BHO

Charles II: May 1675

Pages 93-146

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Please subscribe to access the page scans

This volume has gold page scans.
Access these scans with a gold subscription.Key icon

May 1675

[May ?] Charles du Rousseau, Knight of the Holy Empire, to the King. Petition, stating that one can fabricate coaches with two wheels, drawn by one horse laden with four persons of an extraordinary lightness, which cannot overturn, though the horse falls down, and that some may be made with one wheel, which will pass where a horse can, and turn with so great a swiftness that a body being in shall shoot a pistol as well as if he was on horseback, and that an invention may be given to facilitate the moving of all sorts of wheels, and besides a great many things can be given which will be of no less service than ornament, and offering to come over to England to show his Majesty the experience of it, if he shall be granted a patent for his said inventions. At the side,
May 1.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back, His report in favour of granting a patent as prayed. 7 June. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 69.]
May 1.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Wednesday a pink of Bridlington, laden with rye from the East, ran ashore coming into the Tees. She was overset and all the corn was wet and damaged, but the master and all his company were saved in their boat, and they are in hopes of saving the vessel. The wind continues northerly. [Ibid. No. 70.]
May 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No news since my last. Yesterday and to-day have proved calmer than of late. We have many ships here. Wind N.N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 71.]
May 1.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of the mails and packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 72.]
May 1.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Last Wednesday a small vessel of our town left Cherbourg and arrived here next day. The French there talk as if they feared a war with us, grounded, I suppose, on the Parliament's late address for recalling our soldiers out of the French service. Yesterday came into our road a Yarmouth vessel, which left Charente some weeks since. Some of her company say that 20 men-of-war were fitting out there, supposed for the Straits. They met off Brest three French men-of-war cruising. [Ibid. No. 73.]
May 1.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived here the Elizabeth and Little Mary from St. Malo, by contrary winds above a week in their passage, most of it at Guernsey. The masters say that island is well, and that the occasion of the rising of the people at Nantes, Rennes, St. Malo, and many other places in Brittany was the great duty on and monopolizing of tobacco and other commodities, tobacco from 9 or 10 sols to 30 per lb. These duties are at present dispensed with for quieting the people. They continue to raise what forces they can in that country, and some new levies are still going for the campaign. These continued N.E. winds keep back several of our ships we expect from several other French ports. [Ibid. No. 74.]
May 1.
Bristol.
The Bristol Narrative, or a Just Account of the imprisonment and death of John Thompson, a conventicling preacher there, given on oath that day by Thomas Hobson, keeper of the gaol of Newgate there. 10 Feb., 1674[–5], Mr. Thompson on the Act for restraining of Nonconformists from coming into cities and corporations was committed to prison for 6 months. The day after his commitment the keeper offered him liberty to walk on the leads and take the air, which he willingly embraced, and he walked there afterwards as often as he pleased, not being denied the society of any that came to visit him. But within three days after his commitment he was sick in his stomach, and took a vomit, and the afternoon of the day he took it he complained that he was very sick and had a great pain in his head, which distemper continued and increased violently till his death, on 5 March.
The first four days of his commitment he had the privatest chamber in the house, being no part of the common prison, but of the apartments of the keeper and his family, and being the best room then void, and had his wife's company till the 15th, when Mr. Hardcastle and Mr. Weeks were committed for the same offence; when they and Mr. Thompson requested the keeper to spare them the largest, fairest and most pleasant chamber in the prison, which was accordingly done, and they continued there, till, Mr. Thompson's sickness increasing, the others desired to have another chamber. On Mr. Thompson's death an inquest was held by one of the coroners. During all his imprisonment he was accommodated with all sorts of the best provisions and wines, and was attended by three physicians, all of whom agreed he died of a violent malignant fever, and he was decently interred in Christian burial. Mr. Andrew Gifford was committed about ten days after Mr. Thompson for the same offence.
Whereas it is reported that these gentlemen were put into a dungeon and denied necessary provisions, and constrained to suck liquor through a tobacco pipe, and that this and such like barbarous usage was through the Bishop of Bristol's order, the keeper utterly denies that any such usage ever was, nor was there any order from his lordship or any other for that purpose, but on the contrary the imprisonment of Mr. Thompson was, and that of the other three is, managed with so much Christian tenderness that they were admitted to partake of all the kindnesses their friends heaped upon them, which consisted in daily entertaining them with all sorts of the best provisions and wines.
With affidavit of the truth of the narrative, and with a preface that the Bishop of Bristol had permitted it to be published to undeceive those who have abused by the notoriously false reports concerning Thompson's imprisonment and death. For, whereas it has been commonly affirmed that he was by the Bishop's procuring thrown into a filthy dungeon, where the stench of the place and of a jakes near it, with the want of meat and drink and other necessaries had partly poisoned, partly starved him to death, and that his friends were forbidden to minister to him what he needed, the contrary is most true, he having the fairest lodgings in prison, being never unaccompanied by visitors, and scarcely having intermission from eating and drinking, till he had by a surfeit, whereof he died, made himself incapable of those pleasures to which he had been accustomed. London. Printed by William Godbid. Licensed by Thomas Tomkyns, 1 June, Lambeth. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F.]
May [1 ?] Sir William Wentworth's case relating to the election at Thirsk, 18 Feb., 1672[–3]. He had 30 votes and Mr. Wharton but 15. The bailiff declared Sir William chosen, and adjourned the Court. Mr. Wharton's 15 electors then went to an alehouse and signed an indenture with five others incapable of voting. Mr. Wharton, without undue practices, could not have had above two votes. Mr. Wharton alleges that 5 of Sir William's electors were proved at the election to be cottages, and seven more were found not to have votes, but at the election none were challenged to be cottages, nor was exception taken to any but three, all of whom had their votes allowed at four former elections. Tuesday the 4th is the day of hearing. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 262.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 75.]
May 1. Commission to Augustine Sheldon to be cornet to the Duke of Monmouth. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 36.]
May 2. Sir Leoline Jenkins to Williamson. On behalf of the bearer, Mr. Morgan, a kinsman to the member of that name, and a great sufferer for the King, requesting a line to Dr. Busby that his child may be chosen into a King's scholar's place at Westminster School. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 76.]
May 2.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. We suppose the wind is turning, and will bring the ships down from Gravesend. I desire to know in what ships or bound to what places in the Straits (if none to Algiers or Tripoli) I shall send your packets for the consuls at those places. After a long and great drought the earth has been refreshed with comfortable showers. [Ibid. No. 77.]
May 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. Yesterday the Earl of Inchiquin sailed with the Adventure. The wind has been favourable ever since, so he may expect a good passage. [Ibid. No. 78.]
May 2.
Dartmouth.
William Hurt to Williamson. This week the easterly wind has brought over here several vessels from Morlaix and in one of them bound for Southampton is come M. de Carwar (Keroualle), father of the Duchess of Portsmouth and Countess of Pembroke, to visit his daughters, intending first for Wilton House, as I am informed, but whether he will go hence by land or stay for a fair wind I think he is not yet resolved. [Ibid. No. 79.]
May 2.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. I have no list of ships, it being Sabbath. [Ibid. No. 80.]
May.
May 2.
[Contains some deciphered text] T. B. to —. I gave you a little account of something concerning your business not long since, which I hope you received, though I have no answer. What occurs this term more about it of any consequence you shall be sure to have, but as yet I have little of any great concern except many high contests amongst several parties concerned, and it proceeds as yet no further than words, of which also you may know. As to news, here are strange discourses about many persons and things as about a test, and where it was co[n]trived and by whom and what is like to be the issues of it. Some talk much of new l a m p o o n s. If any of them come to my hand, as I am promised some, I may send them to you. Some murmur much, others doubt, but others hope well in the main, that all will be indifferent well, considering the present state of the world. Alderman Love a Parl[iament] man, tells a friend that 'tis probable they will in the end do what the Court party desires, but here is much doubting amongst our dissenting friends what will be done about Liberty when that comes in question. I hope to see you the first opportunity I can, and, if in anything you will further instruct me wherein I may do you any service this term, you shall find me your diligent and faithful friend. Postscript.—If I may direct anything as you advised to Mr John Holford of Tanten Deane, and it may come very well to your hand, let me know, or, if you would speak with me, let me know when and where, or if you have any very real friend by whom I may send to you. Some friends tell me that person, with whom some friends should have met about some concerns as you know, has been in troble of late by Mr Secritary Coventry about several things. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 81.]
[May ?] The Mayor and Burgesses of Pontefract to the King. Petition for a confirmation of their liberties and privileges with grants of the additional privileges mentioned in the paper annexed. At the foot,
May 3.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back, His report in favour of granting the prayer of the petition. 8 May. [Ibid. No. 82.] Annexed,
The Privileges desired to be inserted in the Charter.
1. Two new fairs.
2. Power to take statutes.
3. To attach goods as well as body in the town by the Sergeants at Mace, or to take bail bonds to answer the debt or plaint as is used by the sheriff of Yorkshire.
4. John Dickson, town clerk or clerk of the Peace, to continue for life. [Ibid. No. 82i.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 22.]
May 3. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 674, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 328. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 83.]
May 3. Certificate by Sir William Peake that Peter Lembrack took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [Ibid. No. 84.]
May 3.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Twenty light ships are in the bay expecting a fair wind for the northward. It is now much N., and has been so for several days. The master of a vessel from Norway informs us that the King of Denmark presses all the seamen they can light on for his men-of-war, and that the Hollanders send over a great many seamen to man their ships. [Ibid. No. 85.]
May 3.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind E. [Ibid. No. 86.]
May 3.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Monday went out 27 or 28 sail homeward-bound, the wind being N.W. There have since come in, the wind coming easterly, about 50, many from France, and two Virginia ships laden with tobacco. Several this morning tried to get out, the wind being N., but it presently clapped to the east, so they can do no good out. Last Wednesday came in the caper again to look after her two small French prizes. Wind E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 87.]
May 3.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 28th was cast away near the Gull Rock, about 3 leagues eastward of this, a small vessel of Emden from Bordeaux with wine and brandy. All the men were saved and some of the goods, but the ship was lost. The Bonadventure of Topsham from Virginia came in here. They report that all provision is very scarce there, and that a multitude of squirrels comes down from the woods and eats up and destroys their corn and potatoes and their trees and other provisions, and that they have had a bad crop there this year. They have had also a very bad winter, which has destroyed most of their cattle. The Prince of Poole from Cadiz with oils for London came in here with four or five more from Port-o-port with oils and sugars for London. They report that about 18 or 20 men-of-war are coming out of Sallee, which will much infest these coasts. [Ibid. No. 88.]
May 3.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 89.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Sir Edward Mansell praying that his grant of the offices of Chamberlain and Chancellor of South Wales and Steward of the Courts there may be renewed to him for the lives of his sons, Edward and Thomas, instead of the Earl of Manchester and Arthur, whose names were used in the former one for trust only, recommendation to the Lord Treasurer to give order for passing such a grant as is desired. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 22.]
May 4. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 676, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 329. [Two copies of the proceedings in the Lords'. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 90, 91.]
May 4.
June 9.
Account of the proceedings in both Houses concerning the differences between them with regard to the cases of Shirley r. Fagg, Stoughton v. Onslow and Crispe v. Dalmahoy, all of which fully appear from the Journals of the two Houses. Prefixed is an account of the proceedings in the House of Commons on 14 April. [20 pages. Ibid. No. 92.]
May 4. Robert Wharton's case ordered to be heard 4 May at the Committee of Elections. The right of election is in the persons seised in fee of ancient burgage houses in Thirsk, who elect by prescription, not charter, two burgesses to parliament. Mr. Wharton was chosen burgess by 20 of the persons so seised, against the titles of 3 of whom to their houses Sir William Wentworth took exceptions, which were cleared. Sir William was chosen by 11 that had the right of election and by 12 more who pretended the right but had none. The borough bailiff, being a Popish Recusant, was very partial, and allowed all Sir William's voices and returned him as chosen by 23. Five of Sir William's voices are only owners of cottages which they bought six days before the election, the former owners of which never voted, the other 7 have not titles to vote, as was proved at the election, and will be proved again at the hearing of the cause. Endorsed, "Mr. Wharton's case, May 4, 1675." [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 93.]
May 4.
Your College, Oxford (Queen's).
John Skelton to Williamson. That you should so far suspend your great thoughts as to take notice of Queen's College, shows you imitate the great Creator's wisdom and goodwill, who, after He had built, took as great care to have His world well managed and ordered, and left not the meanest of His creatures without protection. 'Tis our great happiness we should so unanimously pitch on the same person for our governor in whose fortunes you write you have an interest. If we had the art of divining your inclinations, we should assuredly always thus anticipate your commands. I am confident I speak the sentiments of every man here, I do my own most unfeignedly without the least design, for I am too well acquainted with your goodness to be afraid of your greatness or to have any fatal apprehensions of your power. [Ibid. No. 94.]
May 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. This morning arrived one of our packet-boats which left the Brill last Sunday, but I could not hear of any news they brought. Yesterday we had a great number of ships here, most of them light, and the weather being fair and the wind coming somewhat west of north, where it continues to-day, caused most of them to sail towards evening, but now about noon, it blowing very fresh, many are hastening in again. [Ibid. No. 95.]
May 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. Yesterday the wind came to the north-west, and there sailed at least 100 ships, small and great, which had been here and at the Isle of Wight, windbound. The Earl of Inchiquin had a fair wind to reach Cork, where he was to take in his lady. [Ibid. No. 96.]
[May] 4.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. In Capt. Lanyon's absence informing him that no ships are arrived, and that there is nothing worth his notice there. Misdated "4 April," but endorsed "4 May." [Ibid. No. 97.]
[1675 ? Before May 5?] Case of John Sayer, John Billingsley, Thomas Blagrave, Richard Kinsey and Thomas Dyos. By an Act of 20 Car. II. 310,000l. was given to the King, which was to be raised on wines, &c., vended and retailed between 24 June, 1668, and 24 June, 1670, and the Act was not to continue in force any longer; the 10,000l. was appointed for the charges of levying the money. For security of lenders, a register was appointed, and all orders signed for repayment were to be entered, and paid in course to the lenders, and the money was not to be converted to any other use. The persons above named, together with Deremer, since deceased, Wadlow, Hargrave and Henderson agreed with the King to lend the whole 300,000l., 18 Aug., 1668, and the King assigned to them the benefit of the said Act, and appointed the Commissioners for putting the Act in execution to pay the money to be levied to them, to their own use. The first 5 named persons and Deremer, 20 Nov., 1669, sold their orders for repayment to Wadlow, and divested themselves of all interest and benefit in the said Act. On 24 June, 1670, another Act was granted for a new imposition on wines and for raising a further sum for payment of such orders as were registered and not satisfied by the money raised on the first Act; the King, without the privity of the 6 persons above named, appointed Commissioners to put the Act in execution, and the Treasury Commissioners by their warrant appointed payment of the money to be levied by the latter Act to Wadlow, Hargrave and Henderson, which order was afterwards revoked, 24 Dec., 1670, and the money ordered to be paid into the Exchequer; but in the meantime 52,700l. had been paid to the 3 last named persons. The Attorney-General filed a bill against all the parties for an account of the moneys raised upon the two Acts. Sayer, Billingsley, Blagrave, Kinsey, Dyos and Deremer answered and confessed themselves accountable jointly with Wadlow, Hargrave and Henderson for the money raised by the first Act, because the King appointed the moneys to be levied to be paid to them jointly, but not for the 52,700l. levied on the second and paid to Wadlow, Hargrave, and Henderson without their privity, nor had they had any interest therein; yet they are decreed to account jointly with them for the whole money. Upon a petition to the King and Council it was referred to the Lord Chancellor and the Lord Treasurer and the Chancellor of the Exchequer, to consider what was fit to be done for the petitioners' relief, and that the said decree should be put in execution against Wadlow, but that no further proceedings should be taken against the others until the Lords had made their report and further order should be given. They have used their utmost endeavours to get the same heard by the Referees but without effect, and, as the money supposed to be due upon the said decree has been granted away by a privy seal, Sayer, Billingsley, Blagrave, Kinsey, and Dyos (Deremer being dead) are violently prosecuted, attachments have been awarded against them, and they and their families are threatened with inevitable ruin. They therefore pray that their case may be heard by his Majesty in Council, and that all proceedings may be stayed in the meantime. (See Privy Council Register, Vol. XI., p. 411, under 5 May, 1675.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 98.]
