BHO

Charles II: June 1675

Pages 146-193

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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June 1675

June 1. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. Xii., p. 712. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371. No. 1.]
June 1. Journal of the proceedings n the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 348. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 2, 3.]
June 1 & 2. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords those days, which fully appear from Lords' Journals. Vol. XII., pp. 712–717. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 4, 5.]
June 1.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. A long wished for shower to-day. Wind N.E. [Ibid. No. 6.]
June 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Sunday passed by a fleet of laden colliers towards the River. Yesterday towards evening one of our packet-boats arrived, bringing many passengers but no news. They came from the Brill Sunday morning, the wind being mostly easterly. Last night we had a great deal of rain and all this morning the wind has been uncertain. Now it is southerly.
This month will conclude an half-year's account in obedience to your commands last December, ordering the registering the times of the arrivals and departures of our packet-boats, which, with the account of his Majesty's subjects deserting foreign services and passing over in them, shall be ready when either your leisure or pleasure shall command them. [S.P.Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 7.]
June 1.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Sending list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 8.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 8i.]
June 1. Caveat that nothing pass without notice to Sir Gilbert Talbot concerning Mr. Fitzgerald of Ratroan obtaining a writ of error against Sir Edward Sutton. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 11.]
June 1.
Whitehall.
Reference of the petition of Hellen Wolsley, Col. Pretty, Col. Hene, Major Lorimer, Capt. Bell and other loyal indigent officers to whom his Majesty lately gave a patent for all lotteries, except the Royal Oak Lottery, for 13 years, praying an order to the Groom Porter and the Master of the Revels to desist from the exercise or erecting of any lotteries, to the Lord Keeper to examine how the matter of right stands between the petitioners and the Master of the Revels and between them and the Groom Porter, and to report the same with his opinion thereon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 27.]
June 2 & 3. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords those days, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII, pp. 717-719. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, Nos. 9, 10.]
June 2. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 350. [Ibid. No. 11.]
June 2. Certificate by William Wood and Josiah Ricroft that Robert Guthery, late of Dundee, but now of London, mariner, had taken before them that day the oaths of allegiance and supremacy. [Ibid. No. 12.]
June 2.
London.
Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh to [Williamson]. I was sorry to hear to-day, at Whitehall, that you were not well and had taken physic. I trouble you with these lines, since my lord Ambassador told me you had not seen the King, my master's, letter to the States General of 5 Dec. last. I may be mistaken in thinking I imparted it to you as soon as it came to my hands, but I am sure we spoke of it, when I sent you the printed memorials of M. Ehrensteen, where the said letter was joined at the end of his memorials. And, whereas I have since had them translated and printed for my own and some friends' satisfaction, I send herewith some exemplars thereof. [Ibid. No. 13.]
June 2. The Earl of Pembroke to Williamson. Requesting him to obtain the King's approbation of the persons therein named to be deputylieutenants for Wiltshire. (The names are the same as those approved, post, p. 161, with the addition of Sir Edward Baynton, K.B., and Sir John Coventry, K.B.) [Ibid. No. 14.]
June 2.
Oxford.
Dr. John Wallis to Williamson. We understood to-night by a letter from Mr. Everard that our business is but just where it was. The Commissioners now pretend that, the suit being in Stirt's name, they cannot dismiss it without order from him, that they hear nothing from him to that purpose, though it is pretended that they have sent to him, that, when he signifies his consent and will relinquish his licence he shall have his bonds delivered up, but before it cannot be done. The Vice-Chancellor thereupon sent for Stirt, while I was present, to know whether he had sent any such order. He says, he heard nothing from them at all of any such thing, that he never knew the suit was in his name, nor ever gave order for it. For his own part he never would have contended with the University at all, and would relinquish his licence with all his heart, if he might have his bonds. He had long since desired of them to have given over Lady Day last, but they (at least Mr. Downs, one of them) told him that they could not, nor would not deliver up his bonds, but, if he would give over, they would yet have the forfeiture of the bonds of him or his sureties, and that the Lord Treasurer would spend 1,000l., but that he would maintain him in it. He now tells us that he will write to them to-morrow, that he is willing the suit be dismissed, and will deliver up his licence if he may have his bonds, and will cast himself on the mercy of the University, and says he has formerly so written to them. You see our delays, and it is now so far gone, Tuesday next being our day of hearing in the Exchequer, that, if we know not by Friday night any certainty, some of us must be at London on Saturday, to prepare against Tuesday morning.
Postscript.—After sending this Stirt tells me he will be with you to-morrow himself, and bring or send you this letter. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 15.]
June 2.
Sunderland.
Samuel Hodgkin to Williamson. To-day the coal owners and fitters of this river have begun to mend this harbour, by taking away a shoal called the Stell, which seems to be very feasible, and will make a very good harbour. A considerable fleet of loaden colliers is now off this. Our vessels from Holland and Flanders complain much of the incivility of the Dunkirk and Ostend capers. [Ibid. No. 16.]
June 2.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday the French fleet, being two stout ships, two small ships and three sloops, plied to windward towards the Dutch fleet, being four men-of-war and about 50 merchantmen homeward-bound at the Back or East part of the Goodwin. But, when the French saw the Dutch resolved to fight them, they tacked to the Eastward and let them go by. They now appear again at the Back of the Goodwin, sailing southerly. Wind S.W., not a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 17.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. Recommending John Ceely, M.A., prebendary of that cathedral, a person of piety, wisdom, and learning, for the next vacant place of canon residentiary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 70.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 18.]
June 3. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals. Vol. IX., p. 352. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, Nos. 19, 20.]
June 3. Heads offered on behalf of the House of Lords at the conference concerning the House of Commons attaching Serjeant Peck and others, Crispe's counsel. (Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 718.) [Ibid. No. 21.]
June 3. B. di Barbore to Williamson. I believed that being Turk in ordinary the King's servant in the capacity of superintendent for regulating the manufactures of this kingdom, this would have served me for protection, of which I never believed I stood in need. By the malice of a woman I have been arrested and sent to Newgate, no regard being paid to my protection, and no request (as the order is) having been presented to the Lord Chamberlain. The business I had with that woman's husband related to accounts, wherein I have paid several letters of exchange and bought goods on his account. I beg you to intercede for me with the Lord Chamberlain that I may come out of this by his authority, since he is my master after the King, and, if you find it good, that I write to the King. I commit my business to your prudence, and to the friendship you have promised me. [French. Ibid. No. 22.]
June 3. Dr. J. Fell to Williamson. Your great kindness for this place will, I know, render you not displeased with the account of what has passed here in the reception of the young Prince of Neuburg, who came to us late Tuesday night very unexpected. However, Mr. Vice-Chancellor, myself and Dr. Marshall attended on him to bid him welcome, and tender him the respects of the University. Yesterday morning the Vice-Chancellor being detained by the necessity of beginning the term, myself and Dr. Marshall attended the Prince, and, having provided four coaches for the reception of his Highness and servants, brought him first to Christ Church where my young men gave him a volley of poetical shot, and the canons, noblemen, gentlemen and students of all conditions made a solemn appearance. Having paid his Highness what respect we could and showed him our public buildings, we conducted him to St. John's. From thence we passed through the grove, having ordered the coaches to go about, and visited Wadham, then New College, then we showed him your buildings, afterwards Magdalen College and the Physie Garden and Merton College. By this time it grew to be noon, and it was time to wait on the Prince to his lodgings. After dinner we attended him to visit the University, and, having signified that they were met in Convocation to receive him, and present his Highness and such of his train as he thought fit, to a degree, he accepted the proposal as to his own person, but declined it as to any one else. Whether he did so in point of greatness, or upon intimation that one of his dependants had made some indecent proposals under his pretence to bring in unfit men to share that respect of ours I know not, but we obeyed his pleasure, and, having while the Convocation was gathered together and settled, showed his Highness the fabric of the Schools, the Library and curiosities there, we conducted him solemnly into the Convocation House, where Dr. Bourchier, the Professor, with a short and elegant speech presented him to the degree of Doctor of Laws. He being seated in a seat raised on purpose and handsomely adorned for him, Mr. Vice-Chancellor in a like elegant oration created him, after which the Pro-Orator, Mr. Wiatt of our House, with great dexterity addressed him him in the name of the University. From hence the whole University attended him to the Theatre, where also a peculiar seat was raised, and here we gave him a treat of music. Afterward his Highness viewed the Printing offices (which he had never seen, as it happened, before), the roof and other particularities, which done, we attended him homeward, and in the way showed him All Souls' College. This morning Mr. Vice-Chancellor, myself and others have taken our leaves, and presented his Highness with the History and Cuts of the University in two volumes fairly bound. The whole performance went with order and solemnity, and, so far as we can discern, has given satisfaction. [3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 23.]
June 3.
Oxford.
Dr. John Wallis to Williamson. I suppose, before this comes, you will have received mine of last night, which I directed Stirt, the vintner, about whom our contest has been, to deliver to you himself. You will, I presume, as well by this as the former carriages, perceive that there is a design by delays and chargeable attendances to weary out ourselves and our friends from pursuing this business, which yet we are so deeply concerned to bring to a good issue, as absolutely necessary for preserving the good discipline of this place. You know very well that my Lord Treasurer, before we came out of town, declared himself satisfied, and promised the Duke of Ormonde and yourself, as he had before done to the Bishop of Bath and Wells, that the suit in the Exchequer should be presently dismissed, and the Attorney-General and divers of the Commissioners had done the like. You and Mr. Everard by your direction have since solicited it, and it is now pretended that, the suit being in Stirt's name, they cannot dismiss it but by his direction, to whom having written about it, they have yet received no answer. (Stirt's version of the affair as in Wallis' last letter calendared ante, p. 148.) I doubt that, things being put off thus long, I must be in London by Saturday night, that I may have at least a day to prepare against Tuesday morning, unless by to-night's post we have somewhat of certainty from Mr. Everard to the contrary. I think it not improper you stay Stirt in town till Tuesday be over, that he may say as much in Court, if there be occasion, as he promised to say to you. I write this, lest, when Stirt comes to the Commissioners, they may persuade him not to deliver you my letter. [Ibid. No. 24.]
June 3.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. A vessel arrived here to-day from Dieppe, bringing news of a battle lately fought betwixt the Germans and the French, wherein the French are said to have lost 10,000 men. [Ibid. No. 25.]
June 3. Warrant to Serjeant James Beck to search for and take into custody Thomas Felton, Groom of the Bedchamber, and carry him to the Tower, for sending a challenge to a peer; and also Henry Bulkeley for carrying the same. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 136.]
June 3. Warrant to the Lieutenant of the Tower to receive the above two gentlemen into his custody and keep them safely till further order. Minute. [Ibid.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Matthew Robinson, at Newmarket. The King, hearing of your indisposition, has dispatched the bearer, M. Forcade, one of his own chirurgeons, to endeavour your recovery, which I wish he may effect. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 38.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Col. Scott. Major Kirke having earnest business on his father's death that will require his stay here longer than he intended, I have dispensed with his absence, and, that the regiment might not suffer in it, I have ordered Capt. Ramsay to execute the place of major, till Mr. Kirke's return. [Ibid. p. 39.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Capt. Ramsay. Empowering him to discharge the duties of major during Major Kirke's absence. [Ibid.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to the Bishop of St. Asaph. Recommending to him the bearer, Mr. Jones, one from his diocese, who has served these two years as chaplain to his regiment in France, and requesting him to bestow on him the first vacant living in his disposal that shall be fit for him. [Ibid.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting a grant dated 28 March, 1674, to John Ogilby, of the place of Cosmographer, and his petition for the acceptance of a surrender thereof and for a new grant thereof to himself and his kinsman, William Morgan, for a grant of the said office to the said Ogilby and Morgan and the survivor of them during pleasure, the said Ogilby surrendering the said recited grant. [Precedents 1, f. 77.]
June 4. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 720. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, Nos. 26, 27.]
June 4 & 5. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 352-354. [Ibid. No. 28.]
June 4.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 29.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 29 i.]
June 4. Extract from a letter from the captain of the Garland describing how a French privateer off Dungeness refused to strike, though fired at continually for two hours, pretending he took them for Dutch ships. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, No. 157.]
June 4.
London.
Statement by Louis Cayroze, merchant, of London, giving particulars of his goods taken by the Ostenders on board the Barbara Maria, the Hope, the Charity, the James and the Mary of Dover, all neutral vessels, and adding that he has given all necessary proofs at Ostend and Brussels, where he has appealed, but the only justice he has received is that of complaining of the exorbitant costs he has been charged with, and that no way remains to him, but such as his Majesty shall prescribe, and imploring his assistance. Endorsed, " 5 June, 1675, from M. Le Pin for M. Cayroze." [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 30.]
[June ?] Statement of Mr. Cayroze's case. The ships Barbara and Mary, Charity, Hope and Bunch of Grapes belong to Swedes, Danes, and Hamburgers, and on their return from France, where they were laden, were taken by the Spaniards, and carried into Ostend. Mr. Cayroze is concerned for several goods in them, which belong to himself. His friends at Ostend write that, though they have duly claimed his goods in the Admiralty Court there, yet, for want of speedy justice and the ill-usage they suffer, being mostly wines and brandy, they are like to be utterly spoiled. He prays the King's letter to the Governor of Flanders, desiring him to command the Admiralty Court to administer speedy justice to him according to the law of Admiralty and the treaties between the two Crowns, and to restore such goods forthwith as he shall prove to belong to him. Endorsed, "State of Mr. Cayroze's case. Sir W. Godolphin." [Ibid. No. 31.]
