lord Inchiquin to settle the Protestant religion at Tangier, and at the first word of the Duchess of Portsmouth have preferred Dr. Brideoke to be Bishop of Chichester, and have made Crew Bishop of Durham. I do not know what factious men would have, but I am sure none of my predecessors ever did any thing like me to gain the good will of his subjects. So much for religion, now for your property. My behaviour to the Bankers for a public instance, and the proceeding about Mr. Hide and Mr. Lutton for a private one, are such convincing evidences, it would be needless to say more of it. By the Lord Treasurer's advice I have made a considerable retrenchment of my expenses in candles and charcoal, and intend not to stop here, but will with your help look into the late embezzlement of my kitchen stuff, of which, upon my conscience, neither the Lord Treasurer nor Lord Lauderdale are guilty, but, if you find them dabbling in that business, I leave them to you, for I would have the world know I am not a man to be cheated. I would have you believe of me as you have found me, and solemnly promise that whatever you give me shall be managed with the same conduct, thriftiness, sincerity and prudence that I have ever practised since my happy restoration. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 197.]
April 13-16. Quotations from law-books relating to the bill for the augmentation of vicarages, the debate about members for Durham, the appointment of a Committee to review bills depending the last session, the appointment of a Committee on the laws relating to Highways, Sir John Prettyman's case, the bill for erecting a Court of Conscience, the exactions of the officers of the Anlnage and Hundred Courts, all in the House of Commons, and the bill for the Trial of Peers introduced into the House of Lords. [Ibid. No. 198.]
April 14. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol., IX., p. 316, except that it appears that the Parliament rolls therein mentioned as being tendered to the House were about their continuing their meetings during the time that any petitions of the people are depending. [Ibid. No. 199.]
April 14.
Dover
John Reading to Williamson. About 6 on Monday night the Calais packet-boat arrived with the mail and passengers. Lord Howard, Sir Theodore Dewes and several other gentlemen came. This morning the Calais packet-boat went to sea with the mail and a few passengers, none of note, wind N.W. This morning a vessel from London, with powder and shot, bound for France, ran ashore on the rocks in the road. The men are all saved, but the vessel sank. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 200.]
April 14.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. No news. Wind fresh at northwest. [Ibid. No. 201.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Howell, the Recorder, and the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, to reprieve Edward Toll, condemned to death at the Old Bailey for setting fire to his master's house, he being under 14 years of age, and having been instigated by a servant maid. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 128.]
April 14.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to Williamson. Though I am not able to reproach myself with neglect of any duty either to the King or to this country, yet I am advised it would be prudent to engage some particular person to attend at London, lest in these busy and circumventing times something might be stirred up to my prejudice, whereof I might not receive timely advertisement. I have thereupon prevailed on the bearer, Mr. Muschamp, a relation of my own, to spend some time during the sitting of the Parliament, and humbly recommend him to your notice, and beseech you to allow him the honour of waiting on you sometimes. Thus you may see how your generous humour and very great civilities increase your troubles. [S. P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 154.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
The Privy Council in England to [Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor]. To-day the petition of Dame Charity, the relict of Sir Maurice Eustace, late Lord Chancellor of Ireland, being read to his Majesty in Council, which complained that she is debarred by a judgment in the Court of Chancery in Ireland of the benefit of a general custom of that kingdom, and particularly of a custom of the City of Dublin, whereof her husband was a freeman, whereby she is to enjoy to her own use the full moiety of her deceased husband's personal estate, after payment of his funeral expenses and debts, notwithstanding the benefit thereof, on a full hearing between the petitioner and the executors of her said husband, was allowed her in the Chancery of the Court of Exchequer in Ireland, all which fully appears in her petition, whereof a copy is enclosed, and prayed that, in regard the said matters are of great consequence relating to a general custom of the said city and kingdom, she might be admitted to a rehearing before your Grace in Chancery, assisted with the judges, his Majesty has granted her request, which by his command we hereby signify to you, and also require you with all convenient speed to rehear the said cause, calling to your assistance the judges of both Benches and the Barons of the Exchequer not concerned in the cause, and with their advice finally to settle and determine the same according to right, and it is his further pleasure that, till the said cause be reheard, all further proceedings on the former decree be stayed. [Copy. Ibid. No. 155.]
April 15. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 317, except the reason given by the Marshal for not delivering up the body of Sir J. Prettyman, viz., that he knew not who should be his security, that after the sessions he should return to prison. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 202.]
April 15.
Wallingford House.
Charles Bertie to Williamson. Entreating him to use his interest with Dr. Busby that Henry Steed, one of the King's Scholars of Westminster, may be elected for Oxford by the Dean of Christ Church the next election. [Ibid. No. 203.]
April 15.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Tuesday loosed out of this 20 light colliers and stood northwards, wind E.S.E. It is now N.N.E., and very good weather. [Ibid. No. 204.]
April 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. A little past noon to-day, after I had written the enclosed, one of our packet-boats came in. I had by it a letter dated 23 April giving this account: that Rheinberg was three weeks since again taken by the French; that there is slender preparation against the French in Holland either by sea or land. What issue this summer's work may produce God knows, yet some here believe the French King intends to make peace with this state on very easy terms, but he concludes, that he is of another opinion. [Ibid. No. 205.]
April 15. James Welsh to Williamson. Yesterday the Catherine yacht went hence for Dieppe, carrying over the Hon. Henry Sidney, the Earl of Leicester's son. [Ibid. No. 206.]
April 15.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Adventure and Guernsey are at Spithead, ready to sail when the Earl of Inchiquin comes. [Ibid. No. 207.]
April 15.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Friday, I am informed, an unhappy accident happened at Penzance. A small vessel from Bristol put in there. All the men went ashore, leaving only a boy on board. There was hot lime, pitch and tar in her. It took fire, by what accident none knows. The boy was saved in a boat, but the ship burnt to a coal. Since Monday some few small vessels are come in. One from France laden with salt and wine met with a privateer, which took from him all his wine and beat him and his men severely. One from New England, that touched at Barbados to repair some disasters, says all things are quiet and well in those parts. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 208.]
April 15.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Yesterday came in the Desire, of Southampton, from Cork, homeward-bound. They report all things in those parts to be quiet and thriving. The John's Adventure, of London, also came in in 9 weeks from Barbados. They report that the last crop has been very plentiful and good, and that but few ships are there, so that the islanders think there is some stop of ships in England. [Ibid. No. 209.]
April 15.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Sieur de Montargis to transport to France 20 horses sent from his Majesty to several persons there. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 56.]
April 16. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 317. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 210.]
April 16,
17, 19, 20.
Quotations from law-books relating to several bills before the House of Commons on those days. [Ibid. No. 211.]
April 16. James Hickes to Williamson. As yet nothing hath visibly appeared for Mr. John Holford in Taunton. [Ibid. No. 212.]
April 16.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind easterly. [Ibid. No. 213.]
April 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. These violent N.E. winds for the last six or seven days give us no foreign news. For domestic, the old rebellious party persist with their private meetings, notwithstanding his Majesty's late declarations to the contrary. 'Tis believed and hoped by the cavaldry that Parliament will sit a considerable time and revive Acts against Recusants in general. Some dispute is beginning between the two parties at Canterbury about the choice of the late Mayor there. The Royal party say the choice is not legal, the fanatic are of the other opinion. [Ibid. No. 214.]
April 16.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Another arrived to-day whose name I have not got yet. The Master's name is Peryman of this place, who left Flushing last Wednesday. The day before news came there that the French army was come within six miles of Middelburg at a place where there was a very narrow arm of the sea, the French being on the other side the water. This alarm occasioned the drums to be beaten all over the country to raise forces to stop the French. There was also a general report all over the United Provinces that the Prince of Orange was poisoned, on which there was a meeting at the Hague by the Commonalty, who would not be satisfied till the Prince showed himself to them out of a window. Two of the lords were hanged for plotting against him. [Ibid. No. 215.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 215 i.]
April 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the restitution of the temporalities of the bishopric of Llandaff to William, the present bishop. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 65.]
April 16. Pass for 10 horses for the Due de Luxembourg as a present to Sir W. Lockhart. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 28.]
