BHO

Charles II: July 1675

Pages 193-242

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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July 1675

July 1.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The weather has been very bad ever since our launching the Sapphire. Yesterday was a very blowing day; the wind continues high and northerly. One of our packet-boats is just come in. They say the French privateers and capers make foul work with the Dutch fisher-boats and suffer them not to fish. They have no news from the camp but that their soldiers are very unruly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 202.]
July 1.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N. About 2 yesterday arrived his Royal Highness in a yacht, and that morning saw his Majesty at sea and left him off the Isle of Wight. The wind being at N. and blowing hard, he could not get in, but to-day is less wind. I suppose, if not gone to Plymouth, they may be here by noon. About 8 this morning his Royal Highness went to sea to find his Majesty. Tuesday the great ship was launched, and named the Royal James, a brave stout ship, as any the King has. The Duke of Monmouth came here with his Royal Highness, but is gone to sea this morning to accompany him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 203.]
July 1. Muster taken that day of the Duke of Monmouth's company in garrison at Hull and also of the train of artillery there. [On parchment. S.P. Dom., Car. II. Case F., No. 68.]
July 1.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Dr. Bathurst. I am too sensible of the fatal mischief to the University from remiss government, ever to be a solicitor for anything that should lead to it, yet could not well deny the suit of so many worthy gentlemen as are interested in the Royal Oak Lottery. They have your Chancellor's recommendation to you for leave to exercise their lottery during the time of the Act, after which I consider it but a compliment to me that they ask mine. What I am specially to be a suitor for is, that the time may be allowed them as long as well the matter will bear. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 45.]
July 2. Sir William Temple to Sir L. Jenkins. I have been twice at your house to acknowledge the favour of your visit. This morning the bearer, Samuel Gellibrand, a stationer in your neighbourhood and a very honest man, long of my acquaintance, has desired me to recommend to you only the justice and serious consideration of an affair depending before you, whereby an estate of his grandfather's or elder brother's is pretended to be given from him by a will of his brother's, made, as he says, after he was past any condition of making it. Send me Leo ab Aitzema by the bearer. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 204.]
July 2.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. Last Monday night the Lady Gray arrived from Calais. [Ibid. No. 205.]
July 2.
noon. Portsmouth.
Henry Savile to Williamson. Yesterday at Yarmouth I received two packets from you of the 28th and 29th, and this morning at my arrival here had your other of the 29th, with the Spanish letter, which was before omitted.
Coming from the Downs on Tuesday with a very fresh gale, the wind very fair but the weather hazy, for fear of the shore we outran our course, and went to leeward of the Isle of Wight. Our mistake discovered, we were forced all that night to beat up to windward in very stormy weather, and on Wednesday morning his Majesty came to an anchor under Dunnose, and there lay in very rough weather till yesterday morning, that he got in his shallop into the island, where Sir Robert Holmes met him, and carried him to a good dinner at Yarmouth. There his Royal Highness came in the afternoon, and after supper they both came hither, arriving at one this morning. This stormy voyage has not at all discouraged his Majesty from the sea, and all he can be persuaded to is only to change his ship and return in the Harwich, a good thirdrate frigate, but he will by no means hearken to any proposition of returning by land, notwithstanding all manner of conveniences and supplications have been proposed to him. He intends to dine tomorrow at Titchfield at Mr. Noel's, and from thence go straight on board the Harwich, and so make the best of his way to the Thames. God send him better weather than he has had, else he will at his return have no reason to call this a voyage of pleasure. The Katherine yacht is yet missing and in her Lord Hatton, Lord Cornwallis and Tom Jermyn. She has not been seen since Tuesday night. when she shot for help, being at anchor, but we suppose it was only for something wrong in her mast and hope she may have reached some western port. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 206.]
July 2.
Late at night. Portsmouth.
Sir John Werden to Williamson. Yesterday morning the Duke went out to sea towards the place where we had left the King at anchor, but near the Isle of Wight we met some of the King's servants in a boat, who told him the King was landed that morning in the Isle of Wight, whereon he sailed straight to Yarmouth and met the King there, where they were very well received by Sir R. Holmes. The King came hither at one this morning, has been very well treated by our Governor, and much pleased in seeing the new ship, the Royal James, as also in seeing one of the yachts, built here for the French King at Versailles, drawn on a cradle placed on four wheels at least 200 yards to the seaside, where it was lifted up with tackle and other engines (though it weighed at least 42 tons) and let down gently on the ooze, where the tide came in to it, and this afternoon we have seen it sail about with great applause. Since dinner the King has seen the garrison exercise, one troop of horse, four companies of foot of the Guards and four more of the Duke's regiment, which they performed very well, and his Majesty is now seeing fireworks prepared on purpose for him. To-morrow the Court dine at Mr. Nowell's and after dinner embark again for London. [Ibid No. 207.]
9, Friday morning. [July 2.]
Portsmouth.
Capt. G. Legge to Williamson. His Majesty surprised the garrison last night between 12 and 1. He intends to stay here today, and to dine with Mr. Noell at Titchfield to-morrow and thence go on board the Harwich and return in her to London. [Ibid. No. 208.]
July 2.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 209.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 209 i.]
July 2. T. B. to — I expected to have heard from you about your business, but have not of late. I have several times sent to you, and many times endeavoured to speak with you, but could not, about your concerns, and yet desire it, for I have something of consequence to offer, and I suppose (except words), if anything be acted in your affairs, in the sphere I move in, I may know of it. There is little news in these parts, but great expectations, many doubts, some hopes, and verily some talk, as if it were the design of D? [anby?] to amuse us with uncertain strange reports. Some say that o[ur] K[ing] is gone to see his cousin. Some say the bishops have or will procure a procl [amation] to suppress all meetings of Friends, and that with great severity. There are some notable lines abroad of some Ro[man Cath[olics] for their liberty. I am promised one. As soon as I have it, I may send it. Our friends seem much to be comforted at (an imaginary) total rout the Brandenburgers have given the Swedes, nay, some pretend to give so exact an account out, that they can tell what pounds of powder are taken and what money to a farthing, as it were. If it be true, 'tis considerable, but some say it is not all true, but only some small rencontre about a town, that was like to have been surprised. Some talk as if the Danes besiege Hamburg. 'Tis also reported that Turenne is much straitened in his quarters and cannot get from the Imperialists, and that there are insurrections in France, and a world of these stories.
Postscript.—Pray let me know if you received that directed to Mr. John Holford of Ta[u]nton Dean as you advised, and, if you did, and will so receive letters. I may send that way best, if anything offer of concern in your business. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 210.]
July 2.
Whitehall.
Two warrants to the Commissioners of the Customs making free the Flying Hart, now called the Friendship, of London, and the Soil Fish or Gilded Buck, now called the Lark, of London, both Scotch prizes taken in the late Dutch war. [Precedents 1, f. 34.]
July 2.
Windsor.
Warrant to the Duke of Ormonde. Being informed by Prince Rupert that there is no provision of carts and carriages made in the late Book of Establishment for him to attend the King in his removes and progresses, and that thereby also his former allowance of 6 bottles of claret per diem is reduced to 3, which is too small a proportion for such a diet, he is to give present order to the officers of the Board of Greencloth in all the King's removes to allow him a coach and two carts, and to augment the 3 bottles to 6 each day. [Ibid. f. 89.]
July 3.
Edlington near Doncaster.
Sir Thomas Wharton to Williamson. Acquainting him that Sir Philip Musgrave was able to ride 93 miles in two days and a half to that place, and then to be so little weary as to leave it for the pleasure of riding again the next day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 211.]
July 3.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 212.]
July 3.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About noon to-day arrived the Mary of about 250 tons from Surat. The Joshua of about 600 and the Falcon of about 300 tons, both, they say, from Bantam, are coming about the South Foreland. That from Surat is very richly laden, and the other two are not much inferior as the Surat ship says. Little wind, variable from N.W. to S.E. [Ibid. No. 213.]
July 3.
Saturday afternoon.
Capt. Sir R. Haddock to Williamson. Describing the King's voyage from the Downs to Portsmouth as in the letters previously calendared. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 214.]
July 3.
Portsmouth.
S. Pepys to Williamson. His Majesty, having first landed and been entertained noon and night by Sir R. Holmes in the Isle of Wight on Thursday, spent yesterday at Portsmouth, with much appearance of satisfaction in his visits on float in the morning (and particularly from the new ship and the yachts built by Commissioner Deane for the King of France) and on shore in the afternoon from the Governor. He is this morning going to Titchfield, where he dines with Mr. Noell, resolving to set out thence homeward by sea again this evening with this, I hope, better choice in his passage that he will take it on the Harwich to the Downs, where Commissioner Haddock and some others will attend him, to the lessening though not wholly removing the apprehensions we were lately under from the two great adventures he was then running without other security on board him but his own seamanship, and poor Clements'.
6 p.m. in the Fareham River. Just as I came to the bottom of the other side, I was called away to attend the King to Titchfield, where he has been very hospitably treated by Mr. Noell, and, dinner being done, is returned to his yachts to be by them transported to Spithead where the Harwich and the rest of the frigates expect him, with purpose of making the best of his way this evening towards London, the wind blowing at W.S.W. very fresh and the weather fair. He has been pleased to bestow the honour of knighthood this day on Sir John Tippetts, Sir Richard Haddock, and Sir Anthony Deane, the two former at Portsmouth (with Sir [Roger] Manley, the deputy governor there) the last at Titchfield.
Some work the King has set me will keep me at Portsmouth this night, towards which I am going from Titchfield in the new French yacht, which (taking in all qualities and its little depth of water) seems to outdo anything that ever yet swam. Before my sealing this, the King is going on board the Harwich now under sail. You will be pleased to dispose of the enclosed from the King to Mr. Cheffins (Chiffinch). [Ibid. No. 215.]
July 3.
10 p.m. Saturday night. Portsmouth.
Capt. G. Legge to Williamson. I came just now from his Majesty. He is under sail and clear of the island, so, if the wind continue fair, you may expect him at Whitehall on Monday. The ill weather in his passage hither has made him change the Greybound for the Harwich, the best man-of-war with him, and, I think, the safest. (Accounts of the King's dining at Titchfield and conferring the knighthoods mentioned in the last.) [Ibid. No. 216.]
July 3.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to James Hickes. Giving an account of the King's entertainment and of his departure, as in previous letters. [Ibid. No. 217.]
July 4.
Christ Church.
Dr. Richard Allestree to Williamson. Expressing his thanks for his frequent favours to him. [Ibid. No. 218.]
July 4.
Bridgetown.
Theo. Bishop to Williamson. Sir Edward Walker has obliged us very much in giving us the opportunity of hearing from you. I was in great hopes to have heard when we in Warwickshire might see you here, and you know you told me it was resolved by you it should be so. My husband is much your servant. The cheese is not forgotten, but till later in the year I cannot furnish you with that which is good. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 219.]
July 4.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of packet-boats and mails. [Ibid. No. 220.]
July 4.
Portsmouth.
[Sir] R[oger] M[anley] to Isaac Dorislaus at the Post Office. Describing the King's arrival at the Isle of Wight and Portsmouth as in previous letters. On Saturday morning having first knighted your brother [-in-law] in his bed-chamber and the two commissioners, Tippetts and Haddock, on the walls, he went to dine at Titchfield, and coming on board the Harwich near eight he set sail with his whole fleet towards the Downs, the wind due west, a fine gale. Describing the fireworks and the exercise of the garrison on Friday. [Ibid. No. 221.]
July 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. About the King's dining at Titchfield, his departure and his conferring knighthoods. [Ibid. No. 222.]
July 4.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to [Williamson]. Recommending Mr. Reading, who, on the occasion of the Lord Lieutenant's going to England, is also going thither. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 170.]
July 5. Certificate by Sir William Peake that Passchier Liever took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 223.]
July 5. Nathaniel Herne to Williamson. Hoping he will do him the favour to dine with him to-morrow, and asking him to let him know the hour and whom he wishes invited to accompany him. If not to-morrow, Herne must attend the sessions all the rest of the week. [Ibid. No. 224.]
July 5.
Chiswick.
Charles, Lord Gerard, to Williamson. Requesting his favour on behalf of the bearer, Mr. Moore, who was an old servant to Sir Francis Windebank and to Secretary Nicholas at Oxford, and to give him a quick dispatch in getting his grant signed by his Majesty. [Ibid. No. 225.]
July 3.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Friday loosed out of this bay 40 light colliers and stood northward. Here are four ships of this place from Norway. The masters report they met with several capers at sea, French, Hollanders, and Flemings, few of them but took something from them. To-day came in a Dane, and all are delivering their ladings. Since Friday last, abundance of laden ships have passed by southward daily. [Ibid. No. 226.]
July 5.
Deal
Richard Watts to Williamson. About 10 last night his Majesty in the Greyhound with the rest of the fleet came into the Downs from Portsmouth. The greater ships he left in the Downs, he going up in the Greyhound, and with him, they say, only the Soldato and two small ships more. The wind was N.W. by N., not a topsail gale. Little wind at S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 227.]
July 5.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Between 7 and 8 yesterday evening his Majesty passed by this from the westward, having the wind at S.W. and very good weather. Yesterday afternoon arrived a packet-boat from Nieuport. [Ibid. No. 228.]
July 5.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 229.]
July 5.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Since my last there is come into port the Speedwell from Barbados with sugar, cotton and ginger, and one from Hamburg with wax and piece goods for Bilboa, and some 7 or 8 small coasters, two from Croisic for Ireland laden with salt and some brandy. These say there has been a great insurrection in Brittany, and very numerous opposing that King's impositions, and that the Governor is much wounded in the tumult by a woman on horseback, who shot him with her pistol and cut him with her sword, but their King's concession to their demands appeased that belluam multorum capitum. This morning we hailed a vessel from London bound for Ireland with a nobleman's goods. The great Dutch vessel that has been this last 7 months here expecting convoy is, they pretend, sold to and manned by Englishmen, bound the first fair wind for Holland. Wind E. [Ibid. No. 230.]
July 5. Careat that there be granted no royal presentation to William Shippen, clerk, for the corroboration of his title to the rectory of Presbury, Cheshire, and no mandate to the Archbishop of Canterbury to grant a dispensation to the said Shippen to hold the rectory of Kirkheaton, Yorkshire, with the very rich rectory of Sefton, Lancashire, without notice to the said Archbishop, the Master of the Faculties, and Thomas Legh of Adlington, the patron of the rectory of Presbury, as the said Shippen has held two rectories for four years without any dispensation and has obtained a third, contrary to the laws both of the kingdom and the Church. [Latin. Ibid. No. 231.]