June 4.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. Shipping news. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 165.]
June 5. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 725. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 370, Nos. 32, 33.]
June 5. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 354. [Ibid. No. 34.]
June 5 & 7. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons those days, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 354, 355. [Ibid. No. 35.]
June 5.
Oxford.
Dr. John Wallis to Williamson. Mr. Everard's letter came to hand yesterday, time enough to prevent my journey to London, understanding thereby that the hearing for Tuesday next is put off till the Tuesday following. 'Tis strange that, when every body profess themselves satisfied in what we pretend to be our right, we should meet with nothing but delays, in a business which might be so soon dispatched, either by adjudging our right, or at least by dismissing the cause. I doubt the putting it off from Tuesday to Tuesday is but in order to the putting off for this term, which is but short, and then they will think themselves quit of us at least till Michaelmas Term. I cannot think it is my Lord Treasurer's design to use us thus, but somebody else's, whose business it is to abuse both him and us. I should think that, if the Lord Chief Baron were acquainted how the Lord Treasurer professes himself satisfied and the Attorney-General also, and how little it is the King's pleasure we should have this trouble given us, he would without further trouble dismiss the suggestion, especially since he has already declared, that, if in our charter we have not only affirmative, but also negative words [that none but we, &c.], as we have very fully, the right is then clearly ours by the proviso in the late Act. But I am not to prescribe you methods, but only implore your assistance.
Postscript.–I do not understand what that discourse is of Mr. Warcup, with which he tells Mr. Everard that he thinks we are satisfied, nor does Mr. Vice-Chancellor. But, if he mean the overture of obtaining a new grant for us to license a greater number, and thereon found a revenue, &c., it is wholly contrary to our desires. For, though the University be not so rich, but that a new accession to our revenue would be welcome, yet it is not our design to advance a revenue by licensing more taverns, but to pursue our discipline by restraining the number, and that neither others nor even ourselves should have a power to license more. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 36.]
June 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind keeping southerly and westerly, the packet-boat which came from the Brill last Wednesday did not arrive here till about noon to-day. The master informs me that last Monday off Dunkirk or Calais, five or six French men-ofwar encountered the Dutch Smyrna fleet of about 40 sail, but under the convoy of about 5 men-of-war. The French fought them, but, as it reported in Holland, without any success. Several or most of the Dutch fleet are gone into the Texel and to their other ports.
A French privateer of 10 guns that for some time had plied betwixt this coast and Holland was this week also, as I understand him, encountered by a Dutch man-of-war, and after a brisk fight for half-a-day, and several on both sides slain, was mastered and carried into Holland. [Ibid. No. 37.]
[June 5.] The King's answer to the Lords' Address for removing Sir John Robinson from the lieutenancy of the Tower. (Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol XII., p. 725.) [Ibid. No. 38.]
June 5. Warrant for Henry Bulkeley's release from the Tower on his paying the usual fees. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 136.]
June 5.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Monmouth to Major Kirke. As he has allowed Mr. Sarsfield the pay of a capt.-lieutenant reformed for his pains in soliciting the business of the regiment at Paris, requiring him to take care that the said allowance be paid him out of the pay of those reformed officers who are allowed to the regiment, and likewise ordering that the profits out of the cstat-major, after deducting the pay of the several officers concerned, be equally divided between the colonel-lieutenant, lieut.-colonel and major as likewise all other advantages to be made upon the musters by the absence or death of officers. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 40.]
June 5. The King's Speech to the Houses of Parliament. (Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 725.) [Precedents 1, f. 75.]
June 7. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 726. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, Nos. 39, 40.]
June 7. Journal of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 355. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 41.]
June 7.
Hull.
Richard Gleadow to Williamson. Last week arrived here two ships from Virginia, laden with tobacco. Both bring news of a great dearth there this winter both by want of corn as also by the death of almost all their cattle and hogs, so that the ships there may be much straitened for provision. Three others also arrived. The masters of all these ships report that the lighthouses lately built on the Spurn at Humber mouth did them much good, and are of very great and necessary use for avoiding the danger of the great sand lately cast up there, of which many ships have formerly perished. [Ibid. No. 42.]
June 7.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. On Friday a small French man-of-war, who would not strike to one of his Majesty's ships, was forced to run into this harbour, and is here stayed for his contempt. [Ibid. No. 43.]
June 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 44.]
June 7.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 45.]
June 7.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind having been at N. or W. there are very few ships in the port. [Ibid. No. 46.]
June 7.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 3rd came in here the Hope of Amsterdam for Rochelle, which reports that last Tuesday off the Ness she saw the Dutch fleet with their convoy standing very close together so that they could not tell their number, and five French men-of-war, which, it seems, had some skirmish the day before with them, for they heard several guns, but the French gave way to the Dutch, and that one of their ships was on fire betwixt both fleets, but how it came on fire they cannot tell, unless the French put it on fire themselves, that it should not fall into the hands of the Dutch. There also came in the Bachelor of London, bound for Newfoundland and so for the Straits. They spoke with the Cambridge, and, though the report was here that they had 80 men killed, they say there was none. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 47.]
June 7.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. By a small vessel of Scilly we are informed that about 17 leagues off the Land's End he met with two Turks men-of-war of betwixt 40 and 50 guns apiece, who sent their boat on board, and finding him to be English told him they were straitened for provisions, having met with no prizes, and that they must borrow some of him. They would pay him one time or other. They took his compass, some beef and pork, &c., and dismissed him very civilly. He says they were more civil to him than the Ostenders were the last voyage, for they cut his anchors from his bow and used him very discourteously.
We are informed by Anthony Cole, master and part owner, as he alleges, of the Hopeful of London bound for Dundalk with wheat, that 24 May he lost his ship not far from his intended port, and all his men but himself and one other. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 48.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a grant dated 29 Aug., 1671, to Edward Vernon of the town and village of Clontarf, and the lands of Hollybrook and the island of Clontarf, co. Dublin, and of all the messuages and hereditaments lying within the limits of the said town, village, lands and island, for the creation of the premises into a manor by the name of the manor of Clontarf, with power to the said Edward Vernon to set apart 300 acres or less for the demesne lands of the said manor, and to alien in fee or for lives any part of the premises to be holden as of the said manor, notwithstanding the statute of Quia Emptores, in free and common socage or by suit of court or otherwise, and to hold a Court Leet and view of frank pledge and a Court Baron and to impark 300 acres or more or less for deer and other beasts of venery with a grant of all waifs, strays, &c., and with power to the said Edward Vernon to hold a Court of Record within the said manor to have cognizance of pleas for any sum not exceeding 20s., with a grant to him of all customs, anchorages, flockages, heriots, tolbuts, fens, brooks, water weirs, fishings, quays, creeks, sands, seashores, wrecks, gulfs, pools and other immunities and franchises formerly belonging to the said lands and islands, with power to the said Edward Vernon to hold two yearly fairs at the town of Clontarf at the rent for the said fairs of 10s. per annum. [Over 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 314.]
June 8. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear by Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 727, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 356, with an account of the proceedings of the House of Commons the previous afternoon, which fully appear by Commons' Journals, ubi supra. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, Nos. 49, 50.]
June 8.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. We have here a report, though the Dutch do not acknowledge any loss, that two of their Smyrna fleet miscarried, one sunk by a French man-of-war and another run aground on the Goodwin Sands, and there, as some say, set on fire. It is further said that the French fought them a whole day, but the particulars we have not yet received. The wind blows fresh northerly; no packet-boat since my last has arrived from Holland. [Ibid. No. 51.]
June 8.
Portsmouth
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W.N.W. The Monmouth yacht was yesterday paid, which was the only occasion of their tarrying here and not proceeding to their station on the coast of Ireland. [Ibid. No. 52.]
June 8.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 53.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 53 i.]
Tuesday,
June 8. 10 p.m.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Great Chamberlain. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he give notice to the Lords to be in their robes to-morrow at the House, his Majesty having something to say to them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 39.]
June 8.
10 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Falconbridge (Fauconberg). Giving him notice of his Majesty's intention as in the last letter, that the Band of Pensioners may be ready to attend. [Ibid. p. 40.]
June 8.
10 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Master of the Jewel House. Giving him notice of his Majesty's intention as in the last two letters, that he may have the Crown and Robes ready at 10 o'clock. [Ibid.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Governor of the East India Company. In execution of the last article of the Treaty Marine of 1 Dec., 1674, by his Majesty's commands transmitting him the enclosed authentic copy of the said treaty, that it may in all things be punctually observed by the Company. [Ibid. p. 41.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Commission to Prince Rupert to be Lord Lieutenant of Surrey. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 13.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Appointment of John Bolt, the elder, of Winchfield, and Thomas Terry, of Cleworth, to be agistors within the Forest of Windsor. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 65.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Robert Thornton of the office of Provost Marshal of Jamaica in reversion after Sir Thomas Lynch. [Precedents 1, f. 78.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
Passport for Elias Payne, master of the Unity, of London, and for his said ship. [Ibid. f. 79.]
June 8. William Harbord to [William Bridgeman]. My Lord Lieutenant has commanded me to acquaint Mr. Secretary Williamson that the Earl of Tyrone, being a peer and privy councillor of Ireland, Governor of the county and city of Waterford, and captain of a foot company, is lately gone for England without licence from the Lord Lieutenant, which his Excellency apprehends not only to be a disrespect to his Majesty, whom he represents, but that such practices will breed a contempt in the officers of the army to their General, and he desires that no licence may pass from his Majesty to dispense with his absence. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 166.]
June 8.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that there having lately happened a difference between the Commissioners of the Treasury in Ireland and the Duke of Ormonde about the payment of 5,000l. per annum payable by virtue of a contract between the King and the said Duke, application was made to the Lord Lieutenant, who, conceiving himself restrained by an Order in Council in England of 14 Jan., 1673[-4] from determining the matter, transmitted the proceedings to the Earl of Danby and Secretary Coventry, and gave orders that 2,500l., the present money in question, should be detained in the hands of the Farmers of the Irish revenue till 18 June instant, that the King's pleasure might be known, and a reference of the Duke's petition to the Earl of Danby and his report dated 7 June that the difference in question, relating only to an account, ought properly to be heard and determined by the Lord Lieutenant, whom his Majesty may empower to proceed therein, notwithstanding the said Order in Council: confirming the said report and authorizing the Lord Lieutenant to proceed to determining the said difference, notwithstanding the said Order in Council, and in the meantime to give order for continuing the said sum in the hands of the said farmers, till the said difference be settled. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 317.]
June 9. Journal of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 729, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 357. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 54.]
June 9. The King's Speech to the Parliament. (Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XII., p. 729.) [Two MSS. and 4 printed copies. Ibid. Nos. 55-60.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Richard Wescombe, Nicholas Warren and George Torriano showing that the Anna and Margaret with her lading valued at 13,000l. having been wrongfully taken in time of peace by a Hollander, on the petitioners' application his Majesty from time to time and especially during the intended treaty in Holland and at Cologne ordered his ambassadors to insist for payment of the same, which could not be obtained for the general stop of proceedings there, but, another treaty having been afterwards renewed by the Spanish ambassador here, the petitioners' case was also referred to him in order to procure satisfaction, which, after the peace was concluded, he undertook to do, but he returned to Spain before bringing the business to an issue, and praying his Majesty to recommend their condition to the succeeding Spanish ministers here and to the present Dutch ambassadors and to direct his ambassador in Holland, that they may continue to interpose for a speedy dispatch and relief therein: that Secretary Williamson effectually recommend the petitioners' case as well to the ambassador at the Hague as to the Spanish and Dutch ministers here. [Ibid. No. 61.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
Order in Council for naturalizing the Greenland Adventure and the Hope, of Hull, purchased in foreign parts and fitted out for that voyage at the expense of near 6,000l. by the Greenland merchants of Hull, on the petition of the same. [Ibid. No. 62.]
June 9.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Some gentlemen from Holland report that General Montecuculi has engaged Monsr. Turenne, and that the French King and the Prince of Orange are within 20 miles of each other, every day expecting an engagement.
This mackerel time they have caught so many that in the Isle of Thanet 50 very new out of the boats were sold for 4d. last week, the winds blowing fresh and against them so that they could not go for London. Within those eight days we have had much rain, corn of all sorts much prospering, and that like to be good which was almost scorched. Wind fresh at N.E. [Ibid. No. 63.]
June 9.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of the mails and packet-boats. [Ibid. No. 64.]
June [9]/19.
London.
Newsletter. The Lower House has ventured to arrest the King's General Advocate and three others who pleaded an appellation before the Upper House, and, the officers of the Upper House having delivered them, they were sent to the Tower. Next morning the Speaker of the Commons saw the four advocates with many lords at Whitehall, had them seized and sent to the Tower, and received the thanks of the House. The Lords addressed the King and obtained an order for the release of the advocates, but the Lieutenant of the Tower said he would not do it without the command of the Commons. Mr. Felton, Groom of the Bedchamber, is also sent to the Tower. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 65.]
June 9. Caveat on behalf of Sir Edward Carteret and Mr. Mitton that no grant pass of the estate of Jonathan Frost, late a pawnbroker, now prisoner in the Marshalsea, who is to be tried for clipping. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 11.]
June 10.
Gray's Inn.
