BHO

Charles II: August 1675

Pages 243-281

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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August 1675

Aug. 1.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Repeating what he had stated in former letters about the packet received 19 July.—Yesterday I received two packets from you and delivered them both to Capt. Terry, being also for Sir Jonathan Atkins, and only he bound thither and wind-bound here about three weeks.
The common report is that the day M. Turenne was killed the Confederate army engaged the French and next day did the like and gained a great conquest over them, but this comes from Holland, but these 14 days I have not had a letter or Gazette from Whitehall; the blame, I am certain, is not in our post-office.
I know, though I write to Mr. Secretary Williamson, such things come not to his view. I beseech that he who has the perusal hereof would answer Mr. Secretary's favour to me, that I may not be troublesome to him himself.
Little wind at S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 137.]
Aug. 1.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. [Ibid. No. 138.]
Aug. 1.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 139.]
[Aug ?] John Stokes to the Right Worshipful Mr. Mayor. On account of his great weakness and present necessity entreating him to pay him or grant him an order for the 13s. 4d. which he promised to pay him for Capt. Layfield. At the foot,
Aug. 2. Order by Jo. Barker and William Palmer to Mr. Basnet to pay Stokes 13s. 4d. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Aug. 2.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. To-day the 11 Swedes which have been so long in the Downs went for London. Rainy weather. Little wind at W. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Aug. 2.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Our pilchard men are in great hopes of a good year of fishing at last, there being a greater show of them now on this coast, and in several places small quantities taken. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Aug. 2.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Wind W.N.W. [Ibid. No. 143.]
Aug. 2.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 30th came in here the Elizabeth of Dover for the Terceiras with several other small vessels for Ireland and Wales, and also the Five Rings of Middelburg in three weeks from the Terceiras, laden with wines homeward-bound. She has been out of Holland these six months trading there from island to island, so that she is very foul and has several leaks, so that the men were almost tired out to keep her clear, and were forced to run her aground as soon as she came in. It is said they intend to sell her here, if not, she must stay here some time to clean and mend her leaks. She met no ships at sea nor can she speak of any Turks men-of-war about those islands, but all things there have been and are very peaceable.
Last week in several places in this country have been taken about 1,000 hogsheads of pilchards, which are the first quantity taken for this year, and there is good likelihood of more being taken next spring-tide. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Aug. 2.
Windsor.
The King to the Vice-Provost and Fellows of King's College, Cambridge. Nominating Thomas Page, a principal member of their society, and loyal and well deserving, for the office of their provost, likely to become void by the promotion of Dr. James Fleetwood to the bishopric of Worcester, and requiring them to choose the said Page and to present him for admission to the Bishop of Lincoln, their Visitor, immediately after the determination of Dr. Fleetwood's interest, adding that he will give orders for conferring upon him a doctor's degree in ntroque jure, for the better qualifying him hereunto. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 185a.]
[Aug. ?] The King to the Vice-Chancellor and Senate of the University of Cambridge. Directing them to admit Thomas Page, on whom he has conferred the Provostship of King's immediately after the determination of Dr. Fleetwood's interest, to the degree of LL.D. [Ibid. f. 186.]
Aug. 2.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Clerk of the Signet. By Lord Rochester's desire, desiring that no pardon pass to John Crockson for killing a bailiff, till notice be given him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 13.]
Aug. 3.
Stookton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind westerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 145.]
Aug. 3.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Several days about the end of last week passed by this for the Thames a great laden fleet. We judged them most colliers. Last Sunday towards evening arrived one of our packet-boats with several passengers, but they coming away early last Thursday brought little fresh news. They have in the Dutch Gazette the death of Marshal Turenne, but with it they talk of little less than the total rout of the French army by the Imperial.
The weather has been very bad for several days, the wind betwixt N. and W. It is said it has done much hurt to fruit and corn. To-day is calmer. Wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 196.]
Aug. 3.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 147.]
Aug. 3.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 148.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 148 i.]
Aug. 3.
Windsor.
The King to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, to be communicated to the Senate. Directing that the degree of M.D. be conferred on Thomas Novell of Little Eastcheap, practitioner in physic, formerly a member of Jesus College and resident there for several years, and publicly licensed by the University to practise, who, labouring under a great imperfection of speech, cannot perform the exercises required by the statutes for that degree, and that of B.D. on John Ardrey, a member of the University, in whose favour the like instance has been made. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 12.]