April 17. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 318. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 216.]
April 17. Certificate by Sir William Peake that Witte Lambert took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [Ibid. No. 217.]
April 17. The Mayor and Jurats of Hastings to Williamson. By letters from Mr. Samuel Otes we understand that his son, Titus, is expected to attend and make good his late information against Capt. William Parker, senior, exhibited to us and enclosed to you in our late letters, before the Privy Council next Wednesday. But, because he is bound to give evidence on an indictment against William Parker, junior, son of the above, for an unnatural offence, whose trial is unavoidably to be at the gaol delivery at this town next Thursday, which we are all necessarily to attend, we pray that another day of attendance may be appointed for the said Titus Otes and others concerned in the said information. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 218.]
April 17.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. On Thursday evening the Navy yacht came in from Yarmouth. The captain says some of his men were informed there that the people belonging to the derelict fly-boat here got ashore in their boat somewhere thereabout. Among them were several passengers, who, getting into the boat, told the rest on board, that, if they would not come off with them, they would not return to fetch them off, so it is reported they all went off together. The wind continues N.E. Yesterday morning came in a Flushinger with a Brandenburg commission against the Swedes, as it is reported, but has got no purchase yet. [Ibid. No. 219.]
[1675?]
[April 17?]
Mr. Benson's case with Sir John Reresby and Mr. Longe. Sir John alleges there are but 9 votes in Aldborough and that he had 5. Mr. Benson says there are 25 and he has 15, but, admitting there are but 9, yet Mr. Benson shows he has 6 of them and excepts against every one of Sir John's votes, and shows that none of them had a right to vote for him. It is true two of those are ancient messuages, but the persons that voted for them had no title to them. One other of the 9 voted for Mr. Longe.
As to Mr. Longe, Mr. Benson says he had one of the 9 and 4 of the 25, and that the rest of Mr. Longe's are copyholders, cottagers, and new purchasers of chantry lands, who never voted before. [Ibid. No. 220.]
[April 17?] Note by John Ramsden, sheriff of Yorkshire, that the execution of this writ is shown by an indenture certified by Peter Foster, bailiff of the within named borough. Latin. With note, that Mr. Benson is returned only by Foster's indenture. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 318.) [Ibid. No. 221.]
1675
[April 17.]
Bill continuing for 5 years longer a former Act giving liberty to buy and export leather and skins tanned and dressed. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 318.) [Ibid. No. 222.]
April 17.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Gilbert. Archbishop of Canterbury, to grant a dispensation to Dr. William Lloyd, Bishop elect of Llandaff, to hold in commendam Cadington Minor prebend, belonging to St. Paul's, London, and the rectory of St. Andrew's, diocese of Llandaff. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 65.]
April 17.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Sidney Sussex College. Directing that Richard Reynolds. M.A., Fellow of the College, employed by the King as schoolmaster at Tangier, should, as long as he continues in that service, remain a Fellow and enjoy all the profits and other advantages of his Fellowship as if he were resident, and dispensing in his favour with any statute to the contrary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book. 47, p. 6.]
April 17. Order on the petition of Abraham Jaggard for making the ship, now called the John and Mary, taken in the last Dutch war by virtue of letters of marque granted by the High Admiral of Scotland, and adjudged lawful prize by the Admiralty Court there, and bought by the petitioner, a free ship. [Precedents 1, f. 59.]
April 17. Similar orders for the ships Young Emperor, now called the John, of Newcastle, and the Young Tobias, now called the Desire, of Yarmouth, the last on the petition of John Dare, of Yarmouth. Minutes. [Ibid.]
April 18.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. The Adventure and Guernsey continue at Spithead, waiting for Lord Inchiquin. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 223.]
April 18. Commissions to Sir William Colster to be ensign to Major Staniers, to Thomas Merryman to be first lieutenant to Captain Ramsay, and to Francis Carol to be second lieutenant to Captain Burke. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 29.]
April 18.
Whitehall.
Grant to Thomas Povey, as one of the Masters of Requests, of a pension of 100l. per annum for his life, to commence from Lady Day last. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 61.]
April 19. Journal of the procedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 318. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 224.]
April 19. Henry Bellingham to Williamson. Requesting him to write to Sir T. Chicheley that he may have 34 l. 12 s. 8 d. out of the next moneys due to Joseph Buckmaster, master carman to the Ordnance Office, as he has a bond under his hand for the same, and his necessity is such that he expects every day to be cast into prison. [Ibid. No. 225.]
April 19.
Canterbury.
W. Kingsley to Williamson. My former acquaintance with you at Oxford emboldens me to acquaint you with some very unhandsome passages between our Mayor and Mr. Barrett, a young greenheaded lawyer, against my worthy friend Serjeant Hardres, one of the burgesses for Canterbury. To declare to you the several affronts to a gentleman of an ancient eminent family and one learned in the laws, besides M.P., is not in truth to be imagined. I implore your assistance to my good friend, and real resentment of this high abuse to a gentleman who so little deserves it. [Ibid. No. 226.]
April 19
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of the packet-boats and mails and other vessels. [Ibid. No. 227.]
April 19.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind S.E. No other news. [Ibid. No. 228.]
April 19.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind is and has long continued E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 229.]
[April 19.] Bill for the Trial of Peers as amended in Committee. (See Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 662.) (Printed in The Ninth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Part II., p. 50.) [Ibid. No. 230.]
April 19. Warrant to John Dawson, messenger, to take into custody Sir Robert Peyton and bring him before the King in Council to answer what shall be objected against him. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, p. 129.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Commissioners of the Customs. By his Majesty's commands transmitting to them translations of three memorials presented to him by the Dutch Ambassador, that they may inform themselves how the several matters of fact stand, and give their opinion accordingly, one of which being like to concern the farmers of the French tonnage, they are to put it in a way that the parties interested in the farm may know the case, and say what they have to say upon it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 34.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to John Wickham, messenger, to take into custody and bring before the Council William Carslake for spreading false and seditious news. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 56.]
April 20. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 319. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, Nos. 231, 232.]
April 20. Dr. Richard Sterne, Archbishop of York, to Williamson. This time twelvemouth, after a full year's controversy between Dr. Neile and me concerning his admission to the Deanery of Ripon (whether it should be by the King's immediate mandate to the Chapter there, as Dr. Neile had been, following the error of Dr. Wilkins, or by his Majesty's presentation to the Archbishop, as both jure communi and by the fundamental charter of that church it ought to be, and by the practice in the time of King James and King Charles I. it had been), it was at last determined that it should be the latter way, as I desired, and so, though Dr. Neile had been actually admitted on the King's immediate mandate, yet he was ordered to go over all the seals again and to be presented to me as Archbishop of York, and to be anew instituted and installed, whereby it was settled for the future. Dr. Neile died last week, and, as I hear, Dr. Tully is designed as his successor. My request is, that, lest there may be any new trouble about it, you would set it right at the beginning, that it may pass by way of presentation, as it did and ought to do. [Ibid. No. 233.]
April 20. Dr. J. Fell to Williamson. I shall take care that the Latin MS. you mention be speedily returned. At present, it being in the hands of a gentleman who is in Kent, I cannot come at it, but I hope two or three weeks will create no inconvenience. Next week I hope for an opportunity of attending on you, when I shall give you an account of the commands you have laid upon me, and expect your more particular in the concern you formerly mentioned. [Ibid. No. 234.]
April 20. Charles Gaudy to Williamson. Beseeching leave to acquaint him, that, when the King was last at Newmarket, he promised the writer his letter for the recommendation of this gentleman, Mr. Secomb's, son, to the Charterhouse, and gave his permission to be reminded of it by Williamson, and assuring him he is a person who deserves the favour extremely, and wants the advantage, and is every way fit for him to assist. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 235.]
April 20.
The Guernsey, Plymouth Sound.
Sir Palmes Fairborne to Williamson. The 18th I embarked at Portsmouth, and yesterday afternoon arrived here. There being little wind, and what there was at west, we came to an anchor. Just now, being 9 a.m., the wind is come N.E., so we are getting under sail as fast as we can, not doubting we shall have a very quick passage to Tangier. I am extremely sensible of the many favours I received from you since my being in England, and beg you will honour me still with your good opinion. The memorial I presented you of my knighthood to be put in the newsbook was not done, as you ordered, the Thursday before I left London. If it was not done since, I beseech you to order it to be so. [Ibid. No. 236.]