July 5. Report by Sir R. Carr on the petition of George Porter, calendared ante, p. 175, that the premises mentioned in the petition were granted as therein mentioned and now are parcel of her Majesty's jointure, that there is a petition pending for the same matter preferred by Edward Tildesley, who is now in possession thereof, and claims under the title of Mistress Elizabeth Lennard, administratrix of her sister, Mistress Howard, and that, if his Majesty be inclined to gratify the petitioner, which can no way prejudice the revenue, he conceives it may be done by empowering her Majesty's trustees to grant the same. [Ibid. No. 232.]
July.
Hampton Court.
Warrant to the trustees of the Queen Consort, after reciting the said petition of George Porter and the above report, for a lease of the premises petitioned for to the said George Porter for 40 years in reversion after the expiration of the term of 31 years now in being granted to Mistress Howard in the manner desired by the petitioner. [Draft. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 233.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
The Earl of Arlington to Williamson. Having appointed a post to go every day to and from Windsor for the convenience of the Court during his Majesty's stay there, I desire you so to order it that the mail thence every night may be dispatched at 8 or 9 at farthest, so that the letters may arrive here in time to have the convenience of the general office for their further conveyance or delivery here, care being already taken that the letters that go daily hence shall depart at the same hour as now on the usual post days, and, if before or after that precise time you shail have occasion to send letters, care shall be taken that horses be provided for expresses without disturbing the prefixed time for the general letter office, which cannot happen without great inconvenience to the said office and dissatisfaction to all concerned in the punctual going and coming of letters at the prefixed times. [Ibid. No. 234.]
July 6. Certificate by Sir William Peake that Ary Peterson Weyman took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [Ibid. No. 235.]
July 6.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind N. [Ibid. No. 236.]
July 6.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boat which left the Brill on Saturday according to custom is not yet arrived. About 30 or 40 ships (laden colliers we judge them) are passing by for the Thames. It is said betwixt 3 and 400 small and great are laded or lading at Newcastle. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 237.]
July 6.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 238.]
July 6.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Wiliamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 239.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 239 i.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Thomas Dickon and John Towneson, late of Water Friston in the West Riding, convicted of burglary for breaking into the mansion house of and robbing Samuel Sunderland of Harding in the West Riding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 139.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chamberlain for swearing and admitting Henry Guy as Groom of the Bedchamber in the room of Silas Titus. [Precedents 1, f. 34.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
Warrant constituting Col. John Russell commander-in-chief of the forces left in London and Westminster during the King's absence to preserve the peace, in which he is to observe such orders as "our dearest and most entirely beloved son James, Duke of Monmouth" shall give from time to time. [Ibid. f. 35.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for the creation of a subpœna Office in the Court of Chancery in Ireland for drawing, writing, preparing and engrossing all writs of subpœna, with a grant of the said office to Richard Aldworth for his life. [S.P. Dom., Car. II., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 329.]
July 6.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting letters of 4 June, 1673, which directed that all moneys recovered out of any debts due to the '49 security should be paid to Abel Ram of Dublin, goldsmith, for the use of the persons concerned in the said security, and after payment of such quit-rents as were due thereout should be equally disposed of, so that the said '49 officers might receive the full benefit thereof, and that several persons endeavour to divert the said moneys to other particular uses to the prejudice of the '49 officers, and that the debts have been by the trustees of the said security assigned to the Crown, only that the same might be applied to the satisfaction of the unsatisfied arrears of the said officers, declaring that the said recited letters be in all things pursued and observed so far as he shall judge the same expedient, and that he take care that none of the said moneys recovered out of the said debts be applied to any other uses than to what they were by the said letters designed, any other letters that he had received from the King to the contrary notwithstanding. [Ibid. p. 331.]
[July ?] Thomas Jones to the King. Petition praying for a pardon to Henry Firman and his release from his long imprisonment, he having been employed by the petitioner for the discovery of frauds committed by Samuel Sewster, purser of the Speedwell, and his Majesty, having on a former petition of the petitioner's, reprieved him about 18 February last, when found guilty at the Old Bailey Sessions for making out a false Navy ticket, and Firman soon afterwards made out the said discovery amounting to 500l. or thereabouts, notwithstanding which he has lain prisoner in Newgate above four months. At the side,
July 7.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Recorder of London. On the back, His report of the truth of the statements in the petition. 9 July. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 240.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 37.]
July 7.
Guildhall.
Sir Thomas Player to Williamson. This gentleman is the person I spoke to you of yesterday. He has conformed, as you will find certified by the Bishop, and this prosecution against him is most malicious. I entreat you to look on his certificates and Sir W. Jones' opinion, and to procure for him a nolle prosequi before his Majesty goes away. I dare assure you he is a modest, humble, learned and loyal person, and one that can and will really serve his Majesty. Endorsed, "About Tilsley." [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 241.]
[July ?] John Tilsley to the King. Petition showing that, being possessed of the small vicarage of Deane, Lancashire, he ceased to preach for some years after the Act of Uniformity, till in 1670 he conformed, and obtained licence to preach from the then Bishop of Chester in his diocese, and by virtue thereof has officiated at Deane by permission of the legal vicar thereof, but is since prosecuted in the County Palatine of Lancaster by Roger Kenyon on the Oxford Act for restraining Nonconformists from inhabiting corporations; and begging a warrant to Sir John Otway, Attorney-General for the County Palatine, to enter a nolle prosequi on the said information. With legal queries on the above case, and report of Sir William Jones that the petitioner should not be restrained nor required to take any fresh oath, having done what was required by the Act of Uniformity. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 371, No. 242.]
Another copy of the above petition with a separate copy of the opinion and case. [Ibid. Nos. 243, 244.]
July 7.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Twelve light colliers are at anchor in this bay waiting for a fair wind, it being now much northerly. Last Friday and Saturday passed by southward a great fleet of laden colliers. [Ibid. No. 245.]
July 7.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. We are in a quiet and healthful condition in these parts. [Ibid. No. 246.]
July 7.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. [Ibid. No. 247.]
July 7.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 5th arrived the Fellowship of this place from Rotterdam. The master and merchants say that, a little before their coming away ten days since, the declaration of war was published against the Swedes, and the drums beat for seamen, which came in apace to go aboard a squadron of about 15 men-of-war fitted at Helvoetsluys, their design no further known than to secure their trade. Their discourse there was that the French decline battle with the Prince of Orange. Their expectations from him are great. [Ibid. No. 248.]
July 7. Caveat on behalf of Sir Herbert Price that nothing pass concerning the grant of a lead mine lately discovered in lands anciently belonging to the Monastery of Coverham, in Swineside in Coverdale, Yorkshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 12.]
July 7. Caveat that no instalment be made for a debt of William Prettyman for first fruits and tenths (and for which Charles Porter and Mr. Fenn are bound), till notice be given to the Earl of Arlington who has a privy seal for 5,000l. odd hundred pounds to be paid out of the moneys due by Mr. Prettyman. [Ibid.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of John Hall, praying a concurrent lease of the bailiwick of Westminster and of Neat's Court Farm and Hugh's tenement in the Isle of Sheppey, to commence after the expiration of the leases in being and such further estate as shall be granted by the Queen's trustees, paying her the reserved rent during her life, and afterwards the rent of 10l. per annum. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 37.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
The King to the Provost and Fellows of Eton. Recommending Stephen Upman, Fellow of King's, who has been for some years preceptor to his natural sons, the Earls of Southampton, Euston, and Northumberland, for admittance to the next vacant Fellowship at Eton, since, as he is a member of King's College, and therefore qualified by their statutes for the same, this favour will be no prejudice to the declaration lately made by the King to the said College, which he intends shall be punctually observed for the future. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 10.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Pass for the Comte Gustave Lellie and the Sieur Melchior d'Haulteville to transport themselves with their servants, &c., to Hamburg. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 69.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Keeper for a bill constituting Commissioners for Licensing Hackney Coaches, the Commissioners being the same as in the warrant of 22 June, with the omission of Weld, Warcup, Philip Bulstrode and Harris, and the addition of William Aerskin, Henry Progers, John Mytton, Robert Maddox, Henry Bulstrode and Symon Smith. Minute. [Ibid.]
July 7.
Whitehall.
Patent to Goodwin Wharton for 14 years of a new invention for the buoying up of ships and the more easy landing and lading of goods. Minute. [Ibid. p. 70.]
July 7.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant, after reciting the warrant of 11 Jan., 1671, for a commission for the erection of a supreme court and criminal judicatory for Scotland (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1671, p. 17), and that John, Earl of Athole, had lately resigned his office of Justice General, and that Sir William Lockhart, formerly Lord Justice Clerk, had lately died, for a new commission constituting Alexander, Earl of Murray, the Justice General, Sir Thomas Wallace of Craigie, Lord Justice Clerk, and five other senators of the College of Justice to be his Majesty's Commissioners and Criminal Judges with the powers conferred by the said recited commission. [3½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 262.]
July 7.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for stating the accounts of the money received by Alexander, Archbishop of Glasgow, on account of the yearly allowance of 300l. sterling from the time of his demitting his charge to his restauration and for causing speedy payment to be made to him of the 300l. alleged to be due to him, if they shall find it so. [Ibid. p. 266.]
July 7.
Windsor Castle.
Commission to Charles Rosse, writer in Edinburgh, to be clerk to the Court Martial of the forces in Scotland. [Ibid. p. 267.]
July 7.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. After reciting the warrant to them of 19 February last, concerning the pay and allowances of Christopher Irving, surgeon-major, and John Jossie, second surgeon of the forces in Scotland, which allowances had not yet been made effectual to them, and that the said surgeon-major had voluntarily offered to accept 9s. sterling per diem in place of the allowances formerly granted to him and his mates, and for a horse to carry the surgeons' chests, and the said second surgeon 3s. 4d. sterling per diem, in lieu of the allowances formerly granted to him and his mate, warrant for payment to them of the said allowances respectively from the date of their several commissions, and warrant for payment to Charles Rosse, clerk of the Court Martial, of an allowance of 5s. sterling per diem. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 268.]
July 7.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a gift to John, Earl of Athole, of the escheat and life-rent of Sir Robert Murray of Abercarney. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 270.]
July 7.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a gift of the bastardrie and last heir of Sebastian Aston, burgess of Linlithgow, in favour of Robert Milne, Provost of Linlithgow. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 271.]
July 7.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a presentation of Donald McKinnon, student of theology, to be minister at the kirk of Straith and Slaite in the Isle of Skye. With note that the presentation of this benefice belongs to the Bishop of the Isles, but, that bishopric being now vacant, his Majesty presents. [Docquet. Ibid.]
July 7.
Windsor Castle.
Protection to Captain Henry Martin, a native of Scotland, who, contrary to the proclamation forbidding subjects to list themselves in any foreign service, acted for some time under a French commission in a privateer, but who is now sensible of his offence, and desires to return to his native country. [Ibid. p. 262.]
July 7.
Windsor Castle.
Protections to the Countess of Leven, James Gordon, elder, of Rothiemay, John Gordon, younger, of Rothiemay, John Ogilvy, elder, of Peile and Thomes Inglish of Mordistown, the first being for three and each of the others for two years respectively. [Ibid. p. 273.]
July 7.
The Council Chamber, Dublin.
Proclamation by Lord Lieutenant and the Council. After reciting the Act of 28 Henry VI. made in Ireland for the suppressing, taking and killing notorious thieves and robbers, which authorized all persons to kill and take all such notorious thieves and all thieves found robbing or breaking houses by night or by day, and offered a reward to every one killing or taking such thieves of 1d. of every plough and ¼d. of every cottage in the barony where the manslaughter is done for every thief, to be levied by the sheriff of the county within one month after such manslaughter, who, if negligent, is to pay the money himself, charging all good subjects to be aiding and assisting to each other in taking and killing all such notorious thieves as shall be found robbing, spoiling or breaking houses by night or day, against the said statute, and commanding the sheriffs to make levies of the moneys intended thereby to be raised as rewards. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 309, p. 414.]
July 8. Mary Briant to the King. My desire is so much to see your princely Majesty I know not what to do. Pray direct me and pardon my boldness. I came to London on foot last year three weeks before Whitsuntide, and came to Whitehall. I asked for Mr. Gilbert Thornbury, so a proper man with a pike in his hand said your Majesty was at Windsor, and Mr. Thornbury also, so I returned forth of London on foot, but I cannot do it again. I have been in London three years, one after another, and all in vain. I also desire your Majesty would grant me something from your hand to dig for money that was hid by thieves many years ago, and to empty a well which, it was supposed, much was put into, and other hopeful places, that none might say me nay. Two pots of money have been found near this plot already. Many have desired to try, but dare not dig in other men's ground without order. I can tell your Majesty things which will not wholly displease you. Pray grant me my desire. I live in Rowde, a mile from the Devizes, and have a brotherin-law, Humphrey Hockell, a brazier, living in the Devizes. If your Majesty be pleased that I may hear from you, if directed to my brother-in-law's house it will be safely delivered to me. I have your Majesty's picture in my house. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 1.]
July 8. Certificate by Sir W. Peake that Francis vande Kerckhove took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. With attestation at the foot that Kerckhove with his family intends to settle in England. [Ibid. No. 2.]
July 8. Order by the Committee of Trade that there be a general meeting of all the merchants of London trading to Cadiz, Port St. Mary, St. Lucar, and Seville at Grocers Hall next Monday at 3 p.m., who are to subscribe two certificates, one containing the names of such of them as approve of the allowances agreed by several merchants to be made to Sir M. Wescomb as Consul at Cadiz by an instrument of 24 Aug., 1671, and the other the names of those who disallow the said agreement, the said certificates to be presented to their Lordships next Tuesday, and further that the persons who subscribed the said instrument or as many of them as are about the town be summoned to the meeting. [Ibid. No. 3.]
July 8. Minutes of the Committee of Trade about Sir M. Wescomb and the merchants. The due was 150 ryals plate on every ship, Mr. Rumbold testifies sometimes was given a piece of 8, but not of due.
Two ryals plate on a ducat freight on strangers, and one on the nation. He does not demand this as his right.
A general meeting of the traders to Cadiz, &c., particularly those in the list. Sir M. Wescombe to be present, if he pleases. (Vote of the meeting to be taken as above.)
Monday afternoon at 4 the Irish Committee. Lord Ranelagh to have notice to be present about Lord Dillon's business.
The Composition Trade at 4 likewise next Monday, the Commissioners of the Customs to be present, Mr. Bertie to give them notice that they come prepared to give their opinion concerning the Composition Trade.