Aug. 4.
Hampton Court.
Order in Council on the petition of John Underdowne, which showed that about three months ago a vessel was cast away on the Goodwin Sands, wherein were some bags of wool, which being seized and condemned for his Majesty's use, part thereof was bought by the petitioner, who sold them again to some Dutchmen on condition of delivering them on shipboard which the petitioner did, but, the vessel being seized by a French caper, the Dutchmen refused to pay for the wool, threatening to ruin him and take his life, and prayed a pardon for transporting the wool, that a pardon be prepared to the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 149.]
Aug. 4.
Hampton Court.
Order in Council on the petition of Simon Francia of London, merchant, which set forth that last September were laden on the Mary of Dover seven bales of goods, which were consigned to Dover and thence to Bordeaux on the petitioner's account, that the said ship was carried into Ostend by a privateer, where the petitioner has made his claim according to law, but that he can receive no fruit thereby, because Diego Deza, advocate fiscal of the Admiralty Court there and principal owner of the said privateer, is now in England, on pretence of making out some colour for detaining the said ship and goods, and which prayed for relief, forasmuch as the said goods bona fide belong to the petitioner and are in the actual possession of the said Deza, who by law, as the petitioner is advised, is liable to make satisfaction for the same; referring the petitioner's case to Sir L. Jenkins, who is to report thereon with all convenient speed. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Aug. 4.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yescerday afternoon arrived in the Downs four Dutch men-of-war, and two of their East India ships outward bound, forced in by contrary winds.
'Tis confidently reported that the Confederates of Brittany have to head them one Malotto, formerly Lieut.-General to the Prince of Condé, and Col. Ludlow, and the latter heads rebels in England. Tis also strongly reported that they have taken Brest. Little wind at S.W. At least 60 outward-bound ships in the Downs. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Aug. 4.
Deal.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. There is a report by one from Dunkirk that yesterday a very great force of Dutch and Spaniards was within two miles of Calais, and 'tis feared that place will be besieged. The truth we expect by the packet-boats, which are not yet arrived. [Ibid. No. 152.]
Aug. 4.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 1st arrived the Jane of this place in 24 hours from Morlaix. That place keeps a very good guard to keep out the insurgents on any approach they may make, and expects some force from the King to quell those disorders, but they are not so numerous nor formidable as has been reported, nor are headed by any considerable persons. There is no Dutch fleet on the French coast.
Since the death of Col. Strangewayes last Monday fortnight the parties intending to stand for knight of the shire to succeed him are already getting voices. They are said to be Lord Digby, Mr. Fulford, Mr. Harvey, and Mr. More. Sir John Strode espouses the interest of the first, and the Earl of Shaftesbury that of the last, who is the greatest upholder of illegal meetings of any in this county. [Ibid. No. 153.]
Aug. 4.
Hampton Court.
Warrant to Sir Edward Griffin to pay 20l. to the gentlemen of the Chapel Royal in lieu of 3 deer granted to them by custom yearly. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 196.]
Aug. 4.
Hampton Court.
Warrant to the Recorder of London to insert Margaret Eager, convicted at the gaol delivery for Surrey for felony, but reprieved in order to transportation, into the next Circuit Pardon, she bearing a good character in the parish where she has always lived, and this being her first offence. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 140.]
Aug. 4.
Hampton Court.
Warrant for a privy seal granting to the Duke of Monmouth the King's half of certain forfeitures reserved to him by the charter of 3 April, 1661, to the East India Company, whereof no part has yet been answered to the King. [Precedents 1, f. 92.]
Aug. 4.
Hampton Court.
Warrant for a grant of a yearly pension of 50l. sterling under the Privy Seal of Scotland to Gilbert Browne, sometime of Bagby, during his life. [Docquet. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 325.]
Aug. 5.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Several ships pass daily southwards. Wind E.N.E. With note at foot to Mr. Ball requesting him to convey to Capt. Thornton at the Paper Office a letter directed to him by Aslaby. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 154.]
Aug. 5.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The Dutch men-of-war and East India ships, which I informed you in my last were forced into the Downs by contrary winds, are now ready to sail, the wind coming suddenly to the north-east. Most of the others are sailing, in all about 50. [Ibid. No. 155.]
Aug. 5.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Aug. 5.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 157.]
Aug. 5.
Windsor.