April 20.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Saturday arrived here two vessels of this place from Rotterdam. The master of one, the Merchant's Adventure, says that on the 1st going for Rotterdam 9 leagues eastward of Yarmouth Roads a small caper of 8 guns with French colours came up with them, and took from them butter and other goods above the value of 10l., notwithstanding their seabrief was showed them. The wind continues N.E. [Ibid. No. 237.]
April 20.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. The Guerusey sailed Sunday afternoon in their voyage to Tangier, and with her went Sir P. Fairborne. The Adventure attends the Earl of Inchiquin and is ready to sail when he comes. [Ibid. No. 238.]
April 20.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Guernsey with the victuallers to-day set sail for Tangier with a fair wind. [Ibid. No. 239.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 239 i.]
April 20. Warrant to the Recorder and the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex to reprieve William Spencer, prisoner in Newgate, convicted at the Old Bailey as accessory to a burglary committed in the lodgings of Robert, Earl of Manchester, within Whitehall Palace. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 129.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Mayor. Recommending to him by the King's command for the freedom of the city the bearer, Jaques Caron, a French hatter, a great master in that trade, who comes with design to settle it here to a degree that never yet has been done, especially that of Caudebecs, and whom the King has ordered to be made a denizen. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 35.]
April 21. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 320. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 240.]
April 21.
The America.
Edward Cranfield to Williamson. We sailed on the 12th from Tor Bay, wind N.N.W., and now we are in the latitude 39° 45', where, meeting with some ships bound for the Channel, I thought it my duty to give you an account where we are. The wind coming up last night at N.E. we hope will carry us in a few days to the Maderas. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 241.]
April 21.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The Quakers and other Dissenters meet frequently in great numbers. Seven or eight light colliers are at anchor in this bay waiting a fair wind to the northward. It is now N.N.E. [Ibid. No. 242.]
April 21.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. This being the day for electing a burgess, we have elected Mr. Robert Coke of Holkham. He had 291 votes; his competitor, Alderman Simon Taylor, but 205. [Ibid. No. 243.]
April 21.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Those high winds between N. and E. keep the outward-bound ships up the River and admit none to come up the Channel. I received the Weekly Letter last Friday, which has been viewed by several gentlemen and others. They much rejoice at his Majesty's good thoughts of his Parliament, and opinion of establishing the Protestant Religion. I have your packets for Algiers and Tripoli. No ship since that of the supercargo who refused to take them has come in. I have twice before written of them, but have no command to send them up or keep them till opportunity presents. [Ibid. No. 244.]
April 21.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of the packet-boats and mails. [Ibid. No. 245.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of Stephen Sowton, M.A., to the rectory of Orsett, Essex. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 66.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Bishop of Chester. Sending a copy of Mr. Ogden's second petition for a mandamus for a fellowship in Manchester College and desiring his answer thereupon. [Ibid. f. 183.]
April 21. Licence to Edward Villiers, after reciting a grant to him of the keepership of the mansion house at Richmond and of the Little Park there, and of the keepership of the game there, to keep a pack of beagles to hunt within the said manor, with a prohibition of all persons from hunting in the said manor without the King's licence. [Precedents 1, f. 59.]
April 22. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 321. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 246.]
April 22, 26, May 2. Quotations from law-books and other authorities relating to several bills before the House of Commons on those days. Under 2 May, on the general bill for naturalization, is quoted "Antoninus Pius multis peregrinis jus Romanae civitatis dedit;" and the Duke of Savoy's project in 1627. To bring into Piedmont commerce and to shun the necessity of sending into foreign parts for commodities that may be easily brought to his ports, and which come by way of Marseilles, Genoa and Leghorn, the Duke has resolved in his cities and ports utterly to take away all customs and imposts, and to grant ample and perpetual liberty to all nations as well for trade as habitation, utterly abolishing a law called la legge Ubena, and establishing all manner of necessary and wholesome laws for the execution of speedy justice and for ordering good and valuable moneys and whatsoever else shall be thought necessary and convenient. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 247.]
April 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday many light colliers came in here, the wind blowing a brisk gale at N.E., but this morning it being got westward of north they are hastening out again. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. [Ibid. No. 248.]
April 22.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. The Adventure continues at Spithead tarrying for the Earl of Inchiquin. [Ibid. No. 249.]
April 22.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The Blessing of Barbados came in here in seven weeks from thence with sugars for London. They speak of the good crop there, and that several vessels came out with him and the Phoenix frigate, which they say came from Guinea, and that she had taken two Dutch ships there before the peace. It is supposed the rest of the fleet are got up as high as Plymouth, wind N.E. The Hope of Newcastle and about 20 more came in here from Rochelle, most of them laden with salt. They say the French fleet for the Bank is gone to sea with a good convoy. The 21st came in here the Content of Falmouth in five days from Rotterdam, which says a great fleet is fitting out there for Greenland with a good convoy, and that, a little before they came away, three ships put to sea for the East Indies, and that they expected next year 20 sail from there. It was reported that a Brandenburger had brought in to some part of Holland a Swedes prize, and that the King of England had sent over two physicians to the Prince of Orange, and that he was recovered and had been abroad.
A great Dutch ship from St. Tubus (St. Ubes) that lay here several weeks for convoy had orders last post to put to sea and go about Ireland and Scotland, and accordingly put to sea on Tuesday, wind E. Some vessels that came in the day before said there were two French men-of-war off the Lizard, one of 35 and the other of 28 guns, so it will be hard for her to escape. I wish I might have the King's speech sent me. [Ibid. No. 250.]
April 22.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 251.]
[April 22.] Order that a carcat may be entered in the name of Robert Bertie, Secretary to the Customs, that nothing pass relating to his office without notice to him. [Ibid. No. 252.]
[April 22.] Bill to prevent any members of the House of Commons from taking upon them any public office. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 321.) [Ibid. No. 253.]
April 22. Careat that nothing pass relating to the place of Secretary of the Customs, without notice to Robert Bertie, the present Secretary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 9.]
April 23. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 666, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 322. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, Nos. 254, 255.]
[April 23.] Address of the House of Commons against the Duke of Lauderdale. (Printed in Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 322.) [Ibid. No. 256.]
April 23.
London.
John Could to Williamson. My work with your Honour is to put in a good word for Mr. Carslake. The poor man may have showed his weakness; his love to what he esteems desirable may have prompted him to more than was fit, but I conclude there was not the least design of evil. But that I was fettered with business, I should this morning have been a petitioner to his Majesty in his behalf. I pray let what kindness can be, be afforded the poor man, who is unable to bear the burden of the charge. I am the more earnest, because he was a constant and painful preacher in the city all the time of the plague, when scarce any remained to engage in so necessary and then hazardous a work. [Ibid. No. 257.]
April 23.
Bristol.
Dr. Thomas Tully to Williamson. Your letter found me here this morning, where the cold uncertain weather will oblige me to stay all this night. I propose to wait on you next week with the payment of my thankful respects. I fear Monday night will be the soonest I can reach Oxford from here, where my crazy body will require a day's rest, and then, as fast as I can crawl, for London. I have also sent my humblest thanks to my Lord of Durham. [Ibid. No. 258.]
April 23.
Rydal.
Daniel Fleming to Williamson. To receive for a poor present two such kind letters as you have sent me, one writ the 13th, a very throng day for a man of your figure, is an extraordinary obligation. That day was one of much business to you and of very much sorrow to me, for then it pleased God to call my dearly beloved wife out of this miserable world and to leave me and 14 hopeful children to bemoan such an extraordinary loss.