Edward Rigby to Williamson. Having been twice at your lodging to-day about the business I formerly mentioned and finding you either not at leisure or not at home, I make bold to trouble you with this by the bearer (who is the person who stays in town only to know whether a pardon may be obtained or not) to beg you to let me know where the gentleman lives whom you have engaged to beg the pardon, and what his name is and whether he has made any progress, and how soon a fiat may be obtained, for I hear his Majesty intends for Windsor in a day or two, and, if it be not done before, I shall in a great measure despair of its ever being done. I humbly entreat you to acquaint me, if any thing is, or is likely to be done, and how soon it may be expected, if at all. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 66.]
June 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By the packet-boat arrived here last Tuesday afternoon we were informed that the Hollanders say the rencontre was betwixt 4 men-of-war and about 30 of the Holland St. Uball fleet (and not their Smyrna fleet), with 5 or 6 French men-of-war, who fell on them in a fog and took two of their fleet and they miss a third, but, when the mist cleared up, they say they beat the French, who fled before them. They further report that last Sunday they heard very many guns, and were told by a vessel they met at sea, that those French men-of-war and some Dutch men-of-war had met, and were in fight, but the certainty of it we have not received.
For several days many laden colliers for the river have passed by.
This morning another packet-boat came in, by whom we are informed that the war against the Swedes was proclaimed last Tuesday at the Brill, and four days before at Amsterdam. They brought over, as is reported, a Polonian envoy, who is gone for London. [Ibid. No. 67.]
June 10.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Sir Capel Lucken or Thomas King, burgesses for Harwich. This town in general is oppressed by Dutchmen that lie always begging about the streets and to me in particular for passage and victual in the packet-boats, which I am not able to do. I pray you therefore to speak to the Dutch Ambassador to provide for his countrymen, for I have writ very often. but can get no satisfaction from him, I having carried and victualled several hundreds myself, besides the charge our town is at.
War was proclaimed last Tuesday at Rotterdam between the Dutch and the Swedes. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 68.]
June 10.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The Matha and Millior of Cork came in here, which came lately from Dunkirk, and reports that the French King is drawing out of that and all other garrisons what forces they can spare to reinforce his army in Flanders, and that there are about 40 capers belonging to that place. The Owen and David of London has taken in about 45 hogsheads of tin in bars, and is put to sea again to-day for Leghorn or Smyrna, wind N. Last Monday passed before this the St. David with several merchantmen under his convoy from Barbados, and it is supposed they put into Plymouth the day after, the wind being N.E. [Ibid. No. 69.]
June 10.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 70.]
June 10. Warrant for Mr. Felton's release from the Tower, on his paying the usual fees. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 136.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Mr. Jolliffe. Having been for many years a witness of the great zeal and diligence with which poor Mr. Harris served the interests of the Merchant Adventurers' Company, recommending Mr. Kynvin, his son-in-law, for the employment he had under the Company. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 41.]
June 10.
11 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Dover. I have received both yours of yesterday concerning the Ostend privateer there, that had committed the insolence upon the French shallop upon the Stade before Folkestone, and having communicated them to his Majesty I am commanded to signify his pleasure that, notwithstanding what you say in your last letter of the privateer's having given satisfaction for the damage and restored the shallop and goods, you continue to make stay of the said privateer to answer the insolence and offence committed against his Majesty in the violation of his port, in which further order will be forthwith taken. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 43, p. 42.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Keeper of the petition of Sir Francis Wyndham and Thomas Wyndham, which showed that Dr. Nicholas Love of Winchester made his last will 8 Sept., 1630, being then possessed of a lease of the manor of Crundall for 99 years, if Nicholas, Robert, and Barnaby, his sons, should so long live, that the said Nicholas, the son, being convicted and attainted of the murder of his late Majesty, all the lands were forfeited to his Majesty, that by an indenture of 18 Jan., 1661 [-2], the said lands were let by Lord Berkeley and others, the trustees of his Royal Highness, that Barnaby, Robert and Edward, sons of the said Dr. Love, colluded, that a citation was taken out of the ecclesiastical Court of Winton in the name of the said Barnaby calling the said Robert and Edward to appear in that court, where sentence being passed against the petitioners in their absence, they appealed to the Court of Arches, where a definitive sentence was given in their behalf 9 May, 1673, that the said Barnaby pretending he was wronged by that judgment last June obtained a Commission of Appeal to Sir Timothy Baldwin and others, that the petitioners made it appear that Dr. Love's will, having stood proved for near 40 years, after the probate was made 30 Sept., 1630, ought not now to be called in question, and that the judgment in the Court of Arches in July 1673, for the dismission of the petitioners was just and right, that notwithstanding Sir Timothy and the rest, Dr. Exton and Dr. Trumbull, two of the Judges Delegate, dissenting, reversed the said judgment of the Court of Arches, and therefore desired a Commission of Review. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 28.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
Licence to the High Sheriff of Gloucestershire, who has been very sick, to come to London to consult physicians. [Precedents 1, f. 78.]
June 10.
The Council Chamber. Dublin.
Proclamation by the Lord Lieutenant and Council. After reciting that divers disloyal persons, commonly called Tories, have of late very much infested several counties and have committed divers robberies, burglaries and murders whereunto they have been encouraged by protections of late having been too frequently granted to some of them by persons having or pretending authority from the Lord Lieutenant, and also because the persons who have harboured the said Tories have not been so strictly inquired after, prosecuted and punished as they ought to have been, declaring that no person shall after the 24th instant grant any protections to any robbers or Tories, and that any protections granted to them after that date shall be of no force, with a proviso that any protections duly granted before that date shall continue in force for the period they were granted for, and that, if any persons so protected shall in respect of any services done by them expect to have their protections continued or to be pardoned, they are to make timely applications to the Lord Lieutenant, and strictly requiring the sheriffs of the counties, wherein any such Tories are or shall be, to raise the power of their respective counties, as there shall be occasion, for apprehending and bringing to justice all such robbers and Tories, the justices to assist the sheriffs therein, and to cause examinations to be forthwith taken concerning such murders, robberies and stealths, in their respective counties, that the persons who shall appear guilty thereof may be indicted and outlawed if they do not render themselves, and also to enquire strictly after all relievers or harbourers of such robbers or Tories or such as shall refuse to assist in following or apprehending them, and to cause such persons to be bound over to the next assizes to be prosecuted. [3 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 309, p. 411.]
June 11.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Shipping news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 71.]
June 11.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived [Ibid. No. 72.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 72 i.]
June 12.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Since my last no packet-boat has arrived. Wind N.W. and weather very calm. I humbly desire your commands concerning the account I have kept of the packetboats, and of the soldiers brought over in them, who have deserted foreign service. Both these I have kept as well as I could, and thought not fit to send them you or discontinue them without order. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 73.]
June 12.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. No news. [Ibid. No. 74.]
June 12. Approbation by the King of John, Lord Coleraine, Sir Robert Howard, Sir Richard Grubham How, Sir George Grubham How, Sir Walter Ernley, Sir Seymour Pyle, Sir James Long, Sir Edward Hungerford, K.B., Sir Henry Coker, Sir John Ernley, Sir Thomas Mompesson, Richard Lewis of Edington, Thomas Thynne, Alexander Thistlethwayte, George Bond, William Duckett, and Joseph Stockman to be deputy lieutenants of Wiltshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 14.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Edmund Wyndham, Knight Marshal, praying a privy seal for payment to him of 416l. in lieu of lodgings out of Court, since the time he was Knight Marshal, being 8 years, and that for the future he may either have lodgings assigned him or 52l. per annum continued to him for the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 29.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Richard Champion, keeper of his Majesty's privy lodgings, praying a further allowance for his messuage in East Greenwich, called the Rose and Crown tavern, conveyed to his Majesty and lying near his palace there, whereby he was 300l. loser. [Ibid. p. 30.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Thomas Duppa, Gentleman Usher, praying that he may be paid a debt of 305l., transferred to him by Sir John Ayton out of the Treasurer of the Chamber's office for divers services done, out of the arrears of the tenths of the diocese of London. [Ibid.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Edward Halsall, one of his Majesty's querries in ordinary, praying a gift of what money he can recover of the sutlers provided for the regiments of Blackheath, to every three of whom 120l. was advanced by his Majesty to be repaid to his Majesty by bond, his Majesty, being disposed to gratify the petitioner, refers and recommends it to the Lord Treasurer to report what his Majesty may fitly do in it for the petitioner's gratification. [Ibid.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of the Justices of Northamptonshire at their last Epiphany Sessions, praying a grant of the site of the Castle of Northampton, consisting of 8 acres, and of the stones and materials towards building a new house for the sessions. [Ibid. p. 31.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Having so often and so clearly declared our pleasure to you concerning the disorders that appeared in that our kingdom these 12 months past, and finding that by your diligence before the last vacance that factious humour was in some measure quieted, we hoped we should not have been so soon troubled with such offences. Yet now we are informed that more effects of that seditious spirit break out afresh, and particularly that a party of our forces has been deforced by a riotous and tumultuous assembly near the house of Cardross, where one King was rescued from our soldiers, whom Lord Cardross so highly owned before as his domestic servant. We specially recommended the trial of the former disorder concerning that King, and, if that matter had been thoroughly examined and duly punished, it is probable we should not have met with such an insolence in that place again.
We are also informed that in other places, especially in Teviotdale and East Lothian, many numerous and disorderly communions have been kept by indulged ministers, and that in Ayr there has been lately a meeting of indulged and outed ministers, who have issued orders for keeping fasts and other illegal injunctions, as if they had been a judicature.
Therefore we require you to examine thoroughly those and all other disorders of this kind. We doubt not you will find out those who encourage such practices, and, that you may more solemnly apply fitting remedies, it is our pleasure that you particularly summon all those of the Privy Council who are within fourscore miles of Edinburgh, to attend by a short day, there to remain during this session, and we require you to give us particular information who does not come and whom you shall find negligent or remiss in our service after they come, that we may apply suitable remedies, for we will not endure remissness in what so much concerns the reputation of our government. In the meantime you are to go on vigorously and to give us frequent accounts. You shall also enquire after the spreaders of false news, by which such disorders are encouraged and our authority disparaged. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 253.]
June 12.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy of Ireland to Robert Reading, and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to the issue male of his daughter, Elizabeth Reading, with a discharge to him of all services and payments to be performed or made on account of the said dignity being conferred on him. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 320.]
June 13.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of the mails and packet-boats. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 75.]
June 13.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Earl of Arlington, Lord Chamberlain, for swearing Mary, the wife of William Young, into the place of Seamstress and Laundress to the King, in reversion after — Chiffinch, who now enjoys the same. [Precedents 1, f. 80.]
June 14.
Carnon Hall.
Hugh Morrell to Williamson. Having been informed by a gentleman lately come from London, that his Honour had given directions in several places there for summoning up several clothiers from the counties to attend his Majesty in reference to clothing and the regulating of English manufactures of all kinds, which now, wanting the same, are so false and deceitfully made that the nation and its manufactures are now in no esteem compared with what they have been, and wool is now fallen from its usual price, 12d. per lb. or more, to 4, 5 and 6d., proposing the establishment of a Committee for Trade in London consisting of 31 of the ablest bred merchants of London, of each company one or two, but no Lords, being beneath their dignity and out of their element. To this committee all the corporations in England relating to clothing, or mines of tin, coals, iron, &c., or manufactures of old or new draperies might weekly or monthly make their addresses for directions or instructions or represent rules for government, to be confirmed by his Majesty and the Privy Council relating to the true making of English manufactures, which this committee is to consult on and then report to his Majesty and the Privy Council with their grounds for his Majesty's confirmation, so that this committee would be properly his Majesty's subordinate council for all the counties to prepare and perfect their addresses for his Majesty and the Council, to free them from the laborious and intricate mysteries of clothing and commerce, and hinder the clothiers spending their time and money by often coming up to London. Were this committee established, several things of intricate nature of trade, commerce, sea affairs and the like might be referred to them, as his Majesty's father and the Privy Council did to the committee the writer (who is now 82) procured. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 76.]
June 14.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. 34 light colliers are now loosing out of this bay with a fair wind, being S.SE. The master of a vessel from Norway informs us, that, when he came from thence, it was reported that war was proclaimed betwixt Sweden and Denmark. Yesterday here was a great meeting of Quakers, and other Nonconformists have their constant meetings as formerly. [Ibid. No. 77.]
June 14.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. The Hope of this port came in, which left St. Malo last Wednesday. The master and passengers report that three days before their coming away the difference at Rennes was not composed. A merchant, a passenger, reports that 13 of the officers for collecting the new duty on tobacco had been burnt by the townsmen of Rennes, but on speaking with the master and others I cannot find any truth in this report. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 78.]
June 14.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 79.]
June 14. The King to the Dean and Chapter of Winchester. Recommending Richard Stanesby for the office of bailiff of Martin Hill fair near Winchester, with the profits of the same, at the yearly rent of 10l., as held by his late father, Richard Stanesby, and by his late brother, James Stanesby. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 70.]
June 14.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he prepare a proclamation according to the enclosed heads to be ready for his consideration next Council day. [Precedents 1, f. 80.] Enclosed,
The said heads, being those of the proclamation calendared post, p. 168 [Ibid.]
[June?] Thomas Neale to the King. Petition for a patent for 14 years for his invention of a pump serviceable for draining mines and other uses of that nature, which forces and draws water with one and the same stroke. At the foot,
June 15.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney-General, and his report in favour of the petitioner's request. 22 June. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 80.] Annexed,
Diagram of the pump in question. [Ibid. No. 80 i.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 31.]