Warrant for payment to Bernard Grenville, Groom of the Bedchamber, who is being sent as Envoy Extraordinary to the Duchess of Savoy, of 500l. out of a Privy Seal dormant for 10,000l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 196.]
Aug. 5.
Windsor.
Royal assent to the election of Dr. James Fleetwood to be Bishop of Worcester. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 73.]
Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Theodorus Lattenhower, M.D., a Hollander, for a patent for certain engines for raising water in greater quantity, &c. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 43.]
Aug. 6.
Woburn Abbey.
The Earl of Bedford to Williamson. Expressing his most hearty thanks for the very exact account received from him that week by the post of all the several passages that have fallen out of late between the Imperial army and the French. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 158.]
Aug. 6.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 159.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 159i.]
Aug. 6.
Windsor.
The King to the Bailiffs and Common Council of Ludlow. Approving of the election of Sir Job Charleton, Chief Justice of Chester, to be Recorder of Ludlow in the place of Sir Timothy Littleton, a Baron of the Exchequer, resigned. [Precedents 1, f. 92.]
Aug. 6.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. The Maryof Youghal came in here yesterday from Rochelle laden with salt, and a small vessel of Jersey to lade leather. The seamen that murdered the Dutchmen off the coast of France were hanged to-day at Cork. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 178.]
Aug. 7.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Yesterday anchored in this bay 12 light colliers, the wind being N., and to-day they are loosed and stood northward, the wind being E.S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 160.]
Aug. 7.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. At noon yesterday arrived one of our packet-boats. They bring no news, except some Dutch flams, that two English regiments in the French service have deserted it.
The newsletter from your office miscarried last night again. I believe the failure is not there, but would be found elsewhere if searched into. The wind has been for several days mostly southerly. [Ibid. No. 161.]
Aug. 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. The Lark anchored in St. Helens Road on Thursday and sailed on Friday for Tangier. The Pearlis at Spithead, having been cruising in the Channel, and after taking some few stores wanted will proceed on the same design. Sir Anthony Deane will sail to-day on the Cleveland for Havre. [Ibid. No. 162.]
Aug. 7.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. I have no list of ships. A vessel from Morlaix reports that at his coming away last week there was a report that four men declared to the peasants in arms, that, if they would lay them down, they should have a general pardon and should pay no more taxes, which they complained of, and that on this declaration the peasants laid down their arms. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Aug. 7.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Lord Provost, Bailies and Town Council of Edinburgh. After reciting the letters of 24 Sept. and 16 Feb. last (calendared in the last volume, p. 367 and p. 591), whereby a stop was put to the election of magistrates for Edinburgh and the existing ones were continued in their places, removing the foresaid stop on the election of magistrates, and commanding them the day after the sight thereof to convene the whole Council and to elect out of the lists already made the Lord Provost, Bailies, Dean of Guild and Treasurer, who are to hold office till the next election to be at the ordinary time mentioned in their set, viz., the next Tuesday after Michaelmas. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 323.]
Aug. 7.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Archbishop of St. Andrews and Glasgow or either of them. Warrant for taking off the confinements of Archibald Turner, John Robertson, Andrew Cant, late ministers at Edinburgh, and John Hamilton, late minister at Leith, who were formerly removed from their ministry in those places and confined to several other places for their undutiful behaviour towards their bishop, and their mutinous petitioning for a national synod without the consent of their ordinary, and for granting them liberty to repair to Edinburgh or elsewhere, where they may wait on the Archbishops and the Bishop of Edinburgh in order to their giving such satisfaction and making such due acknowledgements as are mentioned in the King's late instructions. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 324.]
Aug. 7.