We have had here a late unhappy dispute among the magistrates about taking away the Quarter Sessions from Kendal, where they have been held a long time to the great advantage of this county. Sir P. Musgrave is engaged against us, for whom we all have a very great kindness and honour, whose interest, we know, is very great. But, if he shall make any application to you about this, I doubt not you'll keep one ear open, till you shall hear what may be said in behalf of the inhabitants in the barony of Kendal. We only desire to continue things as they have been a long time, which we are very confident will be much more advantageous to the King and country than a change will prove. I will forbear giving you any further trouble, till you give me leave to do it, and then you shall have a true account of this affair, and we shall beg your assistance therein. [Ibid. No. 259.]
April 23.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 260.]
April 23.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Blessing of this place that left Rotterdam last Sunday can say nothing of the French being near Middelburg, or of a plot against the Prince of Orange, so I conceive the report I had from the master of a ship from Flushing was a mistake. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 261.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 261 i.]
April 23. Secretary Coventry to the Lord Treasurer. Sending by the King's command a letter from Sir Richard Pigott, to whom the King made a promise that there should be no more proceeding against him in the Exchequer, till he and his partners have been heard. The King wishes that a stop is to be put to any extents issuing till the farmers are heard. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26. f. 194.]
April 23. Conge d'elire to the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln to choose a bishop in place of Dr. William Fuller, deceased, and letter recommending Dr. Thomas Barlow, Provost of Queen's College, and Margaret Professor of Divinity. Oxford. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 183.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Licence to William Legge, cornet to the Earl of Oxford's own troop in his regiment, to be absent for 12 months, and to be mustered as cornet with his two men during his absence. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 13.]
April 23.
Whitehall.
Grant to John Griffith and Charles Coling, son of Richard Coling, successively, and to the survivor of them of the clerkship of the Billets in the Court of the Marches of Wales for their lives and for the life of the survivor. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 57.]
April 23.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. On Wednesday evening came in the Rose of Belfast from France with salt and brandy. Her master says that two more of his town came out with him, and that they met a Flushing caper, which took from him a barrel of brandy, from one of the others half a hogshead of brandy, and from the third a hogshead and a puncheon of brandy and beat the master very much. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 156.]
April 24. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 323, except that a bill to revive and make perpetual an Act for avoiding unnecessary suits and delays was read and ordered to be read again. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 262.]
April 24. Scheme of a method to be employed for the fishing trade to be established under 3 commissioners, 4 treasurers, and 16 underofficers, 40 busses of 70 tons each to be built, and a stock of 40,000l. to be provided; with estimate of the charge and profits, showing that 31,463l. would be gained the first year. Noted by Williamson, as given him by the King to keep that day. [Ibid. No. 263.]
[April 24.] Objections by the King against setting up the fishing trade, that we have not experienced seamen and fishermen enough; that the Hollanders living more cheaply and knowing the markets will undersell us, and their merchants may sell at a loss to discourage us; and that the laziness of English seamen will spoil the undertaking; with answers thereto; the laziness is to be checked by allowing the fishermen a proportion of the fish caught. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 264.]
[April 24.] Memorandum of advantages to be derived from the fishing trade, viz., setting poor people to work; saving 300,000l. spent yearly in the purchase of fish from the Hollanders; advantage of traffic with the fish; increase of shipping, and making good pilots. [Ibid. No. 265.]
April 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. After sending away mine last Thursday, I had this account of the double commissioned Dutch privateer, that had a Dutch and a Brandenburg commission. It is here reported that he declared he would have one of those Swede vessels that were at anchor in Hollesley Bay under the convoy of the Pearl, and a caper with a French commission plying hereabouts he threatened him also, yet kept at anchor near Landguard Fort. The French caper came in here and passed by him last Wednesday night, and about 1 on Thursday morning boards the Dutchman, secures their watch of four men on deck, and all the rest where they were in the hold, cuts their cable, and steals her away with them to sea, and all this without so much as a musket or pistol fired.
The latter part of this I had yesterday confirmed by one of the four Dutchmen that were on the watch, who says, they, not mistrusting anything when the caper was laying them aboard, with their hands endeavoured to thrust the caper off, when presently they were entered by 40 men and secured. The French caper had two small guns, and the Dutch two also, and two or four pederas mounted, well armed and victualled, and a Dutch chaplain on board to pray for a blessing on their honest endeavours.
Yesterday very many light colliers, not liking the weather, came in here. The wind blows very stiffly at east. [Ibid. No. 266.]
April 24.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon in the storm came out of Ostend a galliot hoy of about 60 tons bound for Ireland. Last night she ran fast on the north part of the Goodwin, and suddenly broke to pieces. Though it blew a whole storm, God gave the men a fine slatch of weather, and they all got into their boat, and came before the wind and arrived here to-day. It blows a gale at N.E., variable. [Ibid. No. 267.]
April 24.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. The Ostend capers are very busy on our coast and commit several outrages amongst our merchant vessels, and particularly last Tuesday not far from Dungeness an Ostend caper came up to a small fisher-boat of this town, who were shooting their nets to catch mackerel, and, though our men, when they saw her come towards them, declared themselves to be English fishermen, they poured into this small open boat a volley of small shot, and shot one of the men through the arm and broke the bone, so that it is much questioned whether he will escape or not. Our Mayor and jurats have given an account of it to Secretary Coventry and I thought it my duty to give you this also, that, if you think fit, you may acquaint his Majesty and Council, in order to prevent further mischief. Our poor seaman hopes he might have satisfaction for this injury from the Captain, if he could know his name, which he could not learn, nor could they make any further discovery of the ship, but by her having 12 guns, and that they confessed themselves Ostenders.
Postscript.—I am since informed she has 14 guns and that the captain's name is Philip Mastricke. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 268.]
April 24. T. B. to —. That business that you might expect some account of. The friends met not, as was promised, wherefore you may expect what may be of consequence from particular friends. There is much news talked of, but 'tis dangerous to write, some say, for letters are opened at the post houses, and some are questioned already for writing, they say. 'Tis doubted it will go hard with Dissenting friends, many fear, others hope it will go well in the end. There are high differences, some say, amongst them. Some say they will give and do what may be desired, others think they will not. 'Tis said some speak notable high in many cases, which 'tis like you know, but there are some, as I may think, considerable things not convenient to write, which, if you think fit to appoint the time and place where, I shall see you, but, if I may offer the place, I should think that very convenient where you formerly were.
Postscript.—If you will have what is hinted written, and direct a way how it may come to your own hands, it shall be done as well as I can, although some of it has many long circumstances in it, and other things more fit to speak than write as I suppose.
Whether, if it be directed to Mr. John Holford, Ta[u]n[ton] Dean, it may come safe to you.
The business did not succeed. [Ibid. No. 269.]
April 24.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Thomas Tully. Last week I informed you of Dr. Neile's death, and that we were proceeding to perfect your grant notwithstanding the opposition designed by some. By this time you will probably have heard of another change of a more considerable rank. It is the death of the Bishop of Lincoln and the grant of that dignity to Dr. Barlow. What I have now to bespeak you in is your goodwill that Tim. Halton, as Senior Fellow Resident in the College, and as my friend, may succeed in the Provostship. I hope, as it is but a justice to him, so it may not be to the disprofit of the College. What I mainly endeavour in this and all other incidents of this kind, is, that they may be unanimous in what they do, and therefore I beg you to join your influence in the society to unite them in this mind. I was not sure but that you yourself might have some thoughts of desiring it for yourself, which made me more solicitous to bespeak your friendship early in it, and what I do is with the privity and good liking of Mr. Provost, who has promised to write to you himself. He will acquaint you what we are further endeavouring for you on the vacancy of the Margaret Lecture. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 35.]
April 24.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Yates. Requesting his and his House's interest in favour of Dr. Tully, upon the vacancy of the Margaret Professor's chair by Dr. Barlow's promotion to the Bishopric of Lincoln. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 36.]
April 24.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Fell. I am endeavouring to secure the College for Tim. Halton, and as a little compensation to Dr. Tully, who might reasonably have an eye to it. I would be very glad to compass the Margaret Lecture for him. I beseech, if it may reasonably be, to engage you and your interest for him, and by your means Dr. Yates, which two Houses, I am told, will infallibly secure the thing to him. [Ibid. p. 37.]
April 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of William, Earl of Inchiquin, praying that the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland may be directed to cause letters patent to be passed of the castle, town and lands of Killnecurra, Ballyamsarry, Strahanagh and Mulcosogran, in the barony of Barrymore, co. Cork. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 21.]