May 5. Journal of proceedings in the House of Lords that day. The House, being resolved into a Committee to consider heads for a bill for the better securing the Protestant religion, agreed that the disarming of Popish Recusants be one head. Then entering into debate of the next head proposed, viz., that no Romish priest attend the Queen but such as are foreigners, and such now attending her as are otherwise may be removed, and that, after the death or removal of such other servants as at present attend her, none be admitted in their rooms but such as are Protestants or foreigners, after some time spent in debate thereof, by reason of a message from the House of Commons concerning the privilege of Sir John Fagg, who is defendant to an appeal depending here, which took up the rest of the day, ordered that the House be in a Committee again upon heads on Saturday morning. [Ibid. No. 99.]
May 5. Journal of proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 330. [Ibid. No. 100.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Warrant from the Duke of Monmouth to Col. Scott and in his absence to the lieut.-colonel or major with five captains to hold courts-martial for the trial of offenders whether officers or private soldiers of the Duke's foot regiment in the French service, with full power to punish all crimes and misdemeanours according to the discipline of war, and, the case requiring, to give sentence of death against any officer or soldier and to see the same immediately executed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 35.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of William and John Cooke and John Hoskins and the annexed paper praying for a pardon for forgery, subornation and perjury. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 22.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Presentation of John Hinton, M.A., to the rectory of Newbury, Berkshire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 6.]
May 5.
Whitehall.
Grant to Philip, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, to be Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 58.]
[Before May 6.] A particular deduction of the case of William Eyre, concerning his right to the half barony of Shelelah (Shillelagh) and castle of Carnow, co. Wicklow, now in the possession of William, Earl of Strafford, presented to the King and both Houses of Parliament.
Calcot Chambre sold a very considerable estate in Oxfordshire, and with the purchase money bought the half barony of Shelelah and castle of Carnow, containing about 60,000 acres, and 18 Aug., 1629, made a lease thereof to James and Nathaniel Fiennes and John Crew for 200 years from his death, in trust for payment of his debts and legacies, and subject thereto to such uses as he should by deed or will appoint, and in default thereof to the use of his own right heirs.
The said Chambre died, having by his will given all his lands to his son, Calcot Chambre, and likewise all his goods and chattels, and appointed him sole executor. After his decease the said trustees by virtue of the said lease possessed themselves of the premises, and agreed to lease them to Sandford, a son-in-law of Calcot Chambre, senior, one of the principal creditors and legatees, for 3 years, for payment of the debts and legacies, he allowing young Chambre 300l. a year for his maintenance.
But the late Earl of Strafford, then Lord Deputy, having even in the life time of Calcot Chambre, the elder, attempted to render the said estate forfeited as plantation lands, caused another inquisition to be taken, endeavouring to represent it as forfeited by making the said 200 years' lease, but the title and estate being clear, and it not being in the King's disposal to grant any custodiun and no forfeiture being made, great endeavours were made to the three clerks of Sir Philip Percival, then Registrar of the Court of Wards, if they would alter the demicle of the last mentioned inquisition, who informed their master, Sir Philip, who strictly commanded all his said clerks not to attempt such things or he would turn them out of their places.
A plot was laid to get the estate by another way into the hands of the Earl's creatures and agents without paying any valuable consideration. Chambre, the younger, coming to Dublin with his wife to live in England with his father-in-law till the said three years were expired, was persuaded by the Earl's agents to use means to get Sandford out of the estate, and to arrest him for 7,000l. he was to account for in his father's time when he managed the estate, but the next morning Chambre himself was made prisoner for the mourning for his father's funeral, and Sandford, on posting to Dublin to pay the debt, was told, if he went to him, he would be arrested for 7,000l., on which he went and took counsel with the Earl, who advised him instead of releasing his brother to clap another arrest on him for 1,000l. pretendedly due to Sandford, and Chambre and Sandford being thus set at variance, the Earl caused Sir P. Percival and others to propose they might have a lease of the estate for 22 years for the use of the Countess of Carlisle, paying 4,000l. fine and 500l. per annum and the third penny profit of the wood, and the said agents persuaded Chambre to petition the Earl that the lease to Sandford might not go but the lease proffered by Sir Philip might be perfected, that he might receive the 4,000l. to pay the debts and legacies and get out of prison.
This petition the Earl transmitted to the late King and Council, seeming to commiserate Chambre's condition and desiring their order to compel the trustees to consent, they living in England. The trustees were summoned before the Council, who alleged they were making a much more advantageous lease to Sandford, on which the King and Council ordered, 17 Jan., 1637 [–8], that the business should be wholly remitted to the Earl of Strafford to perfect the lease to the Countess of Carlisle (which was in truth for himself) or to make any better bargain for the petitioner.
Chambre then petitioned the Earl and the Council that the lease propounded by Percival might not be made good, for he could have a much better bargain, his brother-in-law, Lord Brabazon, offering a much larger rent and fine, but the Earl refused this offer, contrary to the King's orders, and caused the lease to Percival to be perfected by a special order on the terms first offered by him, nor were the fine, rent, or third penny of the profit of the woods ever paid, or, if any of the 4,000l. was paid, it was after Chambre's death and to whom the Earl and his agents pleased.
Sandford being thus turned out and the Earl's agents put in possession, Chambre was still detained a prisoner, and petitioned the Earl that the 4,000l. fine might be paid, that he might pay his debts and get out of prison. On this the Earl caused an agent to tell him that the 4,000l. fine would not pay his debts and to persuade him to sell the reversion for 13,200l. (Account of how by Chambre being kept a prisoner and ill treated he and his wife were induced to sell the reversion.) A fine was next day clapt up and a deed of 2 Nov., 1638, sealed by Chambre for the reversion only to Joshua Carpenter, Henry Wentworth and others, intended, though not expressed, for the use of the Earl in fee simple, for 13,200l., mentioned therein as the consideration, though the estate was then worth above 120,000l., but of even that money only 500l. was ever paid which was to one Chambre of Minmore for relinquishing all his pretension to the premises. This deed and fine, which were obtained not only by duress but directly contrary to the King's order, being executed, Chambre was released but died a few days afterwards, the end of Nov., 1638, leaving two children, a son that died soon after, and a daughter.
The said Chambre, 17 Aug., 1638, made his will, bequeathing all his lands to his wife for 12 years, and in remainder one moiety to her for her life, the other moiety to his heirs male, and for want of an heir male to his uncle, Chambre of Minmore, in tail male, and bequeathing 2,000l. to his daughter and making his wife sole executrix and giving her all his goods and chattels, whereby she became entitled to the lease of 200 years and the 13,200l. agreed to be given for the reversion. Whatever was given to Chambre of Minmore by will or otherwise was sold by him a year after Chambre's death to his relict, so that the Minmore family have no pretence of any right to it.
Chambre, the younger, thus dying without signing any deed to lead the uses of the said fine, and his will being concealed, the Earl's agents set up a nuncupative will supposed to be made by him, and made Mary, his relict, prove the same, and also a lease and release of 3 Nov., 1638, supposed to be made by the said Chambre only, of all the premises and a deed of uses or covenants of the same date between Carpenter and others, the Earl's trustees, of the one part, and the said Chambre, Squire Lester, his father-in-law, Job Ward that afterwards married his relict, and the said Chambre of Minmore, pretended trustees for him, of the other part, whereby the said Carpenter, &c., covenanted to lay out 13,200l. in land to be conveyed to the said trustees for Chambre for several uses therein mentioned, but both these deeds were false and hatched after Chambre's death.
The nuncupative will and these deeds being thus admitted and Ward having married Mary Chambre, and they desiring the Earl that the 13,200l. might be laid out in land for Calcot, the infant son of Calcot Chambre, the younger, the Earl making Ward his favourite, caused the infant to petition that the trustees, Fiennes and Crew, might give up their trust in the said lease of 200 years, who, induced by the supposititious deeds and a decree in Chancery founded thereon, were prevailed on to sell the lease to persons for the use of Carpenter, &c., but on condition that the said 13,200l. should be paid or laid out in purchasing land of inheritance according to the said articles, which was never performed. The late Earl indeed pretended to purchase a place called Renalaghs or Knockbrea, which was no real inheritance, being a lease for years.
In 1640 Chambre's real will was discovered and proved and the nuncupative will set aside, on which the Earl being at a stand, he, having about Trinity term, 1637, caused a case called the case of tenures on defective titles to be made, comprised the premises therein and about 1640 obtained an Act of the Irish Parliament, as is pretended, whereby the said half barony were vested in his Majesty or any he should grant them to as plantation lands and defective titles, whereon he obtained letters patent under the Great Seal of Ireland granting the premises to persons in trust for his son, now Earl of Strafford, who has since renewed the said letters patent, and thereby and by the said Act he holds possession, whereas the premises were not plantation lands, nor was the old Mr. Chambre's title in any way defective nor were they ever forfeited or sequestred to the Crown.
In 1647 the suppliant Eyre married the said Mary, formerly relict of the said Chambre, the younger, and therefore ought to have enjoyed the premises for the remainder of the said 200 years, and accordingly most of the said writings came into his hands and also the said lease, but he was deprived of them by deceit and subtilty and many of them came into the hands of the now Earl and his agents.
Eyre being a close prisoner in Warwick Castle in 1649, Judge Advocate Whaley, formerly Mrs. Eyre's servant in Ireland, persuaded her to make Col. James Temple her daughter's guardian, lest Cromwell, on account of her husband, should sequester the estate, and she accordingly trusted Temple with most of the said writings concerning the estate, which he refused to deliver when requested to do so by Eyre and his wife in 1650, and inveigled the daughter to marry his youngest son, Alexander.
Eyre in the latter part of 1650 entered on his estate in right of his wife, and the then Council put him in possession thereof and he held it for several years, but, he being made a prisoner again by Cromwell for many years, the Earl of Strafford and Col. Temple and his son Alexander and his wife commenced many suits to oust him from the premises of which he was in possession and used the said writings which Temple had unduly deprived him of, and redelivered the lease of 200 years to the now Lord Crew, one of the trustees, who has acknowledged that he has it and is ready to deliver it to whom a Court shall command.
The first suit was on behalf of the Countess of Carlisle for the said lease of 22 years, though she had not paid a penny rent nor any profit of the woods, so that it was long since void.
In 1657 all the suits came to a hearing and Chancellor Steele judged that the reversion might belong to the Earl of Strafford because of the fine, though surreptitiously obtained, but the Court was of opinion that the lease of 200 years belonged to Eyre in right of his wife and therefore dismissed the said Earl and Countess with all their suits and seemed resolved to continue Eyre in possession in right of his wife.
The Earl's agent then produced the said Act for strengthening defective titles, among which the estate of Shelalah was foisted in untruly as aforesaid, on which the Chancellor deferred his judgment till next term, expecting the cross bill of Eyre and his wife would then come to a hearing.
Before the next term the Earl and his agents put in a plea to the said cross bill waiving all pretence of titles, and challenged the said estate merely by the said Act, and letters patents thereon granted 28 Sept., 1641, to George Carr and others for the use of the now Earl of Strafford. Eyre being a prisoner, and his counsel neglecting to argue the said plea or to bring that cause to a hearing, the Chancellor pronounced his decree in the other cause wherein the Earl's agents were plaintiffs, and gave away Eyre's pessession. not on any other title the Earl had, but merely by that pretended Act, declaring it was chiefly to be considered whether it be a defective title or not, and therefore gave the Earl possession only till he was outed by due course of law or further order of the Court, and blamed Eyre's counsel for not bringing his cross bill together to a hearing, and told them there was speaking of a will and inquisition proving the estate was no defective title, and that he believed there were such things but they were not judicially before him, and he therefore advised Eyre to appeal to a Parliament, which would undoubtedly do him right, which he, being of an inferior Court, had not power to do.
(Account of how Eyre was kept a prisoner till the fall of Richard Cromwell and again after the restoration was kept in close prison for above 10 years on unfounded charges of treason.)
When released he made his humble address for the recovery of his just rights in the said estate, wrongfully, as he conceives and is advised, withheld from him, these continued troubles (he fears purposely contrived) being the only cause he did not do so sooner.
While in prison for pretended contempt of court under that inevitable necessity. Chancellor Eustace granted an injunction and turned his wife and family out of the estate of Renelaghs too, and they have ever since been kept out of it, which was pretended to be purchased with the money to be given for the reversion of Shelelah. Mrs. Eyre fainted for want in the streets of Dublin, and died two hours after, crying that her daughter Temple had broken her heart, for she and her husband enjoy all the Earl or his ancestors gave for Shelalah (except the 500l. to Chambre of Minmore), though the whole of the 13,200l. belonged to Eyre in right of his wife as a chattel, and the judges declared that whatever purchase money they paid to any but Eyre they paid in their own wrong, which caused the now Earl to take a bond from Temple to keep him harmless from Eyre, for Mrs. Chambre's daughter had a distinct portion of 2,000l. by her father's will, though now they would make her heir of all they have left the family.
(Arguments to prove from the premises that both the inheritance and the lease of the said estate were vested in Eyre's wife.)
By an affidavit made by a person of credit, who was present on the scaffold at the death of the late Earl of Strafford, it appears that the detention of the said estate is contrary to his lordship's resolutions, the deponent making oath that he heard the Earl a short time before his death command Sir George Wentworth to charge his son upon his blessing not to claim any right to the estate of Chambre (by name) in Wicklow, Bourke's estate in Connaught or any other estates in Ireland but what he had legally and justly purchased for his money on valuable considerations, and that he should disclaim any right or title to the same.
In consideration of all which the ruinated suppliant humbly makes his address to his Majesty and the most High Court of Parliament to relieve him by the restitution of his just rights so long wrongfully detained from him. [Printed paper. 31 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335. No. 158.]