Windsor.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that Sir Philip Percivale, by the petition of his guardian, Katherine, Lady Percivale, had represented that his grandfather, Sir Philip Percivale, was long before the rebellion quietly seised of several towns and lands therein mentioned in co. Cork, which he held by way of mortgage, and paid for the same upwards of 8,000l. sterling, that the said lands were never seized nor sequestered, but, as soon as the fury of the rebellion was over, the petitioner's father, Sir John Percivale, entered into quiet possession thereof, that by a clause in the Act of Settlement passed several years afterwards the right of redemption of all mortgages was vested in the Crown in trust for the 49 officers, that the petitioner had the pre-emption of the said right adjudged to him by the Commissioners of Claims and paid for the same but 150l., it being found by them on a valuation that the said towns and lands did not, nor would they on a 21 years' lease, yield near the interest of the original money, yet that by some extensive words of the Act of Settlement all this ancient estate is subject to a new quit-rent of near 90l. a year, as if the petitioner had enjoyed it as an Adventurer or Soldier, and therefore prayed a discharge of the same, and that only such a moderate quit-rent might be reserved as might bear proportion to the 150l. paid as aforesaid, and a reference thereof to the Committee for Irish Affairs, and that it appearing that the only advantage the petitioner had by the said Act consisted in the pre-emption of his mortgages that were not then worth more than 150l., in consideration thereof and of the good services of the petitioner's grandfather and father to the Crown, authorizing and requiring him to cause letters patent to be passed remitting to the petitioner and his heirs the said new quit-rent of 90l. except the sum of 10l. a year and no more, unless the said lands paid any rents to the Crown before the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, which rents together with what they stand charged with to any other person are to be excepted out of this grant, with a proviso that the said new quit-rent of 90l. per annum or thereabouts and the arrears thereof be paid into the Exchequer till Christmas next without any abatement. [Over 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 388.]
Aug. 8
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. Some passengers on the packet-boats from Calais and Nieuport which arrived Friday afternoon report there has been an engagement lately between the French and Germans but say nothing of which had the best. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 164.]
Aug. 8.
Windsor.
Pardon to Capt. George Brimicane, sentenced to death by the Court of King's Bench, Jamaica, for murder. (Calendared in S.P. Col. America &c., 1675–76, p. 268.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 141.]
[Aug. ?] William Walcot to the King. Petition for a patent for 14 years of his invention of making not only water corrupted fit for use, but also the sea water fresh, clear and wholesome in large quantities. At the side,
Aug. 9.
Windsor.
Reference thereof to the Attorney or Solicitor General. On the back,
Report of Francis Winnington, Solicitor-General, in favour of granting the patent. 23 August. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 165.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 43.]
Aug. 9.
Wallingford House.
Charles Bertie to Williamson. The King lately bestowed on the bearer, Mr. Moore, a reversion on the four waiters in the port of Bristol, and accordingly he passed his patent but by mistake has named one Messenger in it, who, though it did not then appear, has surrendered to one Seward. It is evident his Majesty and the Lord Treasurer designed him the full benefit of it, which he cannot enjoy unless the alteration be made in the bill in the King's presence, which favour I request on his behalf. [Ibid. No. 166.] Annexed,
Note that in the bill James Seward is to be inserted in the room of Robert Messenger. [Ibid. No. 166i.]
Aug. 9.
Aswerby.
Sir Robert Carr to Williamson. I am afraid the old proverb should prove true, out of sight, &c., for, since the discarding of my kinsman, I neither hear from you nor of you. It has caused a great scarcity of news in these parts. To-day Sir John Newton and I dined with Mr. Justice Ellis, when you were heartily remembered. On Saturday night Hartop and Walden came hither to advise about making up the breaches, for the post before I came hither my mother had sent down to lock up all her goods, supposing to lay me, as I intended to lay them with drinking your health, in the straw. [Ibid. No. 167.]
Aug. 9.
Rose Castle.
Edward, Bishop of Carlisle, to Williamson. I expected to have seen Mr. Ardrey in my way, staying at Appleby part of three days, or that he would have come hither, or at least have written before this, that I might have known how he thinks to proceed about the prebend, and I wonder that he who used to be very solicitous formerly should not stir in his own concern now. I suppose you acquainted him with what was concluded. I am ready when called on to do my part. Mr. Archdeacon indeed gave me a visit here since I came, but seemed desirous to hold his prebend here for some time. I owe so great respect to that family that I shall be unwilling to deny any of their just desires. But in this I suppose you have gained his resignation or a promise of his cession; when that is declared to me, I shall willingly perform my promise, and value myself the more for having any opportunity to serve a person so well deserving of the Church and of this diocese as yourself. I was obliged to the bearer of the letter (of which I told you) from the D[uke] of M[onmouth] to give him notice before I should confer any prebend, which though I have done, I think to his satisfaction, having told him of a resignation, yet it may be best to dispatch this business to prevent further application. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 168.]
Aug. 9.
Aldeburgh.
Ralph Rabett to Williamson. No news. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Aug. 9.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 170.]
Aug. 9.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last week came in two or three small vessels. (News of the capture of a French prize as in the next.) The Dutch vessel from the Terceiras and that from Surinam continue here, expecting a convoy. [Ibid. No. 171.]