April 25. Lewis Herault declares that John Guepin has said several years since the restoration that England had reason to be sorry for Cromwell, because he was a great zealot for the laws of God; that, if the English were wise, they should free themselves from the families of Stuarts, and that he hoped they should do it. Guepin added that the service practised in the chapel at Whitehall differed a little or not at all from the Mass, in a word that it was the Mass copied. Herault declares besides that he heard it but this week, and that, if the company of elders and deacons of the French Church, London, had been more in number last Wednesday, he should then have declared it to them, and that he intimated to them he had something to declare. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 369, No. 270.]
April 25.
Sunderland.
Samuel Hodgkin to Williamson. To-day arrived two vessels from Amsterdam, who say they came out of the Texel last Friday, and fell in with two Dunkirk privateers, but, the sea being high, they could not lay them on board, but before that they had plundered a small vessel of Stockton. Several light and loaden colliers are passing by, but the grand coal fleet is not in sight. [Ibid. No. 271.]
April 25.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of the packet-boats and mails. [Ibid. No. 272.]
April 25. Warrant to release on bail William Spencer, convicted of being accessory before [the fact] in robbing the Earl of Manchester's lodgings, and to insert him in the next general pardon for poor convicts of Newgate without the clause of transportation. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 134.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
Commission to Rowland Morgan to be captain of a company whereof Capt. John Howard was captain in the Holland regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 12.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir R. Holmes, Governor of the Isle of Wight, to stay and detain all vessels belonging to Hamburg that now are in or shall hereafter come into any port or road within his government, till the King's further pleasure be signified. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 57.]
April 26. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 324. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 1.]
[April 26.] Charge of impeachment against the Earl of Danby. (Printed in Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 324.) [Ibid. No. 2.]
April 26.
Drury Lane.
The Earl of Anglesey to Williamson. Recommending the bearer, who was formerly in his service, where he behaved decently, and was since in Lord Arlington's office for about 12 months under Mr. Richards, where, the Earl is informed, he discharged himself with good approbation. French he has naturally, being born in Guernsey, and he has very well acquired Latin and English. His request is to be clerk under Mr. Brisbane, one of Williamson's secretaries. [Ibid. No. 3.]
April 26.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Apologizing for not writing last post, having a great cold. Wind N.N.E. [Ibid. No. 4.]
April 26.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last week came in here at least 40 sail, most of them from France with wine, brandy and salt. On Thursday came in a Dutch caper with two small French prizes with red wines. On Saturday came in a vessel from Virginia with tobacco for Holland, but stops for advice from her owners. The wind has long continued E. and N.E. [Ibid. No. 5.]
April 26.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. The 23rd above 25 merchantmen from France and other places homeward-bound put to sea from this, but the next day, the wind coming easterly, some of the sternmost which put back here say that the rest put in for Plymouth. The 24th came in here the Looking-Glass of Flushing, a small Dutch caper, with two small prizes, both laden with small wines. The night before they came in, they met a French ship that put out of this and hailed her, but they having a man on board that spoke English he said she belonged to London, and so escaped. The Friends Adventure of Dover also came in in 14 days from Bordeaux. About 28 sail came out with them, which, they believe, are put into Scilly. They say that the disorders in that city were very great, the President and several others were killed and some of the Parliament men's houses were pulled down, and it had grown higher, if the Governor had not gone about the city, and said, as the common people said, Vice le Roy sans Gabelle, for whoever would not say so they killed. The King of France is drawing 20,000 men against the city, who refused to let the King's forces come into the citadel, but they broke in by night, and so have got possession of it. The King, it is said, will make the ringleaders examples. The tax was very grievous, for they were to pay 5 sous for every bushel of corn they baked, and so for every new hat and coat and other clothes they should have to wear, and there was a patent granted to one man that all the tobacco of the growth of that country should be sold for 20 sous a lb. and all that should be brought in for 40. It is supposed that, if Toulouse, a Parliament city near by, do not oppose this tax as well as Bordeaux, that city will receive much damage. By a vessel that came in here from Rochelle, I am advised that, before they came away, two Dutch ships loaden with Frenchmen came into Charleboyes Road, for the Dutch having taken all the plantations the French had in the East Indies gave them these two ships to bring them home. The Black Cock of London came in here in 5 weeks from Virginia with tobacco, bound home. They have had a very bad crop there this year, and tobacco will be very bad and scarce. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 6.]
April 26.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 7.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower, to release Col. Francis Lovelace, his prisoner, he giving security of 500l. to surrender when required, he having fallen dangerously ill of dropsy and being in great want of necessaries. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 130.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Commissions to Francis Williamson to be lieutenant and John Richardson to be ensign to Capt. Morgan in the Holland regiment. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 12.]
April 26.
Whitehall.
Commissions to David Legros to be lieutenant and Henry Wharton to be ensign to Capt. Huitson in the Earl of Craven's regiment of Guards. Minutes. [Ibid.]
April 27. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 325. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 8.]
[April ?] John Draper, of Bristol, merchant, to the King. Petition stating that 17 Nov. last there were laden at Stockholm on the Mary of Malmo, belonging to the Crown of Sweden, 46 lasts of pitch and tar, 290 rings of brass wire and 24 barrels of steel bound for Bristol, on the account of, and consigned to the petitioner, which ship was frozen up and could not go to sea till lately, and on her voyage was taken by a Zealand caper and brought up by him to Terveer by virtue of a commission from the Duke of Brandenburg, and praying, as the said goods are still detained and some of them have been already rifled, and as the petitioner laded them long ago before any intimation of a war between Sweden and Brandenburg, that his Majesty would interpose with the States General and the Duke of Brandenburg for the speedy restitution of the said goods, some of them being very perishable. [Ibid. No. 9.] Annexed,
April 27. Affidavit by the said John Draper, echoing the statements in the petition. [Ibid. No. 9i.]
April 27. Examination of Alexandre Vieuar, minister of the Gospel, living at present in London, concerning Jean Guepin, taken before Williamson. In 1666 I was staying at Amsterdam, where during September, October, and November, Guepin slept in the same room with me. He often conversed about the affairs of England, and told me, when we were alone, that England had reason to regret Oliver Cromwell, that his government was better than the present, that he was a great zealot for the law of God and that he maintained the pure religion. As for the King, that he could not do without bishops or common prayers, and that he had brought back all those things which displeased the English. I asked him what the common prayers were. He replied, if you were at Westminster or the King's chapel you would believe yourself among the Papists. It is a complete copy of the Mass, but, if the English are wise, they will get rid of the Stuart family, and I believe they will do so in time. That man then went to Hamburg, and I stayed three years at Amsterdam, and then returned to France and stayed there till I came over to London, where I met Guepin, and having told this scandalous conversation to Dr. Herault, he advised me and gave me means to make my declaration public. [French. S.P. Dom., Car., II. 370, No. 10.]
April 27. Dr. J. Fell to Williamson. It is a privilege our people take here to bestow all bishoprics before the King disposes of them, and they, having on the first news of the vacancy of Lincoln made the Provost the successor, went on in the same method to bestow his places, and on Sunday night one of the most popular Bachelors in Divinity that we have in town came to me, signifying his concern in behalf of the Master of Pembroke, and on Monday several others of other houses made the same application. I told them all that it was very indecent to begin a canvas before a place was actually void and probably a considerable time would pass before there would be a vacancy. Besides they should consider that Dr. Tully might justly pretend to the place, and, if he did, would not fail of being assisted by his friends, so that their appearing might be a great unkindness to Dr. Hall, who does not appear as a candidate, nor probably would have his name brought in question, and besides would make a competition and disturbance in the University, wherefore I desired them to forbear. This was all I thought proper to say; I shall speedily see how far my counsel is taken and give you an account when I come up. [Ibid. No. 11.]
April 27.
St. Edmund Hall.
Dr. Thomas Tullie to Williamson. I am but just returned here, where I had the best bienrevenu I could desire, your most obliging letter, and the news of our friend's preferment. Your commands in reference to the College shall have the utmost and heartiest observance I can pay them. I hope there will be no disturbance. Pray give my service to Dr. Halton, if with you. I hope to wait on you on Friday at farthest. [Ibid. No. 12.]