[June?] Henry Jermyn to the King. Petition for a grant of a certain old way from Cheveley to Newmarket, that he may enclose the same, he laying out a new way on his own ground and at his own charges in the manner directed by the inquisition therein mentioned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 81.]
June 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Towards evening last Sunday one of our packet-boats arrived with very little news. I saw in a letter from Holland, that the French forces began to retreat, but it was believed to be only a French trick, as the writer words it. There was also a confirmation that the States had declared war against the Swedes. The wind has been these three days and still is northerly. [Ibid. No. 82.]
June 15.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. The Bristol, Sir John Berry commander, departed hence for Newfoundland this afternoon. I enclose the list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 83.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 83 i.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Order by the Duke of Monmouth that, whereas there has been an ancient order in the garrison of Hull against listing or entertaining any soldier in any of the companies known to be married, which of late has not been observed as it ought by reason of the removal of companies from and to the said garrison, and whereas there are two companies, the Governor's and the Deputy Governor's, constantly residing in the said garrison, which are not subject to be removed as the others are, the respective officers of the said companies do not in future list or entertain any man as a soldier that shall be married, and, if any soldier of the said companies marry after being listed, he shall for that reason forthwith be disbanded, but this does not include the soldiers already married before the date of this order, who are hereby dispensed with to continue in the said companies, provided they otherwise do their duties. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 41, p. 40.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of several gentlemen and citizens using the exercise of Archery about the City of London and the suburbs, about certain fields, wherein they always had right to shoot, enclosed by sundry persons, and praying a commission under the Great Seal for the enquiring and reforming thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 31.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Warrants for the naturalization of the Greenland Adventure and the Hope, flyboats of about 300 tons burden bought by the Greenland merchants of Hull and furnished out for that voyage. Minutes. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 65.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Licence to Henry Jermyn to stop up for the enlargement of his park at Cheveley, Cambridgeshire, part of a road from Cheveley to Newmarket from the south-east corner of the said park to another corner thereof called Warriner's Corner, he making at his own charges and in his own ground a substituted way. Minute. [Ibid. p. 66.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter constituting Sir Thomas Wallace of Craigie, one of the Senators of the College of Justice, Justice Clerk in place of Sir William Lockhart of Lee, deceased. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 255.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a letter granting to the said Sir Thomas Wallace a yearly pension of 400l. sterling during his continuance in office. [Ibid. p. 257.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer in Scotland. Being very sensible of the fidelity and integrity of Sir Adam Blair, lately one of the receivers of the revenue in Scotland, and particularly of his readiness to improve his own private credit for bringing money into our Exchequer when we were in Scotland, when our own revenues came in but very slowly, and being thereby obliged to take care that his zeal for us in such a troublesome time may not prejudice him in his private fortune, we hereby authorize and require you to cause those formerly commissionate for auditing such accounts to proceed with all possible diligence to audit the said Sir Adam's accounts, charge and discharge, and to state the balance thereof without any delay on pretence that Sir William Lockhart of Carstaires, whose father was one of the receivers of the said revenues, has not made his accounts, and if, on stating the said Sir Adam's accounts, it shall be found he is super-expended, we hereby authorize and require you to take a speedy and effectual course for his repayment. [Ibid. p. 258.]
June [before the 16th.] Henry Sandys to Williamson. At your last return from Holland you expressed a kindness to me for my father's sake. Now, being in necessity and wanting bread, I beg your kind assistance, begging you to let the King know my condition is so bad that without his gracious favour I must finish in a gaol. I once had an employment, a colour in the regiment of Foot Guards, which I served in almost seven years after two engagements at sea. Then I had the honour to dance at Court, which expense was so great that, having Col. Russell's ill-will, I was forced to sell my command to pay my debts, which I had never run into but for dancing at Court. When I sold my employment, I resolved to go with Sir Jonathan Atkins to Barbados, but I was otherwise advised by them who now slight me most, and, since there is not any hope of my father's return, I beg his Majesty will not let me starve, who am now very near it. Had I behaved to the disgrace of the employment I served in or the disparagement of my family, I had deserved it, but, since I have done neither, I fling myself at your feet to implore his Majesty's favour and sudden relief. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 84.]
June 16. Henry Sandys to Williamson. My friend gave me an account of the letter I sent you, which I beg you will pardon me for. My condition is so bad that, unless I have your good counsel and assistance, I must not expect any thing. Some, that pretend to be my friends, leave me in the utmost extremity. The Duke of Monmouth has been several times acquainted with my condition, who promised to do something for me. I beg you will remind him of my condition, who does not think it so bad as it is, and, if it be best, as in my apprehension it is, I beg you to desire him to send me to the French army. My father, I hope, will return you thanks. I will send my friend to wait on you when you command. [Ibid. No. 85.]
June 16.
Lower Anceholme.
Edward Hornsby to Williamson. About a month ago I wrote you two lines concerning my son, which, I hope, you received. I had some notice that you would have him to some trade, and what you do with him I shall humbly condescend to, for I have a great many more children, and we have very hard times, and what I am able to do for my son shall not be undone, but I hope you will take it into consideration and do something for me and my child, and I hope what you do for us the Lord will repay you, for we are never able to do it for what you have done already. I would have written to you when my son came up, but there were some that hindered me. [Ibid. No. 86.]
June 16.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. There is a strong report, which is probably true, that Col. Bingham, the high sheriff of our county is dead. Mr. Audley Grey, that stood on the prick with him is also dead. The third person is one Sydenham. Mr. John Mitchell of Kingston, Col. Bingham's son-in-law, is a fit person to serve out the year, if his Majesty please. [Ibid. No. 87.]
June 16.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 88.]
June 16.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 13th came in to Helford the Content of Falmouth with salt from St. Martin's, which says that two days after they came out they met a Biscay caper of 10 guns, which very much abused the master and men by putting burning matches betwixt their fingers and gave the master several hundred blows, although they had their sea-brief with them, to make them confess they belonged to the French, and took from them what small things they had on board, and all their clothes and some of the ship's provision. This base usage makes our small vessels afraid to go to sea. The 14th six great ships passed Eastward before this harbour, wind N.W., which, it is supposed, may be East India or Straits ships. The proroguing the Parliament, and no public Acts passing give cause of various talking here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 89.]
June 16. Privy Seal for payment of 300l. to Richard Bulstrode for his equipage in going to the campaign. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 195.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London, praying the remission of an arrear of 1,159l. 17s. 3d. of the last 18 months' assessment in addition to the 800l. per month remitted in the last Lord Treasurer's time, in regard of many houses therein uninhabited and tofts of ground unbuilt &c. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 32.]
June 16. Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Edward Christian praying payment of 200l., part of an arrear due from his Majesty to John Crofts, who was indebted to the petitioner's fatherin-law. [Ibid.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Lewis Morgan, son of John Morgan, late one of the Yeomen of the Guard, deceased, praying such an estate as shall please his Majesty in the three little outhouses at Royston that belonged to Royston House, now in the possession of Edward Sutton, Philip Bright, and Elizabeth Sallaway, which are of the yearly value of 10 or 12l. [Ibid. p. 33.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Richard Browne, clerk of the Privy Council, about his arrears as Resident from his late and present Majesty at Paris from 1641. [Ibid.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
The King to the Bishop of Salisbury. Recommending Joseph Barker, M.A., domestic chaplain to the Speaker, for the next vacant prebend in that church. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 7.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Wells. Recommending Joseph Barker, named in the last entry, for the next vacant place of residentiary in that church, in which he already holds a prebend. [Ibid. p. 8.]
Drafts of the last two documents in Williamson's hand. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, Nos. 90, 91.]
June 16. Presentation of Dr. Timothy Halton to the Archdeaconry of Oxford, void by the promotion of Dr. Barlow to the Bishopric of Lincoln, and in the King's gift pro hac rice. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 8.]
June 16.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to — House, Mayor of Reading. His Majesty, being informed by Sir William Armorer, J.P. for Berkshire, that you pretend to have an order or warrant for remitting fines imposed at the assizes on persons offending against the Act against Conventicles attested under my hand, has commanded me to require you forthwith to send me an authentic copy of such order or warrant as you pretend to have. [Precedents 1, f. 81.]
June 17.
Whitehall.
Proclamation forbidding subjects to give assistance to any of the King of Spain's subjects now in rebellion against him. Complaint having been made to us by Don Pedro Ronquillo, envoy extraordinary from the said King that several merchants and other subjects have carried provisions and given assistance to those of Messina, now in rebellion against the said King, contrary to the treaty of 1667 between us and the said King, we expressly command all our subjects to forbear giving any assistance to those of Messina or any other of the said King's subjects in rebellion against him. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 336.]
June 17.
Whitehall.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the President of the Session. Informing them that his Majesty desires them to dispense with the absence of Sir John Lockhart, one of the Senators, during the session, as he is obliged to go to London and perhaps to Paris to look after the concerns of his brother, the ambassador, who is lately deceased. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 259.]
June 18. Certificate by Sir George Waterman that Augustin Hanson on that day took before him the oaths of allegiance and supremacy. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 92.]
June 18. The Earl of Bridgwater to Williamson. Requesting that he might receive his Majesty's licence for making Sir Thomas Mainwaring and Nathaniel Booth deputy lieutenants for Cheshire dispatched in due form. [Ibid. No. 93.]
June 18.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 94.]
June 18.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 95.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 95 i.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Sir Edward Carteret, first gentleman usher daily waiter, of the estate of Jonathan Frost, forfeited by his conviction for clipping and coining. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 195.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Francis Chaplin. In favour of Simon Seaman, son to his Majesty's interpreter of the Turkish and Eastern languages, whose suit is to be Clerk to our Company. Though as a poor member of it I could not allow him to ask for his Majesty's letter, I most willingly grant him mine, and beg you to second my request to the rest of our brethren Clothworkers. I beg you to speak to my brother Robinson, Gauden, Sir W. Peake, my brother Burkin, Beckford, &c. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 42.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
Approbation by the King of Sir Thomas Mainwaring and Nathaniel Booth to be deputy lieutenants of Cheshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 14.]
June 18. The King to the Sub-Warden and Fellows of New College, Oxford. As he understands the wardenship of the College is void by the death of Dr. Woodward, and that they are now choosing a successor, leaving them entirely free in the election, and declaring that certain letters granted some years in favour of Richard Rowlandson, M.A., one of the Fellows, containing the King's recommendation of him in general for such suitable preferment from the College as his loyalty and good affection to the King and the Church might entitle him to, are not to be applied to this case or used for influencing the present election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 9.]
Draft thereof in Williamson's hand. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 96.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant after reciting a reference to the Committee for Irish Affairs of the petition of Edmond Nugent and their report, which was that his father, Col. Robert Nugent, faithfully served in the late wars of Ireland under the Duke of Ormonde, till that kingdom was overrun by the usurper, under whom he suffered great affliction and imprisonment for his loyalty, and was divested of his ancient estate and forced into Connaught, where he was constrained to take lands, that a considerable part of the said lands has been restored to several persons by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation and no reprisal set out to the petitioner for the same, that the petitioner was postponed from a hearing of his innocency for this sole account, though then a minor, that the said Col. Robert Nugent was to have been restored to all his estate by the Act of Settlement, but never received any benefit thereof, and that the lands therein described in the barony of Burren, Clare, and in the barony of Gallen, Mayo, are all that remain to the petitioner of the said transplanted lands in Connaught, and that the lands therein described in the half barony of Fore, Westmeath, were part of the said Robert Nugent's ancient estate, to which he was to have been restored by the Act of Settlement, and are now in the petitioner's possession, or are undisposed of by the Commissioners of the late Court of Claims, and that the said report had been approved in Council, authorizing and requiring him to cause a grant to be passed to the said Edmond Nugent and his heirs of all the King's right, title and interest in the lands particularly mentioned in the said report, under the services and quit-rents reserved thereon by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 318.]
June 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for swearing and admitting Sir William Gore to be a Privy Councillor in Ireland. [Ibid. p. 320.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Attorney-General to prepare a grant to James, Earl of Northampton, of the office of Constable of the Tower to be held during pleasure. Sign mannal. Countersigned, "J. Williamson." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 97.]
Draft thereof. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Minute thereof. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 67.]
June 19.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 17th arrived the Windsor from St. Malo and Guernsey, and the Prosperous from Morlaix. The masters of both say there are great insurrections and risings in several other places in that province as well as at Rennes, standing out against the late edicts imposing a great duty on tobacco and many other things. The Duc de Chaulnes, going amongst them with his Lieut.-Governor to appease them, has received a slight hurt in his face, and the other mortally wounded. The Marquis Guabryau with some others and some English merchants went from Morlaix to Brest, where the Duke now is, to visit him upon it. This vessel about mid Channel fell in with a fleet of about 12 Dutch men-of-war making westward, but they would give no information, but ordered them to get out of their fleet. The great trading place of St. Malo and Morlaix is now but little commerce, and our ships, which so frequently visit them, now have but little encouragement to go there. The islands of Guernsey and Jersey are well. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 99.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that the report of the Committee for Irish Affairs on the petition of the Trustees for managing the security of the '49 officers had been approved in Council the 16th instant, for observing the instructions following in the future management of that interest:—First, he is to cause the grant intended to Col. Cary Dillon in pursuance of the letters of 21 Sept., 1673, and 2 March, 1674, and 8 June, 1674, to be stopped for the many inconveniencies that appear in the same; next, he is to take care, that in the distribution of what is or shall be discovered to appertain to that security, no '49 officer have any more than the 4s. 1d. in the pound already received, till those that are deficient receive as much; next, that whoever is deficient of the said 4s. 1d. in the pound, and shall discover wherewith he may be satisfied to that proportion, his discovery to be applied thereunto, but all persons concerned to have equal liberty of discovery in all places and at all times; and lastly, that whatever surplus remains, after any discoverer is so satisfied, is to go into the common stock in order to a general distribution. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 321.]