The Irish Committee to be summoned to attend next Monday at 3. [Ibid. No. 4.]
July 8.
Oxford.
Dr. John Wallis to Williamson. I have acquainted the ViceChancellor how ready you were to afford us your kind assistance, for which he returns his very hearty thanks. You may remember how it was against the hair, both with the Commissioners and some others, to have the business so allowed us, and some of them were not well pleased that the vintner sided so much with us. I pressed him to do so, finding we had need enough of it to obviate delays, on assurance I would use my endeavour that he should at least have some competent time allowed him for selling off his wines, but I find on my return some of us here are more severe than I think proper, that would not allow him a day or to sell a drop, but to be gone presently. If all of us should be of this mind, I doubt it might be of ill consequence, since we are not secure we may not be put to play the same game over again. I do not find the Vice-Chancellor himself inclined to so much severity, so, I presume, we shall go more moderate ways. It is thought here that the Bishop of Worcester is either dead, or not likely to subsist long, which will give occasion of alterations. If that or any other occasion give you opportunity of doing a kindness to your servant or my son, I believe his Majesty would be very ready to grant, if we knew what to ask. I have signified to Dr. Conant by his son your good thoughts as to him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 5.]
July 8.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 6.]
July 8.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. By a letter from Morlaix of 6 July that stile, it's reported that the peasants in that province have taken up arms, and kill, burn and destroy all the gentry and all such as have been receivers and excisemen, and have but little kindness for their clergy. They are come within two leagues of Morlaix, and have put them into such a consternation that they know not what to do nor how to dispose of themselves. [Ibid. No. 7.]
July 8.
Whitehall.
Patent to Thomas Neale for 14 years for an engine or pump invented by him for draining mines and other uses of that nature, which forces and draws water in one whole entire barrel with one and the self same stroke, drawing more water and raising it higher with less strength and much more ease than any other hitherto invented. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 74.]
July 9.
Plymouth.
A Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 8.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 8 i.]
July 9. Grant to Henry Bulstrode, Gentleman of the Privy Chamber, of the King's interest in the estate of John Amys of Borden, Kent, lately become felo de se. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 195.]
July 9.
Windsor.
Warrant to Lord Chief Justice North and Baron Vere Bertie, Justices of Assize for the Western Circuit, to forbear sentence in case William Vowles of Panborough, Somerset, be found guilty of felony and burglary, the King being informed of several circumstances in his favour. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 137.]
July 9.
Windsor.
The King to the Commissioners for regulating Hackney Coaches. Recommending to them Henry Henley, for 15 years coachman to the Duke of Ormonde, and requiring them to grant him their licence to drive a hackney coach on the first vacancy occurring in the number established by law, next after such as have been already recommended for licences. [Precedents 1, f. 84.]
July 10. Warrant for the appointment of Richard Lloyd, LL.D., the King's advocate general for the office of High Admiral, and Samuel Francklyn, M.A., the King's procurator general, to proceed, sue, and prosecute in the Court of Admiralty, all such as are accountable to the King for prize ships, goods, &c., according to the Act of 14 Car. II. c. 14, entitled, Directions for the prosecution of persons accountable for prize goods, Sir Walter Walker, who had been appointed thereto, being dead, and for the Judge of the Court of Admiralty proceeding therein forthwith. Draft. With note by the Earl of Danby, that he sees no cause why his Majesty may not give such warrant as above-mentioned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 9.]
July 10.
Beaudsert.
Sir B. Broughton to Williamson. When I was serviceable at the time of the plots, you promised me Lord Arlington's favour and yours. Allow me now to be a petitioner to you both. My son is B.A. in Trinity and stands for a fellowship in All Souls. The major part of that society is for him, as I am informed, by one of the Fellows, who doubts not to carry it, if not overcome by a Court interest. I beseech you, if an application be made to his Majesty for another, to put in for me, and grant me your letter to the Warden, if not engaged already. [Ibid. No. 10.]
July 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About 4 this morning arrived one of our packet-boats with many passengers. They bring no considerable news; the nearness of the two armies and the unwillingness as they imagine of both to engage is their chiefest discourse. Several laden colliers have lately passed by for the Thames. The wind has been mostly N.W. these last three or four days. [Ibid. No. 11.]
[1675.]
July 10. Lo[ndon.]
Sir Christopher Musgrave to Williamson. I am very sorry I could not receive your commands to Worcester. His Majesty and his Royal Highness having declared their gracious intentions towards me, I must receive the effect of them by your favour, and therefore request you to move them in it. The length of the march requires a summer season, which spends apace. [Ibid. No. 12.]
1675.
July 10.
Pass for a ship of the Grand Duke of Tuscany armed by him for convoying merchant ships to and from Leghorn with the name in blank. With note, that two more blank passes of the same tenor and date were granted for two other ships. [Precedents 1, f. 82.]
July 10.
Windsor.
Warrant to the Ranger of Enfield Chace, as several deer belonging thereto straggle out into the woods and corn adjacent, whereby divers of them are killed by the country people, requiring him to cause such of the said deer as he shall judge not likely to return and remain in the said chace to be hunted and killed, to prevent their drawing out others with them and being killed by the peasants. [Ibid. f. 83.]
July 10.
Dublin.
Robert Leigh to [Williamson]. On this occasion of the Lord Lieutenant's going to England, who sailed about five yesterday afternoon, I thought it my obligation to remind you that this is the time for getting anything in this kingdom, especially if a Parliament be called here soon as is given out, for he carries with him, as I guess, a scheme of all the settlement of this kingdom with an account of most things in the King's disposal still, with design to advise his Majesty what course shall be taken in it, as also to the renewing of the establishment and settling the revenue either to farm or otherwise, so that without doubt good things will be got wherever they fall. His two chiefest favourites here go with him, Sir Charles Meredith, Chancellor of the Exchequer, and Sir John Temple, the Solicitor-General, an ingenious worthy gentleman, and extremely well versed in the settlement of this kingdom, and well worth your acquaintance, if you have a fit opportunity, for none could be fitter to serve you in relation to this country, or to put you in this juncture on some proper thing in the King's gift.
Postscript.—Apologizing for troubling him with the letter about Mr. Reading. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 171.]
July 11.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. Passengers from Calais and Nieuport talk of a defeat given the Swedes by the Brandenburgers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 13.]
July 11.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. The ships from the Downs are come to Spithead, viz., the Norwich, Yarmouth, Ruby, and the Ann and Christopher and the Holmes fireships. They are taking in provisions, and are then to go to Sir John Narbrough. [Ibid. No. 14.]
July 11.
Windsor.
Warrant for a grant of the office of Sealer to the Great Seal of England to Thomas Barron, the younger, for his life in reversion after James Davies. [Precedents 1, f. 84.]
[July ?] Benjamin Barron to the King. Petition for the Rangership of Whitchott Forest in reversion after Mr. Legge. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 15.]
July 12. Reference thereof to the Lord Treasurer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 38.]
July 12.
London.
Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh to Williamson. As Lord Oxenstierna, being made Groom of the Stole to the King of Sweden, is ordered to make all the haste he can for his return, and, as all other passages but that of Gottenberg are dangerous, his request is that you will beg the favour of one of his Majesty's yachts for him and several other Swedish gentlemen, that they might begin their voyage about eight days hence. I spoke to his Majesty about it before his going for Portsmouth, and had for answer that, after his return, he would do it. Therefore I hope your intercession will meet with no difficulty.
We have further news from our army that our loss surpasses not 2,000 men, and that the Brandenburgers have had a great deal the worser, and that ours were ready to take the field. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 16.]
July 12. J. Stanfard to Williamson. The enclosed to his Majesty, the Lord Chamberlain, Lord Ossory and yourself are from his Most Serene Highness, my master, and are thanks for the unlimited civility the Prince of Neuburg received from you all. I beg you will deliver the first and command the address of the others. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 17.]
July 12.
Worcester.
Dr. T. Lamplugh to Williamson. You may have heard before this how last Friday morning between 9 and 10, it pleased God to put a period to the pains and patience of our good Bishop, who spent the day before in bemoaning himself to his God and sending up pious ejaculations to him. After that he lay speechless for about 12 hours, and then, without any reluctancy, quietly resigned his soul and departed in peace, and I doubt not it was welcomed with Enge, bone serve. The day after I came hither, he called me to his bedside and asked after his friends at Court, and made frequent mention of his gracious master, and prayed most heartily for him and said "Nothing laid him so low as the consideration that he had not been more serviceable to him," and many other pious expressions concerning him. By his will he gave all his temporals (after payment of debts and funeral expenses) to pious uses, to repair this church, to rebuild the Bishop's house, and to the poor of his diocese, both clergy and laity. He showed kindness to his friends and relatives, but this was done in a deed by itself. This place very much resents his death. The Mayor ordered his funeral knell to be rung in every parish in the town, and all the rest generally express great sorrow for his loss. This day sennight is appointed for the day of his interment, which will be done, according to his own direction, in a modest and decent manner. [Ibid. No. 18.]
July 12.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. This week came in a few vessels. The wonderful providence of God has been lately manifested on a young lad of this port, who was disordered in his brain, and some three weeks since got out of his mother's house at 10 at night, and got on board a small boat with one oar, the wind being high and N.W., and was driven out to sea, and some five days after was found 12 leagues off Ram Head by a vessel for Croisic, who carried him in there, and last night he was brought in hither by a vessel from thence. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 19.]
July 12.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Giving a fuller account of the lad mentioned in the last, whose name was Hugh Rogers. The master of the vessel that brought him says there was some disturbance in Brittany, but that it was appeased again. [Ibid. No. 20.]
July 12. Warrant from Lord Arlington to Sir Christopher Wren to repair a little room in the Greencloth Yard at Whitehall near Sir George Carteret's for the use of Mrs. Jones, necessary woman to the Queen. [Ibid. No. 21.]
July 12. Caveat on behalf of Sir R. Carr for Mr. Barron that nothing pass concerning the grant of the place of Ranger of Whitchot Forest till notice given to him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 12.]
July 12.
Windsor.
Warrant to Sir John Ottway, Attorney-General of the County Palatine of Lancaster, to enter a nolle prosequi on an information exhibited at the Manchester Quarter Sessions against John Tilsley, clerk, upon the Oxford Act restraining Nonconformists from inhabiting corporations, nothwithstanding he has conformed himself to the laws. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 70.]
July 13. W. Carr to Williamson. Lady Northumberland, not being personally acquainted with you, has desired me to recommend her business to you, of which you will be informed by the bearer. On my account I know my son is no friend to her family, therefore I must beg you to get him to give a speedy dispatch to her request. On the back,
Draft by Williamson of the reference to Sir R. Carr, calendared post, p. 212. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 22.]
July 13. Certificate by Sir W. Peake that Creyn Van Doren took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [Ibid. No. 23.]
July 13. Burton Goodwin to Francis Royley. I was in good hopes to have had my old shop, but, being taken before I came, I have sheltered myself in the Castle, where, being once acquainted, I do not question I shall have as good a trade as if I were in the town, and now I am at a reasonable charge and on the other side at a very great one.
Here is but a thin Court at present, and I am afraid it will not mend. Here are no more gentry than just what wait on the King. All the rest run out of town. Give my love to Jack Roche. [Ibid. No. 24.]
July 13. Sir John Frederick to Sir John Nicholas. According to the Order in Council, he has held a meeting in Grocers' Hall of all the merchants trading for Spain; most of them subscribed the paper disallowing the allowances for Sir Martin Westcomb, but none the other approving of them. [Ibid. No. 25.] Enclosed,
i. Certificate of approval of the above allowances, as granted 12 July, 1675; with note that all refused to subscribe it. [Ibid. No. 25 i.]
ii. Certificate of their desire that no more be paid to Westcomb than 100 ryals per vessel and 50 to the rice-consul, and nothing on his part be imposed on any goods laden on English ships. Numerously signed. [Ibid. No. 25 ii.]
July 13. Order by the Committee for Trade on the above case, that a report be prepared, certifying that Sir Martin, in order to keep on good terms with the merchants, will not pretend to any other duty for consulage than the 150 ryals per ship for himself and his viceconsul and quits his pretensions to other duties and that he will not force ships to receive a guard till his consulage be paid, nor require other bills of lading than what the master and merchants give in, only he desires security for his 150 dollars, and advising a recommendation to the merchants for an increase to his allowance. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Minutes of the above order. [Ibid. No. 27.]
July 13.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived yesterday morning, but the master not staying above three hours at the Brill, heard not any news, except the general discourse of the defeat of the Swedes. The wind has been for several days and continues about N. and N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 28.]
July 13.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N. To-day, if the wind continues, the Harwich, Yarmouth, Ann and Christopher and Holmes, with two merchant ships bound for Tangier, will sail from Spithead to prosecute their commands. [Ibid. No. 29.]
July 13.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 30.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 30 i.]
July 13.
Windsor.
Warrant for a congé d'eliré to the Dean and Chapter of Worcester to elect a bishop to that see, void by the death of Dr. Walter Blandford, and for a letter recommending Dr. James Fleetwood, chaplain in ordinary to the King, and Provost of King's College, Cambridge, for election. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 71.]
July 13. Warrant for the reprieve of William Bonner, prisoner in Newgate, condemned to death for stealing two horses of small value, this being his first offence, and he drawn in by bad company. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 140.]
July 13.
Windsor Castle.
Report by Secretary Coventry on the reference to him by Order in Council of 25 June last for endeavouring an amicable composition between the Loyal Indigent Officers and the Master of the Revels and Groom Porter. I find the main question is about the Indian Game and Twirling Board, which the officers allege to be a lottery and consequently granted them by their patents, and they also say it was never permitted since their patent but by them. On the other side it is averred by the Groom Porter that it is a new invention and let since his coming into the office, being only a game and no lottery and by the general clauses of his patent belonging to him. I moved a composition and acquainted them with your Majesty's express pleasure for their agreeing, but the Groom Porter thought the right of his place so much concerned, that he would not be persuaded to it, so I refer it to your Majesty's further consideration. [Precedents 1, f. 83.]
July 14. Memorandum that his Majesty, having that day declared in Council that he would not wear any foreign points or laces after his return to Whitehall, likewise ordered that after Michaelmas next none of his subjects wear any such points or laces, and the Lord Chamberlain of the Household is not to permit any of his subjects wearing such points or laces to appear in his Majesty's presence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 31.]
July 14. Certificate by Sir W. Peake that Cornelius Lamberts took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [Ibid. No. 32.]
July 14.
Chester.