[Before May 6.] "The case of William Eyre concerning his estate in Ireland, truly stated and humbly presented to the King's most excellent Majesty and both Houses of Parliament." (Paper similar to the last and in great part agreeing verbatim with it.) Endorsed, "1675, Mr. Eyre's case." [Printed. 16 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335. No. 159.]
[Before May 6.] "A Brief of the Case of William Eyre," being a summary of the contents of the last two papers. (For these three documents see Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 681, p. 689 and p. 708, under 6, 11 and 28 May, the first entry being that William Eyre appeared at the bar and owned "The Case of William Eyres" complained of by the Earl of Strafford and said that he would justify the contents thereof, the second being a reference to the Committee of Privileges of the examination of the matter of calumny in the said case complained of as a scandalous paper by the Earl of Strafford, and the third being a reference to the same Committee of the reflections in the said case on trustees, whereof Lord Crew was one; and also the Ninth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Part II., p. 63.) [Printed. Ibid. No. 160.]
May 6. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 680, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 331. [Two copies of the Commons' proceedings. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 101, 102.]
May 6. Patent appointing William Jennison town-clerk of Newcastle-onTyne, given under the common seal of the town. [Latin. Copy. Ibid. No. 103.]
May 6. Elizabeth Vyner to Williamson. My son presumed to present you with the enclosed letter written in French, how fit for your perusal I know not, but I hope you will excuse the defects of his youth, and retain your kind resolution of giving him an employment under you. [Ibid. No. 104.] Enclosed,
Thomas Vyner to Williamson. Asking pardon for not haring written to him, but as yet he does not know French enough to express his civilities. Has begged his mother to assure him always that he desires to be able to serve him and to preserre his farour. Saumur, April 20. [French. Ibid. No. 104i.]
May 6.
Harwich
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The Pearl with the Swedish ships under her convoy sailed this morning and so are a great number of light ships bound N., the wind being W., which has also cleared our harbour of all the ships that have taken shelter here for above six weeks, by reason the wind has continued so long in the East. [Ibid. No. 105.]
May 6.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This afternoon arrived the Phænix from Guinea and Barbados, in which voyage the captain and many of her company died. His Majesty about eight days ago made the lieutenant captain, and his commission lying ready for him here was delivered him two hours before he anchored. Yesterday afternoon the wind came westerly. The Phænix reports that 100 merchant ships are coming up the Channel for the Downs. The packets for Algiers and Tripoli are yet in my hands. I desire orders in what Straits ships to put them, or if I shall send then up. Wind W., not a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 106.]
May 6.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. About 4 yesterday morning a packet-boat went to sea with the mail that came from London Tuesday night, and some few passengers for Calais. We hear this morning that the Nieuport packet is arrived in the Downs with the mail and passengers, notwithstanding the wind and weather were very good for them to come into the harbour, but the design of those packet-boat masters is to spite the clerk of the passage all they can, and to smuggle prohibited goods in the Downs or at St. Margaret Stairs three miles beyond Dover Castle. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 107.]
May 6.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 108.]
May 6.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. The 3rd and 4th put out hence a fleet of merchantmen of about 20 sail that had been windbound. Wind N.W. The 5th came in here the Prosperous of Falmouth from Vannes for Stockton with rye. They speak much of the late disorders there about the taxes, and say that there is another tax coming, that all merchants, peasants, and others, that cannot make out that they are gentlemen, shall pay a rate called the Grand Fifth, besides the great rates on all the poor people. They generally talk very high, and some of the better sort, that they should have such taxes brought upon them in Britanny, which has been free in so many King's reigns. Several have been killed at Rennes, their head Parliament city, about these taxes. [Ibid. No. 109.]
May 6.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 110.]
May 6. Pass to Baron Hartsfeldt for transporting two geldings to Hamburg. [Precedents 1, f. 65.]
May 7. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day. Sir J. Fagg being at the door and called in desired longer time to answer the petition, which was granted him till Wednesday next. Richard Vincon, servant to the Duchess of Cleveland, being arrested and complaint made thereof, it is referred to the Committee of Privileges to examine what has been done in the case of privilege of Parliament allowed to noble women and widows of peers and to report the same to the House. The House then resolved into a Grand Committee on the bill for the Test. On debate it was resolved that there shall be both a declaration and an oath distinct in this bill, but the declaration only subscribed to, and the oath only sworn to. The beginning of the declaration, viz., I, A.B., do declare that it is not lawful upon any pretence whatsoever to take up arms against the King, was presently agreed to, and the second sentence. viz., and that I abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person, after a long debate was agreed to by the Question. The House being resumed and report made that some progress had been made, they appointed to be on this bill in a Committee again next Monday and so adjourned till to-morrow. (See the Ninth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Part II., p. 51.) [Three copies with some slight differences. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 111-113.]
May 7. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear by Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 331. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 114, 115.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
The King's answer to the address concerning the Duke of Lauderdale. (Printed in Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 332.) [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 116, 117.]
Draft thereof in Williamson's hand with an alternative clause to follow the words "General Pardon," not inserted in the message as sent, viz., "And, if any man may be questioned for offences committed before the last Act of General Pardon, by the same reason offences committed before the former Act of Oblivion may also be brought into question, which his Majesty would be most unwilling to give his subjects any just occasion to apprehend." [Ibid. No. 118.]
Another copy of the above answer. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 59.]
May 7.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. We have a very backward spring and a great drought occasioned by the pinching N.E. winds, which also keep all trade from us. Yesterday, after ten days' sickness mostly of a lethargy, died here Mr. John Clark, burgess for Cockermouth. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 119.]
May 7.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 120.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 120i.]
May 7. Commission to Cornet Langston to be cornet to Capt. Hill. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 29.]
May 7. Caveat in favour of Sir John Nicholas that no grant pass for a market to be kept at Cataricke, Yorkshire, without notice to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 9.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Reference of the petition of Capt. Thomas Corbin, SurveyorGeneral of the King's Woods beyond Trent, representing that his salary of 50l. per annum has been stopped since 1672, to the Lord Treasurer, that he may give such orders for settling and paying the said salary and the arrears thereof as he shall think fit, or otherwise report what may be done for the petitioner's gratification. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 23.]
May 7.
Whitehall.
Pass for embarking and transporting to France or elsewhere beyond the seas 12 horses for the use of the Chevalier de Vendosme. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 59.]
May 7. Warrant to the Earl of Winchilsea to be Lord Lieutenant of Somerset during the minority of the Duke of Somerset. [Precedents 1, f. 66.]
[May 7.] Request of Lady Wentworth on behalf of her daughter Henrietta, grandchild of the late Earl of Cleveland, daughter and heir of Thomas, Lord Wentworth, and of Lady Lovelace, the only daughter of the said Earl, and her son, Lord Lovelace, that the House of Commons will not pass the bill presented by Lady Poole for selling the said Earl's estate, for payment of a pretended debt, which she never claimed by law. [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 121.]
[May 7.] Statement of the case of the said Henrietta Maria. Lady Wentworth, showing that the late Earl of Cleveland and Lord Wentworth, his son, made many efforts to clear off their debts, and that an Act was passed by which the Barons of the Exchequer were authorized for seven years in a summary way to state accounts between the said Earl and his creditors, which being done the trustees named in the Act were to sell land to pay the debts mentioned therein, in which the pretended debt of 6,000l. (to Lady Poole and Dorothy and Lucy Withypoole) is not named: that another Act was passed giving further powers to which a proviso touching the said pretended debt was added without the Earl's knowledge, but there was so much difficulty in proceeding thereon that nothing was done by virtue of the Acts, and that since the Earl's death Lady Wentworth on her daughter's behalf has done much, by purchasing in mortgages, to redeem the property. During all this time neither Lady Poole nor Dorothy nor Lucy Withypoole ever applied for or demanded the said pretended debt till about a month ago by Mr. Powell. Lady Wentworth and her daughter will waive her privilege and submit to be proceeded against by law. She hopes, therefore, that no unusual remedy will be provided for Lady Poole or any other creditor of the Earl. [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 122.]
[May 7.] Answer by Lady Wentworth, in behalf of herself and her infant daughter, and of the Dowager Lady Lovelace and Lord Lovelace, her son, to the paper delivered at the door of the House of Commons by Lady Poole, accusing the House of Peers or the family of the Earl of Cleveland of obliterating her name out of the Act presented for payment of the Earl of Cleveland's debts when it came to the royal assent, &c., and controverting her other statements. [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 123.]
[May 7.] Reply to the above answer, declaring the first Act passed for the Earl of Cleveland was not for the advantage of his general creditors, but only of those who petitioned; that Lady Poole's name was obliterated therefrom; that the Earl owned it kindness in her to accept 6,000l. when above 30,000l. was due; that application has often been made for the money; with a request for a further enlargement of the time granted by the two former Acts for settling the estate. (For all these papers see Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 331, 332.) [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 124.]
May 8. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which partly appear by Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 681. It adds:— The House went into a Grand Committee to consider of the heads for securing the Protestant religion, and agreed on the following head, viz., that no Romish priest attend her Majesty but such as are foreigners except Mr. Huddleston, and that after her present Majesty's death no servants may be admitted to attend any future Queen but such as are Protestants or foreigners, which after being reported to the House, they appointed to be in a Committee again next Tuesday. [Four copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 125-128.]
May 8. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear by Commons Journals, Vol. IX., p. 333. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 129. 130.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
The King's answer to the address for recalling his subjects from the French service. (Printed in Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 333.) [Ibid. No. 131: and Precedents, 1, f. 69.]
May 8.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. Last Thursday the wind presenting westerly, which for a long time had been easterly and northerly, set a great fleet from hence to sea. some for Eastland, two great flyboats for Greenland, and some for Holland. The Endeavour of Hull sailed last week for Holland, but was forced back into the Humber by contrary winds, and coming at night near the Humber's mouth had run on a new sand lately grown there, and undoubtedly miscarried, had the master not had the benefit of two new lighthouses lately erected on the Spurn, by which means he came in safe. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 132.]
May 8.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day the Soldate, commonly called the Queen's frigate, arrived in the Downs, but stayed not, the wind being very fair between S. and S.E. [Ibid. No. 133.]
May 8. Secretary Coventry to Mr. Percival, Deputy Governor of Deal Castle. Signifying the King's pleasure that he make his appearance before the King and Council on 12 May, and adding that, as he will see him so soon, he will not reply to his letter of the 5th instant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 14, p. 137.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
The King to [the Warden, &c., of Manchester Collegiate Church]. He had required them by his letter of 2 Nov., 1670, to admit George Ogden, M.A., to the next vacant fellowship; but he finds another has been admitted by virtue of a letter obtained from him some time after. He therefore requires them to elect and admit Ogden on the next vacancy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, p. 66.]
May 8. Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of William Denny, rector of East Harling, Norfolk, who being sued for non-residence and condemned in 80l. fine, prays for the King's moiety. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 22.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Warrants to the Lord Keeper to affix the Great Seal to the ratifications of even date of an article agreed between the King and the States General for the prevention of differences between the English and Dutch East India Companies, and for composing amicably any that may arise, and of a declaration that the ninth article of the treaty concluded with the States General 9/19 Feb., 1673-4, was fulfilled without any further proceedings thereon. Minutes. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 62.]
May 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Horatio Moore of the place of Master of the Tennis Courts at Whitehall, Hampton Court and elsewhere for his life, in reversion after Thomas Cooke, the present Master, with the fees of 8d. per diem granted to John Webb by King James, and 120l. per annum granted by the late King when Prince of Wales, and with all other advantages thereto belonging. [Precedents 1, f. 68.]
May 9.
Garnon Hall.
Hugh Morrell to Williamson. My humble desire is only that my petition may be read, and not so as to have your Honour appear more for me than as a member of the Council. My relation now also at the Board presents my addresses of this nature to his Grace of Canterbury, the Lord Treasurer, Lord Holles, and Sir Edward Salter, in whose hand are my petition and accounts of state, whereby to have some conclusion. To be in a suffering condition, I and mine, at the age of 82 should move the hearts of those in place and power. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 134.]
May 9.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning arrivals and departures of the mails and packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 135.]
May 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 136.]
May 9.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Yesterday came in a Dutch East India ship of about 8 or 900 tons, outward bound, which is yet in harbour to be supplied with a mainmast which she lost in a late storm. There is a report that her captain said they saw a vessel somewhat off Scilly of about 150 or 170 tons lying in the sea with her keel upward. [Ibid. No. 137.]
May 9. Warrant for a privy seal for making an instalment to Peter, Bishop of Ely, on his own security alone, of his first-fruits, to be paid in four years by four equal shares, with a proviso, in case the Bishop should die or be removed from the bishopric within four years, for discharging him or his representatives from any parts not then due, inasmuch the first-fruits, amounting to 2,134l. 18s. 5d., reduced by deduction of the tenth to 1,921l. 8s. 7¾d., are higher than those of any other bishopric except Winchester. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 67.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to insert Thomas Wright, condemned at the Cambridgeshire Assizes for burglary, but reprieved, in the next general pardon, without the proviso for transportation, he being only 16 years of age. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28,f. 131.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Commission to Sir Jonathan Atkins, Governor of the Island of Barbados and [others] to try Colonel Philip Warner, accused of the murder of Thomas Warner, esq., Deputy Governor of the Island of Dominico, first having made him drunk with the whole of his company to the number of sixty or seventy persons. (Calendared in S.P. Col., America, &c., 1674-6, p. 228.) [Ibid. f. 132.]
May 9. Careat that nothing pass concerning a Fellow's place in Manchester College till notice be given to Secretary Coventry, the first vacant one being promised to George Ogden. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 9.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Duke of Ormonde to swear Henry Bulkeley into the place of Master of the Household in reversion after Sir Herbert Price. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 60.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. Signifying the King's pleasure that he prepare a proclamation strictly forbidding the King's subjects from going to serve in foreign parts as soldiers, and bring it to the Council next Wednesday. [Precedents 1, f. 66.]
May 9.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to John Harris, his heirs and assigns, of the office of Chafewax in Chancery with the fee of 2½d. per diem, and an annuity of 360l. for providing the necessary wax, for the lives of his sons John and Thomas, in reversion after Stephen Chase, the father, and Stephen Chase, his son, who are in possession of the said office for their lives and the life of the survivor. [2½ pages. Ibid. f. 70.]
May 10. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day. The House being in Committee, the second part of the declaration in the bill for the Test was read, viz., Or against those that are commissioned by him in pursuance of such commission, and after some time spent in debate it was agreed to be thus worded:— Or against those that are commissioned by him according to law in time of rebellion or war, acting in pursuance of such commissions. The Declaration being finished it was proposed that the oath might run thus:— I, A.B., swear that I will not endeavour to subvert the Protestant religion now established in the Church of England, nor to subvert the government either in Church or State. The further consideration thereof was adjourned till Wednesday morning.
The bill to prevent frauds and perjuries reported and ordered to be engrossed.
The Test as now agreed on:—I, A.B., do declare that it is not lawful on any pretence whatever to take arms against the King, and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person or against those that are commissioned by him according to law in time of rebellion or war, acting in pursuance of such commissions, and also take the oath following. (See the Ninth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Part II., pp. 51, 52.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 138.]