June 20.
Clutton.
William Harris to Edmund Naden at the Red Lion in Holborn. I have received your letter, and none of us can make a discovery of any man in that case, unless we must do them wrong, and also concerning ourselves we are nothing guilty, but there is a sort of idle persons that, if a man will not please them with what they would have, either money or victuals, will swear anything for 5s., and will invent anything that they know will hold to ruin any honest man, for they can hurt no one in any other case, because they are people of no credit, but, if they should swear as they have not, the country knowing their condition, we hope it will take no effect, for the God of heaven knows it is wrong if they do. This is to desire you, if it may be done on the terms you writ, to dispatch it, otherwise to repair home with all speed. You have writ thrice as to a discovery and, if you write a hundred times, it is all one, for we know nothing in that case, and so satisfy yourself and those you treat with. We desire you to make haste home, if the business will not be done. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 100.]
June 20.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. Last night went to sea a packet-boat for Nieuport with the mail and some few passengers, among them Lord Castlehaven. [Ibid. No. 101.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. This petition being presented this afternoon to his Majesty, he has commanded me to send it you to consider what lawful way the Lord Mayor may be redeemed from this affair, and that you wait on his Majesty in person to-morrow morning to deliver your opinion. With note that the petition was from the Lord Mayor praying his Majesty to interpose his authority to keep him from appearing at the King's Bench Bar, he being very ill and the honour of the City concerned. [Precedents 1, f. 81.]
June 20.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to [Williamson.] Recommending the bearer, Mr. St. George, King at Arms for Ireland. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 167.]
[June ?] Goodwin Wharton to the King. Petition praying for patents for 14 years for his new inventions for buoying up ships sunk in the sea, and for landing goods from or for putting them on board ships. At one side,
June 21.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney or Solicitor-General. At the other side,
Report by Francis Winnington, Solicitor-General, in favour of granting the prayer of the petition. 3 July. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 102.]
[June?] Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 33.]
June 21.
Bridkirk.
Margaret Williamson to her brother [-in-law] Williamson. By a letter from cousin Williamson I perceive you order to be paid to Dean Smith the moneys due from the quarry and the 100l. legacy left you by my dear husband. I have already paid Mr. Dean what is received about the quarry, and should willingly obey your commands to pay in the 100l., if my abilities were answerable to my desires. I confess it's your undoubted right, and the effect of your great kindness to forbear me so long. But I have met with many troubles and disappointments in the manage of that concern, which I could not have grappled with but by the unwearied advice and assistance of some very kind friends. They can sufficiently witness that many considerable debts due to my husband have proved desperate by the insolvency of debtors or insufficiency of evidence to prove them, and what he was owing is much advanced beyond what I expected, not only as to his accounts in the Exchequer, but in the county also, several claiming considerable sums whom I concluded debtors to him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 103.]
June 21.
Windsor.
Dr. Gregory Hascard to Williamson. I have received the Lord Chamberlain's letter to wait for the Dean of Carlisle this next month. I am fully assured this kindness comes from you, and shall the more industriously fit myself for this attendance that I may not forfeit that character you bestow on me. Dr. Child presents his most humble service and has sent to my house an harpsichord against your coming. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 104.]
June 21.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Near 200 light colliers are now at anchor in the bay expecting a fair wind, it being much northerly. [Ibid. No. 105.]
June 21.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Friday came in a small vessel from Brest, who tells us, that there are in Brittany often insurrections among them, opposing and wounding the Commissioners for Excise and other impositions. He says likewise, 7 or 8 Algier men-of-war are in the Channel, and that an Ostender of 16 guns had much to do to escape them. There are a few small vessels in the harbour and the great Dutch vessel that has been here this six months continues here still, expecting a convoy. Wind northerly. [Ibid. No. 106.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to William Maskll of York, goldsmith, for clipping and coining, he having acknowledged his crime, discovered several confederates and given security to prosecute them. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 137.]
June 21. Caveat entered at the Signet Office at the desire of the Master, Wardens and Assistants of the Trinity House that no grant pass for the incorporating of Lightermen and Ballastmen till notice be given to Mr. Secretary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 11.]
[June?] Request that the above caveat may be entered. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 107.]
[June?] John Sumpter, prisoner in the gaol for Berkshire, to the King. Petition, stating that he was convicted at the last summer assizes for highway robbery, but reprieved, and, it being his first offence, praying that he may be allowed to serve on any of his Majesty's frigates, as he faithfully did in the late Dutch wars. At the side,
June 22.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Judge of Assize that sat on the petitioner. [Ibid. No. 108.] Annexed,
Report by Sir Edward Thurland that Sumpter was convicted for the highway robbery of Andrew Platt and taking from him 4l. in money, and had judgment, but, it being alleged it was his first offence, and he being able bodied to serve in the plantations beyond the seas and desirous to do so, the judge reprieved him, and his Majesty commanded a respite till his further pleasure be known, and submitting to his Majesty's consideration whether he be an object for a free pardon or for one with the usual clause of transportation. 2 Nov., 1675. [Ibid. No. 108 i.]
June 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About 11 last Saturday night one of our packet-boats arrived. The master and passengers report that Limburg was taken by the French, and that the Prince of Orange having joined the Duke of Lorraine's and the Lunenberg forces, was pressing on to engage the French, which they declined. This was the general discourse in Holland, when they came thence last Thursday. The wind is northerly. The packet-boat which should have left the Brill last Saturday is not yet arrived here. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 109.]
June 22.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day his Majesty's new ship, the Harwich, arrived in the Downs. The report here is that his Majesty will honour our parts with his royal person this week. [Ibid. No. 110.]
June 22.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. No ships have arrived since I sent the last list. [Ibid. No. 111.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir T. Chicheley. "Whereas, in order to the finding out of the longitudes of places for perfecting navigation and astronomy, we have resolved to build a small observatory within our park at Greenwich upon the highest ground at or near the place where the Castle stood, with lodging rooms for our astronomical observator and assistant, our will and pleasure is that according to such plot and design as shall be given you by . . . Sir Christopher Wren . . . of the place and site of the said observatory, you cause the same to be fenced in, built and finished with all convenient speed," the materials and workmen to be paid for by the Treasurer of the Ordnance out of the moneys coming to his hands for old and decayed powder sold by the order of 1 Jan. last, provided that the whole sum to be expended shall not exceed 500l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 15.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Ellen, Lady Kinsale, mother and administratrix of Patrick, Lord Courcy, Baron of Kinsale, deceased, praying an order for payment to her of 337l. (on a pension of 150l., paid to his ancestors by his Majesty's progenitors, from his predecessor's death, but by reason of the said Patrick's patent two years and three months after his father's death not paid him during that time) out of the Irish revenue, after the end of Lord Ranelagh's undertaking at Christmas, 1675. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 34.]
June 22. Warrant to the Lord Keeper for a bill constituting Edward Grey, Sir William Roberts, Sir Thomas Daniell, Edward Progers, George Weld, Richard Kirby, Edmund Warcupp, Philip Bulstrode, Cornwall Bradshaw, John Harris, Samuel Maidwell, Francis Weaver, and Philip Burton, Commissioners for licensing Hackney Coaches. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 67.]
Two drafts thereof, in one of which Henry Killegrew is substituted for Weld. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, Nos. 112, 113.]
[June?] Note that Mr. Killegrew desires that Sir W. Roberts, E. Warcupp, Cornewall Bradshaw, and John Harris may be put in the room of Ambrose Scudamore, Emery Hill, Anthony Gawdy, Edward Brooke, Edward Woodward, John Hoskins, Symond Smith, and Henry Peck, or in the room of which four of them Mr. Secretary pleases, so as the number do not exceed 21. [Ibid. No. 114.]
[June?] Lists of the persons to be left out being those mentioned in the last entry with the addition of George Weld; of those that were to supply the defects of the old commission and make the number 21, viz., Edward Grey, Sir Reginald Forster, Sir Richard Mauleverer, Sir Thomas Daniell, Sir William Bowles, Sir Thomas Gery, Sir John Kirke, Edward Progers, William Erskin, John Mitton, Henry Progers, and Richard Kirby; and of the persons in the warrant Mr. Killegrew gave Mr. Secretary, being those in the last entry but two with the omission of Weld and the addition of Henry Killegrew and Henry Progers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 115.]
June 22. Passes for six and for three soldiers belonging to the Army in Ireland to go to Waterford and to Dublin respectively. [Home Office, Warrant Book. 1, p. 67.]
[June?] John Combes, mercer, of London, to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner was robbed last February of goods to the value of about 80l., that John Ashmore and Richard Short were condemned at the last gaol delivery of Newgate, and have confessed themselves instruments of the fact, and that they sold the goods to Anne Ivery and John Collyer, brokers, for 3l. 10s., against whom the petitioner can have no remedy at law, unless by the evidence of the said Ashmore and Short, and therefore praying that they may be inserted in the next free pardon for poor convicts in Newgate. At the foot,
June 23.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Recorder of London. On the back, His report, that Combes was robbed of the said goods and that Ashmore and Short were convicted as accessories or otherwise to be transported, who remaining in prison made some discovery to the petitioner that the goods were disposed of by them to brokers, against whom the petitioner can have no remedy at law except by their testimony, which cannot be allowed of without a pardon, and, if they be pardoned in order to transportation, and afterwards be transported before the petitioner can have a trial against the brokers, he will be without any remedy, and therefore he humbly conceives it fit, that Ashmore and Short be put in the pardon for transportation, but be kept in prison till a trial can be had against the brokers, that use may be made of their testimony at the trial, and that, if they shall make an effectual proof to convict the brokers, they may then be put into the next pardon for convict in Newgate without transportation, because he is jealous that these delinquents may possibly delude the petitioner on pretence of their discovery, and, having obtained a free pardon, afterwards will be left to their liberty to make good the accusation against the brokers, or may perhaps be bribed by them to the contrary. 26 June. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 116.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 34.]
[June?] Christian and Elizabeth Hayes, daughters of Col. Patrick Hayes, to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioners had been hindered from obtaining the benefit of the order in Council of 19 Dec., 1673, (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673–1675, p. 63), concerning the debt due to them by the Senate of Hamburg, by reason of Secretary Coventry's being changed from the Northern Province, also by Sir W. Swan, the Resident at Hamburg, having been long in England, and having but lately gone thither; that they, having since his departure applied to Secretary Williamson for him to execute the said order, he showed them a copy of the King's letter of 9/19 July, 1661 (calendared ubi supra), which was obtained by Vincent Garmers, Syndic to the said Senate, who is very nearly related to the person who first detained the petitioners' estate, one clause whereof relates to the petitioners, which letter, they apprehend, was obtained by surprise upon his Majesty, he having since very often heard their case and ordered it to be examined, to all which references the Hamburg Resident was summoned, and the said letter was never objected against the petitioners, and praying that his Majesty would grant them letters of reprisals, or would direct Secretary Williamson to write effectually, whereby the petitioners after so long a time may be satisfied their debt of 46,000 rix dollars, and their interest, costs, and damages. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 117.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the above petition that a copy thereof be sent to Secretary Williamson, who is to instruct Sir W. Swan to make interest for the petitioners' satisfaction with the Senate of Hamburg. [Ibid. No. 118.]
[June?] George Porter to the King. Petition for a lease for 40 years of the herbage and pannage of Merscough Park in the county and Duchy of Lancaster, with the lodge and cow pasture and moss thereto adjoining with the right of turbary therein mentioned, in reversion on the expiration of a lease made by the late King to Elizabeth Howard, a maid of honour to the late Queen, by virtue whereof Edward Tildsley is in occupation of the premises, upon the same rents and services as are contained in the existing lease. At the side,
June 23.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 35.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Order in Council after reciting the order of 9 June, which directed Secretary Williamson to make instance in behalf of Richard Wescombe and others (calendared ante, p. 157), that, upon what had been that day said touching the Treaty of Breda and the ratification thereof, the said order be superseded. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 120.]
June 23.
Garnon Hall, near Epping Forest.
Hugh Morrell to the King. Consideration of his gracious speech to the Parliament at their adjournment till October next, wherein he has given them free liberty to petition him for redress, brings or rather enforces him, now in his old age past 82, humbly in this manner to make his addresses to his Sacred Majesty. He is enforced to make use of a near relation to present his petition to his Majesty and the Honourable Board relating to his property, which is known to his Grace of Canterbury, Lord Holles, Secretary Williamson and others, but to that date he has been so unhappy as not to procure it to be read at the Board in his Majesty's presence, which his Majesty's gracious speech encourages him that he will now obtain. After the above date is added, "but reserved by means of your Majesty's absence in your progress to this 9 Aug., and further retained to this 20 Sept." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 121.]
June 23. Col. John Russell to W. Bridgeman. Requesting him to prepare a commission for the bearer, Richard Pope, to be ensign to Capt. Richardson's company in the regiment of Foot Guards. [Ibid. No. 122.]