Matthew Anderton to Williamson. Last Monday the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland landed in this river out of the Norwich. accompanied by the Earl of Tyrone, Sir John Temple, Sir William Talbot, Col. Dillon and divers other persons of quality. He went hence early yesterday morning, and hopes to be at Windsor on Friday or Saturday next at furthest to wait on his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 33.]
July 14.
Hampton Court.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge. Requiring them to elect Thomas Lynford, M.A., the man of most loyalty, piety and learning among the candidates, to Dr. Carr's fellowship in that college, which is of King Edward's foundation, and is now void. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 183.]
July 14.
Hampton Court.
The King to Sir R. Rainsford and Sir [Timothy] Littleton, Justices of Assize for the Northern Circuit. In case Christopher Banistre, Edward Ashton and Joseph Worthington of Lancashire, who are to be tried before them for the killing of Peter Slater, be found guilty, directing them not to give judgment, and on their return to give a full account of the whole matter to the King, that so he may judge how far the said persons are fit objects of his mercy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 15.]
July 14.
Hampton Court.
Reference to Sir Robert Carr as to what is of the Duchy of Lancaster of the petition of Elizabeth, Countess of Northumberland, (the part of her suit which relates to lands immediately depending on the Crown having been referred to the Lord Treasurer) for a lease of 99 years without fine of the prefixed particulars, reserving to the lessees in possession the full benefit of their leases and paying his Majesty the reserved yearly rent now payable thereout. Prefixed is the above particular of lands, &c., in the King's disposal, now in lease for about 25 years from 1675 and some in lease for 35 years in the liberty of the Duchy of Lancaster, viz.:—
Essex. Manor of Dedham as set for 21 years to l. s. d.
Humphrey Whitegrove, 10 April, 1667 31 11 5
Yorkshire. Radham Park, &c., set for about per annum 17 5 7
In Ripon a marl quarry and several cottages, and 2 11 8
lands in Whitby and Kellington as set per annum 0 6 8
Staffordshire. Manors and parks of Tutbury, Castle Hay and Hanbury as set to several tenants for about 40 years to come for about per annum 35 10 0
16 8 0
11 15 0
2 10 0
2 0 0
0 13 4
Agersly and Hanbury Parks and in Hollfield some lands and liberty to dig plaster, and coal mines in the manor of Newcastle, Ruffhey, Shalton and Hanley with perquisites of Courts in Newcastle, &c. 54 6 0
Lincolnshire. Marsh lands in Bourne Fens set in 1660 for 31 years at per annum 5 0 0
Kent. Lands called East and West Broomfields in lease for 31 years from 4 June, 1663 2 0 0
[S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 38.]
July 14.
Hampton Court.
Grant to [Benjamin] Baron of the office of Ranger of Whichwood Forest, in reversion after George Legge. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 72.]
July 14.
Hampton Court.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrant for granting discharges of the feu and blench duties of the lands belonging to Colin, Earl of Balcarres, for the crop and year 1674. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 274.]
July 14.
Hampton Court.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury and Exchequer in Scotland. Warrant for inserting the taxt duties of the ward, non-entry, relief and marriage in the blanks of the signature in favour of Sir John Stirling of Keir, which changed the holding of his ward lands into taxt ward, according to the retoured duties of his said ward lands. [Ibid. p. 275.]
July 14.
Hampton Court.
Warrants for charters of new infeftment to the following persons of the following lands, &c.:—
Sir Charles Ramsay of Bal-manie, Baronet, his heirs male and assigns whatsoever. Lands and barony of Balmanie and half of the town and lands of Pitgarvie and other lands, on the said Sir C. Ramsay's resignation, with a norodamus and an erection thereof into the barony of Balmanie, and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Sir William Bennett of Gru-bett, in life rent, and William hiseldest son, and the heirs of hisbody, with remainder to the said Sir William's heirs and assigns. Lands and barony of Grubett, on Sir William Bennett's resignation, with a novodamus and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Robert Burnett, brother of Sir Alexander Burnett, of Leyes, deceased, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands and barony of Glenbervie and the patronage of the Kirk of Glenbervie, on the resignation of Capt. Robert Douglas of Glenbervie, with a novodamus, and with a taxation of the marriage, when it shall happen, to a certain sum to be filled up in the signature by the Commissioners of the Treasury.
John Hamilton of Cowbairdie, in life rent, and James his eldest son, and the heirs of his body,with remainder to the said JohnHamilton's heirs and assignswhatsoever. Town and lands of Cowbairdie, on the resignation of the said John and James Hamilton, with a novodamus and an erection of the said lands into the barony of Cowbardie, and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Col. James Menzies of Culdaires, with remainder to Archibald, his eldest son, and their respective heirs male and of tailie. Lands of Coldaires and Tynnaffs and Auchairne, on their own resignations, and half the kirklands of the paroch kirk of Dull, comprehending the lands of Carf and other lands, on the resignation of themselves and Thomas Menzies of Carf, with a confirmation of the infeftment of the said Thomas and those of William and Alexander Menzies, his father and uncle, of the said kirklands, and with a novodamus and an erection of all the said lands into the barony of Coldairs.
George Clappertoun of Wylliecleugh, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands and barony of Williecleugh and mains of Williecleugh on the resignation of John Clappertoun, minister at Zara, and others, with a novodamus and an erection thereof into the barony of Williecleugh and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Gilbert, eldest son of Gilbert Neilson of Craigcaffie by Jean Fleeming, deceased, his first spouse, and the heirs male of his body, with remainders over. Lands and barony of Craigcaffie in Wigtonshire, and lands of Smyrtoun in the Earldom of Carrick, Ayrshire, on the resignation of Gilbert Neilson, the elder, with a reservation of his life rent, and with a novodamus and an erection of all the said lands into the barony of Craigcaffie and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Thomas Lyall of Easter Gaigy, and Joanna Maria Lindsey, his spouse, and the survivor of them and the heirs male of his body, with remainders over. Lands and mains of Mickle Dysert in the barony of Dysert, Forfarshire, on the resignation of Robert Melvill of Dysert, with the consent of William, his eldest son, and Patrick Scot of Rossie, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Andrew Plumbar of Midlesteid, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Sharplaw and Linhouses and other lands in the parochine of Kuname, Roxburghshire, on the resignation of William Crumbie of Sharplaw, and Barbara Rutherfoord, his spouse, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
David Hunter, younger. of Burneside, his heirs or assignswhatsoever. Town and lands of Auchterforfar as well the sunniehalf as the shadowhalf thereof, with other lands in the parochine of Monyfuith, Forfarshire, with a norodamus and an erection thereof into the barony of Auchterforfar, and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
William Oliphant of Colcuquhar, with remainder to David his son and the heirs male of his body, with remainders over. The five halves of the west end of Forgundeny called Chartersland, and two part of the shadowhalf of the oxgate of Pitcaithlie and other lands, with a norodamus and an erection thereof into a free barony and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
George Gordon, eldest son of Patrick Gordon of Boigs of Darley, his heirs male and assigns whatsoever, with similar gifts in remainder to James and John, his second and third brothers, with remainders over. Town and lands of Boigs of Darley and other lands in the parochine of Auchterless, Aberdeenshire, on the resignation of the said Patrick Gordon, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
John Scott of Syntowne, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of North Syntowne in the barony of Dawick, Roxburghshire, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
Hugh Fork, sheriff clerk of Renfrew, his heirs and assigns whatsoever. Lands of Leichland and OverLeichland and other lands in the parochines of Paisley and Kilbarchan, Renfrewshire, on the resignation of James Wallace and George Rosse, with a novodamus, to be holden of his Majesty and his successors as the same are now become in his hands by virtue of the Act of Surrender made by the Abbots and Lords of erection in favour of his late Majesty in 1638, and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward.
[Docquets. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, pp. 276–294.]
July 15. Certificate by Sir W. Peake that Henry Van Campen took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day, and declared that he intends with all convenient speed to bring over his family to reside in this nation. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 34.]
July 15.
Cambridge.
Dr. Lively Moody to [Williamson]. If I write seldom, the only reason is that I understand myself better as well as your great affairs than to be importunate. If I write at all, 'tis but to let you see that the sense of your many favours shall never depart from me. I may be unhappy, but will never be ungrateful. 'Tis some satisfaction to me that our University looks on me as a man not made to serve my own ends but those of the public, were I in some better capacity, and, therefore, were it in their power, I should not stick long at mark, but I have many friends, though not one angel to throw me into the pool but yourself. 'Tis you only that can stir those waters, which when you do, you shall find legs and arms and all I am ready to serve the interests of our Church. [Ibid. No. 35.]
July 15.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. To-day sailed out of this bay 40 light colliers, the wind E.N.E. A great many laden ships have passed by to the southward all this week. [Ibid. No. 36.]
July 15.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Several ships laden and light pass by us daily. The wind continues easterly. [Ibid. No. 37.]
July 15.
Portsmouth
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. Yesterday morning sailed the Harwich and Yarmouth and the rest of the ships to be added to Sir John Narborough against the Tripolieses. [Ibid. No. 38.]
July 15.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 12th came in a Newcastle vessel in seven days from Amsterdam bound for Bordeaux. The master says there were 16 men-of-war of from 50 to 80 guns ready to put to sea, and that five great ones came out with him as far as Beachy, and that there was a report that the two armies were engaged. The 13th came in the Constant Mary in 10 days from Croisic. Off Ushant she met with five Flushing men-of-war of from 24 to 30 guns, which had taken a French man-of-war of 30 guns and another great ship of 3 or 400 tons, laden with timber for the King's use, bound for Brest. The 14th came in the James of Penryn in four days from Morlaix, which confirms the news of the rebellion there, and says they are in three armies, 10,000 in an army, and that they have the best in the country to head and encourage them. They have hanged several in the highways and have sent to Morlaix that they shall hang all that collect to gabelle, or, if they escape, will pull down their houses. The merchants are shipping their goods on vessels to send them down under the castle for security, for they know not how soon they may come there. [Ibid. No. 39.]
July 15.
Windsor.
Warrant to Lord Chief Justice North and Vere Bertie, Justices of Assize for the Western Circuit, to forbear to execute the penalty of the law on James Rew of Ashbrittle, Somerset, if found guilty of a theft, his wife Alice having been as accessory indicted for the same fact and acquitted. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 138.]
July 15. Caveat that no grant pass of a King's waiter's place in the port of London. With memorandum that this caveat was entered at the desire of Sir John Duncombe and Sir John Shaw. and that notice be given to Mr. James Bairbone of Maiden Lane, Covent Garden. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 12.]
July 15.
Windsor.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Christ's College. Granting a dispensation for non-residence to Henry More, D.D., Fellow of the College, who by reason of indisposition of body and for other reasons, cannot be resident so constantly as by the strict rules and statutes he ought to be. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 11.]
July 15.
Windsor.
Warrant for swearing and admitting Henry, Bishop of Oxford, to be Dean of the Chapel Royal, void by the death of Walter, Bishop of Worcester. [Precedents 1, f. 85.]
July 15.
London.
The Earl of Danby to the Prince of Orange. I should not have presumed to trouble your Highness, had not the Lord Ambassador Temple given me confidence to believe you will not be offended at my tendering the humblest of my duty and service and assuring you I should esteem it my greatest happiness, if I could do anything worthy of your consideration. He will be able to inform you at his return not only how earnestly but how affectionately the King desires a perfect kindness and confidence betwixt your Highness and himself, and I know nothing in this world of which I could ever be more ambitious than to be an instrument both in the promoting and preserving of it. I find my Lord Ambassador so perfectly of my mind in all things which tend to your service, that I have desired him to give you a larger account of my readiness to obey any commands wherein your Highness may think me useful. (Recommending the bearer, Col. Fenwick.) [S.P. Dom., King William's Chest 1, No. 6.]
July 15.
Ham.
The Duke of Lauderdale to the Earl of Linlithgow. In compliance with your desire I have acquainted his Majesty with the question touching command lately risen between the major of the Major-General's regiment and the captains of the regiment of Guard commanded by yourself, who does not think it reasonable that any captain of the latter regiment should command the major of the other, but he declares that even the youngest captain of the regiment of Guard shall command any captain of the other regiment. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 295.]
July 16.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind westerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 40.]
July 16.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Sending an account of the charge of the shallop sent out by Williamson's orders in May, 1673, to give notice of the enemy's being at sea and to carry packets to the fleet, of which he had formerly given him notice, had he not been prevented by Williamson's going soon afterwards to Cologne. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 41.]
July 16.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 42.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 42 i.]
July 16.
Windsor.
Warrant for inserting Henry Firman, convicted of having forged a Navy ticket, in the next general pardon. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 73.]
July 16.
Windsor.
Warrant to the Chief Justice of the King's Bench, and the Recorder of London, for inserting in the next general pardon John Ashmore and Richard Short, at the request of John Combes, mercer, of London, who by his petition has stated that he was robbed last February of goods of considerable value, and that Ashmore and Short were convicted as accessories and confessed they sold the goods to Anne Ivery and John Collier, against whom the petitioner can have no remedy at law, unless by the evidence of Ashmore and Short. [Ibid.]
July 16.
Windsor.
Declaration that Lady Diana Verney, daughter of William, Earl of Bedford, lately married to William, Lord Alington, Baron of Killard in Ireland, shall enjoy the same place and precedency as is and was due to her as daughter of the said Earl, in as much as every daughter of an earl, marrying a peer, has but place and precedency as the wife of that peer except by a particular dispensation, with warrant to James, Earl of Suffolk, Deputy Earl Marshal, to see this order observed, and cause this declaration to be registered in the College of Arms. [Ibid. p. 79.]
July 16.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a grant to James, Earl of Northampton, of the office of Constable of the Tower, to hold during pleasure, fee 100l. per annum. [Precedents 1, f. 85.]
July 16.
Windsor.
The King to the Commissioners for licensing Hackney Coaches. Requiring them to continue Henry Spelman, who has for several years behaved well and faithfully as clerk and collector of the coaches' rent, in his said place. [Ibid. f. 86.]
July 16. Recommendation to the Commissioners for licensing Hackney Coaches of John Crow, coachman to Mr. Savile, for a licence to drive a coach after such as have already obtained letters for such licences. [Ibid. f. 87.]
July 16
and 20. Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. Two letters containing nothing but shipping news. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, Nos. 172, 173.]
July 17.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By one of our packet-boats which arrived yesterday afternoon we received this account:—That the Dutch are fitting out with all diligence 40 men-of-war for the Sound, that De Ruyter is to command them, and that the ship he goes in himself is ready at Helvoetsluys. Withal they report (upse Dutch) that the Prince of Orange is seeking out the French army. Wind N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 43.]