April 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Sunday afternoon one of our packet-boats arrived, which came from the Brill the day before. The master says another came from thence with a mail last Wednesday, but we hear nothing of him and have fears for him, because he was in the worst of the weather. Yesterday the wind was southerly, and a great fleet of light colliers sailed hence. The Pearl and the Swedish ships under her convoy are still in the Rolling Grounds, the wind to-day being again in the East.
Postscript.—After sending this to the post-house, the missing packet-boat arrived. I sent for this again to let you know the Wednesday mail was landed at Queenborough on Friday, and all in safety. By a letter he brought me, there is little, except the forwardness of the French, and of a proclamation now expired forbidding the fishing, &c., for Greenland, but now they are putting out in great abundance, besides 14 East Indiamen in readiness, 7 from Amsterdam, 5 from Rotterdam, and 2 from Zealand. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 13.]
April 27.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. The Adventure continues at Spithead waiting for the Earl of Inchiquin. The Wivenhoe fireship is ordered here to be fitted for the Straits. [Ibid. No. 14.]
April 27.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Dutch caper put ashore to-day here all his Frenchmen without the approbation of the Deputy Governor of the Royal Citadel and without giving them any money for their subsistence here before they could get passage for France, or for travelling to get passage elsewhere.
Postscript.—The Deputy Governor made the captain of the caper take on board again all the Frenchmen he put ashore. [Ibid. No. 15.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 15 i.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Reference of the petition of Sir William Petty and Robert Marshall about the quit-rents of Kerry to the Lord Treasurer, to consider thereof and of the several reports from the Chief Governors and Privy Council of Ireland, and petitions transmitted from them concerning this matter and what has been done already thereon, and what the petitioners have further to allege, and to make his report on the whole with his opinion, and particularly on the within-mentioned petition of 4 July, 1673, and what expedient may be used concerning the seizure complained of. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 21.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Grant to Anne, Countess Marischal, for her life of several lodgings built upon the wall of St. James' Park next the Horse Guards, which at her own charges she has fitted and beautified. With memorandum that this was the renewal of a warrant granted in Lord Arlington's time. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 58.]
April 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Charles, son of Sir Charles Cottrell, master of the ceremonies, of the office of master of the ceremonies for his life in reversion after his said father, with the fee of 200l. per annum, and for a grant of the expenses he shall incur in journeys with ambassadors and the like, with a proviso for cessor of the former grant to him of the office of Assistant to the Master of the Ceremonies on his succeeding to the said office. [3 pages. Precedents 1, f. 61.]
April 27.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson, Shipping news. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 157.]
April 28. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 326. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 16.]
April 28.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of packet-boats and mails. Last night a yacht went for Dieppe carrying over Sir John Arundel. [Ibid. No. 17.]
April 28. Caveat that nothing pass concerning the grant of a prebend of Worcester till notice be given to Lord Windsor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 9.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Arthur Ross, late parson of Glasgow, of the bishopric of Argyle with all the benefices, lands, lordships, &c., thereto belonging. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 230.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a mandate to Alexander, Archbishop of Glasgow, to consecrate and instal Arthur, now Bishop of Argyle. [Ibid. p. 232.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the presentation of William Annand, a minister of Edinburgh, to the Deanery of Edinburgh. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 233.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to John Veatch, younger, of Dawick, of the escheat of the goods of Sir Michael Nasmyth of Posso, and likewise of the escheat of the life-rent of the same. [Docquet. Ibid.]
April 28.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form to Lord Banff for three years and to Archibald Campbell of Pearsie for two years. [Ibid. p. 234.]
[Before April 29.] Request by the Duke of Monmouth for an exchange to be made between Mr. Mauleverer, ensign to Capt. Godfrey's company, and Mr. Wheeler, ensign to Prince Rupert's company at Windsor, and that they may have commissions accordingly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 18.]
April 29. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 670, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 326. [Ibid. No. 19.]
April 29.
Brasenose College.
Dr. Thomas Yates to Williamson. Yours of the 24th came when I was abroad, else you had had a more speedy account. I shall with all cheerfulness and faithfulness obey your commands, and, though as yet neither Dr. Tully nor any other appear for the Margaret Professor's place, yet I have recommended it to divers of ours, and hope they will not forget that great honour and kindness you did to this place in sheltering it from the attempts lately made on their freedom in elections, but render you all returns in their power. [Ibid. No. 20.]
April 29.
Ednall (Eden Hall).
Thomas Musgrave to Williamson. I can neither sufficiently admire your goodness nor express my obligations to you. In retaining or resigning my prebend at Carlisle, I shall be wholly guided by your instructions. I should not have presumed to have imposed this trouble on you, but that your great kindness, especially in effecting my promotion to Durham, commands me to acknowledge it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 21.]
April 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By one of our packet-boats which arrived this morning with Lord Clare in her, we are told that the Duke of Brandenburg is at the Hague. whither resort great numbers of people from all parts of the United Provinces. Yesterday was very stormy: the wind continues easterly and blows very fresh. I have since waited on Lord Clare, who speaks of a small retinue the Duke of Brandenburg has with him at the Hague. [Ibid. No. 22.]
April 29.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. The Adventure, Sir B. Rooth commander, is at Spithead waiting for the Earl of Inchiquin. [Ibid. No. 23.]
April 29.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 27th several vessels bound eastward put to sea, but the wind came out that night at S.E. and blew a great storm, so that, unless they got into Plymouth or elsewhere, they may be in some danger. The small Dutch caper I wrote about last post put to sea, and came in again yesterday in the storm. She has left the prizes in a merchant's hands here. The 28th came in here the Mary of London in six weeks from the James River in Virginia. They report that all sorts of provisions are very dear there, and tobacco very scarce. They were in much distress for victuals when they came into port. They speak of four vessels cast away there in a storm or hurricane, and that there are several vessels in the Channel, so, if this wind holds at East, we shall have many of them here. Some are come in already from France. [Ibid. No. 24.]
April 29.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 25.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Edward Griffin to pay 100l. to Andrew Cokaine, yeoman rider to the King, for charges in physicking the King's horses at Newmarket. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 194.]
April 29. Commission to James Wheeler to be ensign of Captain Godfrey's company of foot in the regiment of Guards under Colonel Russell. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 129.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Thomas Player. Recommending the bearer, Jaques Caron, with particulars about him as in his former letter calendared ante, p. 72. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 38.]
April 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. On the submission sent us by you of most of the subscrivers of that strange address and the other submission we transmitted to you, by our letter of the 1st instant we authorized you to continue the process against them till the first Council day in June, and now, being informed that those named in the last submission who were not here have also submitted, we authorize you to discharge the said process immediately, that all the subscrivers of the said address may be in the same condition as when they signed and presented it, and it is still our pleasure that the restraint from coming to Edinburgh be taken off both as to the subscrivers and the others mentioned in our said letter, and that the same favour be allowed to James Hunter and the others mentioned in your letter of the 8th. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 234.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
Establishment of an allowance of 500l. a year to the Governor of the Isle of Wight for his pay and entertainment to begin 25 March last, when the former allowance expired. Sign Manual. Countersigned, "Danby: J. Williamson." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 26.]
April 30. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 673. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 27, 28.]
April 30. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 327. [Ibid. No. 29.]
April 30.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 30.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 30 i.]
[April 30.] Abstract of the bill for explanation of an Act to prevent dangers from Popish Recusants (the Test Act), as amended in Committee, which is printed in The Ninth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Part II., p. 50. [Ibid. No. 31.]