May 10. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 334, except that it is added that the Committee on the consideration of his Majesty's answer concerning the recall of his subjects from the French service came to no resolve. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 139, 140.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Request by Secretary Coventry that a careat may be entered in Secretary Williamson's office that no grant of the Cursitor Baron's place be passed or offered for the King's signature to the prejudice of Mr. Justice Crawley, to whom his Majesty has promised it, when void. [Ibid. No. 141.]
May 10.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last night anchored in this bay above 100 light ships for Newcastle and Sunderland, and this morning they loosed and are standing away to the North, the wind being W.S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 142.]
May 10. [Contains some deciphered text] T. B. to —. I have writ twice to you since I saw you, since this term began, wherein I gave you all the account of the particulars of your business that I was capable of, and have endeavoured faithfully and diligently to serve you. As to news here, there are many strange discourses. Some say there is a sermon about some things said to be preached before the H[ouse] of Co[mmons]. The text 1 Cor. vi, part of the 19th and 20th verses. 'Tis in manuscript, but as yet not come to my hands. Some talk much of many of them after the manner of the text. Much there is said about the Test and about L[ord] Latherdal and many other things. I was to see you several times, but could not have opportunity, but as to your business (in the main) you shall find me your real friend. I entreat you to send me word whether you had this and two others not long before. [Ibid. No. 143.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Additional instructions from the Duke of Monmouth to Col. Scott.
1. You shall enjoin the officers in England to repair to their respective commands, and, if any officer neglect to join the regiment within a month after this date, he shall be cashiered, unless he be excusable by sickness or absent upon pass, and I hereby give you power to place others in the room of those that fail of their duty.
2. I hereby give you power to fill up whatever lieutenants' or ensigns' places shall fall vacant after your arrival at the regiment, with the persons you think most deserving, anything in my former instructions to the contrary notwithstanding, but in the vacancies of my captains you are to accept my nomination of the person to succeed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 34.]
May 10. Caveat that no pardon pass to Mr. Banister for killing Mr. Slaughter till Sir Thomas Slaughter has notice. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 9.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Confirmation of all the charters of the borough of Pontefract, with the additions mentioned in the paper annexed, being those calendared ante, p. 97. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 60.]
May.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the above grant and confirmation. Draft. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 144.] Annexed,
Privileges to be inserted in the new charter, being those calendared ante, p. 97. [Ibid. No. 144 i.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Treasurer of the Chamber to pay Nicholas Staggins, Master of the Music, 100l. a year, to commence from Midsummer 1673, without account, for such uses as the King shall direct. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 61.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Renewing the command to them in his letter of 16 July, 1674, not to suffer any men to be levied in or transported from Scotland into any foreign service without his special licence. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 236.]
May 10.
Dublin.
Susanna Durham to Williamson. The great kindness my husband, Major James Durham, and I had from my near kinsman, Sir E. Nicholas, and by your assistance at his desire in 1660 and 1661, viz., his Majesty's letter of 17 Sept., 1660, to Lord Robartes, then intended Lord Deputy, for a foot company to my husband, but, that Lord not then coming over, that letter proved ineffectual, all troops and companies being then soon disposed of, and afterwards that of 22 June, 1661, for him to be muster-master general of all the trained bands, &c., in Munster and Connaught, which, meeting with some opposition here, my husband waived, and was at the charges of a patent for the first company that should fall, but being wearied out accepted a lieutenant's place which he held till 1672, when his company with many others was disbanded; yet the Lord Lieutenant ordered him with two privates out of each company in Leinster and Uster to take charge of the island of Innis Boffin and the fort there; the like favour was not granted to any that were disbanded. And, because he was not a commissioned officer, and so not payable by the establishment, he was paid out of the concordatums till Nov. last, when his Excellency ordered an entire company to repair thither, and the commanded men under him to repair to their respective companies. I therefore as a relation humbly request you to prevent my coming over to trouble you by procuring his Majesty's letter on my husband's behalf for a foot company, and that you will effectually recommend it to Secretary Harbord, who is now there. If necessary, you may find several certificates &c., annexed to petitions, when we had those letters. If you see Lord Henry O'Brien, under whom my husband had command, I doubt not of his assistance. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 161.]
May 11. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 687, except as follows:— The House being in a Committee, the next head, concerning the eldest sons of peers of the Romish religion to be bred up in the Protestant religion during their fathers' lives, is read and postponed. Then the next head, viz., to take care of the education of such children in the Protestant religion, whose fathers are dead and were of the Romish religion, is read and agreed to. [Three copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 145-147.]
May 11. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 334. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 148, 149.]
May 11.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 150.]
May 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About 6 this morning came in one of our packet-boats, by which I received this account, the verity whereof I dare not engage for. The King of Sweden has declared war against the Hollanders, which makes no small discontent among them, yet others there encourage themselves with their confidence that the King of Denmark will declare against Sweden, and thereby divert his army from coming towards them. The Elector of Brandenburg left the Hague last Wednesday, and it was said the Prince of Orange intended to set out last Saturday towards Brabant. Dissension amongst the English officers in the Dutch service increases very much, articling and impeaching one another, so that the States have had more trouble with them, as it is said they themselves complain, than with all their land forces besides. One belonging to my Lord Ambassador Temple coming over also in this packet-boat reported also, as I am informed, that five or six English soldiers in the Dutch service were by a council of war condemned to be shot to death, but my Lord Ambassador procured the execution to be deferred, the Prince being absent. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 151.]
May 11.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. I have delivered your packets for the consuls of Algiers and Tripoli to Capt. John Temple, commander of the Dartmouth frigate, bound for Leghorn the first wind. Little wind at S.W. [Ibid. No. 152.]
May 11.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 153.]
May 11.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. But one ship arrived since my last, the Prosperous of Weymouth from Briack (St. Brieuc) in France, with rye for Plymouth. [Ibid. No. 154.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Thomas, son of Thomas Lewis, who has gone to settle in Jamaica, for killing William Aston, another young passenger, in a duel, when the ship touched at Barbados, for which he is condemned but reprieved till the King's pleasure be known. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 133.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Smith. Besides my ancient obligations to the House of Northumberland, who have in many occasions countenanced me and my relations, I am so particularly a servant to Mr. Gee, a person principally employed in the affairs of that family, that I owe him all the little interest I have in my friends to serve him. He has now the interest and recommendation of that family to the vacant burgess-ship of Cockermouth, and I must beg your assistance to him, as far as it properly comes in your way. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 38.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Thomas Fisher, reference to the Justices of Cumberland, where he was born and has since lived, to inquire into his merit and to find out a way to settle some small pension on him proportionable to his wants and to what the county can bear. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 24.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. After reciting that the Duke and Duchess of Buccleugh and Monmouth have sustained great prejudice and devastation in their estate in the south of Scotland by the depauperation of their tenants by reason of the great and extraordinary storm last year, whereby the greater part of the cattle belonging to them was lost, so that a very considerable part of that estate remains yet waste and unpossessed, and little or no rent can be expected till the respective rooms be anew stocked with cattle, in regard the same for the most part consist of grazing and store rooms, and that the Duke and Duchess had applied for licence to import from Ireland horses not exceeding 200, and nolt, consisting of oxen, cows and stirks not exceeding 4,800, to be divided amongst the respective tenants and rooms of the said lands, authorizing them to grant such a licence as is desired, provided that the Duke give account from time to time of the goods so imported, and find sufficient caution that none of the said cattle be sold or transported into England or be applied for any other use but stocking the said lands, the licence to be for one year and no longer. [2½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 237.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer in Scotland. Directing that the signature in favour of John Drummond, of Lundie, for changing the lands therein-mentioned from simple ward to taxt ward be passed, and that the taxt duties to be inserted in the blanks of the said signature be filled up according to the retoured duties of the said lands. [Ibid. p. 239.]
May 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. After reciting the clause in the Act of Explanation whereby 30,000l. was granted in lieu of the lapsed moneys, and, after payment of 3,000l. thereout to Richard Stratford, of London, the residue, 27,000l., was to be paid to such persons and to such uses as the said lapsed moneys or the lands to be set out in satisfaction of the same were or ought to have been granted in pursuance of his Majesty's letters of 10, 11 or 12 Feb., 1662[–3], and that by the said letter of 11 Feb. one-third share of the said lapsed moneys and of the lands, &c., to be set out in satisfaction thereof, to be divided into three equal parts, was granted to Sir Edward Nicholas, late Secretary of State, and to Sir William Morice and Sir Henry Bennet, now Earl of Arlington, then the Secretaries of State, and that the said Earl, Sir John Nicholas, heir of the said Sir Edward, and the said Sir W. Morice have represented that no lands were ever set out in pursuance of the said letter in satisfaction of the said lapsed moneys, nor can be now set out in consequence of the above recited clause, and that the said 30,000l. has never been assessed on the lands liable thereto, having regard to several directions given for the speedy assessing and raising of the said 30,000l., warrant for payment to the said Earl of Arlington, Sir John Nicholas and Sir William Morice of the said 9,000l. out of the first moneys levied of the said 30,000l. immediately after the 9,000l. already directed to be paid out of the said fund to the Earl of Orrery. [3½ pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 308.]
May 12. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day. They sat till 9 at night in a Grand Committee about the bill for the Test, and at last agreed it should be thus:—I, A.B., do swear that I will not endeavour to alter the Protestant religion, as it is now by law established in the Church of England.
They sent down a bill for the prevention of frauds and perjuries. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 155.]
May 12. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 335. [Ibid. No. 156.]
May 12. Certificate of the officers of the Swan that two French men-of-war whom they fell in with near Salcombe that day refused to strike the flag to them, though told that it was the duty of all ships to do so in those seas, saying they had no orders to strike to any ship whatsoever, and when shot at, tacked about and got away. [Ibid. No. 157.]
[May ?] Arguments against the reasonableness of the demand made by Mr. Griffin, minister of the Hamburg Company at Hamburg, for permission to remove to the Secretary's house. The former minister, Mr. Elborough, was only allowed to live in the Secretary's house, because it happened to be empty, the then Secretary having a dwelling of his own there, and, when Mr. Elborough left in 1665, the Court ordered their present Secretary to remove into it. Mr. Griffin, not liking the house usually occupied by the minister, hired another, and the Company were civil enough to pay the rent, but they hope not to be interfered with in the disposal of their houses. [Ibid. No. 158.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Griffin. I should have returned you early my thanks for your letter, had I not reserved myself for the opportunity of this hand. I have begged Sir W. Swan to assure you of my very hearty service on all occasions, and particularly in that of your house, which I intend to take the first occasion to speak with Sir Richard Ford about. I am sorry to find things are not in some better order in your Company on that side. I am sure that, as on the one hand, I shall ever be most ready to serve the Company in all its concerns, so far as it is my part, I will endeavour to mind them of what is theirs, and to bring things to order and rule, and I hope Sir W. Swan will contribute to it what depends on him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 39.]
May 12. Caveat, that no grant pass of any fine of 500l. imposed on Giles Bland in Virginia for some quarrel with the Secretary of the Council there. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 10.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
Approbation by the King of the election of Thomas Crumpe, barrister, to be town-clerk of Ludlow, in the place of Thomas Jones, deceased. [Precedents 1, f. 67.]
May 13. Sir Leoline Jenkins to [Williamson]. Has delayed the two reports enclosed, because, both cases being of a very nice speculation, he wished to have exact information from the officers in Dover and Torbay. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 159.] Annexed,
Report on the case of the Postillon of Cadiz, a Dutch ship laden with Spanish wines, which being at anchor in Torbay, was there captured by French men-of-war within musket shot of the shore, in spite of a signal of the King's protection, and her restitution was refused when demanded by the Deputy ViceAdmiral. This is a violation of that security and protection which by the law of nations all parties in war ought to suffer each other to enjoy in the King's ports; reparation is most justly due to his Majesty, which cannot be reputed full and satisfactory unless the ship and goods be restored, or their full equivalent with damages. The affront to authority must first be expiated and then the loss to the party violated be fully made up. 12 May. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 159i.]
Holy
Thursday. [May 13.]
Dr. Thomas Tullie to Williamson. Expressing his sense of his obligations to him, singling out from the rest of his noble kindnesses, that which made Williamson unkind (he had almost said unnatural) to himself. [Ibid. No. 160.]
May 13.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind has been easterly these two days, by which we hourly expected the return of one of our packet-boats, but it has not come, so we are destitute of news. [Ibid. No. 161.]
May 13.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. The Nieuport boat has again landed the mail and passengers in the Downs, though they had very good weather to bring them into this harbour. [Ibid. No. 162.]
May 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. Tuesday morning off the Isle of Wight many great guns were heard to go off disorderly, and some broadsides. They left off about 10. We suppose either some Ostend or Dutch man-of-war met with a French man-of-war. [Ibid. No. 163.]
May 13.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Has been prevented from writing lately by a violent distemper he has had. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 164.]
May 14. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 691, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 336. [Four copies of the former and two of the latter. Ibid. Nos. 165–170.]
May 14.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. 'Tis reported here by one Allin, master of a small vessel, that 3 or 4 leagues off he met with two French men-of-war, who fired at him, boarded him, and took away 5l. in money, and pillaged two packets of cloth. The Swan frigate met these same men-of-war (as is supposed) who refused, when he bade them strike, unless he would first do the same, whereupon he fired at them and chased them, but they being too nimble escaped. Enclosed is a list of ships arrived since my last. [Ibid. No. 171.] Enclosed,
Probably the said list. (The date is torn off.) [Ibid. No. 171i.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners for rebuilding St. Paul's Cathedral. Being informed that a portion of the imposition laid upon coals, which by Act of Parliament is set apart for rebuilding St. Paul's, amounts to a considerable sum, enough to begin the work, and with the materials and assistances which may be expected will put a new quire in great forwardness, and having out of divers designs presented chosen one, "very artificial, proper, and useful" which is so ordered, that it may be built in parts; signifying his royal approbation of the said design and requiring them to proceed forthwith according to that design, beginning with the East end or quire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 68.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
Instalment of the first fruits of the Bishopric of Chichester, amounting to 609l. 7s. 1½d., to Ralph Brideoke, D.D., elected and confirmed Bishop of that see, to be paid in four years by equal portions, the first to be made at Lady Day next. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 7.]
May 14.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. I have had no news the last three or four posts. To-night came in the Mary of Weymouth from Virginia, homeward bound. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 162.]
May 14.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Transmitting a copy of the petition of Capt. William Hamilton and James Hamilton, his son, setting forth that the first petitioner served the late King faithfully in the troubles in Ireland and was frequently imprisoned by the late usurpers, and praying that the lands of the two towns of Ballydargans and other lands and the Lough called Innice Lough Cullen in co. Down belonging to him be created into a manor to be called the manor of Hamilton's Hill, and that the lands of Tollymore and other lands in the said county, belonging to the petitioner James, be created into a manor to be called the manor of Tollymore, and for a grant of two fairs yearly in the premises, and directing that, if he finds the two manors may be created without prejudice to the King's service or to other men's interest, to give orders for creating the same accordingly and for holding the two fairs. Subjoined is a copy of the petition. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office Vol. 9, p. 311.]