July 17.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. The assizes for this county began last Thursday and ended yesterday, the next day. King, the coachman, one of the four supposed robbers of Mr. Matthews, the Exeter carrier, of 770l. the day before the last assizes betwixt Dorchester and Blandford, was last Wednesday brought from London in order to his trial, but found not guilty. One Game of Yeovil that struck Mr. Warre, by reason whereof he lay some time ill, and after the striking down robbed him at Babel hill, near Yeovil, was condemned to die, and another for horse stealing, the latter not like to suffer. Whether the former shall escape hanging is a question. The judges went this morning for Exon, where they intend to be to-night. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Sunday, July 18.
5. p.m. Wimbledon.
The Earl of Danby to [Williamson]. I have newly received a letter from Lord Sunderland, directing me by the King's command to let you know it is his pleasure to have a warrant prepared by you as soon as may be for creating the Duchess of Portsmouth's son Duke of Richmond, by the name of Charles Richmond, Duke of Richmond, and to be in every particular as the last patent for Duke of Richmond was, which his lordship says you can procure. If Lord Sunderland's letter had arrived before I left town, I had acquainted you with these commands myself. I shall let his Majesty know what I have done so soon as I reach Windsor, where I intend to be to-night. [Ibid. No. 45.]
July 18.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrivals and departures of packet-boats and mails. At 8 this morning arrived a yacht from Dieppe with Sir Thomas Bond's lady. [Ibid. No. 46.]
July 18.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. It being Sabbath day I have no list of ships. Last night came in here the William of this place from Virginia, most of her men sick. Yesterday the Dutch East India ship which set a new mainmast here, went out of Catwater into the Sound; she waits for a convoy for the East Indies. [Ibid. No. 47.]
July 18.
Windsor.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Wells. Desiring that Edwin Sandys, M.A., have the first canon residentiary's place in their church, according to the recommendation of 31 Aug., 1674, although letters have been unwittingly granted since then in favour of another person. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 71.]
July 18. Grant of the place of Usher and Crier in the Court of King's Bench to Thomas White in reversion after Nathan Smyth for the lives of John Baggelley, Thomas Bartlet and William Higford and the life of the survivor of them. Minute. [Precedents 1, f. 88.]
July 19.
Eden Hall.
Sir Philip Musgrave to [Williamson]. Your favours to me and mine at my last being at London are daily thought on by me. After I had spent almost three weeks in crossing to and fro in my journey on visits to some friends, I came here at last, not altogether as well as when I left it, for my many days travel, though most of them shorter than when I came up to London, disordered me more, but every month's addition to my years I expect to be attended with increase of infirmities. On account of his Majesty's service I request you will remind him of his purpose to send my son Christopher's company to Carlisle. There is need of it, and his appearing at the assizes there would be of use to the King and country's concern, which I shall ever regard more than my own, though I suffer for opposing those not so inclined. My son Thomas is now installed a prebend at Durham, and attends your commands only for the resignation of his prebend's place at Carlisle, which I perceive he may hold without any further qualification, if our bishop's delay in making good his word to you shall require it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 48.]
July 19.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Saturday came into this bay, the wind being northerly, about 80 light ships, but in the evening, the wind coming fair, they loosed and stood northwards, and we judge are got to their lading ports. This day several light ships passed by southwards. [Ibid. No. 49.]
July 19.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day I received from your office a packet for Sir Jonathan Atkins, Governor of Barbados, dated 8 June. Where the mistake lies I know not, or where it has lain these six weeks. I showed them the superscription at the post office. They made it appear it came but last night. The outside directed to me bore no date or writing, so I know not well who to trouble. There is no Barbados ship in the Downs at present, but we expect one from Gravesend this week by whom I shall send it. Very little wind at S.W. [Ibid. No. 50.]
July 19.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Since my last I have no news but that the Bretons continue their rebellion, as I am informed by a vessel arrived this day from Conquett that they are up in several places, but without any guide. They do much mischief in destroying the gentry. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 51.]
July 19.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Lord Arundel, who is at present here, commands me to give you his humble service, and he acquainted me with your noble expressions and promises of kindness towards me, for which I humbly return my most hearty thanks. [Ibid. No. 52.]
July 19.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 13th came into Helford the Anthony of that place from St. Malo, which says that the mutineers are about 10,000 strong about those parts, and that their leaders are all in vizards. They have sent into that place that, unless they kill those that are for the gabelle, they will come in upon them. They expect to have the same privileges they had in Queen Anne's time. The Parliament at Rennes is removed to a strong garrison town near St. Malo. The 16th came in the Rosse of Helford, which says they met off Ushant the five Flushing men-of-war, who confirm the taking of the French man-of-war and the great ship laden with timber. They have also taken a French West Indiaman of 16 guns, and have taken and driven ashore a fleet of about 60 small Frenchmen. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 53.]
July 19.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the the last. [Ibid. No. 54.]
July 19.
Windsor.
Warrant for creating Henry, Earl of Euston, Duke of Grafton. Minute. [Precedents1, f. 87.]
July [19].
Windsor.
Warrant for creating Sir William Ducie of Tortworth, Gloucestershire, Baron of Clones, and Viscount of Downe, in the kingdom of Ireland. Minute. (The date is originally written July 19, but the 19 was afterwards cancelled.) [Ibid. f. 88.]
July 20.
Welbeck.
The Earl of Ogle to [Williamson]. My father entreats you to acquaint his Majesty that within these three years three deputy lieutenants are dead, and none has been made since, and that Sir Edward Nevile of Grove is very fit for that employment, and he humbly desires his Majesty's allowance to make him a deputy lieutenant. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 55.]
July 20.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 56.]
July 20.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Robert Yard. I lately wrote several times to Sir Joseph, relating to some particular business of my own, but not hearing from him makes me question whether they ever came to his sight, and to desire your advice how in future, when I have private business not relating to correspondency, I shall address my direction to him. I have also a kind of a jealousy that I am sometimes not kindly used betwixt Whitehall and this, and therefore beg you to let me know where the miscarriage was of that letter of last Saturday, which should have come from Sir Joseph's office, for I received none. Here is no news, westerly winds having, as we suppose, hindered the arrival of our Saturday's packet-boat. The Sapphire sailed hence for the River. I presume Sir Joseph is at Windsor, and therefore I must direct my letters of business to him there. [Ibid. No. 57.]
July 20.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. Yesterday the Greyhound came in here, which is to convoy the two French yachts built here for that King, they being for to go for Newhaven (Havre). [Ibid. No. 58.]
July 20.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosed is the list of ships, as also a relation which Ryder brings from Morlaix. Wednesday came to Looe a vessel from St. Malo, which had a very short passage. The master reports that there was a great body of peasants in arms nigh St. Malo requiring all they met to join with them. They killed all who refused, saying they would leave no enemies behind them. They sent a message into St. Malo that they should send them out eight persons belonging to the Customs; if they refused, they would fetch them out by force. Their leaders are in vizards. They say that the whole province will join with them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 59.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 59 i.]
Statement by John Ryder, master of the Morlaix Merchant which came from Morlaix 14 July, that about 8,000 countrymen were in arms when he came thence, and that they had sent a letter to the Gorernor of Morlair that, if he did not permit them to come into the town quietly and have the bodies of eight persons belonging to the Customs, they would come into the town by force and arms. The train bands are in arms to oppose the peasants, and planted three great guns in the Townhouse, and one gentleman's house, where are 9 great guns planted, and filled up old hogshead butts with earth for their musketeers' safety. One of the French King's officers was hanged to his own door with boots and spurs, burning his house to the ground. 18 July.
Postscript by Lanyon.—The gentleman executed was at his country house. [Ibid. No. 59 ii.]
July 20.
Windsor.
Appointment of Richard Lloyd, Doctor of Laws, Advocate General for the office of High Admiral of England and K.C., and Samuel Franklyn, M.A., the King's Procurator General, to sue and prosecute in the High Court of Admiralty, according to the Act of 14 Car. II., entitled, "Directions for the Prosecution of such as are accountable for Prize Goods," all such as are accountable to the Crown for prizes, ships, goods, &c., received by them and still in arrear, Sir Walter Walker, who was formerly appointed thereunto, having since died. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 74.]
July 21.
Hampton Court.
Order in Council approving of a draft proclamation by the Attorney-General for the better collecting the revenue from Fire Hearths and Stoves, and ordering that the same be forthwith prepared for his Majesty's signature and be printed and published. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 60.] Annexed,
The said draft. Declaring that the King expects the Farmers and Commissioners faithfully to collect the said duty and not suffer it to be lessened by forbearing to levy it, and strictly requiring all subjects to observe the laws made for establishing and collecting the said duty and to pay the same where by the laws it ought to be paid, and not to affront or molest the officers by any violent or unlawful means on pain of being punished with the utmost severity of the law. (This proclamation is not in the collection of printed proclamations.) [Ibid. No. 60 i.]
July 21.
Euston Hall.
The Earl of Arlington to [Williamson]. I thank you for yours of yesterday, and beg your pardon that I did not more solemnly take my leave of you the day I left London. The country is as much to my content as I could wish, but it has been rendered more comfortable by the news I received this evening of the Duke of Grafton. The extracts of the advices are a great satisfaction, therefore I pray let them be continued, and for the intervals let the little boy be sent with Babington. [Ibid. No. 61.]
July 21.
Sherborne, Dorset.
Hugh Hodges to [Williamson]. I beg your pardon for the trouble of these lines, being not so well-known to you as I could wish, though you may have some remembrance of me, whilst I was a member of Queen's College, where I was a pupil of Dr. Lamplugh. Being last week at the assizes I was informed by the judges of our Western Circuit, Lord Chief Justice North, and Baron Bertie, that a Mr. Parkins, a collector of the hearth-money in these parts, had made an affidavit before them of an abuse that I should offer him, in giving him a box on the ear, and of some other things that I should do, relating to the hindrance of that part of the revenue, and that they believed he intended to lodge a complaint against me at the Council Board. On examination they found that the injury was done me by Mr. Parkins, and on the account they received of me from Lord Digby, Col. Strangewayes and several other gentlemen of our county they find me quite another person than Mr. Parkins represented me, and they have promised me on their return from circuit to give the Lord Treasurer a true account of this matter. The truth of the case is this. I having been informed that he had spoken very basely, unbeseemingly, and indeed very scandalously of me, much reflecting on me as a Justice, I civilly sent for him, intending only to have given him a kind admonition for it. But, when he came before me, he carried himself in such manner, that I told him such language and behaviour deserved sureties for his better behaviour. On which he claps on his hat, and cocks it, and requires me to walk out of the room and fight him at the sword's end. I then pulled off his hat and required sureties for his good behaviour, and told him I would give him till next morning to procure them (it being then 9 at night) and committed him to the custody of the constables. Next morning he came to me again, and on his submission and begging excuse for his ill carriage, affirming what he did was in his liquor, I discharged him, and he thanked me for my kindness. Of the truth of this I have no less than four witnesses who were present all the time he was with me. Had it not been out of the respect I had to the collection of the hearthmoney, I should not have so easily passed it by, for, as they are to be encouraged in their service, so it will not be taken amiss, if they are checked when they are insolent. My humble request is that, if complaint be made against me, you will be a means that I may not be put to the charge and trouble of a pursuivant, for I will appear at the least notice, and do me what lawful kindness you can, in case they trouble me. The judges on their return will give a true report to the Lord Treasurer, and my friend, Col. Strangewayes, had likewise written to him, had he not fallen suddenly ill last Sunday afternoon in some apoplectic fits, whereof he died yesterday afternoon, to whom my readiness to serve his Majesty, even in my encouragement of his officers of Excise and Hearth-money as well as in all things else, was well known. If you command Mr. Brydall to give me a line of the receipt of this, he will readily do it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 62.]
July 21.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of the packet-boats and mails. [Ibid. No. 63.]
July 21.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. We had news this morning of the death of Col. Giles Strangewayes, lately made one of the Privy Council, who died last night at his house at Melbury, and, as we hear, suddenly. We have no other news but of small plunderings made by a Biscayer on a vessel come hither yesterday from France [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 64.]
July 21.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Since I wrote of Col. Strangewayes' death the Hope of this place came home. The master says he came from St. Martin's Road, Tuesday sennight, where he left the Portsmouth frigate bound for Lisbon with a French lady or duchess, who was to come to Rochelle from Paris. Last Friday to the southward of the Fountain Head he met with the French RearAdmiral and five men-of-war with several convoys. Saturday in Conquet Road he met with the Deptford ketch, which had carried home the Duchess of Portsmouth's father and mother, bound for the Downs. He heard of no disturbances at Rochelle or thereabouts. [Ibid. No. 65.]
July 21.
Hampton Court.
The King to Sir Harbottle Grimston, Master of the Rolls. Directing him on the first vacancy of any of the six clerks' places, after William or Anthony Hammond or their nominee be received and admitted into the vacancy of any of the said places according to his letter of 20 Oct. last (calendared in the last volume, p. 380), to admit and receive into the said employment Thomas Tufton, or such other fit person as he, his executors, administrators, or assigns shall nominate. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 16.]
July 21.
Hampton Court.
Creation of the King's natural son, Charles Lenox, to be Baron of Seathrington, Earl of March and Duke of Richmond, co. York, with a further grant of the Castle of Richmond in the said county, with the fee of 20l. per annum for the support of the dignity of an Earl and of 40l. for that of the dignity of a Duke. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 76.]
July 21. Hampton Court. The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. As recommended in their letter of the 10th instant to the Duke of Lauderdale, authorizing them to grant to the tacksmen of the Customs a defalcation of 7,000l. sterling for the first two years, and to take the said tack off their hands for the remaining three years, that, before their parting, the customs and excise may be again put to roup or settled in a commission for collection as they think best, and authorizing them to pay what levy money they think reasonable to the captains of the ten companies levyed last year in Scotland. And, whereas the 500l. sterling lately advanced by them for buildings and repairs in and about Holyrood House is all exhausted, and there is a necessity for continuing the work before the winter comes on to advance 1,000l. more, approving of their former advance and authorizing them to advance the 1,000l. sterling as proposed. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 296.]
July 21.
Hampton Court.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for readmitting William Carstaires, late lieutenant to the Laird of Touche's company, who had been cashiered on account of a riot, to his former employment, upon his submission, his acknowledgement of his offence, and his promise not to be guilty of the like crime thereafter. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 297.]
July 21.
Hampton Court.
Warrant for a charter to Sir Patrick Ogilvy of Boyne, his heirs male and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Ardinboth, Portsoy and others in the parochine of Fordyce and barony of Boyne, Banffshire, on the resignation of James, Earl of Findlater, with a norodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 298.]