[April 30.] Reasons against the Act for erecting a Court of Conscience [at Westminster]: that it takes away trial by Jury; destroys the inferior courts as Courts Baron &c.; compels persons of quality to submit for small debts to a company of shopkeepers; the King's servants are put under its jurisdiction without liberty to sue in the Court of the Household; it will be impossible to recover debts from the persons appointed Commissioners during their tenure of office, nor will they be able to recover debts due to them. Unlearned men cannot be supposed to be competent to decide the legal questions that may arise, and there may be equal difficulty in a cause of 40s. as in one of 40l.; but there is no appeal. Allowing the parties to give evidence themselves will cause frequent perjuries, &c. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 327.) [Ibid. No. 32.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Mr. Percival, Deputy Governor of Deal Castle. Is displeased at his attempts to abuse him by his complaints of Hancock, who, he pretended, had enclosed a piece of ground to the prejudice of Deal Castle, whereon an order in Council was made, though he knew that Sir John Berry, the Governor, had given the poor man leave to do what he did. He advises him to let Hancock remain without molestation, till he hear what the King and Council further order. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 14, p. 137.]
April 30. Commission to Francis Mauleverer to be ensign of the company of foot under Prince Rupert in Windsor Castle. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 129.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
Commission to Christopher Bannistre to be marshal to the Horse Guards regiment and troops of horse that shall be in the King's pay and entertainment in the room of Richard Llewellin. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 13.]
April 30.
Whitehall.
Grant of the office of Master of the King's Hawks to the Earl of Rochester and William Chiffinch during life, on the surrender of Sir Allen Apsley and Sir Peter Apsley. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 56.]
April. [Walter, Lord Aston] to Williamson. My most humble thanks for your letter of the 12th. I shall not fail to give you a speedy account of anything worthy of your knowledge. You have so many worthy persons of our country sitting with you, and my near neighbour, Walter Chetwynd, now newly elected for Stafford, so faithful a subject, and so gallant, knowing and obliging a person, that you cannot but be most perfectly informed of all things of this country. The now general discourse in all companies here is upon a letter that is conceived writ from the Earl of Shaftesbury to the Earl of Carlisle. Every part is much descanned upon, but most conclude that the Parliament will be speedily dissolved and a new one called, and to that end some, who believe that the Papists in this country have a great interest in many of the electors, are endeavouring to persuade that it is not the Protestant party, but the Episcopal Prelatical party which have now a great influence in the present House of Commons, which at this time is the cause of putting the penal statutes rigorously in execution against them, but on a new election persons would be certainly chosen of a disposition, if not for a full toleration, yet at least so qualified that they would have no just cause to complain. Others have lately conceived that in regard this country, where his Majesty was preserved (and that Whitgrave and the Pendrells who were so eminent loyal in his preservation are now prosecuted for being Papists) is more severely prosecuted than any other in this circuit, [they] should [unite] in a petition to the House of Commons not only of themselves, but joined with all the Papists of England. Where I meet with this discourse I cry it down all I can, for I would have no grace or mercy expected from any but his Majesty. You will pardon me for daring to send my judgment. which is this. If Parliaments be of absolute necessity for the good of this nation, the less while they continue, surely the securer, but it is evident that, if this be dissolved, that the Presbyterian interest and the Fanatics will carry it in most countries. You have advised me so well in your last which I will endeavour to follow, and I am now confident that in what upon any exigency I shall be driven to, I shall find you my friend in what is reasonable and just. If you command me anything, either my cousin Jeffes will send it me, or if it be put into [Stafford] bag it comes safe to me, I living within two miles of the town. [Signature torn off, and day of month and names of places erased. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 33.]
[April ?] Henry Oldenburg to the King. Petition for a patent for 14 years for making and disposing of watches as invented by Mons. Christian Huygens, useful to find the longitudes both by sea and land, which invention has been transferred by Huygens to the petitioner for his Majesty's dominions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 34.]
April.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a patent to Oldenburg as prayed in the above petition. [Draft. Ibid. No. 35.]
April.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to William Bridgeman of an annuity of 400l. per annum to continue for 7 years. [Draft. Ibid. No. 36.]
[April ?] Reasons proposed to Parliament for making a free trade for tanned leather in the Bill now committed (21 April) for continuance of the Act for transporting leather.
The reason of the law that hindered a free trade was to prevent transportation, which now being made lawful, the law itself should no longer be a restraint on trade. Transportation, which since the late Act has been found very beneficial, cannot be so effectually encouraged as it ought unless the transporter may sell at home what he finds unfit for transportation, or what by any sudden emergency may become unsafe to venture at sea. By a free trade the price at remote fairs and markets will be generally advanced, so as to bear proportion with Leadenhall market, and Leadenhall will be kept to equal and indifferent rates and the leather trade be balanced throughout the realm. By keeping a restraint on buying and selling leather, the tanners about London will monopolize the whole trade therein, and it has been the prudence of all Parliaments to prevent monopolies as destructive to trade.
A retailer of leather, as well as one of cloth and other commodities is necessary, especially for supplying the poorer traders and artificers, by furnishing them with leather curried and dressed and proper for their use, who otherwise could not provide for supplies to last till the return of the market, and the week's time that must be spent in currying after the market day before it be fit for use, nor can their stock hold out for providing by wholesale the variety of colours leather is now put into, and must be had to suit their customers and maintain their trade. All the mischiefs and inconveniencies that can be opposed to the free trade of leather are sufficiently provided against by the searching and sealing of leather already provided for by law in all markets and corporations. [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 37.]
[April ?]
London.
"The Voice of the Nation or an humble Address to the High and Honourable Court of Parliament for their just severity to repress the growing boldness of Atheism and prophaneness in the land." Thanking them for their care firmly to establish the Protestant religion in England and to strengthen the English monarchy against the pretended title and unwearied attempts of the Papal tyranny. A greater danger calls on them to stop the growing disease of domineering atheism and both actual and doctrinal blasphemy. While they take care men may continue Protestants, it is asked openly, if they must be Christians. The grounds of Christianity are boldly battered with unreasonable reasons and the highest scorn. In effect it is the old Popish plot, for, when the principles of Popery will not take, the emissaries of Rome into England instil those of Atheism, as, the zeal of religion being taken away, they may then work their politic interest. (Quotations from Dr. Wilkins, the late Bishop of Chester, in favour of punishing Atheism severely.) Several excellent books and powerful pithy sermons have been written against Atheism, but they have hitherto only made Atheists more proud and insulting. Since they are not to be confuted but by authority, that confutation is craved of Parliament, which their wisdom shall think most fit. Printed for Henry Brome.
With MS. notes that it is impossible this transgression should be healed, whilst the public theatres are suffered to be the schools of blasphemy, debauchery and buffoonery, to disparage serious religion, all solid virtues, lawful marriage, sobriety and true-heartedness to our country.
On the back is an anonymous letter.—Here you may behold what a seasonable opportunity of vindicating the glory of God's name was put into the hands of the band of pen[sioners], but some were busy selling God, their souls and their country for private and filthy lucre. The names of those manifestly guilty should be publicly recorded, and also those who voted the confiscation of the whole kingdom, and that cottagers, who have no voice in elections, should pay 2s. yearly for a stone not worth 2d., when the chimney villains call it a hearth. Some of these watch when the poor cottagers are absent, and then carry away their bedding and pots for their own lucre. Those also should be named who made the horrible decrees against Quakers and countenanced the country Justices to superadd such un-heard of cruelties to those horrible statutes as may be seen in Will. Penn's Cry for Justice, and in his Continued Cry. In his England's True Interest you may see the Great Charter has been furiously violated. 'Tis possible the R[ight] R[everend] Pre[lates] countenanced those statutes according to their usual zeal, but Penn proves clearly that neither King nor Parliament nor magistrate nor minister have a divine right to determine what is heresy or what is schism. J. Milton has said more for it in two elegant sheets of true religion, heresy and schism than all the pr[elates] can refute in 7 years, and you may tell them "Ex ore tuo te condemnabo by referring them to Dr. Jeremy Taylor's Liberty of Prophesying."