June 23. William Middleton to Williamson. I am confident your generous disposition will attribute my troubling you so frequently to my necessities occasioned by my former sufferings and my present long imprisonment, having now continued 18 months in durance. His Majesty has lately sent me word, that, if I can find out anything, I shall have his gracious favour. Now, Mr. White being dead, the Keeper's place of Ludgate is vacant, and the Lord Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council have the disposal thereof. The Clerk of the Peace told me that the Common Council will not allow such public offices to be sold, to avoid all occasion of oppression, and believes his Majesty's letter may easily prevail for it. I therefore humbly beseech you to take your opportunity to move his Majesty in my behalf. I am capable of the place, being a freeman, and I believe the chief in the House will incline to it. [Ibid. No. 123.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Thomas Smith. Requesting his goodwill in favour of Mr. Bo[w]les for the Fellowship lately void by the death of Mr. Reekes. He is particularly recommended by the Duke of Ormonde as the son of a very loyal family and related to several considerable persons in his country. "It is all our care to keep off mandamuses from the Universities, and that, we hope, may beget us some little interest in your kindness, when we find ourselves thus engaged to interpose our private recommendations." [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 43.]
June 23. Caveat that no pardon pass for Henry Slaughter of Lancashire for the death of Peter Slaughter, till notice be given to Mrs. Anne Banister in Little Suffolk Street, at a varnisher's house. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 11.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Recommendation to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of the Preachers in Lancashire, praying a pension of 200l. per annum and the arrears thereof formerly allowed to such preachers as should be appointed by the Bishop of Chester to officiate in an itinerant way in the many chapels, otherwise not sufficiently provided for, and of the certificate of the members, deputy lieutenants, and justices of the said county. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 34.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Privy seal for payment of 38,000l. without account to Baptista May, keeper of the Privy Purse, for the use of the same. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 68.]
June 23.
Whitehall.
Order in Council, that the affidavits of John and Thomas Le Hongues (Houques) sworn before the magistrates of Guernsey (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1673–1675, p. 336), be delivered to Secretary Williamson, who is to speak with the Dutch Ambassador thereupon in order to obtain satisfaction for the wrong they suffered from the Dutch caper. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 30.]
June 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boat we expected to have come from the Brill last Saturday was, after coming out of the Maes, stopped by a caper, who, pretending a Brandenburg commission, plundered all the Dutch passengers and took from them about 60 guilders, but meddled not either with French or English. The master landed his mail and passengers somewhere about Margate last Monday, and arrived here Tuesday evening. The wind all yesterday was easterly, but to-day is more northerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 124.]
June 24.
Westminster.
Warrant for a Privy Seal for a grant to Robert Williamson of Lincoln's Inn of the offices of one of the clerks of the Privy Seal and of clerk of the Council of the Court of Requests for his life, so soon as the same shall become void by the death or other determination of the interests of the four clerks in possession and three others in reversion or any four of them. [Latin. On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F, No. 67.]
June. Docquet thereof. [Docquets, Vol. 25, No. 362.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Henry Brouncker desiring that a lease he has of a house &c. at Sheen may be renewed and made up to 99 years, recommendation to the Lord Treasurer to give order for passing such a grant as is desired. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 36.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Robert Thornhill, praying a warrant to Dr. Lloyd in such manner as was before to Sir Walter Walker about prosecuting for prizes &c. in the Court of Admiralty. [Ibid.]
June 24.
Westminster.
The King to Ralph Montagu, Master of the Great Wardrobe. Warrant for the delivery to the Bishop of Durham, Clerk of the Closet, of the following for the service of the King's Closet, viz., two palls of cloth of gold of two breadths apiece, and 5 yards apiece in length, lined with fustian and fringed with gold and silk, and sewed with silk for the Communion Tables, two long and one short cushions of the like cloth of gold for the King's own seat, fringed and tasselled with gold, and sewed with silk, one dozen of small cushions of crimson velvet, both sides alike, to kneel on, one traverse of crimson taffeta containing 10 breadths and 5 yards deep, with lyors of thread, ribbons of silk and copper rings to it and sewed with silk, one demy carpet and two small carpets of Turkey work for the King's own seat, 12 yards of green cloth to lay between three pair of fronts, every front containing two yards, 16 ells of fine diaper for 4 cloths for the Communion, 20 ells of fine Holland for 4 cloths more for the Communion Table, 13 ells of fine diaper for two Communion towels, four surplices of fine Holland gathered, one bare hide of ox leather, two standards bound with iron with locks and keys to them, two trussing coffers and one other coffer, two great and two lesser Bibles for the King's own use, bound accordingly, one dozen of service books, and two other service books bound accordingly, 2,000 hooks, a great fire shovel, a pair of tongs, one perfuming pan, two great hammers and two brushes. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 322.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrants for swearing and admitting Murrogh. Viscount Blessington, and Col. Randolph Clayton to be Privy Councillors in Ireland. [Ibid. pp. 323, 326.]
June 24.
Westminster.
The King to Ralph Montagu, Master of the Great Wardrobe. Warrant for the delivery to Thomas Haynes, serjeant of the vestry, for the use of the Chapel Royal, of the following, viz., 4 surplices of fine Holland cloth gathered in the collar, two for the Dean and two for the Sub-Dean, 64 surplices of fine Holland cloth for the gentlemen of the said Chapel, 12 for the musicians and 36 of the like fine Holland cloth for the children of the said Chapel, 20 ells of fine diaper for four cloths for the Communion Table, 9 ells of fine Holland for two cloths for the Communion Table in the body of the Chapel, 20 ells of the like Holland cloth for 6 towels for the Communion, 7 ells of broad canvas and 4 yards of green cloth, 3 Bibles of the great volume, 4 Communion books and 34 Psalter books, one Turkey demy carpet to lay before the Communion Table, and one other lesser Turkey carpet to lay on the Altar, one gross of points of silk for the copes, 3 standards, whereof one is for the song books of the said Chapel, being two sets more than formerly, 2 bare hides of ox leather, 3,000 tenter hooks, 3 hammers, one fire shovel, and one pair of tongs, three black jacks, 3 gispins, 2 brushes, one perfuming pan of iron, 6 hour glasses, and one pair of iron andirons. [Ibid. p. 323.]
[Before June 25 ?] Several Spanish Merchants to the King. Petition for an order for hearing Sir M. Wescombe, consul at Cadiz, concerning the petition presented by them against him last November, with which Secretary Coventry was desired to acquaint him, he having now come over, and that the petitioners may be given notice thereof. (See last volume of the calender, p. 429.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 125.]
June 25.
The Tower.
Sir John Robinson to Williamson. I have been much indisposed these two days, yet yesterday and this afternoon was at Whitehall, but could not find you. I kissed his Majesty's hand, from whom I had a promise by the Lord Keeper that I should not suffer. After that I waited on the Attorney-General, who told me he had not spoken with his Majesty about me, nor could he do anything, till he had a warrant directed to him. I intend to ride abroad to-morrow morning, which, I hope, may do me much good as to my health, and shall attend the Lord Keeper and the Attorney-General, and shall submit to his Majesty's pleasure, be it what it will, with a sedate mind. Let me beg you to add to all your kindnesses, that, if his Majesty signs any warrant before his going away, you would remit me a copy of it. The Attorney-General has been so kind as to promise to do nothing till he give me notice of it. I shall acquaint you with his and the Lord Keeper's mind when I have it, and beg your advice. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 126.]
June 25. James Hickes to Williamson. The colonel thinks that sending you down the labels is now rather trouble than any service, you having had them so long for inspection, by which he has been and is incapable of observing any defects, which daily he took notice of, if any, and by the following post wrote to the transgressors for redress, so he thinks it convenient to keep them, and ease you of that trouble, and use his own endeavours to keep affairs in as quick and current dispatch as he can. This he has signified to me to be made known to you, which, in his opinion, you will be pleased with; otherwise you will signify your further pleasure.
I hope you will honour Sir Gilbert Talbot and Robert Paton at dinner on Monday at Drapers' Hall with the society of the honest Archers, of which they are the present stewards. [Ibid. No. 127.]
June 25.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. Last Monday was the election of knights at Durham for that bishopric, the writ being sent down before the prorogation. The competitors were three, Sir James Clavering, Col. John Tempest and Mr. Vane, son of the late Sir Henry. They came to the poll, which continued from Monday morning to Wednesday night, and then, contrary to the expectation of most of the gentry, it was Sir J. Clavering's (and that country's) misfortune to have the fewest votes.
The N.E. wind is still so predominant that few ships come in or out. [Ibid. No. 128.]
June 25.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Monday at Durham began the election for that county, which continued till 9 Wednesday night. Sir J. Clavering, Col. Tempest, and Squire Vane were voted for. The first had 735 votes, the second 1,034, and the last 854, whereon Sir Gilbert Gerard, the high sheriff, declared Col. Tempest and Squire Vane to be fairly and freely elected knights of the shire to the great joy and satisfaction of the people in general.
Wind now S.W. [Ibid. No. 129.]
June 25.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 130.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 130 i.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the High Sheriff of Surrey to reprieve during pleasure Jonathan Frost, convicted and sentenced to death at Southwark for clipping and coining. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 136.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Master and Wardens of the Clothworkers' Company. In favour of Mr. Seaman, as to whom see his letter of the 18th calendared ante, p. 168. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 44.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir Francis Leake. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that he, or in his absence the Lieut.-Governor, cause the late English, Scotch, and Irish seamen taken serving on board a certain Dutch man-of-war to be delivered on board such of his Majesty's ships or other vessel, as he shall direct by Mr. Pepys, having first caused their examinations to be taken before the Mayor of Gravesend, or some other justice, of the true state of the case, where they were taken by the Dutch, how used, how and on what terms dismissed from their imprisonment, and also what passed here in the River in their being taken from on board the Dutchman, the said examinations to be returned hither as soon as taken. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 44.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
Commission to Richard Pope to be ensign to Capt. Richardson in Col. Russell's regiment of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 16.]
June 25. Passes for Geoffrey Palmer with his two servants to go to France, and for Catherine Todeske with her daughter and family to go to Dieppe. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 68.]
June 25.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. I have had nothing to trouble you with this long time. The Robert of this place came in yesterday from France with salt. He says he made all the haste he could, for they were afraid of an embargo on all English ships. Last night came in a small ketch from Southampton with tobacco pipe clay. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 168.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Continuing our former resolution of holding a Parliament in Ireland, as soon as the requisite preparations can be made, we desire that, immediately after the receipt of these letters, you, by and with the advice of the Privy Council there, prepare and transmit under the Great Seal in due form some few bills, which you by the like advice shall judge most acceptable and beneficial for our people, and may on our passing and retransmitting the same give a ground for holding a parliament there without loss of time, and after making such transmission, you are to prepare such other bills, as you shall by the like advice find expedient relating to the revenue there or otherwise, as we shall likewise do here for your better guidance, but, if you shall conceive it more for our service that you attend us personally with such heads and materials of bills as shall be judged proper, and that you may be at our considering thereof before any bills be transmitted, we leave you free to attend us as soon as you think fit, leaving directions with the Lord Justices in your absence to attend the work of preparing such further bills as shall be thought necessary. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 324.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for him to repair to the King's presence that he and the Council may advise with him at large and receive information touching the affairs of Ireland, and directing him to appoint the Archbishop of Dublin and Sir Arthur Forbes to be Lord Justices during his absence. [Ibid. p. 325.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Robert Leigh of the lands comprised in the former letter of 5 Dec., 1674, calendared in the last volume, p. 449, and in similar terms thereto, except that where in the former "a deficiency of 200l., satisfiable to him" is mentioned, here it is "an allowable deficiency warrantable by the rules of the Acts of Settlement and Explanation." [Over 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9,p. 327.]
June 26. John Monson to Williamson. Apologizing for not having waited on him since his return to England, for he has almost lost the use of his limbs, being forced to this way of address to desire an addition to his former favours by returning the papers left in his hands by Lord Arlington's direction some years ago, by which the writer claimed a reparation from his Majesty according to his own and his father's promises, for, though they were mislaid before his going as Ambassador, Lord Ogle assures the writer from Lord Arlington, that they are now in Williamson's possession. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 131.]
June 26.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. The Ostenders continue their former irregularities, for on the 24th a vessel from hence to Dieppe met an Ostender on the French coast, which not only took the passengers' money but stripped them of their clothes, though several of them were Englishmen. Yesterday went hence two ships of Boston in New England laden with Virginia tobacco for Amsterdam. [Ibid. No. 132.]
June 26. Certificate by Edmund Boldero, Master of Jesus College, Cambridge, Vice-Chancellor, John Carr, Deputy Professor of Medicine, and Henry Paman, that Thomas Novell, now of Little East Cheap, London, was formerly a member of Jesus College and resident there several years, that he is a practitioner in physic publicly licensed by the Vice-Chancellor and Senate, and that his great imperfection of speech renders him incapable the exercises required by the statutes for the degree of M.D., and that they judge him otherwise very sufficiently qualified and meriting. At the foot,
Statement by the Duke of Monmouth that he thinks if fit Mr. Novel should be relieved in his demand by his Majesty's letter, if Mr. Secretary please to procure it in his behalf. 26 July. Windsor. [Ibid. No. 133.]
June 26. Commission to Herbert Price to be ensign to Capt. Downing's company in Col. Russell's regiment of Guards. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 16.]
June 26.
Whitehall.
Warrant from Sir J. Williamson to Roger L'Estrange, Surveyor of the Press, to search for and seize the copies of a profane and scandalous pamphlet entitled The Quaker and his Maid, and to seize and bring before him the author, printer, or publisher thereof. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 68.]