July 21.
Hampton Court.
Warrant for a charter to William Joase of Cullynort, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the town and lands of Easter and Wester Cullynnorts and other lands in the parochine and sheriffdom of Banff on the resignation of James, Earl of Findlater, with a norodamus and an erection of the said lands into the barony of Cullymoard and with a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 299.]
July 21.
Hampton Court.
Warrant for a gift to William Steward, one of the lifeguard of horse, his heirs and assigns whatsoever, of the lands of Bardrochwood and other lands in the parochine of Monygoff and Stewardry of Kirkcudbright, which before pertained to Col. William Steward, deceased, or to his daughter and heir of line, Elizabeth Steward, deceased, and now pertain to his Majesty by reason of recognition. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 300.]
July 21.
Hampton Court.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form to William Gray of Haystowne and to his sons William, Michael, and George, and to Gideon Wilson, periwig maker in Edinburgh, for two years respectively. [Ibid. pp. 301, 302.]
July 22.
Sion.
The Countess of Northumberland to Williamson. Understanding by Mr. Thornell that he has delivered his Majesty's command obtained by your favour to Sir R. Carr in my concern, to which he promised to give me answer last Monday, but failed to do so, I now desire your assistance in procuring his speedy dispatch, because the Lord Treasurer will otherwise be gone to the Bath before any end can be put to this business. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 66.]
July 22.
Shene.
Sir William Temple to [Williamson]. I have just received your letter commanding my attendance once more upon his Majesty, which I shall not fail of, God willing, this evening. At my return from Windsor I shall attend your further commands at London. [Ibid. No. 67.]
July 22.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Tuesday evening arrived one of our packet-boats, bringing many passengers but little news. I saw a letter from Holland giving an account of the rudeness of the Hollanders' army in Spanish territories, and of their want of necessaries. The boors shun their camp, fly and quit their own houses, leaving them destitute of provisions; on the other side the soldiers plunder all they can lay hands on, and the very ornaments of the churches which they pawn to their sutlers. They have received but 40 stirers a man since they first marched into the field. Then they were accounted about 45,000, horse and foot, but are considerably diminished since by sickness and want. The Spaniards are much disgusted at their outrages, &c. Wind westerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 68.]
July 22.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Sending an account of the service of the shallop under the Master's hand, and leaving to his consideration what he thinks fit to allow, which, if he does as formerly, it comes to 6l. [Ibid. No. 69.]
July 22.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 70.]
July 22.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 19th came in here the Sampson of London in 8 weeks from Barbados, bound for Holland. They came out with but one ship more, bound for Bristol. After they came into the Soundings they were chased by a man-of-war of about 20 guns, which came so near that they made their colours to be Turks, but, they having in their company two more ships that came from Bordeaux of some force, they did not adventure upon them, though they made as if they would, but they still dogged them till they came within Scilly. They left but few ships at Barbados and much goods, which makes freight very dear.
The 21st came in here the Elizabeth of this port from Port Louis, which says, after she put out of this harbour about 16 days past for Rochelle, they met the five Flushing men-of-war, which forced them to take on board 100 men they had taken out of the man-ofwar they had taken and the timber ship to which she was convoy. After the Frenchmen were on board, instead of going to Rochelle, they forced them to carry them to Port Louis, and so the vessel was forced to take in salt in a small place near it. They say that the Governor of Brittany is in that town, where he fled for security, for fear of the mutineers, which, they say, are reported there to be above 40,000, but not in one body, but they are ready armed on all occasions. They tell the country gentlemen that they suppose they have had no hand in the gabelle, that, if they will stay in their houses with their families they will do them no hurt, but, if they offer to go into any garrison town, they will destroy them and their families and burn their houses. They do not lay the blame on the King for breaking their privileges, but lay it on the nobility and gentry of their country, which makes them so severe against them. They say they are willing to give the King a supply, but they will not be brought under slavery as the Normans are, to be compelled to it by breach of their ancient custom to be free of all taxes. They that appear to be their heads are in vizards. They heard that the Dutchmen had taken another French man-of-war of 16 guns. [Ibid. No. 71.]
July 22.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 72.]
July 22.
Windsor.
The King to [the Master and Fellows of] Christ's College, Cambridge. Requiring them to comply with a letter sent two years ago for Thomas Montagu, nearly related to Robert, Earl of Manchester, to have their next vacant fellowship, although it proves to be Dr. Carr's fellowship, for which he unwittingly granted letters on the 14th instant in favour of Thomas Lynford, M.A. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 184.]
July 22. Caveat on behalf of Mr. Oudart that nothing pass concerning the grant of Seawood forest, Lancashire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 13.]
July 22.
Windsor.
The King to the Lords Justices of Ireland. Warrant, after reciting that William Prigg and Samuel Hale have represented that they are seised in fee of part of the town of New Stapleton, alias Skibbereen, and of lands thereto adjoining, and have besought a grant of two markets weekly and two fairs yearly on the feasts of St. Peter and St. Andrew, for issuing a writ of Ad quod damnum, and, if on return of the inquisition taken by virtue thereof it shall appear that such a grant will not be any damage to the Crown or to others or to the neighbouring fairs or markets, for a grant of the fairs and markets desired. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 332.]
July 23.
Rydal.
Daniel Fleming to Williamson. You are so kind to me that many take notice of it, which, as it is much for my honour, so it is for your trouble. The bearer, Lady Crosland, has a petition to his Majesty, and since the death of Sir Jordan, her late husband, her friends are grown so few that she is forced to make her applications to me. What her desires are I know not, but, she being my near kinswoman, I make bold to desire your favour in her behalf. In acting for widows and also widowers, I doubt not you'll engage heaven to be on your side, which to effect is, I think, no ill policy for courtiers as well as countrymen. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 73.]
July 23.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind easterly. [Ibid. No. 74.]
July 23.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 75.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 75 i.]
July 23.
Windsor.
Warrant to Lord Chief Justice North and Vere Bertie, Justices of Assize for the Western Circuit, to forbear to give sentence against Alice, wife of James Rew, of Ashbrittle, Somerset, in case she be found guilty as accessory to a theft, she having been already acquitted of a similar charge. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 138.]
July 23.
Wallingford House.
Report by the Lord Treasurer on the petition of Sir John Robinson, Lieutenant of the Tower, which set forth that 3,719l. 16s. 9d. was due to him in the Exchequer registered to be paid in course on the money arising by the sale of fee-farm rents with interest at the rate of 6l. per cent. per annum, which he prayed to be satisfied by being admitted to the purchase of so many of such rents as might amount to his debt, that by a report dated 10 Oct. last by Mr. Auditor Philips he finds the said principal and interest to the 9th of that month amount to 4,451l. 18s. 7d., that the same debt being of the same nature with the general debt, the payment of which has by his Majesty's directions been postponed, before the writer had the honour to serve in his present station, and considering the present condition of the revenue and the great difficulties affairs lie under, in so much that it is not to be hoped that anything can be drawn from the treasure beyond the present application of it to the current expense, he cannot think this a season to consider the payment of any of those debts, till the revenue be in a better posture for it, and further acquainting his Majesty that there is since grown due to the said Sir John on nine quarterly bills till last midsummer 3,655l. 18s. 2d., for the satisfaction whereof or of such part thereof as his Majesty shall think fit, on the signification of his Majesty's pleasure the writer will use his endeavours in the best manner the state of the revenue will admit of, either by the purchase of feefarm rents or such other way as may best suit with the conveniency of the service. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 41.] At the end,
On the above report, recommendation back to the Lord Treasurer to consider of some fit way for the satisfaction of the latter part of the debt as there stated. 9 Ang. Windsor. [Ibid. p. 43.]
July 23. Notes in Williamson's hand about Ireland. As to Nominees. The Lord Lieutenant proposes:—1. A true estimate to be made of all the lands set them out in any country by the Act and the values respectively. 2. Of what every man now in fact has, that is, the value of it, that it may be known what anyone has since, and either have it taken from them or own it as the King's gift, and secondly, that those that are defective may be made up.
N.B. They all press to have those very lands set out to them by the Act. The difficulty of which is, that several Adventurers are decreed into Nominees' lands, and, though it be decreed with a reserve of the Nominees' right, yet that was to be evicted within a certain time, which now being elapsed, query, if by a trial at law the Nominees can evict the Adventurers, so as to leave the Adventurers to reprizals. Lord Keeper's opinion:—1. That the decrees to Adventurers are indeed conditional, but that condition was but for that time while reprizals could be executed by the Commission directed by the Act. That time being now expired, those decrees are absolutely irrevocable. 2. That of all that remains in the King's hands to the uses of the Act, it is enough that the King disposes them to any one satisfiable by the Acts, though not just that very one and in that order directed by the Act. Who shall question the King?
As to the Nominees. 1. All accounted that all have, 42,000 acres will be wanting in the whole, reckoning that each is to have what he had if less than 2,000 acres, and none to have more than 2,000. 2. They insist to have in specie the very houses and lands set out to them. As to this says the Lord Lieutenant, try a cause in the King's Bench against an Adventurer possessed of such lands, &c.
Some of the Nominees have more than the Act allots them, and yet possibly have not the very houses and lands assigned them by the Act.
42,000 acres are deficient, &c. 44,000 acres are possessed by several particular persons more than their proportions. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 174.]
July 24.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Informing him that he had ordered the bearer, John Burles, to wait on him to receive such moneys as he should allow to the seamen. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 76.]
July 24.
Windsor.
Warrant for restitution of the temporalities of the bishopric of Lincoln to Thomas, the present Bishop. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 74.]
July 24.
Windsor.
Warrant for making an instalment to Thomas, Bishop of Lincoln, of his first fruits, to be paid in 4 years by four equal portions. [Ibid. f. 75.]
July 25.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Between 1 and 2 this afternoon arrived from East India the Royal Merchant, Lancaster and Phœnix. No boat has yet come from them. A topsail gale at S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 77.]
July 25.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. These two or three days the wind has been at W. and S.W. and blew very hard, which has brought in about 20 or 30 merchantmen. Some are gone up the river and others going over for the other side. Last night came in a gentleman from France, who affirms that Marshal de Turenne with another great person of quality was accidentally killed by a great shot from the Imperialist camp, as they were viewing it, and that Marshal de Crequi is made general in his room, and M. de Bellefond in the room of de Crequi. [Ibid. No. 78.]
July 25.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. The Reserve of London from Alepo (? Alesio) with oils stopped here, and the commander told me that the French with about 100 sail of all sorts of shipping were at Messina, and had supplied the place with all necessary provisions, which he saw. They met with five Argereenes that had surprised a Dutch East India ship of about 7 or 800 tons, homeward bound. Two of the men-of-war stood their course for Argeere, the rest came up with the Reserve, by which the captain came to the knowledge of that action, and it seems that two French men-of-war off the Western Isles had for some time engaged the Dutch West India ship, and could do no good on her, and they, meeting the said Argereenes, acquainted them with that ship and the course they steered. This happened about 3 weeks past. [Ibid. No. 79.]
July 26.
Moore.
Sir Christopher Musgrave to Williamson. I came here on Saturday from Worcestershire, where you were daily remembered by Col. Sandys, Sir Francis Russell and several other gentlemen. Yesterday I sent to Windsor to present my duty to you, but heard you had not been there for a fortnight, which gives me apprehensions you are indisposed. Sir Richard presents you with his humble service. I shall continue with him till Thursday unless you order the contrary. I perceive my father has lately troubled you with a letter and is desirous I should be in the country. [Ibid. No. 80.]
July 26.
Southampton.
Robert Richbell to Williamson. Recommending his friend, Mr. Adam de Cardonnel, who is going to wait on him with his son, on whose behalf he had formerly some discourse with his Honour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 81.]
July 26.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. On Saturday arrived here a ship of this town in 10 days from Norway. He tells us of a fleet of 300 Hollanders under good convoy arrived in several ports in that country. Last Friday he met off Humber a Spanish man-ofwar of 36 guns, which had retaken from a Frenchman a Hollander of 300 tons, that was light bound for Norway. The Spanish man-of-war, notwithstanding our ship came up and struck, shot at him and caused to pay 6s. 8d., but otherwise used him very civilly. To-day are arrived about 10 ships from Norway, two English, the rest Danes. They met on the coast of Norway several French privateers awaiting the coming out of the Hollanders from thence. [Ibid. No. 82.]
July 26.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The 19th I acquainted you that I received that day the packet for Sir Jonathan Atkins dated 8 June. Not having had a command to return it, I delivered it to-day to Captain Terry of London, bound to Barbados. There are about 40 or 50 outward-bound ships in the Downs, most of them to the Straits.
Last night's list gave you a better account of the three East Indiamen than I could, for my letter was wrote two leagues before they came to anchor. Last night it blew very hard from N.W., but now little wind at N.W. [Ibid. No. 83.]
July 26.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No pilchards have been taken on this coast this year, but a vessel from Ireland met with great quantities of them on that coast. [Ibid. No. 84.]
July 26.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Those from France give us no account of affairs there but that the King is returned to Paris, and that Rochelle was drawing out forces to prevent, if they could, further tumults and outrages in Brittany. [Ibid. No. 85.]
July 26.
Windsor.
The King to [the Dean and Chapter of Winchester]. Dr. George Beaumont, prebendary residentiary, has begged a dispensation, on account of his great age and infirmities, from his residence and ecclesiastical duties, which is granted accordingly; and also permission to remove to a milder air, as that where he now lives is, through its sharpness, prejudicial to his health. He is still to be allowed the whole benefits of his prebend, provided he causes his course of preaching to be sufficiently supplied. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 72.]
July 26.
Windsor.
Grant to the Corporals of the Yeomen of the Guard for the time being of the same fees of honour and homage on all degrees, titles, honours, dignities and homages as were formerly granted by letters patent to the gentlemen ushers daily waiters amongst other of the King's servants. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 77.]
July 26.
The Council Chamber, Dublin.
Proclamation by the Lords Justices and Council. Directing that the laws made for keeping the coins of the realm within the same be duly observed, and that no person convey out of the realm any moneys whatever current within it nor any plate, bullion, gold or silver, without the licence of the Lords Justices and Council, except so much as shall be necessary for his reasonable expenses, and charging the searchers and other officers to be vigilant in the execution of the said laws. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 309, p. 417.]
July 27.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The weather has been rainy the last 3 or 4 days. Wind southerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 86.]
July 27.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arriving to-day brought no news. The wind is westerly and the weather has been for several days stormy and rainy. [Ibid. No. 87.]