May 15. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 693, except as follows:— Then being in a Committee upon heads for the bill for securing the Protestant religion, this head was read, that care be taken against the perverters and perverted from the Protestant religion, as it is now established in the Church of England, and agreed that as to the perverters the law may stand as it is, but the rigour of it to be taken off, if they abjure the realm,' that there be an addition of pecuniary penalties put on the perverted, and that without reference to former laws, and a sub-committee to specify the penalties. Agreed also, that provision may be made for such poor Roman Catholics as will become Protestants, and that a stock may be erected and maintained for buying in impropriations for the better maintenance of worthy ministers in great towns. [Three copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 172-174.]
May 15. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 337. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 175, 176.]
May 15.
Ludgate.
W. Middelton to Williamson. Praying him to excuse his importunity, for his great and urgent necessity forces him to it. The Prince has promised to do anything in his power for him, if his Honour would go to him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 177.]
May 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. This morning came in one of our packet-boats by whom I received this account. The Prince of Orange is encamped not far from Charleroi, which troubles the Hollanders, saying they pay such sore taxes for the maintenance of an army, who are like to spend it all in the Spanish dominions. The Swedish war, it's said, goes on, but 'tis not yet certainly known how the Dane stands affected, but he is generally believed to be most inclinable to that state, who seem not much to matter his making himself a party against the Swede, so that he would continue neutral, and with his ships serve them with corn. From the Brill they say there were, 22 May N.S., five men-of-war going out to secure their homeward-bound East India men, 3 from Amsterdam, one from Zealand, and Brackell in the Zealandia, a ship of 44 guns from the Maes. They complain trading is very dead there, the little that is kept up is for the most part by the English. [Ibid. No. 178.]
May 15.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. This morning came in two boats, one from Guernsey, the other from Jersey. In the latter came Sir T. Morgan's secretary, who tells us Sir Thomas' second son died this day fortnight being about 22. [Ibid. No. 179.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
Dispensation to William Payne, High Sheriff of Hampshire, to live out of his county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 15.]
May 15. Careat at the desire of Secretary Coventry that no grant pass of the Cursitor Baron's place in the Exchequer to the prejudice of Mr. Justice Crawley, to whom the King has promised it on the first vacancy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 10.]
May 16. John Malet to Williamson. Entreating his favour on behalf of William Carslake, who is very sick, and at great charge to the messenger, to whom he was committed, and who is very sorry for his offence, that, if possible, he might be discharged that afternoon, his grief and sickness rendering him very likely to die. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 180.]
May 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last Friday arrived here in one of his Majesty's yachts young Taffaletta from London. He went to-day on board the Swallow, and is now weighing anchor and ready to sail for Tangier. Yesterday he was on shore and rode through Deal two or three times. Our sailors tell me the captain of the yacht demanded money of him, at which he was much discontented. Your Algiers and Tripoli packets I sent by Capt. Temple. A very lofty gale at N.E., with some welcome rain. [Ibid. No. 181.]
May 16.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.N.E. Last night came to Spithead the Dartmouth, Capt. Trevanion, bound for the guard of Ireland, and in company a ship from the Thames with great masts for his Majesty's ships here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 182.]
May 16.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. No news. In his last was a list of the ships there. [Ibid. No. 183.]
[May ?] 16. J. B. to —. About the 10th (see ante, p. 113) I sent you an account of some things about your business this term, and directed it, as you desired, to Mr. John Holford, and sent it by the post. I desire you to send me word whether you received it, or whether anything may come that way safely to you, and, if it may, I can the more frequently send.
Postscript.—There is some strange and dangerous discourse about some things relating to your business, of which I shall make a more full inquiry after the circumstances to the utmost of my ability, and come and give you a full account out, as soon as possible. [Ibid. No. 184.]
May 17. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 694, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 339. [Three copies of the former and two of the latter. Ibid. Nos. 185-189.]
May 17. Dr. J. Fell to Williamson. The bearer, Mr. Wood, who has spent much time and pains in the service of the University is informed that Mr. Riley, the under-keeper of the records of the Tower, is in a languishing condition and not likely to survive. The employment suits Mr. Wood's way of study and inclination, so he would think himself competently provided for, if he might succeed thereto. He earnestly desires your patronage, to which on account of the University I take confidence to recommend him. [Ibid. No. 190.]
May 17.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last post I acquainted you that the royal Moor, Taffaletta, was then ready to sail, but they anchored again, and about 4 this morning the Swallow weighed and sailed for Algiers, the wind N.E., more than a topsail gale. Last week a French man-of-war boarded and took a ship belonging to and bound for Belfast near Carrickfergus, in which were four or five Deal men, and some Irish, but all were imprisoned in France. God has given us comfortable showers after a great drought, insomuch that at many places near this, though the ground was ploughed to sow barley, it was so hard they durst not commit their seed to it, because the harrows could not break the clods. Some say the Belfast ship was a Loonedroger, and not a right Irishman. More than a topsail gale, wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 191.]
May 17.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Saturday morning, the wind being high E., and yesterday came in here 70 or 80 sail, all from France, and some others. They met off this on Friday a French man-of-war, which hailed most of them, and fired on some to come under his lee, and would have made them pay for the shot, but they refused and so parted. He fired under Dutch colours. Many more are now before this place, which must come in, if the wind continues due E. They talk of much murmurings and commotions in many parts of France. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 192.]
May 17.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 14th and 15th about 60 merchantmen, all English, from Bordeaux and Rochelle came in here. Those from Bordeaux report that the people there and in other places thereabouts are not satisfied with the great taxes that king is laying upon them, contrary to their privileges. Those from Rochelle and St. Martin's say that at Rochefort and Brest several men-of-war are fitting to join with the Swedes. In this bay this fleet met a French man-of-war of 36 guns. She was seen with Dutch colours from the land, and some say that she shot under them, but, true it is, she shot at several English and made them come by the lee, and come on board, and would make them confess what ships were bound for Holland, or else they must pay 5s. for the shot. The Unity, of Weymouth, that came from St. Martin's, met a caper off Ushant, who told him that he and two more capers of small force being together were chased by three Turks men-of-war, as they believed, for they were black ships and had no galleries. A small vessel from Cadiz says 15 more came out in his company with the Ross frigate. They report that there is war with Tripoli and that several Sallee men-of-war are abroad on that coast. [Ibid. No. 193.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Granting a dispensation from the statute which requires that only one person from any particular county should be fellow at the same time, in favour of Joshua Ratcliffe, senior B.A., and scholar of their house, in case they find him on examination worthy of a fellowship. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 69.]
May 17.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he prepare a proclamation commanding the immediate return of all the King's subjects who have gone into the French service since the peace with the States General, and further that none other of his subjects go hereafter into the said service. [Precedents 1, f. 69.]
[Before May 18.] Case of Sir Henry Thompson. At the York election 10 Nov., 1673, Sir Henry had above 1,100 votes on a fair poll, and these were the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, Common Council, and citizens of the best quality, and he might have had many more who were ready to poll, but he spared them the trouble as needless. He was elected, and singly returned by the sheriffs, by virtue whereof he sits in the House.
Sir John Hewley had not 600 votes, many whereof were no freemen and were challenged for undue polling, and, of those that had the right of election, not above 32 were of that consideration as to be assessed to the poor rate and most of the rest were apprentices and youths under 20 and soldiers hired to take their freedom two or three days before the election and to vote for him.
Notwithstanding, Sir John has petitioned against Sir Henry's election, and the cause is to be heard before the Committee of Privileges, 18 May, 1675. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 194.]
May 18. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 696, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 340. [Three copies of the latter. S.P. Dom. Car. II. 370, Nos. 195–197.]
May 18. William Griffith to Williamson. Representing that the Quare Impedit having been brought last term against the Bishop of London in defence of his Majesty's right of presentation to the rectory of Orsett, Essex, and Mr. Sowton's presentation, to whom his Majesty has granted it, being stopped at the Signet Office by virtue of the caveat there entered by his Honour on Mr. Latham's behalf, if the said presentation pass not the Privy Seal to-morrow, it cannot afterwards till 2 June (there being not another seal till then) and, the next term beginning on the 4th, it is very doubtful whether there may be a Great Seal between, and, if a non disturbavit be next term pleaded on the Bishop's side in regard no presentee from the King has been yet offered him, his Majesty's title in all probability is like to suffer very much, and submitting to his judgment the taking off of the caveat, that so the presentation may go forward at the Privy Seal to-morrow. [Ibid. No. 198.]
May 18. The Earl of Carlisle to Williamson. I formerly moved the King on behalf of a Mr. Turner for a prebend of Worcester, and two or three days ago reminded him of it, who remembered his promise, and ordered me to give you notice of it, to prevent any other and to secure the prebend for Mr. Turner on the first vacancy. [Ibid. No. 199.]
May 18.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Sunday arrived here two vessels laden with corn from the East. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 200.]
May 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By one of our packet-boats which arrived here last Sunday, we are informed that the Prince of Orange set forth towards his army the Sunday before, and was to meet them about Bergen-op-Zoom.
On Sunday a strong easterly wind drove back one of our packetboats, which had sailed hence the night before, but they sailed again yester morning. The weather is fair, but the wind still in the same corner. [Ibid. No. 201.]
May 18.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Williamson. I am now taking the examination of two masters, one of Bremen, and another of Frederickstatt in Holstein, which were both plundered near Albrouh (? Aldeburgh), and he of Bremen, is, as the master reports, plundered to the value of 2,000l. of merchants' goods, besides the goods of the ship. The vessel that plundered them is, as they report, an English built smack and manned with most English, but they think some few are Flemings and two or three French, and, after the privateer had taken them at sea, he carried the Bremener into Albrouh Haven and there plundered him in the River. The privateer had not one gun and was of about 30 tons. The master knows not the captain's name that took him, but says he met some of his goods on horseback in Suffolk as he came hither. [Ibid. No. 202.]
May 18.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. In my last I advised that the Dartmouth frigate was come to Spithead, but it is the Spragg frigate put in here for a boat, having lost theirs in foul weather. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 203.]
May 18.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 204.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 204 i.]
May 18. Commissions for George Combley to be lieutenant, and — Sheldon to be ensign in the Lieut.-Governor, Capt. William Sheldon's, company of foot in the Isle of Guernsey. Minutes. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 131.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to —. M. Lockhart having informed me that he has placed in your hands 14,546 livres 15 sols of the King's money to be paid to my order, I beg you to send me bills of exchange here in England for 3,502 livres which I wish to be paid to the officers of my regiment to whom the same is due, and to keep the rest till further order. [French. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 35.]
May 18. Caveat that nothing pass of the grant of a prebend's place in Westminster till the Duke of Ormonde have notice, the King having promised the same to his Grace's chaplain, Dr. William Asheton. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 10.]
May 18.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Anthony Gylby, praying a grant in reversion to him and his heirs of a piece of waste ground called the Surekle in the Humber, whereof he has already a lease for 31 years, recommendation to the Lord Treasurer for passing such a grant thereof under such rents or other tenure as his Lordship shall think fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 24.]
[Before May 19 ?] The case between Col. Robert Werden and William Williams concerning the Chester election. Mr. Williams engaged, if chosen, to discharge a debt of 40l. the city owed to the King, and also promised to lend the corporation 500l. for 7 years gratis and to spend his estate amongst them, and, having prevailed with the mayor and sheriffs to promise him their votes, he caused some hundreds of the freemen's oath to be printed and dispersed about the city, by which he pretended and asserted as law that all freemen were obliged to give their votes as the Mayor did, threatening, as he was Recorder, to procure that all that should vote against him should be disfranchised, and menacing all the handicraft freemen that, if they voted for Col. Werden, he would make foreign workmen free of the city, adding that whoever voted against him should be loaded with taxes, &c., without any relief while he was Recorder.
Mr. Williams, finding by the first day's polling that he was much short of Colonel Werden prevailed with the sheriffs to adjourn the poll for three days together, employing the interval in making several freemen who had promised him their voices, though capacitated neither by age nor time, and refusing the freedom to others who were every way capable, apprehending they would vote for Col. Werden.
After three days' polling, proclamation being duly made and no more voices appearing, the sheriffs, who had both voted against Col. Werden, numbered the poll, and finding Col. Werden had 50 voices more than Mr. Williams declared themselves satisfied that he was duly chosen, and accordingly an indenture was drawn for returning him and signed and sealed by Sheriff Manwareing, but refused by Sheriff Critchley on no ground but that he said he had promised not to seal it, but he was abundantly satisfied that Col. Werden was fairly elected.
Mr. Williams now pretends that the inhabitants not free of the city have no voices, but that the right of election is only in the freemen, and he, having 17 freemen more than Col. Werden, alleges he is legally elected, and ought to be returned.
It is answered, that 12 of Mr. Williams' number were polled for freemen, being not so, and 14 of them were made free after the election began, being incapable of it; and, supposing he had the greater number of freemen, yet the usage of the place, which must expound the right of election, has been always in the inhabitants as well as the freemen; the last burgesses were so chosen, and all elections in the memory of man have been by the scot and lot inhabitants and freemen promiscuously, and were never questioned till Mr. Williams found himself reduced to the necessity of making it a question. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 342, 346.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 205.]
May 19. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 698, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 341. [Three copies of the proceedings in the Lords and two of those in the Commons. Ibid. Nos. 206–210.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of George Baron and others, laders, and Abraham and Francis Jaggard, owners, of the John and Sarah, which set forth that the said ship on her voyage from Bilboa to Hamburg was seized 4 Oct. last by a French privateer and carried into Rochelle, merely for want of a seabrief, though she was English built, wore an English flag and was navigated by Englishmen; that, notwithstanding the said ship and goods wholly belong to the petitioners, the Council of State at Paris have proceeded in the condemnation of the said ship and goods on grounds altogether slight and illegal, and have imprisoned the master and a passenger in the common gaol; and threaten to try them for their lives as criminals; and prayed that the said ship and goods be restored and the master and passenger released; that Secretary Williamson prepare a letter for his Majesty's signature recommending the petitioners' case to Sir W. Lockhart, Ambassador in France, that he may demand restitution of the said ship and goods and the enlargement of the said master and passenger. [Ibid. No. 211.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of William Strangh, citizen and merchant of London, which set forth that, whereas he had attached and arrested at Amsterdam goods to the value of 1,500l. in part of a debt of 4,700l. due from Alexander Waddal, a declared and fugitive bankrupt of Sweden, and whereas in further pursuit of him the petitioner went from London to Copenhagen in 1673, where he was informed the said Waddal coloured more goods under Danish names and pretensions to defraud his creditors, the petitioner was by a malicious combination of his bankrupt debtor and some Danish subjects imprisoned closely and barbarously on pretence of a transport of the said money and goods to them, though made (if at all, yet illegally) 8 months after the arrest granted by the judicatory of Amsterdam in the petitioner's behalf, a very unjust sentence being passed against him in order to force him to relinquish his arrest of Waddal's goods at Amsterdam, and prayed his Majesty's letter to the King of Denmark for the rehearing of his case: that Secretary Williamson prepare a letter for the King's signature recommending the petitioner's case as prayed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 212.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Robert Yate, Thomas Earle, and Robert Henley, merchants of Bristol, for relief, as, notwithstanding his Majesty's many gracious letters and applications to the Admiralty of Zealand, they can obtain no satisfaction for the violent seizure and detention of their ship, the St. Joseph, that Secretary Williamson forthwith prepare for the King's signature a very effectual letter to Sir William Temple, requiring him to press the States General to do the petitioners speedy justice, and that their appeal may be heard with the exclusion of the former judges, being interested and parties. [Ibid. No. 213.]