June 26. Sir William Domville to Sir Gilbert Talbot. Thanking him for his kind remembrance of him.—As to the queries you demand my advice in, I received them but yesterday, and on so short a time can only offer my present conceptions. I conceive they are not pertinent to the matter in question touching the King's power to dispose of the remaining part of the '49 men's security yet undiscovered and undisposed of, for, as to the clause in the Act of Settlement to which they refer, it is true that certain persons were appointed by the Dukes of Albemarle and Ormonde pursuant thereto, who were authorized by the Act to set and let the said security for the best advantage of the '49 officers. Their authority is derived from the Act, the nomination of the persons to exercise it was from the said Dukes, and the extent of their authority went no further than to set and let for the best advantage. If you refer to clause 9 of the said Act you will there find all the branches of the '49 security enumerated, viz., 1, All the forfeited lands and hereditaments undisposed of in Wicklow, Longford, Leitrim and Donegal, and in Connaught and Clare lying within one mile of the Shannon and the sea, called the mile line; 2, Out of all the forfeited houses in the several walled towns and corporations, and lands thereunto belonging; 3, Out of the benefit arising from the redemption of mortgages, statutes staple and judgments; 4, Out of one year's rent payable by the officers and soldiers put in the Act.
These were the four main branches of the security set apart for the satisfaction of the '49 officers originally by the Declaration and the Act of Settlement. There was indeed afterwards 100,000l. given them by the Act of Explanation, but those branches set apart by the Declaration and the Act of Settlement were the chief, the other being only a sum in gross, which had reference to some part of the first branches, viz., the year's rent payable by the soldiers and officers of Cromwell's army, who had been satisfied by him long before, when these were left without any satisfaction.
Now, as to the four branches, the two first were of forfeited lands in the four counties and in Connaught and Clare, and the forfeited houses in towns and corporations, and the authority given by the Act to the persons nominated by the Dukes was principally and solely exercised about these two first branches which referred to the lands and houses, and, till those two branches were equally disposed and divided amongst them by the Commissioners of Claims about 1666, they set and let them from year to year under certain yearly rents, which were disposed of by them for the best advantage of the parties concerned. But as to the other two branches, these were things which could not come under their regulation to set and let, for they lay, as they do at this day for the most part, concealed and undiscovered to them. I therefore conceive it matters not whether one or more of those trustees being dead or alive the rest may execute, for the subject matter on which they were employed is wholly disposed of by the Commissioners of Claims and there is not a foot of land in the four counties nor in Connaught nor Clare that they could dispose of but is already divided amongst them, and so likewise of their houses in towns corporate there remains none to set or let. Therefore I answer to this as to the second query, to what purpose should any new trustees be appointed on that clause of the Act with a power only to set or let, when nothing is left wherein they may execute that trust ? and that reason may answer your third query. But as to the fourth I conceive that the power of the trustees formerly appointed is at an end for want of a subject matter to work upon, and that there is no use to be made of any such trustees as have been formerly appointed, for their employment was only to set and let those visible branches of that security, and thereof little or nothing is now extant. But, as to what remains of the third branch consisting of mortgages &c., I conceive that his Majesty may, when any person interested in that security as a '49 officer or as assignee to such shall make discovery of any mortgages, statutes staple or judgments unsatisfied, grant to such person in satisfaction of his '49 arrears such part of that branch as may satisfy his debt, and such grant is good within the scope and intent of both Acts, and there will be no need of any new trustees to be appointed, for nothing is left for such persons to be employed in if appointed, and nature and reason never made anything in vain. [2 pages. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 169.]
June 27.
Gray's Inn.
Edward Rigby to Williamson. I was the end of last week twice at your lodgings to take my leave, but, missing my intention, I make bold to give you this trouble, only to beg you to satisfy the bearer, whether the pardon will be granted for his friends, as desired, or not, in regard they cannot discover any person to be guilty of the fact, which they would be pardoned for, for he is quite tired of expectation and does not perceive any great likelihood, unless you will give him an assurance thereof, and then he will be encouraged to stay to see the same effected; otherwise he will speedily return to the country, and leave them to defend themselves by their innocence against their malicious enemies. Therefore I earnestly entreat you to resolve him what he may expect. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 134.]
June 27.
Sheerness.
Major Nathaniel Darell to Williamson. The King anchored last night, as near as we can guess, about the Oaze Edge, and at 5 this morning set sail towards the Downs with the wind W.N.W. and a very favourable gale. [Ibid. No. 135.]
June 27.
1 p.m. The Greyhound.
Henry Savile to Williamson. This is by his Majesty's command to convey the enclosed to you, which you are to deliver, and to let you know that his Majesty is now in the Downs under sail, making the best of his way, the wind W. and by N., a pretty fresh gale. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Sunday. June 27.
3 p.m. The Navy Yacht in the Downs.
Capt. Richard Haddock to Williamson. About noon yesterday the King came to Gravesend with his Royal Highness, the Duke of Monmouth and several lords and gentlemen, and went on board the Greyhound, and immediately weighed anchor and sailed with the attendance of his little squadron, viz., the Greyhound, Soudados and Lark frigates, the Anne, Portsmouth, New and Old Katherine, Richmond, Navy and Kitchen yachts. The wind came round the compass before night with some rain and about 10 we anchored betwixt the Cant and Oaze Edge buoy.
This morning, wind W.N.W., at 4 his Majesty fired a gun, and by 5 we all came to sail, and drove and sailed to the Red Sand buoy, where we lay by for water to put through the Narrow, and by 9 got over the Flats, and at noon up with the North Foreland. We are now putting through the Downs, the frigates that lay here, viz.: the Harwich, Yarmouth, Portsmouth, Garland, Speedwell, Young Spragg, and the Holmesand Anne and Christopher, fireships, going along with us. The King, whom I waited on even now, is resolved to ply away towards Portsmouth, and this ebb I doubt not we shall get the Ness at least, the wind W. by N. You will excuse haste, the King making all the sail he can away. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 137.]
June 27.
4 p.m. Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About noon to-day the King came about the Foreland in the Greyhound. About 1, about 100 of our greatest boats full of men went to present our obedience to him, which he was pleased to accept of. He is now gone out of the Greyhound to the Harwich. Little wind at N.W. [Ibid. No. 138.]
June 27.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. Yesterday at half-past one went to sea the Prince of Neuburg in one of his Majesty's yachts for Dieppe. [Ibid. No. 139.]
June 28. Certificate by Sir William Peake that John Stonechest took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [Ibid. No. 140.]
June 28.
Broad Street, London.
An. Duncan to Williamson. Enclosed are copies of the letters from the Government of Tangier to the Lords Commissioners for Tangier and to the Ambassador at Madrid, by both which you will see the complaints of the said place represent Sir Martin Wescombe a different person from what was represented to his Majesty and the Honourable Board the other day by my Lord Ambassador Godolphin in his letter to Secretary Coventry, by which you may judge the rest of Sir Martin's actions, and that it is not without just cause so many honest, quiet-spirited men of business appear against him. [Ibid. No. 141.]
June 28.
Egleston.
Christopher Sanderson to Williamson. I question not you have heard of Mr. Thomas Vane's being chosen a Knight of the Shire for the Bishopric, the election being finished on Wednesday night the 23rd, and his brother, Mr. Christopher Vane, who was his proxy, came to Raby Castle in great triumph the Thursday night, where his brother was lying in the smallpox, and died Friday morning. Col. Tempest was the other knight, who had 1,046 votes, Mr. Vane 857, and Sir James Clavering 737. All the sectaries in the whole county were generally for Mr. Vane, and it did not a little cause them to prick up their ears, but a little foresight might have prevented and discouraged him from standing or these people from being so brisk in electing him, which was by keeping him out of the commission of the peace, which he got into last year. Sir Robert Eden and Mr. William Bellasis, junior, were the only two persons in the county that stickled for him, and few or no gentlemen besides themselves, but most of his party within the lordship of Raby and Barnard Castle, who have, many of them, houses about 40s. per annumand farm land under the Vanes; and, if they were put out of the commission of the peace for this, they deserved it, and it would be a good precedent to deter others from doing the like. 'Tis said Mr. Vane's brother will put in at the new election for himself, but, if he be kept out of the commission of the peace (which 'tis probable he will first endeavour to be in), I believe he will acquiesce, for I am confident, if Mr. Vane had been kept out of it, he would never have attempted it, for you would [? think it] strange, as I am told, how the Fanatics continually resorted to him, after he was once made a Justice, for it encouraged them. I have no more to add, hoping you will make private use of it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 142.]
June 28.
Bridlington
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The great fleet of light colliers that anchored in this bay loosed and stood northward, and we judge are got to their loading ports. Several light vessels have passed by since. The Quakers and Nonconformists meet constantly in great numbers, and it is to be feared their meeting tends more to faction and rebellion than real zeal of religion, godliness and obedience. [Ibid. No. 143.]
June 28.
5 p.m. The Greyhound, in the Downs.
Henry Savile to Williamson. I wrote to you yesterday by his Majesty's command, and now by the same authority send you the enclosed. He has been beaten back by foul weather to lie here at anchor at present, having this morning almost weathered Dungeness. He is resolved to stay here till the wind prove fairer, which is suddenly hoped, it being now S.E. [Ibid. No. 144.]
June 28.
3 p.m. Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. (Recapitulation of his last letter.) I have been examining the number of boats, and 'tis said there were about four score, but every boat had his jack and ensign, and flags were hung up in Deal town, all which his Majesty was graciously pleased to take notice of. His Majesty passed Dover road, but by contrary high winds was constrained to stand the other way and to-day, a little before noon, came again, and is now at anchor in the small Downs to the northward of Deal about four miles, and about the same distance from Ramsgate Pier. There runs a short scurvy sea. The wind has been and is at S.S.E. more than a topsail gale, but, God be thanked, without danger. At coming of the ebb we hope for less wind and a smoother sea. [Ibid. No. 145.]
June 28.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Giving an account of the King's movements similar to the last. [Ibid. No. 146.]
June 28.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Within these two days arrived the Thomas and Mary and John in 24 hours from Morlaix, and the Samuel and Joan in 5 days from Croisic. By the masters, &c., we have certain advice that notwithstanding the discrying and nul [1]ing the late tax on tobacco, &c., the mutineers are still up in many places in Brittany, specially in the county of Cornwall at Landurny (Landerneau). Chantillien, Lesneven and other places, demanding ease upon the imposition on sellers of wine, &c., by retail and other duties to be taken off from them, being a free province. The English merchants and others, on news of their coming towards them, carried much of their drapery and other goods down Morlaix river and put them on ships for security. This makes a whole stop of our trade, which was very dead before. The two from Croisic came out with about 20 sail, most bound for Ireland. Since the two Algier men-of-war being in the channel and taking an Ostend man-of-war they have not been so troublesome to our ships. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 147.]
June 28.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 148.]
June 28.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Here was a small French sloop which report of five French men-of-war cruising, and last Thursday arrived here from Surinam the George of Galway, laden with sugar bound for the Downs. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 149.]
June 28.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Last week came in here the St. Jacob, a small French caper. It is said she came from Plymouth. She stopped here but one day and then went for Helford, and so kept along by the shore to the westward. She is supposed to be sent into our harbour for intelligence. The 25th came in here the St George of Middelburg in 8 weeks from Surinam laden with sugar homeward bound. They say eight more would be ready loaden and come away a few days after them, and yet they could not clear the last crop. They left that place in a very peaceful and thriving condition. In the Channel, a day before they came in, they spoke with a ship sent to meet our East Indiamen, which told them that some few hours before they saw seven French men-of-war, so they advised them to put into the next harbour, which they did, the wind being fair for them at N.W. Many passengers are on board, and it is said they will take out their goods here, except they can have a convoy, which they cannot stay long for, having so many on board.
All the news here is that the King or the Duke of York will be at Pendennis Castle within this month. [Ibid. No. 150.]
June 28.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last with the addition that the English at Surinam and the Dutch agree very well. [Ibid. No. 151.]
June 28. Inland advices received that day, being extracts from letters all previously calendared. [Ibid. No. 152.]
June 28. Caveat on behalf of Mr. Grenville that nothing pass concerning the grant of the manor of Chertsey, Surrey. [Cancelled. S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 12.]
June 29.
London.
John Banckes to Williamson. Sending the enclosed just received from Sir W. Swann. The Hamburgers are in great fear of the Danes' army as that they may have a design on the town in this conjuncture. They have sent two senators to the King at Gluckstadt, to see if they can make up the business. In the meantime they have ordered the raising of 1,000 horse and 1,000 foot, and caused the trees to be cut down before one of the city gates. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 153.]
June 29.
Magdalen College, Oxford.
Thomas Smith to Williamson. Herewith by my brother's hands I present you with a small discourse published here, not only because it is mine and therefore justly due to you, to whom I owe so much, but because I know such pacific writings are very agreeable to your great care and zeal for the peace of Christendom, which is so unhappily disturbed by such fierce and hot disputes about religion. 'Tis but an essay of a greater work, which I shall prosecute or not as I shall be advised by a most learned bishop to whom I send it. I am now concerned about writing an account of the present state of the Greek Church, which I have long designed but was hindered by my other studies from pursuing, and shall with your leave prefix to it your name, whom all scholars look upon as the great patron of learning, and to whom I especially owe the opportunity of travelling into the Levant and of making those observations. It has been often in my thoughts to make some proposals to you about his Majesty's library at St. James', but this looking like too great a presumption, I forbear till I have kissed your hands at Whitehall and know your pleasure in it.