July 27.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. The Cleveland yacht with the Greyhound are appointed convoys to the two yachts built here by Sir Anthony Deane for the French King, and they will sail the first opportunity of wind and weather. [Ibid. No. 88.]
July 27.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Sending list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 89.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 89 i.]
July 27.
Windsor.
The King to the Fellows of Queen's College, Cambridge. Recommending Henry James, B.D., chaplain in ordinary to the King, and Fellow of that college, to be President of the college, void by the death of Dr. William Wells, and requiring them forthwith to call a meeting of the Fellows, and admit him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 185.]
July 27. Caveat that no grant pass of the Deanery of Rochester without acquainting Sir T. Chicheley, his Majesty having promised it when void to Dr. John Castilian. Cancelled. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 13.]
July 27. Notes in Williamson's hand about Ireland. Quit-rents to be reduced in Kerry, &c. Reduced column, &c.—i.e. where lands were barren, there the real number of acres were passed and reckoned as fewer than they were, for example 10 acres shall pass and be reckoned but as 6 or 8, and the column in which these last sums were placed was called the Reduced Column, the other of the true number, the Extreme Column.
The retrenchment of ⅓rd of Adventures &c. by the Act. N.B.—That the retrenchment was appointed not to be of ⅓rd of the value, but of the acres and lands themselves in specie, so as men chose to keep the 2/3rds which were good, and left the ⅓rd out of the worst, &c., which drew great inconveniency with it. That is best, a great many possessors are able to pay their quit-rents, &c.
Rules of Retrenchment. 1. Only of such and such baronies. 2. None at all of land worth 12d. per acre. 3. The reduced column to be taken in reckoning acres. 4. One-half to be taken per acre, &c.
As to arrears of quit-rents. N.B.—Generally all over Ireland the lands pay one with another, 1/9th or 1/10th or between 1/9th and 1/11th of the yearly value, taking all in a lump.
Civil Survey, i.e. a survey and account at what rents all the lands were set in 1641. This was taken in the settlement of Ireland in order to the laying on.
The Lord Lieutenant and Council having a power by the Act to moderate quit-rents have resolved in March, '66, to reduce quitrents to a quarter of the value of the several lands according to the valuations they themselves had before them in the Exchequer upon record, which were made by certain commissioners being members of the Council in order to the year's value, &c. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 175.]
[July ?] John Bouckel to the King. Petition for a reward for his services, having been employed by Lord Arlington ever since the beginning of the two last wars against the Dutch in Holland, to give constant weekly intelligence of their shipping, which he has done at great risk of his life. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 90.] Enclosed,
Certificate by Jerome Nipho, that Bouckel was employed by Lord Arlington as aforesaid, and that all the time he was at Antwerp on the King's affairs, Boucked wrote to him weekly, giving notice of all that passed in Holland.—28 July, 1675, London. [Ibid. No. 90 i.]
July 28.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This noon arrived the East India ship, the Lancaster, from the Coast. Not a topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 91.]
July 28.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. [Ibid. No. 92.]
July 28.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Since Col. Strangewayes' death the only persons that at present stand to succeed him are Lord Digby and his brother-in-law, Sir Nathaniel Naper, and it is questioned whether the latter will not in the end desist, and be for my Lord, which time must evidence. Squire Freke, of Shroughton, and Squire Browne, of Frampton, upon whom some men's eyes were on that account, declare against it, so does Squire Harvey, who acts for my Lord. If Mr. Moore of Haychurch would set up, it is supposed he would bid very fair for it, but there is not a word of his intention to meddle in it. We have no news from Brittany, but what Lyme affords us, which I doubt not you have had communicated from thence. [Ibid. No. 93.]
July 28.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. In these three days arrived here the Judith, Samuel, and Sara of this place in a week from Croisic. The masters and others say, though quiet there, the disturbances still continue in that province and the seditious more numerous, 40,000 some say, a person of quality amongst them of the house of Rohan. The Duc de Chaulnes, Governor of Brittany, is gone to the castle at Port Louis, the rebellious highly threatening his death, looking on him to be a great instrument of their new burthens and taxes. We are full of discourse of a battle, and Marshal Turenne overthrown. The Ruth arriving from Guernsey in two days says that island is well, but the Ostenders and Biscayers take much upon the French. The rising of the common people at Morlaix quieted by the Governor's promising them a grant of their demands. [Ibid. No. 94.]
July 28.
Hampton Court.
Approbation of Sir Edward Neville of Grove, Notts., to be a deputy lieutenant of that county. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 16.]
July 28.
Hampton Court.
On the petition of Lord Ranelagh and partners praying abatements for several remittals and overpayments according to the contract made on their undertaking, reference thereof to the Lord Keeper, the Lord Treasurer and the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 40.]
July 28.
Hampton Court.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. We have received your letter of the 15th and seen another of the same date to the Duke of Lauderdale, giving a full account of the course you have ordered to be taken in pursuance of our letter of 12 June, wherewith we are very well pleased, not doubting you will take care that our commands and your orders thereupon be punctually obeyed. As the Act of Parliament against Conventicles passed 13 Aug., 167 [0], and that against separation of the 20th of that month were passed only for three years, unless we thought fit to continue them, and as a subsequent Act of 4 Sept., 1673, continued the said Acts for three years after the expiring of the first three, and as we find it necessary the said Acts should be further continued ay and while we declare our further pleasure thereanent, we authorize and require you to prorogate them for three years further and to issue a proclamation for that effect. And, that your good orders may be put in execution, we authorize and require you to empower a Committee of the Council to meet frequently in time of vacancy and to adjourn from time to time in order to take care that none of your orders be neglected. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 302.]
July 28.
Hampton Court.
Memorials of protection in the ordinary form to David and John Somerwell for two years respectively. [Ibid. p. 304.]
July 29.
Chiswick.
Charles, Lord Gerard of Brandon, to Williamson. Not long since a murder was committed on Henry Farmer of Knucking (Knockin), Salop, by David Owens on an arrest made by him, who is since fled, and the jury on an indictment have found the bill, so his estate in lands of the value of 10l. per annum is forfeited to his Majesty. My earnest request is that you will present the enclosed petition to his Majesty on behalf of the bearer Edward Owens, my servant, uncle to the person in question and next heir to his estate.
With note by William Chiffinch that he showed the King this letter, and that he bade him let Williamson know he grants this petition. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 95.]
July 29.
Castletown, Isle of Man.
Account by the officers spiritual and temporal of the isle, having convened themselves by the direction of Dr. Isaac Barrow, late Bishop of the Isle and now of St. Asaph's, to proportion the 100l. per annum, being a donary from his Majesty on the zealous solicitations of his Lordship and others for the advance of the small means of the clergy of the Isle and the schools.
£ s. d.
The sum granted is 100 0 0
There is allotted to six petty schools in the most convenient places in the isle according to the Bishop's direction 18 0 0
So remains 82 0 0
Which is the sum distributed among the clergy of the 14 cures in the isle, the other three, viz., the archdeaconry and two parsonages having already each a competence, and the said 14 to be now of one and the like equal proportion, after consideration of the value of their ancient rates to the nearest computation we could inform ourselves of. (Then follows a schedule giving the names of the 14 parishes, the ancient valuations and the augmentations of each, raising each to the value of 17l. apiece.)
With a note showing that the rectory of Kirk Malew is computed to be a far greater sum than the 17l. set down, during the life of the present incumbent, and giving the reasons thereof. The names of the six schools allowed 3l. apiece are the petty schools at Castletown, Douglas, Ramsey, Kirk Andrew, Kirk Bryde and Ballaugh. Signed by seven persons. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 96.]
July 29.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Yesterday and to-day above 300 laden ships are passed by to the southward from Newcastle and Sunderland, many of them great vessels. I have nothing more to intimate but what is no news, the frequent meeting of conventiclers. [Ibid. No. 97.]
July 29.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. The winds having for some time continued southerly, it's believed that the shipping belonging to the coal trade are, very few excepted, at Newcastle and Sunderland, which are now coming up, about 200 of them being already past this road and come into this haven. Our Nonconformists now meet in public and in as great numbers as when they were indulged, and it is asserted by some that his Majesty intends his Protestant subjects should not herein be disturbed. [Ibid. No. 98.]
July 29.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I have no news, the packet-boat which leaves the Brill on Wednesdays not yet arriving. The letter from your office I expected here last night is again miscarried. [Ibid. No. 99.]
July 29.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Yesterday sailed hence the two new yachts built by Sir A. Deane. They had for convoy to Newhaven (Havre) the Greyhound and the Cleveland yacht. [Ibid. No. 100.]
July 29.
Windsor.
Secretary Coventry to the Mayor of Bristol. One Domingo de Verdioles, a Spaniard, master of the Stars of Spain, has presented a petition to her (sic) Majesty complaining that being bound for Ireland and forced by ill weather to put into Bristol he is debarred from selling his commodity, which being perishable is like to turn to his great loss. His Majesty therefore desires you to inquire, and, if he has done nothing contrary to law, and there be no just ground for denying him the liberty of putting off his goods, that you take care he be not causelessly disturbed, but may be admitted to trade as other Spanish subjects may do, but, if there appear anything to the contrary you are to give me an account thereof. [Precedents 1, f. 89.]
July 29. Notes in Williamson's hand about Ireland. Quit-rents—Lord Dillon's case. N.B. His quit-rents were reduced by the Exchequer from 1,500l. per annum to about 700l., &c. Lord Dillon is in possession of lands by decree of the Court of Claims. But Lord Dillon is suspected to enjoy several lands more than were his in 1641.
N.B. It has happened that several persons have been decreed by the Court of Claims to lands that are thereby adjudged to have been theirs in 1641, which indeed afterwards on trials in the Exchequer are judged not to have been theirs in 1641. Since, notwithstanding (?) of such judgment in the Exchequer, it has happened the said persons begged off the quit-rents of whatever estates they were decreed to, so as some of those lands coming to be evicted, some persons were found to have the quit-rents of lands even out of their possession, as Lord Dillon and several others.
N.B. The Lord Lieutenant and Council's valuation is not an exact valuation. It was in order to the reprizal of persons, quality for quality and value for value, and not in order to the true (?) and half the value. The first valuation was general all over England (sic) and very gross (?) and uncertain. The second was but of certain lands, i.e. according to their value in 1659 in order to the quit-rents, which were to begin in 1660. These supposed exact, at least high enough, but whatever it fell short of 300,000l., the defect was to be supplied by a tax on the whole kingdom. By the second valuation 147l. per annum paid but 14l. and yet 20,000 acres paid but 40s., &c., so unequal is that survey.
A plowland commonly 1,500 or 2,000 acres. Unprofitable or barren taken so as to be reduced in the quit-rents and set down to be by the Council and Lord Lieutenant, &c., to be such as by the Civil Survey were not worth four times the value of the quit-rents, &c.
N.B. The quit-rents were valued by the farmers at 63,000l., but is entered in the summing up 75,000l.
The case of quit-rents is, 1. To moderate and reduce them for the future. 2. To proceed as to the arrears. 1. The two years before the present farm, which are Lord Ranelagh's by his grant. 2. The arrears accrued during the present farm, which is of 7 years and accrues to the farmers.
Lord Clare's quit-rents are now 8 or 900l. per annum and in arrear for 9 or 10 years, &c. He would be glad to submit to 400l., if he could get it moderated to that.
30 July.—The Farmers called in as to their arrears of quit-rents.
1. Those upon which any respites were made by the King's order.
2. The rest on which no respite was made.
N.B. 1. The Farmers have a covenant to detain at the end of their farm whatever sums by them pretended to have been advanced &c.; 2, a power to levy all their arrears without saying for how long the power is to be left in their hands, quod nota, whereas Lord Ranelagh has but two years in his covenants.
Clancarty, Dillon, &c., persons in arrear to the farmers. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 176.]
July 30. Lord Hatton to Williamson. Recommending the son of Mr. de Cardonnel of Southampton with whom he has been long acquainted and whose father he has known for many years. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 101.]
July 30.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 102.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 102 i.]
July 30.
Windsor.
Game warrant to Philip, Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, to preserve the game within 10 miles of Wilton. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 77.]
July 30.
Windsor.
Secretary Coventry to S. Pepys. I enclose a clause in a letter of Mr. Parry's, that, I think, concerns our navigation much, desiring you to present it to the Lords of the Admiralty, and that they will certify his Majesty what they think should be done in order to justify the captain, whose name I know not, but, if his commission be for that ship, you will easily find it out. He is to blame, if being but a merchantman, he pretends a commission, (which, if any, I conceive, must be some old one), and, if a man-of-war, he is not much less faulty to own lading merchants' goods so publicly. I intend to be in London the beginning of next week. In the meantime neglect no time in knowing the Lords' resolution upon it. [Precedents 1, f. 90.]
July 30.
Windsor.
Secretary Coventry to Stephen Lynch, consul at Ostend. Being informed by the consul at Ostend that there are several weavers and other handicraftsmen desirous of transporting themselves to England, his Majesty desires you to give orders to the masters of the packet-boats to give passage to such of them as shall bring passes from Mr. Lynch or his Majesty's minister at Brussels, and are desirous to come and inhabit here in England. [Ibid.]
July 30.
Windsor.
Warrant for a grant of the office of King's Counsel to Serjeant Pemberton. [Ibid. f. 91.]
July 30.
Windsor.
Warrant for a grant of the office of Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas at Port Royal, Jamaica, to Harbottle Wingfield for his life. [Ibid.]
July 31.
Newcastle.
Anthony Isaacson to James Hickes. I cannot tell how the market may encourage colliers, but we have cleared this month for the coast above 800 sail. About 300 went out this week, more had gone, but it blows extreme hard to-day, wind W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 103.]
July 31.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boat which should have left the Brill last Wednesday is not yet arrived, the wind being mostly westerly, and at present blowing a mere fret. The newsletter from your office miscarried again last night. [Ibid. No. 104.]
July 31.
Windsor Castle.
His Majesty's instructions to the Archbishop of St. Andrews to be communicated to the Archbishop of Glasgow and the rest of the Bishops.
1. You are to signify after your return our satisfaction with your account of their diligence in observing our laws anent the Church and particularly with their procedure at their last meeting at St. Andrews in July, 1674, and you are to assure them of our royal countenance, protection and encouragement in the discharge of their offices, and that we shall heartily recommend them to the special care of all our ministers of state for that effect, as they tender the interest of religion, the peace of the Church and kingdom and the establishment of our Government.