May 19.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. We are here in a healthy condition and all in peace and quiet in these parts. [Ibid. No. 214.]
May 19.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived here the John of this place from Morlaix, which came thence two days ago with two others not yet come in. The master tells me that, the day before he came out, the drums were beaten about town, declaring the King's edict of 20 sols per lb. on tobacco, to be paid by all but soldiers, and that the Ostend and other privateers have taken many of their coasting ships, but he did not hear of any fleet of war setting out. They continue to raise what forces they can to send to the King's army. [Ibid. No. 215.]
May 19.
Whitehall.
Proclamation commanding the immediate return of all subjects who have gone into the service of the French king as soldiers since the late treaty of peace with the States General, and forbidding all subjects to enter the said service in future. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 335.]
May 20. Journal of proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 700. [Three copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 216-218.]
May 20. Journal of proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 342. [Ibid. No. 219.]
[May ?] Capt. Gilbert Thomas to the King. Petition, stating that his Majesty, 29 Sept., 1660, appointed the petitioner Provost-Marshal of the City of Westminster and co. Middlesex, granting him the salary, &c., formerly belonging to any such officer, and that he has been very diligent and faithful in the discharge of that trust, and that, whereas his predecessors had 200l. per annum allowed them and their four men, he has received no salary nor allowance for the expensive discharge of this duty, that he has ever been a sufferer since the setting up of the standard at Nottingham, and, after the surrender of Oxford in 1646 was forced for a bare subsistence to travel into foreign parts, and there obtained the knowledge of a secret to make out of the useless dust or powder of indigo, stone blue, flat indigo, and powder blue such as is made in Holland, very useful and necessary for the cleansing of linen clothes, and praying for an order to the Lord Lieutenant of the said city and county to settle the petitioner in his salary as formerly, and for a grant of a patent to him for making stone blue, flat indigo and powder blue for the term of years usual in such cases. At the foot,
May 20.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. At the side, His report in favour of granting the patent as prayed. 28 May. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 220.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 25.]
May 20.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The weather fair, wind northerly No packet-boat has arrived since my last. [S.P. Dom. Car. II. 370, No. 221.]
May 20.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of mails and packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 222.]
May 20.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 223.]
May 20.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind E.S.E. [Ibid. No. 224.]
May 20.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. There came here yesterday six Dutchmen, which belonged to a galliot, the Wineberg, of Norden in West Friesland with wines and brandy from Bordeaux for Amsterdam. They say that the day before they were chased within two leagues of the Lizard by a Turks man-of-war of about 12 guns They left the ship and caine away in their boat, leaving only the skipper and one man on board. The man-of-war shot several guns at the boat, but they all got safe ashore. They told the skipper that, if it was a French man-of-war, he should raise the flag and lower it again three times, and they would come on board again, which he did not, which makes them conclude them to be Turks; nay, they affirm they were so near that they saw their turberts, besides they say, if they were French, they were a free ship. By a vessel from Bristol I am advised that another vessel in her company spoke with them, and that they were two Algiers men-of-war, and that they had this galliot with them.
But the Elizabeth of Yarmouth and the Ann of London, which came yesterday from Bordeaux, report them to be French men-ofwar of 12 and 24 guns, and that they spoke with them and told them they had taken a galliot with nobody on board but the skipper and one man, so that on the whole I believe them rather to be French men-of-war than Turks.
It is reported here that the Parliament were forced to put their hands on their swords in the House, and this should come from some Parliament men. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 225.]
May 20.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 226.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Howell, Recorder, and the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, to insert Apollonia Scroope. convicted at the gaol delivery for Middlesex for stealing goods of Nicholas Bradey, to the value of 10l., but reprieved before judgment, into the next general pardon for poor Newgate convicts, without the proviso for transportation, and meanwhile to release her on bail, till her pardon can be pleaded. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 135.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Commission for Humphrey Creswick to be lieutenant to Captain John Strode's company in the regiment of Guards under Colonel John Russell. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 130.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Certificate by the Duke of Monmouth that so many companies of Col. Churchill's regiment are to be incorporated into his own as they can make up hundreds, beginning with Col. Howard's and so descending in order, except that Captain Churchill is to be in the place of Capt. Teut (Tuite), who is to have the first company vacant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 36.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Declaration by the Duke of Monmouth that, as Col. Churchill's regiment is to be incorporated into his, he would have the officers thereof, who after the reform continue to serve in his regiment, placed in the first vacancies happening there, according to the order and quality of their respective commands. [Ibid.]
May 20. Commission to Richard Fitzpatrick to be ensign to Capt. Buller in place of Mr. Buller. Minute. [Ibid.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Col. Scott. Capt. Trapps, having been more unfortunate in his recruits notwithstanding his endeavours than the rest of the officers, I was willing to prevent his being reformed, and therefore would have Capt. Graham's company broken up, and the soldiers thereof given to Capt. Trapps towards completing his number, and Mr. Laws, ensign to Capt. Graham, is to be ensign to Capt. Trapps, and, if his youngest lieutenant, Mr. Musgrave, continue there, you will place him in the first vacancy of a lieutenant. [Ibid. p. 37.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Col. Scott. Sir Samuel Clarke has spoken to me in behalf of Mr. Owen, first lieutenant of his company, that he may be continued as your capt.-lieutenant, which is his right, and, I suppose, you intended he should be so at his coming over. However, I was willing to gratify Sir Samuel by granting him my letter to strengthen his just pretension. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 37.]
May 20.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Callaghan, Earl of Clancarty, praying an order for a respite of levying some quit-rents, till his Majesty, having been informed of the truth of his allegations mentioned in his petition, shall signify his further pleasure. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 25.]
May 20. Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Callaghan, Earl of Clancarty, praying a custodium of certain lands. [Ibid.]
May 20. Warrant for a patent to William Fanshaw, Gabriel Cox, and Rebecca Croxton for their invention of working point laces after the manner of point de Venise and point d'Espagne for 14 years. [Precedents 1, f. 71.]
[May ?] Christopher Carleton to the King. Petition stating that in June, 1674, a general pardon was granted to the petitioner for all crimes and offences (except treason and murder) whereof he was indicted or found guilty at the then last assizes for Fermanagh preceding the time of the pardon which were in March, and that it was Sept., 1674, before the pardon passed the Seal, and the last assizes mentioned in the pardon were in August, 1674, which makes the pardon void, it naming only the last assizes, the indictment being removed into the King's Bench in Dublin in Aug., 1674, and the petitioner outlawed. thereon, and praying that the said pardon may be amended and better worded for all crimes and offences (except murder and treason) committed by the petitioner at any time before the grant of the said pardon, and also that the words of outlawry may be inserted in it. At the side,
May 20.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General. On the back, His report in favour of granting a pardon to the petitioner of all crimes and offences (except treason and murder) committed before 1 May, 1674. 22 May. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 163.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 25.]
May 21. Journal of proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 702, except as follows:—In a Committee for the Test, agreed that the oath should go in this manner, I, A.B., do swear that I will not endeavour to alter the Protestant religion now by law established in the Church of England, nor the Government of this kingdom, either in Church or State, as it is by law established, and I do take this oath according to the meaning of this Act, and the proviso contained in the same. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 227-228.]
May 21. Journal of proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 343. [Ibid. No. 229.]
May 21.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 230.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 230i.]
May 21. Samuel Rhodes, being indicted at the now quarter sessions at the Old Bailey for the murder of John White, his former servant, and the only evidence against him being that he gave White a blow on his ear several months before he died, and what evidence was taken from White's declaration, and several persons having witnessed at the trial that he died a natural death, and that it was so found by the coroner's inquest, order for respite of any sentence that should be passed on him, till the King's further pleasure be known. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 134.]
May 21. Caveat, that nothing pass concerning the grant of Sir Edward Stradling's estate till Secretary Williamson be acquainted with it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 10.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant from the King, as King and as Prince and Steward of Scotland, for a commission appointing the persons therein named or any five or more of them to be auditors of the accounts of the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland and all other receivers, cashkeepers and collectors of his rents as well property, custom, excise, and casualities pertaining to him as the principality of the said kingdom from the time of the last fitted account in August, 1671, to 12 May, 1674, when the present commission of the Treasury commenced. [Over 2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 240.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift to John, Earl of Athole, as Lord Privy Seal, of a yearly pension of 400l. sterling in consideration of his having resigned the place of Justice General with the yearly pension of 200l. sterling. [Ibid. p. 243.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter constituting Alexander, Earl of Morray, Justice General of Scotland. [Ibid. p. 244.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for the gift to Alexander, Earl of Morray, as Justice General of a pension of 200l. sterling per annum. [Ibid. p. 246.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Directing them to admit and receive John, Earl of Erroll, Lord Constable of Scotland, into the Privy Council. [Ibid. p. 247.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Whereas by your letter of 12 March to the Duke of Lauderdale you represented that, when you fermed the rents of Orkney and Zetland to George Scott, it was done by roup, and that, that ferm being now ended and most of the rents consisting of victual, butter and oil, and being not casual, except in the prices which are uncertain, if they should be again fermed by roup, divers persons will in emulation make offers and it may thereby fall into the hands of such as have neither prudence to manage the same nor are qualified to discharge the offices that attend it, by which our vassals and tenants there may be exposed to the discretion of such unqualified persons both as to the levying of those rents and the administration of justice to them, and that these considerations had induced you to think of a fit person with whom you might treat, and that you did not find any so fit to treat with therein as Capt. Andrew Dick, and that, having conferred with him on the whole matter and calculated the prices of the whole butter, victual and oil at the usual rates, you find that rent comes short of 36,000 merks per annum, which he is willing to pay yearly of tack duty and to accept of a tack thereon for 5 years, to be paid without any abatement except in such a case of plague or war as may render the rents there ineffectual, we are satisfied therewith and authorize you to enter in tack with the said captain on the terms already mentioned, and we have signed the commission sent up from you for the said captain to be steward and justiciar of Orkney and Zetland, which is to be delivered to him on his giving good security for the payment of the tack duty.
We likewise authorize you to discharge the magistrates of Edinburgh of the duty on the lead imported by them for their waterworks, amounting to about 120l. sterling. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 248.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter constituting Capt. Andrew Dick and his deputes Steward of the Stewardry of Orkney and Zetland and justiciar within the whole bounds and islands thereof while he shall be tacksman of Orkney and Zetland. [Ibid. p. 250.]
May 21.
Whitehall.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form to David Edmeinston of Cardin and to John Ker, one of the Life Guard of Horse, for two years respectively. [Ibid. p. 252.]
May 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. It was not till this morning that one of our packet-boats returned, but she brought no news. The wind these two days has been between northerly and easterly. Weather very fair. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 231.]
May 22.
Dover.
James Houseman to Williamson. I find by a letter from a friend there is a charge of 11 or 12 articles exhibited against me before his Majesty and Council, and my friend's opinion is, it may by my enemies be carried to the Parliament. The heads are:—Neglect in sending over the mails, suffering the packet-boats to carry over prohibited goods, carrying over wool and smuggling goods. All I have to say for answer at present is that I am not guilty of any one thing mentioned above, nor of any unjust acting, to my knowledge, tending to the breach of any trust imposed in me. I beg that, if any charge be against me, I may be sent for by letter, not by messenger, for I know the worst of my enemies cannot prove any such guilt upon me. There are four seamen and officers, one of whom goes constantly in every boat sent by the Commissioners of the Customs to prevent the boats from carrying prohibited or unlawful goods, and myself and all the other officers use all our endeavours to prevent those practices. [Ibid. No. 232.]
May 22. Note, that the King has been pleased to promise Sir Francis Leeke the advantage of a hoy supposed to belong to a pirate, and seized near Gravesend 19 May. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 10.]
May 22. Note, that the Lord Privy Seal signified to Mr. Secretary that the King had promised the first living in his gift to Mr. Gaches. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 10.]
May 23.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of the mails and packet-boats. About midnight last Friday the Calais packet-boat brought over Sir Thomas Long [u] eville, Mr. Butler and Mr. Bancks. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 233.]
May 23.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. This morning came in here 12 or 14 Dutch merchantmen from the Straits homeward bound. [Ibid. No. 234.]
May 24.
London.
Edmund Custis to Williamson. I had thought to have tarried your leisure, when the House might have been adjourned, but the revenues and the whole nation are so much concerned in the abusive increase of so many Dutch ships with English seabriefs without being naturalized that I have thought the enclosed fit for your immediate perusal. [Ibid. No. 235.] Probably enclosed,
The paper calendared at the end of 1673 in S.P. Dom., 1673-5, p. 76. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 338, No. 114.]
May 24.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. A vessel of London from St. Martin's came yesterday into our road, having been 16 days in his passage. The master reports that last Sunday fortnight he met an Ostend man-of-war off Brest, who told him he had a little before been chased by three Algerine men-of-war not far from there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 236.]
May 24.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 21st came in here the George of London from Malaga with wines and fruit for London. They have had easterly winds ever since they came out, so that they have been eight weeks. They met about 14 days before they came in a French man-of-war, which had taken the Giant of Amsterdam with salt from St. Tubus bound for the Hague. She went out of this harbour about a month since. She was taken at Roc [k] all, about Hitland (Shetland), for she had orders to go about Ireland. This French man-of-war put some of the men on board this ship, which are come in here. She brings no news from the Straits. The fleet of merchantmen here, being about 30 sail homeward bound, is now putting to sea, wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 237.]
May 24. Royal assent to the election of Thomas Barlow, D.D., to be Bishop of Lincoln in the room of Dr. William Fuller, deceased. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 69.]
May 24. Warrant for a pardon to Samuel Rhodes for the manslaughter of his former servant, John White, with restitution of lands and goods. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 134.]
May 24. Blank commission to Capt. Nichols for the first company of foot. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 36.]
May 24.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Sir Francis Leeke. I have received your letter by Capt. Barbour with an account of some men that were taken transporting themselves beyond the seas. The order I received from his Majesty in those cases was, that all so taken should be dismissed where they were in custody to save the trouble and charge of bringing them up to town, in pursuance of which you may release them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 38.]
May 25.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Saturday two more vessels arrived here with corn from the East. Wind S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 238.]
May 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday the wind veered from N.E. to S.W., where it is at present. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. Many ships bound easterly and northerly are sailed out of this port, and more have passed by us. [Ibid. No. 239.]
May 25.
Plymouth
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Several Straits ships, of which the Turkey merchant was one, are passed up. [Ibid. No. 240.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 240 i.]