The rooting out of Papacy is too hard a task without God's extraordinary assistance. I think I can say more than any one living how Papacy has been fostered in England, Scotland and Ireland, ever since Queen Elizabeth's decease, and before it by King James by his contracts with the Pope, Spain and the Grand Duke of Tuscany to assist him to the Crown when Queen Elizabeth refused to declare him heir, and he made good his promise, e.g. by his dissolution of parliament in 1621 and his justification of it, where you may see what he meant by his imperial crown and prerogative. There you have enough jas divinum in all conscience, and you may see more to the same effect in The King's Cabinet Opened, paper 8, p. 7, the true copy testified by our ladies' grandfather, E. P. Esq. Much I could add, but I must not approach too near those heels, which may kick out my teeth. Now is the critical time. Either we shall by God's assistance subdue the Papacy or that will ruin us. They have hundreds of thousands of priests and Jesuits to assault us boldly from head to foot. You do well in publishing your votes and resolves, that such as resent may send in their objections before they pass into laws. I pray God to prosper you in all those great affairs to which you are called by God and this kingdom. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 38.]
[April ?] Major Henry Staniers to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner has been dismissed after three years' faithful service in the Duke of Monmouth's foot regiment at M. de Louvois' desire for demanding the rights and conditions of the said regiment and praying for payment of the three years' arrears of an allowance granted for his former services and for some consideration for the loss of his employment. [Ibid. No. 39.]
[April ?] Sonnybanke Ghyles to Williamson. Being reduced to indigence by the losses his friends sustained by their loyalty to his late Majesty, begging a grant of all such arrears of tenths of the clergy as are now in arrear or shall be returned in arrear in May, 1675, by the respective bishops, who by Act of Parliament are collectors of those tenths which are payable yearly at Christmas, and who the following May return into the Exchequer the non-solvents in their respective dioceses, on which returns process has been from time to time issued to levy the same, most of them that are of worth having been levied, and the rest being of small value. [Ibid. No. 40.]
[April ?] Address by the Quakers to the King and Parliament, who are now sitting. Showing that the Act for swearing allegiance and denying the Pope's supremacy was made against Popish Recusants, and those who are swearers and could swear in other cases, neither of which they are; quoting texts against taking oaths, which is the only cause they dare not take an oath in any case, although they thus suffer imprisonment, some for 10, some for 12 years, some even dying in prison, so that any who bear them malice can cast them into prison merely by tendering the oath; pleading their inoffensive and honest behaviour for almost 15 years, and urging that no penalty should be inflicted for religion and conscience, adding that something further is intended to be presented to them. Signed on behalf of the said people by James Park, John Grove and Ellis Hooker. [Printed. Ibid. No. 41.]
[April ?] Request of Sir Andrew Dick to the House of Commons, in consideration of his deplorable condition, to appoint a committee to state his just debt. His late father, Sir William Dick, lent large sums, amounting to 37,000l. towards the levy of an army in Scotland for Ireland, and towards sea service against Ireland on public security, but received only 5,600l. back, and a weekly allowance of 5l., which was stopped on the restoration; and 2,000l. allotted him in lieu thereof from excise arrears by the Parliament of 1660 was taken up by the King, so that the family and many hundreds of widows and orphans with whose estates his late father was entrusted are in great distress. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 42.]
[April ?] An Act for the better and more speedy conviction of Roman Catholics and the levying the forfeitures incurred thereon. Any person born a subject who shall officiate as a Popish priest in England, or shall have done so abroad, unless reconciled after his return to the Church of England, shall suffer as in cases of high treason. The Constables and Churchwardens after the — day of —, 1675, twice a year shall make presentment of all persons aged 16 and upwards residing in their parishes or having estates there, suspected to be Popish Recusants who have foreborne to come to church for a month before such presentment, or have said Mass or willingly heard Mass, such presentment to be delivered to the Grand Jury at the next Quarter Sessions, which shall be sufficient evidence for indicting such Recusant for his absence from church or saying or hearing Mass. After indictment proclamation shall be made for the persons indicted to appear at the next Quarter Sessions, and, if they do not appear, or if they refuse to subscribe the declaration in the Act, on such default the defaulter shall be deemed a Popish Recusant convict, and be proceeded against accordingly. The forfeitures from Popish Recusants are to be applied in the purchase of rectories, impropriations, tithes or other real estate for the augmentation of poor vicarages and other cures in the county where the forfeiture shall be levied, regard being had in the first place to such poor vicars, who, or their parishioners, shall be instrumental in convicting Popish Recusants and discovering their estates. Every Popish Recusant indicted or convicted who shall render himself at the next Quarter Sessions or before his estate shall be seized, and take the oaths of allegiance and supremacy and subscribe the declaration, shall be free from all penalties in this Act or in any other on account of recusancy. Noted, as brought in during the session begun 13 Feb. (sic), 1674–5. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 320.) [Ibid. No. 43.]
[April ?] [The Duke of Monmouth] to [Sir W. Lockhart.] I was very much concerned at the news of your indisposition, and therefore no less pleased with the hopes we have of your recovery. The King has commanded me to write to you to press the Italian players to hasten their journey, and for their better undertaking it Sir Stephen Fox will remit you by this post 200l. and a yacht shall be ready at their time in any convenient port they desire to embark at. On their arrival here a place will be assigned them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 30.]
[April ?] Articles to be observed by the Duke of Monmouth's regiment of foot.
1. That none blaspheme the Name of God, swear, or be drunk, upon pain of being punished according to the Articles of War.
2. That no officer or soldier shall quit his post on the march, nor go out of the camp or other quarter above a mile, nor absent himself from his guard night or day, the officer on pain of cashiering, and the soldier of arbitrary punishment.
3. That no officer give his soldier more or less pay than is ordered, or omit giving it at the times appointed.
4. That any sergeant that gives disrespective words to his superior officer, or any inferior officer or private to his sergeant or corporal be punished according to the Articles of War.
5. That all sentinels quitting their post or found sleeping on it be punished with death.
6. That no soldier wrong his landlord or other inhabitant in quarters on march, on pain of being punished according to his crime.
7. That no soldier stir off his guard nor out of his rank on a march without his commander's leave, on pain of death.
8. That all officers that promote any quarrel or give opprobrious words or strike shall be cashiered.
9. That all officers be present in the head of their companies at all drawings out and coming into quarters, and that they retire not till they have seen their arms set up in their proper places.
10. That no soldier shall sell or buy arms or clothes delivered to him by his officer on pain of death. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 32.]
[April ?] Instructions from the Duke of Monmouth for Col. Scott, colonellieutenant of the Royal English regiment.
1. You are to repair with all speed to the regiment to take care of it, and see that it march into the field as befits the service.
2. You are to place the officers I have appointed in the place of those dead or removed, according to the certificates I have given them for such vacancies.
3. You may fill up whatever vacancies shall happen among the subalterns after your arrival, provided I approve of them, but no one is to be confirmed till he has received my approbation under my hand and seal. But in case any captain's place shall be void. I reserve to myself the power to nominate and appoint a successor.
4. The companies of Col. Churchill's regiment that shall be incorporated into my regiment are to have the youngest place, except Lieut.-Colonel Howard's which is to march next after your own, and they are to take place among themselves according to the seniority they had in their own regiment, and you are to dispose of the supernumeraries remaining above the said companies amongst my regiment as you think fit.
5. If any dispute arise between any of the subalterns concerning their right to command, as that a younger officer of an elder company should pretend to command an elder officer of a younger company, I hereby authorize you to terminate all such disputes by an exchange. [Ibid. p. 33.]
April.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 370. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
44 April 1 2 36 0 S.W.
45 " 2 2 33 0 S.W.
46 " 3 2 2 N.E. The whole fleet sailed to-day.
47 " 4 2 3 0 N.E.
48 " 6 1 2 0 N.E.
49 " 7 0 1 0 N.E.
50 " 8 0 0 0 N.E.
51 " 10 0 0 3 S.W.
52 " 11 0 3 1 W.
53 " 12 1 0 0 N.E.
54 " 13 1 0 0 N.E.
55 " 14 1 0 0 N.E.
56 " 15 1 0 0 E.
57 " 16 1 0 0 E.
58 " 18 1 0 0 N.E.
59 " 19 1 1 0 N.E.
60 " 20 1 0 0 N.E.
61 " 21 1 0 0 N.E.
62 " 22 1 4 0 S.W.
63 " 23 1 0 0 N.E.
64 " 24 1 0 0 E.
65 " 25 1 0 0 N.E.
66 " 27 1 0 0 E.
67 " 28 1 3 0 S.E.
68 " 29 1 2 0 N.E.