2. You are also to signify to them that we are well satisfied with the rules and constitutions for discipline signed by them at that meeting and presented by you to us, and you shall recommend them to take care to have these rules consented to by their presbyters in their diocesan synods or otherwise, as you and the Archbishop of Glasgow with the advice of the other bishops shall judge most convenient, that you may thereafter offer them to us, that our royal assent and authority may be interposed for their being observed in our Church of Scotland.
3. You are to use your utmost endeavours for suppressing Popery and Separation and to recommend to the bishops that in their visitations they take particular notice of Papists and Separatists, that they may be proceeded against as the laws provide, and specially they are to notice those, who without lawful authority presume to keep meetings of ministers or to ordain any to the ministry or to take trial of expectants or licence any to preach, that they be proceeded against to the highest censures of the Church, as we have ordered the Privy Council to punish and censure all such as thus violate order, and endeavour to propagate schism.
4. You are also effectually to recommend to the bishops to take special care that none be permitted to teach in schools or colleges, or to be chaplains in families or tutors or governors to the children of noblemen or gentlemen, but such as they shall find cause to be licentiate according to the Acts of Parliament and Council thereanent provided.
5. You are to intimate our pleasure that the bishops keep their residence within their respective dioceses, excepting such as you and the Archbishop of Glasgow respectively shall dispense with, to be employed in our service or the public affairs of the Church, the names of the non-resident bishops to be delivered to us by the Archbishop of the province that we may signify our pleasure concerning the same, and we authorize the Archbishop of Glasgow to dispense with the Bishop of Argyle's residence in that diocese, he always being obliged to perform the duties of his episcopal office therein, and to allow him to continue in the office of parson of Glasgow, as he did before he was promoted to the bishopric, for which he is also warranted to receive the emoluments belonging to the said parsonage till further order.
6. They are to take order for maintaining the poor of each parish according to the laws and former practice, and for that end they are carefully to call for the mortifications and dotations made to hospitals or for other pious uses for the relief of the poor in their diocese, and see they be not embezzled but employed according to the intentions of the benefactors and the foundations of the hospitals and are to represent what they find amiss to us by the Archbishop of the province.
7. Whereas Archibald Turner, John Robertson, Andrew Cant, late minister in Edinburgh, and John Hamilton, late minister in Leith, are removed from their ministry for their undutiful demeanour towards their bishop and their mutinous and insolent petitioning for a National Synod, and have made several applications to be restored, declaring their unfeigned grief for their offence, we remit them to you and the Archbishop of Glasgow and the Bishop of Edinburgh that, on their repentance and acknowledgement of their offence and engagement for their future dutiful behaviour signified by you to us, they may be employed and settled in the exercise of the ministry where you shall find convenient, and that you require the other bishops carefully to notice and condignly to censure all presbyters who behave contemptuously or undutifully to their ordinaries, and who shall either in their sermons or prayers or other discourses reflect on our laws and public proceedings, or shall in Church meetings or elsewhere attempt anything relating to the general concerns of the whole National Church, by petitioning or otherwise, without the consent of their ordinaries.
8. For preserving the revenues of the bishoprics entire, all the bishops are required to give in true and just rentals of their sees with the superiorities of lands and patronages of churches and the commissariots that belong to them to the Archbishop of the province, who is required to insert the said rentals into his arch-episcopal registers.
9. Having granted the revenue of the Bishopric of the Isles for some bygone years to the use of St. Leonard's College, and having notice that those to whom the care of uplifting the same was committed have yet done nothing effectually, we authorize you to commission such persons as you shall judge fit to uplift the same, they finding sufficient security that it may be employed according to our meaning expressed in the gift.
10. It is our pleasure that, when there shall be occasion for public fasting and humiliation in any diocese, on the desire of the bishop or bishops to their respective metropolitans, the Archbishop finding cause shall represent the same to the Privy Council, who are to interpose our royal authority for setting apart such a day as the Archbishop shall propose, and to command the observation of the same.
11. Howbeit bishops do not censure ministers without the advice and consent of presbyters as is by law provided, yet being informed that of late some irregular motions have been made in synods and elsewhere, derogating from the authority of the bishops, and acclaiming a right and power in presbyters which is not allowed by law, particularly that at the late synod of Edinburgh some presbyters questioned and dissented from the proceedings of the Bishop in censuring some factious ministers, which was done according to law and approven by us: You are to signify to the Bishop of Edinburgh our pleasure that he proceed to censure the leaders in these dangerous motions with suspension for such a time as he shall judge necessary, and, in case they persist in owning or abetting these divisive and scandalous motions, to depose them from the ministry. You are also to intimate to the other bishops our pleasure that they carefully advert to such undutiful presbyters and censure accordingly the makers and abettors of such factious motions. [4½ pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 304.]
July 31.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the two Archbishops and some of the Bishops of Scotland. Whereas the Privy Council transmitted to us a petition of August, 1674, from James, Bishop of Dunblane, without offering anything to our consideration of his case, which is of ecclesiastical cognition, which we did not think fit to answer or to have its contents examined here, and the said Bishop having come to London presented another petition to us 16 June, that he may be allowed to clear himself as to the things informed against him, and in the meantime may be restored to the exercise of his episcopal function in the diocese of Dunblane, from which we had by our letter of 16 July, 1674, commanded his translation to that of the Isles, and consequently forbidden his residence in any part of the diocese of Glasgow or meddling in the affairs of the Church except in the diocese of the Isles, unless he be thereunto orderly called, and seeing he thus insists that he may be allowed to clear himself as to any offence charged on him in our letter of 16 July, 1674, to the Archbishop of St. Andrews, taking notice of the factious deportment of some of the clergy in the motion and contrivances for a national synod without the consent of their ordinaries, and being resolved that this business be not taken into consideration here, but that the examination of the case and carriage of the said Bishop be referred to competent persons trusted with the government of that Church, we by virtue of our supremacy over all persons and over all causes ecclesiastical give commission and authority to the Archbishops of St. Andrews, and the Bishops of Edinburgh, Galloway, Aberdeen, Caithness, Brechin and Argyle, or any five of them, one of the Archbishops being always of the quorum, to cite before them the said Bishop at their first meeting to be held in Edinburgh in September, and to examine his case as represented in his petition, and his abetting that dangerous and divisive motion for a national synod, against the consent of his superiors and the bishops of that Church, with power also to examine his carriage at the meeting of the Bishops at St. Andrews in July, 1674, and the secession he made from it, which gave great scandal and offence, and likewise how he has since behaved injuriously towards his metropolitan, the Archbishop of St. Andrews, by traducing him on several occasions, and lately by an abusive insolent letter of 7 June to him, endeavouring to bespatter his reputation and the dignity of his office, and, having heard the Bishop as to all these particulars and after examination thereof, for which, if necessary, they are also empowered to examine witnesses and take informations, we require them to report to us before 1 Dec. next. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 309.]
July 31.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a new gift of 500l. sterling per annum to be employed at the appointment of the Archbishops of St. Andrews and Glasgow for defraying the necessary charges which his Majesty's service in the matter of the Church may require and for payment of the fees of the procurators, solicitors and others who are or may be employed for the affairs of the Church, a former gift above ten years ago of the like sum for similar purposes having for eight years past been rendered wholly useless as to the purposes therein expressed. [Ibid. p. 311.]
July 31.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a discharge to the Archbishop of St. Andrews of the arrears of the proportion of the taxation granted by the Convention of Estates in 1667 for the archbishopric of St. Andrews, being about 3,100 merks, Scots money. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 314.]
July 31.
Windsor Castle.
Warrants for gifts of the office of chaplain in ordinary to his Majesty in Scotland to James Nairne, minister at the Weemes, and Dr. Andrew Bruce, Archdeacon of St. Andrews, respectively, fee 20l. sterling per annum. [The second is a docquet. Ibid. pp. 314, 316.]
July 31.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a grant to the Magistrates and Council of St. Andrews for 7 years of authority to raise 4d. Scots for every pint of ale and beer brewed and sold and 2s. Scots for every pint of wine, aqua vitæ or strong waters sold within the said city, because the said city is under great debts on the occasion of their great losses and sufferings in the time of the late unhappy troubles, whereby they were necessitated to borrow a considerable sum still due out of the box and stock of the poor of that city, and also because the pier and harbour there have been much damnified by several great storms, so that the recovery of their trade so much already decayed thereby cannot be expected, till the same be repaired, the proceeds to be employed first in repayment of the said debt and next in repairing the pier and cleansing the harbour. [Ibid. p. 316.]
July 31.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a letter not only confirming his former gift of the office of Sheriff principal of Ross-shire, to Kenneth, Earl of Seaforth, but also granting the said office to the said Earl for his life and after his decease to his eldest son Kenneth, Lord Mackenzie of Kintail, for his life. [Ibid. p. 319.]
July 31.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a discharge in favour of Kenneth, Earl of Seaforth, of the feu duty of the Lewis, extending to 3,000 merks yearly, not only of all years preceding 1660, for which 1,000l. sterling was paid by him to the Earl of Crawford, but also of all years as yet not compted for till 1674 inclusive. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 321.]
July 31.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Warrant for admitting John, Lord Elphingstoune and Sir Andrew Ramsey of Abbotshall, into the Privy Council in the ordinary manner. [Ibid. p. 322.]
July 31.
Dublin.
Susanna Durham to Williamson. I have received your letter and render hearty thanks for your willingness to help my husband. It is impossible to benefit by first finding out the employment here and then giving you notice thereof, for it is no sooner vacant but supplied. Therefore my humble request is, that, if convenient, you would procure his Majesty's letter for the first company that falls here to my husband with such advantageous words therein as you shall think fit (several having letters to this effect) and that you would effectually recommend him to the Lord Lieutenant who is now at Court and who knows him. He professes a great deal of friendship to my husband and often promises some employment, but many others attending, who make stronger interests with the secretaries, makes my husband fare the worse, though his Excellency and Lord Justice Forbes have great kindness for him. I am persuaded your word will be very significant to his Excellency and Secretary Harbord in his behalf. I wholly rely on you and my kinsman, Sir John Nicholas, to get my husband provided for. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 177.]
July. A. Brett to Williamson. In heroic lines begging his aid, without which he is undone. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 105.]
[July.] John Gold and John Jolliffe, merchants, to the King. Petition, showing that his Majesty has been often informed of the great decay of the English trade in the dominions of the Emperor of Russia, occasioned principally by his taking away the English privileges and banishing all the English from Moscow, and confining them to that non-habitable port of Archangel, and that, he having made profession of great friendship to his Majesty, there is now an opportunity in some measure to renew a trade and settlement in those dominions, the contract for caviare to the quantity of 400 butts being shortly to expire, and, if his Majesty pleases by his letter to that Emperor to mediate that it may be renewed to the English, it might give occasion in part to revive the English settlement and trade there, and give employment to two great ships yearly to transport the said caviare from thence to the Straits, and praying letters to the Emperor of Russia that on the renewing of the contract the petitioners may be treated with in the first place. [Ibid. No. 106.] Annexed,
Draft of the proposed letter from the King to the Emperor of Russia, requesting him to let the King's subjects have the refusal of the farm of cariare. [Ibid. No. 106 i.]
July. John Jolliffe to Williamson. I waited on you last week with a petition with some directions for drawing the Moscow letter, at least the sense of what was fit to be inserted. I hoped before this to have seen you at the Exchange, as you intimated, but, not seeing you there, I waited on you to-day to give account how near departing the ships were, which are the only fitting convenience for the letter or the person that carries it, who are by charter party obliged to depart from Gravesend by Saturday or Monday at farthest, so that now, if you have not blanks, or a certainty of his Majesty's coming to town to-morrow or Friday, it would be necessary to send expressly to-night, the charge whereof I will willingly consider. The bearer, Mr. Lenten, whom we employ to treat about this affair, can give you an account of anything necessary. [Ibid. No. 107.]
[July ?] Specimens of penmanship in different styles in English, French and Latin addressed to Williamson by Peter de Cardonnel, aged 17. (See ante, pp. 230, 236.) [Ibid. No. 108.]
July. Creation of Charles, Earl of Southampton, to be Baron of Newbury, Earl of Chichester, and Duke of Southampton. Minute. [Precedents 1, p. 88.]
[July ?] Notes in Williamson's hand. Ireland.—Nominees were 54. Each of them claim yet 2,000 acres a piece, which are detained from them by Adventurers and Soldiers, &c. They propose 4 expedients—That they who are possessed of their lands: 1. Reprisals out of lands in the King's hands. 2. Out of concealed lands, and they to have letters patents, &c., for what they can discover. 3. Moderation of rents upon custodiums granted them, to bring them to quit-rents, &c. Query, what these rents amount to? by that means to know what this will cost the King.
Flanders Trade.—2 per cent. convoy (?) ½ per cent. Huysgelt. 5 per cent by Charles V.
Composition Trade.—This year more dobeting (?) in the Custom House than ever, i.e. there have this year been greater quantities of foreign goods to be transported out again than ever, &c., i.e. our navigation is infinitely grown, &c. Shipping from Gottenberg, Stockholm, &c., where never any English shipping navigated. Now none but English shipping comes.
300,000l. freight yearly paid to foreigners till this last war; now we get half as much.
Ostend.—Ships manned (?) this day only with briefs in hopes of some good trade, &c., i.e. their navigation sank wholly.
Our Composition trade set up at Dover, 1632, &c., gave rise to the Dutch trade in clothing, &c., i.e. by the means of our Composition trade Spanish wool was not landed here, but was conveyed to Holland directly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 21.]
July.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 372. No. Date. King's. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
109 July 1 0 2 0 N.
110 " 2 0 0 0 N.W.
111 " 3 0 4 7 S.E.
112 " 4 0 4 3 S.W.
113 " 5 7 10 1 S.W.
114 " 6 5 5 2 N.E.
115 " 7 5 3 0 N.E.
116 " 9 1 1 2 N.E.
117 " 11 0 1 0 E.
118 " 12 0 1 0 N.E.
119 " 13 0 2 0 S.W.
120 " 14 0 4 0 S.W.
121 " 15 0 4 0 N.E.
122 " 16 0 3 0 S.E.
123 " 17 1 5 1 N.W.
124 " 18 0 5 1 S.W.
125 " 19 1 4 1 S.W.
126 " 20 3 4 2 S.W.
127 " 21 3 6 3 S.W.
128 " 22 3 6 4 S.W.
129 " 23 4 8 7 S.W.
130 " 24 4 8 5 S.W.
131 " 25 4 9 7 N.W.
132 " 26 4 4 3 N.W.
133 " 27 4 7 1 W.
134 " 28 4 11 2 W.
135 " 29 4 11 1 S.W.
136 " 30 5 5 0 S.