Mr. Bo[w]les' friends could not take a more effectual course to procure my vote in order to his being Fellow than by procuring your letter, and therefore I think it highly concerns me to inform you briefly of the true state of things as they refer to his particular concern. A Mr. Rogers, an M.A. and much Mr. Bo[w]les' senior, a person highly accomplished, is his competitor, to whom the greater part of the Society is inclinable out of a just respect to his learning, behaviour, and seniority. He is also very nearly related to Secretary Coventry, being his father's cousin german, who has appeared very early in his behalf. Though this last consideration does no way sway with me, who more value your favour and good opinion than any person's whatsoever, yet I thought it my duty to acquaint you with it. The Society, I am confident, have that great regard to your recommendation, that, if they were not pre-engaged, Sir Bo[w]les might receive great benefit by it, at least I myself (whose single vote now can do him [no] good) would use the little interest I have with some friends in the College to serve him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 154.]
June 29.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Since my last concerning the election for Durham, death has made void the election of Squire Vane, who died of the smallpox the day month he was married. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 155.]
June 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I committed a mistake last Saturday writing that the packet-boat which came from the Brill last Wednesday was not then arrived, for, she coming in very late on Friday, the master came not to me. Last night arrived another, which came from the Brill Sunday evening, having stayed there not above two hours. They bring no news.
The Sapphire, a fifth-rate frigate built here, was this noon very well launched. The weather has been very dark and blustering with a S.E. wind yesterday. To-day it continues blowing and rainy, wind northerly. [Ibid. No. 156.]
June 29.
Deal.
B. St. Michel to Williamson. I had last night the honour from his Majesty's commands to bring his packet directed to you ashore, at which time he was riding at anchor in the Downs, being forced back again by ill-weather and contrary winds, and being then [not] able to budge for the extreme stormy weather, the wind continuing contrary at South, and now, though the weather still continues so stormy that it is not possible any boat can come ashore from on board his Majesty, though you might have had further advice, I thought it my duty to acquaint you that, the wind being come about fair to the N.E., his Majesty at three this morning proceeded on his voyage, and I hope, if the wind continues, he may be at Portsmouth to-night or to-morrow morning. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 157.]
June 29.
3 p.m. Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 158.]
June 29.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Giving the same news as the last two. [Ibid. No. 159.]
June 29.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. This morning his Majesty passed by for Portsmouth, between 5 and 6, the wind fresh at N.E. A bad accident has happened to the harbour. The sluice being let run, passing by a new turn-water, which was made lately to turn beach out of the haven's mouth, the force of the water undermined the foundation of the north head about 30 feet in length, which breach not being sufficiently repaired, the overseers of the work caused an old vessel laden with 40 tons of beach to be laid at the breach, to prevent, as they thought, the further annoyance of the head, but the vessel sinking with her stern down in a hole against the breach laid the hull so athwart the channel that now no vessels can pass in or out of the harbour. [Ibid. No. 160.]
June 29.
Portsmouth.
R[oger] M [anley] to Isaac Dorislaus, at the Post Office. Though we expect the King hourly, yet he is not in sight nor have we any certainty of his motion. The ship will be launched at 11, the tide admitting of no further delay, and then the post parts. 'Tis now but 8, but, by reason of our drawing into the field, I write this by anticipation. [Ibid. No. 161.]
June 29.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 162.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 162 i.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
On the petition of John Jackson of Shap, Westmorland, yeoman, praying a pension or some relief from the King, in regard of the loss of his son in his service, and his own sufferings and lamentable condition, recommendation to the Justices of Westmorland to provide some annual pension or allowance for the petitioner's relief. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 36.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord President and the remanent Senators of the College of Justice. We have perused your letter to us of the 17th instant with that of the same date to our Secretary. On 12 December last we declared that none of those advocates who deserted their station and should not betwixt that time and 28 Jan. last apply to you for their re-entry should ever be re-admitted to that function at any time. You now inform us that Sir George McKenzie and many other debarred advocates gave in petitions to you before the day prefixed, which were not satisfactory, and for that cause were not transmitted to us; but by this letter you tell us that Sir George has by his late petition explained his former in very ample terms, which petition you have transmitted and with which we are very well satisfied. Therefore we authorize and require you to admit him to the full exercise of his function as advocate, and we hope he will be so exemplary in his duty for the future as may render him capable of our further favour. We also authorize you to restore his brother, Colin McKenzie, whose petition we find very satisfactory. As to the rest of the outed advocates we authorize you to admit such as shall petition in the very terms Sir George or his brother have done and no others, provided always the number of those re-admitted do not exceed that of those who remained firm in their duty. This you are to do without transmitting petitions to us, for we will cut off all frivolous expectations of applying to us, without giving full satisfaction to you. And, as we have fully trusted you with the re-admission of others, so we expect you will be careful not to admit such as you judge to have been main sticklers here or in Scotland in this faction or libellers of our authority in your station, and that you take sufficient assurances from all the re-admitted advocates that they shall not hereafter meddle in any public matters without the true limits of their employment as advocates, and lastly that none of them discourage those who remained steadfastly in their duty. We are confident you will pursue faithfully what we here recommend to you, and you are to take special care that no petition be admitted after this session, and we give you authority to set a shorter day if you think fit, but we will not admit of further delay after next month. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 260.]
June 30.
Southampton.
Adam de Cardonnel to Williamson. I send a letter for you from Capt. Ralegh of Jersey, that came enclosed in mine, which, instead of being left here, was carried to London, and so sent back by the post. Mr. Richbell came back lately from London, who obliged me by employing himself in preferring a son of mine with you, and told me you were inclinable to it, but desired first to see him. I intend very shortly to wait on you with him, and wish he may find favour with you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 163.] Enclosed,
George Ralegh to Williamson. This afternoon arrived here a boat from St. Malo, by which we were informed from one of our justices who is there, that tumults are again broken out at Rennes and other places, so that Duke Chanlnes and others of the chiefest are forced for the present to abscond. When anything else shall happen here worth your knowledge I shall not fail to acquaint you with it. 10 June. Jersey. [S.P. Channel Islands 9, No. 30.]
June 30.
Portsmouth.
S. Pepys to Williamson. I reached this yesterday noon, at which time the new ship was very happily launched, but without any tidings of his Majesty till about the same hour to-day, when his Royal Highness came in with the Anne yacht, from whom I have understood his Majesty's proceedings from the Downs to have been as follows:—
He passed the Downs early on Sunday afternoon, wind at W.N.W., was thwart the South Foreland at 3, it being then high water, and with the ebb turned down to a little short of Hythe, where he anchored at 9 at night.
On Monday morning, between 3 and 4, he set sail, the wind at S. turning to the westward within 4 miles of the Ness point. About 7 the same morning he bore up for the Downs again, and came in there about 11 and rode there all the following night.
On Tuesday morning at 3, wind at E.N.E. he weighed, and, lying an hour driving till the frigates could get under sail, at 4 passed the South Foreland, and at 7 was thwart the Ness, then steering W.S.W. was before 11 off Beachy, when steering W. by S. and W.S.W. they at 4 in the afternoon saw the Isle of Wight, it bearing N.W. distant between 3 and 4 leagues, wind at N. At past 12 that night the Duke came to anchor in Sandown Bay, the King then plying to windward between 2 and 3 leagues short without Dunoze.
This morning at 5 the King was under sail about S.E. from the Anne and about 7 came to anchor when the Anne weighed, the wind then at N. by W. and came in hither between 11 and 12, in company with the Portsmouth yacht.
His Majesty and the frigates who attend him came not in sight of this place while we had day, but our expectations are to see them in the morning.
As to any further particulars I have only to tell you that the Harwich carries the bell from the whole fleet, great and small, and that, in case his Majesty comes not in by the morning, his Royal Highness purposes to go out again towards him to the great discomfort of our landmen, who have had enough of the sea for this bout. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 164.]
Wednesday, June 30.
Portsmouth.
Sir John Werden to Williamson. I received immediately on our landing here a cover from you with a letter which the Duke had presently, and the news-books, which I shall show him as soon as he has time to peruse them.
We had a very tedious voyage, especially to myself who am used to be very sick, but, supposing you have heard how unhappily we were forced to bear up for the Downs on Monday night (when the Speaker with his yacht left us and returned to London), I shall only tell you what has passed since. On Tuesday morning his Majesty and all of us set sail out of the Downs, with a wind very favourable, but so violent that, putting abroad much sail, and when we had passed Beachy the weather proving very thick, perhaps too our compasses being disordered with the violence of the sea, we so far outran or mistook our course that late at night we found ourselves to the westward of the end of the Isle of Wight, and then we fell to ply to windward in very stormy and dark weather and thus lost company and sight of his Majesty in the Greyhound. His Royal Highness about one this morning anchored in Sandown Bay, outside St. Helen's Point. When day cleared up, we saw the King at least three leagues to leeward of us, and, finding he lay still when the tide came fair for him to turn it up to windward, we concluded he meant to go ashore about Freshwater Bay, rather than be at the trouble to contend any longer against the winds, whereupon we weighed at seven this morning, and, the Anne being a very bad seaboat, we got hither at two this afternoon without any further news of the King. The Duke of Monmouth came in at the same time with us, but he had been plying first all night without ever anchoring. Sir Robert and Sir John Holmes are both gone to the Isle of Wight, the first to receive the King, the latter to give us notice, as soon as the King is landed, by fires or smokes from the tops of the hills. I do not yet hear of any news or any signs made, it being now near 6. The Speaker is come to us overland from London. All the officers of the Navy and Ordnance are here, and we have been to see the new ship, the Royal James, built by Mr. Deane and by all acknowledged to be the most complete piece his Majesty has in all his navy. When you deliver the enclosed to the Duchess, please let any of your footmen leave the other for my wife. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 165.]
June 30.
3 p.m.
Capt. G. Legge to [Williamson]. Giving the same news as in the last two letters. [Ibid. No. 166.]
June 30.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. No news. Sending an enclosure from Lyme. [Ibid. No. 167.] Enclosed,
to Mr. Osborne. We have two ressels just now come, run away from Morlaix and two more stay there, they reshipping all our drapery &c., for the mutineers (contrary to the story in our news) being 20,000 were come within two leagues of it, and summoned the town immediately to join with them. Whether they did so they know not, for their departure was hasty. No tonnage money paid. For any creature that looks like a Philistine, down he goes, for one of the maltotiers of Morlaix being rencontred was demanded, if he would be of the people's side. He answered, No, and so one knocked out his brains with the butt end of a musket, saying, Then thon shalt be of no side. The mutineers being come to the above parish, because the priests had taken away the clappers of the bells, immediately hanged four of them, all they could light on. Every nobleman that refuses to join with them they burn or rase his house immediately. This goes under cover. 28 June. Lyme. [Signature cut off. Ibid. No. 167 i.]
June. Lists of the deputy lieutenants and justices of the peace (besides privy councillors, peers and judges) for Middlesex. [Ibid. Nos. 168, 169.]
[June?] Additional establishment for Hurst Castle of one master gunner and three other gunners, the former at 2s. a day and each of the latter at 1s. a day, amounting to 91l. 5s. per annum, to commence from 1 July, 1675, Sir T. Chicheley having represented that there are near 30 guns mounted there, and that it is requisite such gunners be established there. Sign-Manual. Countersigned, "Danby, J. Williamson." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 170.]
[June?]
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Charles, Lord Gerard, of the office of keeper of the palace lately belonging to York Place, and by an Act of Parliament made parcel of the royal palace at Westminster, void by the death of George Kirke. [Draft. Ibid. No. 171.]
June. Philip Kirke to Williamson. Requesting that, if he has any warrant to be signed by his Majesty for Lord Gerard to be housekeeper of Whitehall, there might be a stop thereto till his own concern be heard. [Ibid. No. 172.]
[June?]
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant of the office of Under-housekeeper or Keeper of the Lower Rooms of Whitehall and the gardens and lodgings belonging to the said Lower Rooms to Philip Kirke for his life. [Precedents 1, f. 76.]
June.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 371. No. Date. King's. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
173 June 1 1 3 6 S.W.
174 " 2 1 9 7 S.W.
175 " 3 1 9 4 S.W.
176 " 4 2 11 1 S.W.
177 " 5 2 10 0 S.W.
178 " 6 7 3 1 S.
179 " 7 7 1 3 S.E.
180 " 8 7 1 0 E.
181 " 9 7 1 0 N.E.
182 " 10 7 1 0 N.E.
183 " 11 6 0 0 N.E.
184 " 12 5 0 3 N.
185 " 13 6 0 0 N.E.
186 " 14 5 0 0 N.
187 " 15 6 0 3 N.E.
188 " 17 6 10 2 N.W.
189 " 18 6 10 5 W.
190 " 19 6 12 0 N.W.
191 " 20 6 5 1 N.W.
192 " 21 6 2 0 N.W.
193 " 22 7 0 0 N.W.
194 " 23 8 0 1 E. Two copies,one addressed to Secretary Williamson and one to Secretary Coventry.
195
196 " 24 8 0 1 E.
197 " 25 7 0 0 E.
198 June 27 5 1 W. This evening his Majesty sailed through the Downs and never anchored, only went from the Yarmouth to the Harwich, where he sailed from hence with all the rest of the men-of-war.
199 " 28 6 2 S.S.W. His Majesty to-day bore up in the Downs with all the ships of war with him by reason of bad weather, and are now at anchor.
200 " 29 0 0 0 N.E. This morning his Majesty sailed out of the Downs about 3, the wind being fair, a fresh gale, and is supposed to be by this time at Portsmouth.
201 " 30 0 3 0 N.E.