May 25. Capt. Arthur Herbert to —. Giving an account of his meeting six French ships off Dungeness, at first under Dutch and English colours, which when shot at put up French colours, but kept their topsails up. When shot at they returned the fire, and their Admiral answered it was the King of France's ship and did not strike. They outsailed the Cambridge, which was no match for them. [Copy. Ibid. No. 157.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir John Howell, Recorder of London, to insert Henry Hayse, sentenced at the Old Bailey to transportation for the manslaughter of John Batty, into the next general pardon for poor Newgate convicts, without the clause for transportation, he having been a soldier in the King's regiment of Guards and fallen accidentally into this calamity. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 135.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Charles, Lord Grey of Rolleston, and his heirs, of three fairs at Winterbourne St. Martin's, Dorset, on the second Thursdays in February, May and August, it having been found by an inquisition taken at Cranborne, Dorset, that such fairs will be no damage to the Crown or to others. [Precedents 1, f. 72.]
May 26. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 703, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 345; one copy of the Lords' and two of the Commons'. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 241–243.]
May 26.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. This afternoon came into this road a States man-of-war of 24 guns with a great Dutch hoy in his company. He came out of the Texel last Sunday evening with four hoys in his company loaden with piece goods for London. About 4 last Monday afternoon three French men-of-war of 24, 18, and 14 guns, with a ketch came up with them. The richest hoy, which is now here, the Dutch man-of-war got in tow, the other three shifted for themselves, after whom two of the three men-of-war gave chase. Then suddenly there fell a thick fog so that they could not see one another, so that the Dutch man-of-war with the hoy in a tow steered over for this coast, where both are now at anchor in this road. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 244.]
May 26.
Deal 4 p.m.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning arrived the Cambridge from the Straits. Coming up the Channel she met with three French men-of-war, who not striking, she shot at them, but was answered with many guns, neither did they at all strike. With the Cambridge came in above 20 stout merchantmen from the Straits, and also the Portsmouth ketch, both of which brought home on merchants' account a great quantity of pieces of eight. We have lately had many refreshing showers. The smallpox has been, and is very brief and mortal in and near Deal, Dover and West Kent. Little wind at S.W. [Ibid. No. 245.]
Extract of the passage about striking from the above letter. [Ibid. No. 246.]
May 26.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 24th arrived the Diligence of Pascadaway in New England in ten weeks from Virginia with tobacco, and having cleared according to Act of Parliament went for Amsterdam. The master tells me many of the ships there, failing of their lading, are put upon trading to New England and elsewhere, till the next crop, which this year very much failed by reason of the great drought. Their corn also failed and their provision of hogs, &c., so that their condition is much worse than it has been for many years.
By some coasters arrived to-day and others I find three Algier men-of-war are in the Channel, two of them of upwards of 30 guns, and have taken both upon the French and Dutch as appears by their slaves, but they are very civil to our English they have met with. The master of the Anne of this place, arriving last night from Guernsey, reports that a Sallee man-of-war also had been seen in these seas, and a French man-of-war of 30 guns he met made inquiry thereafter. [Ibid. No. 247.]
May 26.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Sir John Maney, Major Roch, Capt. Thomas Bates, and Lieut. Edward Pickin, four indigent officers, praying an order for their admission into the lottery, signification of his Majesty's pleasure to the trustees of the above mentioned lottery that the petitioners be admitted into the same to receive their respective proportions according to their several qualifications. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 26.]
May 27. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 705, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 345. [Two copies, to one of which is prefixed a journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords on the 26th. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 248, 249.]
May 27. Separate Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, to which is also prefixed a journal of the proceedings there on the 26th. [Ibid. No. 250.]
May 27.
Guildhall.
Sir Thomas Player to Williamson. Certifying that he has received of Mr. Jacobson and Mr. Leemkuell by the appointment of the Senate of Hamburg, 8,750l., which makes up the complete sum of 35,000l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 251.]
May 27.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Three ships from Norway are come into this port and one in the road for Lynn with deals, the master of which tells us that a Holland caper was on board them, but did them no prejudice, only took some firewood from them, but the same caper dealt otherwise with a vessel of Whitby for not striking so soon as the caper would have him. He shot several shots at the English ship, and commanded the master on board, and caused him to pay 6s. 8d. for every shot he shot at him, and, because the master told him he ought not to strike to any ship in those seas except his own King's frigates, the captain beat him and abused him basely. Five or six ships are at anchor in this road. Wind E.N.E. [Ibid. No. 252.]
May 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday the wind being easterly brought into view a good fleet of laden colliers for the River, and in the afternoon one of our packet-boats, but with it no news. In the evening the wind began to bluster with rain and mists, so that it hindered the packet-boat which should have gone for Holland. At noon arrived in a short space, being before the wind, another packet-boat, and in her Mr. Paine and Mr. Dale, but they bring no news but that the Prince is still at Duffell, encamped betwixt two castles. [Ibid. No. 253.]
May 27.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Repetition of the news in his last letter. After post time came in about 20 more merchantmen. One reports that off Hythe a French man-of-war yesterday afternoon chased a loonedroger on shore near or against that town, and, though he was nigh the town, shot about 40 bullets at the loonedroger, a good many whereof must needs fall into the town. This report I received last night from the commander of the Elizabeth of London, who, as he sailed along, saw the matter. Loonedrogers are Dutch ships consigned to Dutch merchants and Dutchmen part, the master and two or three more only English.
Yesterday afternoon the Portsmouth ketch sailed for the Thames. She and the Cambridge brought home much plate. Wind W. and by S., not a topsail gale. Seasonable showery weather. [Ibid. No. 254.]
May 27.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. At 6 last Tuesday morning came into this harbour a packet-boat from Calais, and landed the mail and a few passengers, none of any note. The packet men report that they were told there has been a mutiny in the French army between a party of French and Lord Douglas' regiment about their quarters, and that a great deal of mischief is done on both sides. About 9 Tuesday night went to sea a packet-boat for Calais with the mail and some passengers, none of any quality. Yesterday an Ostend privateer chased ashore between Hythe and Folkestone a great vessel. Her lading is said to be oil, oranges and lemons. About 10 Tuesday night went to sea the packet-boat for Nieuport with the mail and a few passengers, none of any note. [Ibid. No. 255.]
May 27.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind westerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 256.]
May 27.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 24th there came into Helford the Proridence of that place from Rochelle, which met with a Spanish caper of 4 guns belonging to the Groyne, which took from them to the value of 500 livres. The 25th came in here the Maria Jesus Anna, an Ostend caper. They say they have been this six weeks at sea and met with no purchase, and that she and another caper of 4 guns were chased by a French man-of-war, but they steered several courses. This one hardly escaped. What is become of the other he knows not, they making after her. Yesterday evening came in the Samuel of Dover for Bordeaux, which says three leagues off this harbour they met with a ketch from the Groyne laden with fruit for London, who told them that the day before off Seilly they spoke with an Argier man-of-war of 30 guns. The Wineberg of Norden, of which I wrote to you formerly, whose men rowed ashore about the Lizard and came here, and reported they were chased by a Turks man-of-war, and so left the ship and came ashore, is now in Mount's Bay, sent in by a French man-of-war, with the master and a Jew, a passenger on board. Seamen are gone from this to bring her about for this harbour. [Ibid. No. 257.]
May 27.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 258.]
May 27. Presentation of Thomas Hockin to the prebend of Hayder alias Hayther in Lincoln Cathedral. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 69.]
May 27. Dispensation to Sir Robert Dukinfield, High Sheriff of Cheshire, to go to London or elsewhere out of his county. [Precedents 1, f. 72.]
May 28. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day. An Act for the better government of free watermen on the Thames and for the increase of their number was read a second time and committed. The House was in a Committee on the bill for the Test, and considered the manner of administering the oath and taking the subscriptions of the declaration. The House agreed that the Lord Chancellor or Lord Keeper should issue out commissions to such as he shall think fit, inhabiting within the limits of the said respective commissions, to tender the said declaration and take the said oath, and make returns thereof to the quarter sessions in each county, and that the commissioners that shall tender it to the Peers in Parliament shall be six peers or more, and that the members of the Commons' House shall have the same tendered them by the Lord Steward or his deputies, and that all that shall hereafter come into any employment ecclesiastical, civil, or military, or be a privy councillor or justice shall have the said oath and declaration tendered him by the same persons who tender such other oaths to such persons on such occasions. [Three copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 259-261.]
May 28. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 346. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 262, 263.]
[May ?] John Boscavell to the King. Petition for a pass for himself and his wife and children to Bilbao, where most of his friends and relations inhabit, he having served as a lieutenant in Col. Tillard's regiment at the rendition of Oxford, where he was a great sufferer, and having also served in the late war against the Dutch, but now with his wife and five small children being reduced to a perishing condition, because he is now out of all employment. [Ibid. No. 264.]
[May?] Charles Ward to the King. Petition for a pass to Bordeaux, where he has friends and relations, he having served as ensign of a foot company in Col. Tillard's regiment before the rendition of Oxford, where he was a great sufferer, and having since served his Majesty in Lord Musgrave's (?Mulgrave's) regiment, but, having now been long out of employment, being reduced with his wife and children to a starving condition. [Ibid. No. 265.]
May 28.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 266.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 266 i.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Passes for John Boscavell and Charles Ward with their respective wives and families to pass to Bilbao and Bordeaux respectively. [Home Office, Warrant Book1, p. 62.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Pardon to Christopher Carleton of Tellimarghen (Tullymargy) parish of Devenish, Fermanagh, of all crimes and offences (except treason or murder) committed by him in Ireland before 1 May, 1674, and of all sentences, penalties and forfeitures by reason of the premises. Minute. [Ibid. p. 63.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 164.]
May 28.
Whitehall.
Grant to Thomas Elyott, Groom of the Bedchamber, and John Nevill, eldest son of John Nevill of Billingbear, Berks, of the office of Master of the Buckhounds in reversion after John Cary during their natural lives successively. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 63.]
May 29.
London.
Sir John Berry to Williamson. On behalf of his good friend and kinsman Josias Calmady, desiring he would stand his friend to keep him from being High Sheriff of Devon, because he is both scorbutical and hydropsical, and has been subject to these distempers a long time, to which may be added his corpulency and unfitness to travel, especially as he lives about 40 miles from Exon, where the assizes are usually held. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 267.]
May 29.
Pembroke Hall. Cambridge.
Francis Grigg to Williamson. I shall ever esteem it a particular mark of your favour that you permit me to make my addresses to you. I am unacquainted with the way of desiring preferments before they are actually void, and shall therefore most willingly depend upon Providence, not doubting of the sincerity of your intentions. I should think myself happy could I obtain a benefice, a prebend, or a chaplain's place for the present. My great desire to settle in the world has made me, I fear, too importunate. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 268.]
May 29.
Oxford.
Dr. Thomas Barlow to Williamson. This comes to bring my hearty thanks for your continued kindness to your college and me. That I did not this sooner was no want of a just sense of my obligations, but of ability to express it. Beneficia tua indigne æstimat, qui de reddendo cogitat is as true in my mouth as his who first spoke it. God has placed you in a station above any requital of mine. Your kindness is like to create you more trouble, for having done much for me already that gives me confidence to desire more. My confirmation, consecration, fees, first fruits, &c., will cost me 2,000l. or 1,500l. before I shall receive a penny from the bishopric. I was never in debt, yet, I suppose, you and my best friends believe that I was never so much before hand, so that borrow I must, and, to enable me to repay honestly, I mean to stay here, as others do in the like case, till a little after Lady Day next. My college and Margaret Lecture I can keep without any dispensation, and perform the duties of both till then, the sinecure and archdeaconry I cannot. My Lord of Winton and some other friends told me they would speak to his Majesty that I might keep them in commendam as long as I pleased. I neither have nor will desire any of them to do me that favour, but refer the whole business to your goodness and prudence. If I might have the benefit of my sinecure for two years, as you kindly proffered me, and the archdeaconry for one, I shall be abundantly satisfied, for so I shall have something to live on till the revenue of the bishopric come in, otherwise I must go deeply in debt to Lincoln. [Ibid. No. 269.]
May 29.
Carlisle.
Edward Hornsby to Williamson. I have received a letter concerning my son. I hope ere this you have received a letter from Dean Smith. I gave him a full description of my ability, so in my brother Thomas letter he mentions you wished him to write to see what I would bestow on my son to put him to a trade. I have a great deal of children more, and we have hard times here, however I shall do as much for him as I can, but I hope you will be pleased to order some care to be taken of him. I hope you will find him very diligent in any way you please to command him, and we solely leave him to your disposal. [Ibid. No. 270.]
May 29.
Dover.
John Bullacke, Mayor, to Williamson. The 24th there went out of this harbour the Richard, a small merchant vessel of London, with only three men on the deck, but his hold full of men, the hatches shut over them, so that it was not known to the officers at the water side that he had any more than those on deck. He went after an Ostender's prize that went out of our harbour just before him, and has taken her and carried her into Calais. His men were English and French, inhabitants of this town. One of them returned by the packet-boat last night, so I sent a warrant to the constable this morning to apprehend him, but he escaped, so I entreat your Honour's directions. [Ibid. No. 271.]
May 29.
Newcastle.
Thomas Jenison, Mayor, and six others to Williamson. We received notice last post that we are to certify under the town's seal the surrender of Robert Marlay, our late town-clerk and the election of William Jennison in his room, and we accordingly enclose the same, desiring your assistance in speedily obtaining his Majesty's instrument of approbation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 272.] Enclosed,
Certificate by the same persons of the said surrender and election. [Ibid. No. 272 I.]
Surrender by Marlay of the office of town-clerk and election of Jenison thereto, 5 and 6 May. [Copies. Ibid. Nos. 272 II., III.]
[May.] Note by John Rushworth that William Jennison was chosen town-clerk of Newcastle, 6 May instant, that his Majesty has signified to Sir J. Williamson his approbation of the said Jennison, and that something in writing is to be drawn up for his Majesty's approbation to be signified. [Ibid. No. 273.]
[May ?] 29. Commission for John Downing to be ensign to Capt. Berkeley's company in Col. Russell's regiment of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 131.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Col. Scott. Capt. Nichols will give you this letter, to whom I have given a blank commission for the first company vacant in my regiment, which I intended for Capt. Teut (Tuite), but the Duke of York has ordered it otherwise, therefore Capt. Teut must expect the second vacancy. There is a Lieut. Cole in Col. Churchill's regiment, who was formerly my page, and, his company being now like to be reformed, I would have him for his further improvement to continue in the army. Therefore I desire you would place him in the first vacant lieutenantcy in my regiment. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 38.]
May 29. Approbation by the King of the election of William Jennison to be town-clerk of Newcastle on Tyne. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 64.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Lord President of the Session. Informing him that his Majesty had granted Lord Craigie licence to stay at Bath during June for his health, who had parted thither from London the 17th intending to have stayed there not above a fortnight and to have returned to Edinburgh about the beginning of June, but who now finds that he can receive no great benefit from the waters in so short time. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 252.]
May 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a patent for 14 years in Ireland to Sir Philip Lloyd, Richard Hunt, and John Odacio Formica for their new invention of manufacturing a particular sort of crystalline glasses, resembling rock crystal, which has never been exercised by any in that kingdom. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 313.]
May 30. T. B. to —. I am here ready to speak with you. This bearer can call me to you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 274.]
May 30.
Northampton.
Dr. Daniel Danvers to Williamson. There is a small hospital here in the disposal of our very good friend, the Bishop of Lincoln elect, whose acquaintance I was once honoured with and perhaps it may not be quite worn out still, but I need such a potent remembrancer as yourself to move him in my behalf for the reversion after the present incumbent, Dr. Wake, who, if you will believe there is any such thing as Religio Medici, I heartily pray, long may live, and I think I can wait as long as any one for dead men's shoes. I cannot but think you want not better friends or more deserving persons to confer your favours on, yet perhaps there cannot be designed a fitter person than one constantly resident on the place and rightly qualified by his profession for such a crazy employment, and I think such an one was intended by the founder, and, if the poor themselves had votes, they would make such an election. [Ibid. No. 275.]
May 30.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. There are now in the Downs but not yet at anchor above 50 Dutch merchant ships, convoyed by 4 men-of-war, homeward bound. Not a topsail gale at East. [Ibid. No. 276.]
May 30.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. In my last I sent a list of the ships now here, since when I can learn of no alteration. [Ibid. No. 277.]
May 31 and June 1. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords those days, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., pp. 709–712, except as follows under 31 May:—The House then went into Committee on the bill for the Test and agreed that where any person subscribes the declaration and takes the oath he shall have a certificate thereof which shall be evidence in any Court of Record, and that a clause be worded to this effect, and that all persons, who on 1 Sept. next shall be in such office or employment, and all members of either House of Parliament, who shall wilfully neglect or refuse to make the said declaration and take the said oath, shall on conviction be disabled from bearing any such beneficial office or employment, other than that of the peerage, till he conform herein, and shall forfeit 500l. to the Crown, provided that no member of either House shall be obliged to subscribe the said declaration or take the said oath more than once in each Parliament. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 278, 279.]
May 31. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 347. [Ibid. No. 280.]
May 31.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last post I acquainted you of the arrival of above 50 Dutch merchantmen and their convoy. Afterwards three of them ran aground on the Goodwin. Two got off and one from St. Toby's (St. Ubes) laden with salt was stranded, some rigging, anchors, cables and the like only being saved. She was a fly-boat of about 300 tons.
10 before noon. Just now arrived the Berkeley Castle from Bantam. Our seamen who went to assist the Dutch stranded ship say that the Dutch men-of-war's men were very savage to them, endeavouring to cut and stab several of them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 281.]
May 31.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of the mails and packet-boats. About noon yesterday two Holland ships were cast away on the Goodwin Sands, they and some other Dutch ships being chased by the French privateers coming from the West. Two or three of them they took in the chase and carried them away. [Ibid. No. 282.]
May 31.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 28th came in here the Trial of London and the Gift of Poole, both from Maryland, with tobacco for London. Both speak of the want of provision generally in that country by reason of a very hard winter, which destroyed their corn, and their hogs and cattle dying, tobacco likewise being very scarce, so that these ships could have taken in more. They came out about 6 weeks past with two great Londoners, one called the Baltimore, and were separated three or four days after they came out, and met all together the day before they came in off the Lizard. These two put in here for fresh water and provisions, the others passed along in sight of this harbour. These two put to sea again yesterday morning, wind N.W. Yesterday came in here the Amity of this harbour from Lisbon. By contrary winds she put into Kinsale, whence she came last Tuesday, and says four great Virginia men put in there, bound for England, only they stay to refresh themselves with fresh water and provisions. [Ibid. No. 283.]
May 31.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 284.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
On the Lord Keeper's report on the reference of Viscount Powerscourt's petition, which was as follows:—I conceive the petitioner's case to be very hard, and, if letters patent were granted as desired, he would be able by virtue of your Majesty's ancient right, which is not bound by the Act of Settlement, to recover the lands in question, notwithstanding any proceedings or decrees in Ireland. But because it is of ill example to open a way for impeaching decrees by discovery of ancient titles in the Crown, I dare not advise your Majesty to gratify the petitioner by granting new letters patent, though his case be hard and accompanied with great circumstances of equity. But, if your Majesty shall direct the Lord Lieutenant to issue out a commission to inquire the value of the lands in question, and, that being found, to grant to the petitioner so many forfeited and undisposed of lands as may be equivalent to the value of the lands decreed away, and to the mesne profits thereof, for which the petitioner is liable, this may be a proper relief, so always that the petitioner be at the charges of finding out such lands and defending your Majesty's title thereto, and also of purchasing deficiencies to place thereon, if necessary: reference of the said petition and report to the Lord Treasurer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 26.]
May 31.
Whitehall.
Patent for 14 years to Capt. Gilbert Thomas of a new invention for making out of useless dust or powder of indigo, stone blue, flat indigo, and powder blue, such as is made in Holland. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 62.]
May. William Booth to Williamson. Requesting him to speak to Capt. Legge on his behalf concerning a ketch which he knows of that is going to Tangier, of which he has spoken to the Duke of York already. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 285.]
May. Address to the House of Commons. Renowned Patriots, I address myself to your Honours for I am confident you are the patrons of the common cause of the Protestants and are haters and enemies of the tyranny, superstition and abomination of the Pope and the Court of Rome. The necessity of all sorts of Protestants is come to the utmost extremity. The King has given up his life, his understanding, and conscience into the disposal of whores and ladies of pleasure, who do with him what they will. This very same infelicity and disaster hangs also over the heads of the Netherlands, among whom is a Prince, who is ruled by women and ungodly counsellors, committing wickednesses, and carried on by a spirit of ambition confederates with your King to bring all things under his arbitrament, treading the laws and the States under his feet even as your King does, so they are both tyrants. This kind of violence grows apace, and shall at last bring both the English and Dutch nations to be slaves, in case the Parliament and the States do not set themselves against the same. The Popish faction get the upper hand in both these Princes' courts; therefore must there be a vigorous proceeding in the contrary, or else the Protestant interest will be wholly lost. We present this case to the wise examination and scrutiny of the House, beseeching them seriously to reflect hereupon, and so with joint force and counsel between them and the States to proceed with common help and assistance, that this great and otherwise unavoidable destruction may be withstood in its beginning, ere it get the mastery. This serves only for a preparation to affairs of a greater weight hereafter to follow. No name at present subscribed for very considerable reasons. [Two copies, addressed respectively to Si, Thomas Lee and Sir Hugh Bethell, the former endorsed by Williamson "1675, May. Libel." Ibid. Nos. 286, 287.]
May.
The Fleet.
Payne Fisher to Williamson. Taking the short interval of your leisure from public affairs I have made bold to thrust a sample of this second impression so much meliorated and augmented beyond the first that it retains little thereof, unless some few material passages and what in the end relates to Queen's College.
I had long ago exposed it to the public, had my most noble friend, Mr. Wolrych of Shropshire, arrived sooner in town, the only remora which retarded the impression being that Res angusta domi, so essential to poets and prisoners.
I have designed a sufficient number for transportation (the cincture of so small an island being too narrow for so capacious a theme), and others to the Universities, especially to your own college, and one in metal as to the coal to be conserved in that college library. I have not printed above 733 books this bout, reserving a general impression of this poem to be printed at Paris and mingled amongst the rest of my poems purported in the very last page of this book, as soon as I can get out of this close prison, for furtherance of which I intend to print my Carmen ad Clerum entitled Deus et Rex, Rex et Episcopus, on that fair union betwixt the Crown and Mitre as it stands in the first line of this last leaf candidate for the press, and at the end shall add 21 funeral epigrams on some great persons occasionally written by me.
I have no ways to bring myself out of prison but by putting this poem Ad Clerum into the press, and daily expect to be capacitated with a small sum to defray the charges of paper and printing.
I humbly beg your pardon for my ambitious boldness in desiring this to be known to this whole kingdom and the lettered part of the remoter world, how much I am your most obediently devoted servant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 288.]
[May?] Statement by Thomas Dickenson, Warden, that Fitzpaine Fisher was committed to the Fleet 1 July, 1673, for a debt of 7l. and 50s. damages, that by reason of his great poverty and often sickness he has paid neither his commitment fee of 3l. 6s. 8d. nor his chamber rent since his commitment, which is more than is due to his creditor, who will not remit one penny. There is only expected of him, if discharged, 50s. due to the minister and clerk of the Fleet and underofficers there. [Ibid. No. 289.]
[May, after the 27th.] D.P. to [Williamson?]. I had nothing to say to your Honour till now; that you may assure his Majesty that Don Pedro [Ronquillo] brought no moneys with him, but 1,000l., which I am to receive to-day, and that for his own subsistence, till more is remitted, so there is none to bestow or to corrupt. The Dutch Ambassador was with him yesterday for three hours. I heard them sometimes when they spoke loud, being in the next room, to differ in opinion, and one reproach the conduct of the other's master, and Don Pedro's delay in coming. By some odd words of theirs I could hear, and of Don Pedro's asking me after the conference was ended, what a man excluded of the benefit of the law was, and by other men's talk that come to see him, they wish the House of Commons would outlaw all that would not obey the proclamation (of 19 May, 1675) and serve the French King hereafter, and also to make another address for calling home the forces before the late treaty of peace under the same penalty, and he told me, he wished he had been here two months ago. Several that come to see him offer to bring him some acquainted with this or that Parliament man. He said in my hearing he desired it not, alleging that yet he knows not where he is, that he must look about him first. Some assure him that the City will petition against the excessive profits of the French by the English commerce, and charged me to go into the City to my acquaintances to know the certainty of it. Many are come to him to-day to give him joy of a fight of some French ships with one of his Majesty's men-of-war for not striking. All this seems to make him wish a conclusion of the debate about the Ostend ships, which will be entered on this afternoon. Of that, and all other business that shall come to my knowledge, I shall not fail to give notice to your Honour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 290.]
[May.] "Heads of several bills brought in to the Commons' House during their session begun 13 February (sic, it should be April), 1674-5, viz., Bill to prevent frauds and perjuries; Bill for better assurance of such as claim under ancient Fines and Recoveries; Act explaining an Act for preventing dangers from Popish Recusants; Bill for the better trial of Peers; Bill to prevent members of the House of Commons taking any public offices; Act for preventing the illegal exaction of money; Bill for relief of prisoners detained for criminal matters; Act to avoid unnecessary suits; Bill for appropriating the tonnage duties to the use of the Navy; Bill to prevent illegal imprisonments; Bill to prevent (mistake for permit) the exportation of leather. (See Commons' Journals for May, passim.) [Ibid. No. 291.]
[May?] The case of the poor prisoners humbly remonstrated to the Parliament. The care of Parliament shown by the gracious Act of 22 and 23 Car. II., and the bill prepared last sessions to supply the deficiencies thereof has revived a belief in them that Parliament will consider their grievances, especially as the motives for the said Act are rather enlarged than contracted, and the numbers of poor distressed prisoners exceedingly increased especially in the prisons in and about London, some of which are so full that 50 persons or more have been and are shut up together in one room in which 20 could hardly be conveniently disposed, to the great annoyance of each other and of the whole prison, and, it is much to be feared to the corrupting of the air, and consequently the causing of such contagious diseases as may issue in a public calamity.
To enumerate all the grievances and oppressions that the poorest sort of prisoners suffer by the merciless tyranny of many of their creditors and the barbarous insulting deportment of gaolers and their creatures would be too prolix, and vary from the design of this paper, which is only briefly to state their incapacity to make any satisfaction to their creditors, for the case of such only is here stated as are so extremely impoverished, some through national calamities, and others by misfortunes not to be withstood or foreseen, and reduced to such a helpless condition as render them fit objects for relief. whereof at least 40,000 may be in various capacities very serviceable to his Majesty, themselves, and friends.
The verity of these assertions will be easily manifested to a committee appointed to inspect it, to whom many other things necessary to be discovered and regulated touching prisoners and prisons will be made known.
'Tis hoped no other arguments need be used, to quicken Parliament to an early, serious and effectual consideration of the premises. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 331, 335, 336, 341, 347.) [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 292.]
[May ?] Reasons offered to Parliament by drapers, mercers, haberdashers, grocers, hosiers and other trading housekeepers of the great decay of their trades.
A sort of people called pedlars, hawkers and petty chapmen contrary to law carry about, dispose and sell in all the cities, towns, villages and hamlets very great quantities of goods belonging to the said trades to the ruin of the said tradesmen, and the great inconvenience and danger of the whole nation, with arguments to support the above propositions. [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 293.]
[May ?] Answer offered to Parliament to the above pretended reasons against pedlars, &c., setting forth the benefit they are to the people. Though many of them are of the other nation of Scotland, it ought not to be complained of, they being also the same King's subjects. Statutes against pedlars, &c., were only meant to apply to such as misdemean themselves by begging, idleness, &c., and until shortly before the late troubles the justices were empowered to license honest and industrious pedlars, &c. (For both these papers see Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 328, 332, 335.) [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 294.]
[May ?] Exceptions to the bill against levying money; that it may take away the King's tolls, fines of alienations, both primer and post fines, and fines in courts of justice; that it takes away the power to try cases of duties or impositions, since no doubtful point can be tried without hazarding the life of the officer concerned, who, if he makes any mistake, is attainted of high treason; that the clause making it treasonable to levy any money on the subject for the King, save by Act of Parliament, will disable all judges from imposing fines, as the fines go to the King, &c. It will give the like occasion of complaint as did 21 Rich. II., that no man shall know how to behave himself. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 324.) [Ibid. No. 295.]
[May ?] Suggested proviso in the Act [for levying money] that it may still be lawful to the King to receive the usual duty or composition of 12d. the chaldron for sea and pit coal. [Ibid. No. 296.]
May.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting a grant dated 20 June, 1660, to Samuel Mearne, of the office of Bookbinder to the King, and a warrrant of 10 June last for swearing the said Mearne into the office of Stationer in Ordinary, which was accordingly done, and a petition from him praying a surrender of the said grants, and a new grant to him and his son, Charles, for a grant of the offices of Bookbinder, Bookseller and Stationer to the King, to the said Samuel and Charles Mearne for their lives and the life of the survivor. [4 pages. Precedents 1, f. 63.]
May.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 370. No. Date. King's. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
297 May 2 1 4 0 N.E.
298 " 3 2 3 3 N.E.
299 " 4 1 1 2 N.E. Two outward bound gone through and stopped not.
300 " 6 2 1 4 S.S.W.
301 " 7 3 1 4 S.E.
302 " 8 4 2 5 S.E.
303 " 10 4 5 2 E.
304 " 11 4 3 3 S.
305 " 13 3 1 3 E.
306 " 14 3 2 0 S.
307 " 15 3 2 1 N.E.
308 " 16 4 1 0 N.E.
309 " 17 3 2 0 N.E.
310 " 18 3 1 2 S.W.
311 " 19 3 4 0 S.
312 " 20 3 5 0 S.E.
313 " 21 3 0 0 N.E.
314 " 22 3 1 0 N.E.
315 " 23 3 0 0 E.
316 " 25 3 1 0 S.W.
317 " 26 4 4 13 S.W. With some others that went through the Downs not spoken with.
318 " 27 4 10 4 W.
319 " 28 4 2 6 N.E.
320 " 29 4 2 0 N.E.
321 " 30 3 2 1 E.
322 " 31 1 2 5 E.