Aug. 9.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 6th came in here the Fox, a small Ostend caper of 3 guns. Five or six days before they and another small caper being consorts spied a French ship off Ushant, but the other being cleaner and a better sailer got up first with her, and found her to be a foul ship and fired three guns into her, and a volley of small shot. The Frenchman answered with five guns and killed two of the caper's men and hurt three or four more. At last they made her to be a ship from the Bank with fish. She had 5 guns and 22 men. This made the caper adventure again, and so they fired in all their guns and boarded her with all his men, and carried her, having killed 7 of the French and hurt 5 or 6 more. This caper could not come up with her, but he has put some of his men on board, as well as the other, and they thought she would put in here, but she did not, so they suppose she is gone home. This one has taken two small prizes and sent them home. She has washed and tallowed here and put to sea again to-day. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Aug. 10.
Windsor.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. His Majesty received the account you sent him from the Lord Mayor of the 9th, and at the same time what Lord Craven and Sir John Robinson sent me. On the whole he approves of all they had done hitherto, but will give no order till he hears further from those Lords of the Council there, nor does he by any thing yet passed conceive it necessary to send any more guards. If this should again break out, he would have the Lords of the Council meet and give such directions as the present affair may require, and timely notice here if any considerable accident shall arrive. You will acquaint the Lord Keeper, the Lord Privy Seal and the rest of the Council with this. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Aug. 10.
Oxford.
Adrian Scroope to Williamson. My Lord of Lincoln promises me what lies in his power and advises me to make what other friends I can. To you therefore I make my addresses. There are two Fellowships of All Souls now vacant, which will not be disposed of till almost Michaelmas. I am very ambitious of being a member of that society, and know not how to accomplish my designs, unless through your intercession with his Majesty and the Archbishop of Canterbury for their letter to the Warden, and that soon, lest others make friends to them before, for these places go, not by merit but by favour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 174.]
Aug. 10.
Trinity House.
The Master, Wardens, &c., of the Trinity House to [the Committee for Trade.] They have considered Sir John Clayton's proposals for 5 lighthouses with an inclination to promote them if desirable, but find they will be not only useless but prejudicial, and think his reply drawn up by hands little conversant with such matters. However, they have, according to the order of the said Committee of 12 Dec., 1674, considered the papers transmitted therewith, and frequently heard what Sir John has to offer and have transmitted his proposals to the several Trinity Houses of England, who all disapprove, and the fact that the whole scheme is based on papers to be printed to direct seamen in the use of these lights shows that a new navigation is to be instituted for the benefit of the lights and not the lights calculated for the benefit of navigation. Noted, as read to the Committee for Trade 4 Aug., 1676. [Ibid. No. 175.] Annexed,
i. Further observations by the same on the several lighthouses projected by Sir John Clayton at Flamborough Head, Cromer or Foutness (Foulness ?), St. Nicholas Gatt, and Fern Island. [Ibid. No. 175 i.]
ii. The Masters, &c., of the Trinity House, Deptford Strand, to the several Trinity Houses of England. Requiring them to deliver freely and impartially their opinion on Sir John Clayton's proposals for erecting four lights on the north coast of England, and the answers to some objections against them. 1 Feb., 1675. Copy. [Ibid. No. 175 ii.]
iii. The Trinity House, Dover, to the Trinity House, Deptford. They think the said lights would be unuseful and dangerous, because ships might be lost by mistaking the lights. 10 Feb., 1675, Dover. Copy. [Ibid. No. 175 iii.]
iv. The Trinity House, Newcastle, to the same. They think the lights altogether unnecessary and that they would discourage the coal trade by lying so heavy on it. 8 Feb., 1675. Copy. [Ibid. No. 175 iv.]
v. The Trinity House, Kingston on Hull, to the same. They think all lovers of navigation will oppose Sir John Clayton's endeavours for lighthouses; they would discourage shipbuilders and merchants by lessening their profits; they will be hurtful and not useful unless directed by printed papers which cannot be infallible, and they would tend to the injury of navigation. 18 Feb., 1675. Copy. [Ibid. No. 175 v.]
Aug. 10.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The only news is the good and pleasant harvest weather. Wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 176.]
Aug. 10.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last, so we have no news. [Ibid. No. 177.]
Aug. 10.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About the 7th I told you that we heard two days together the great guns playing, which was thought to be some fight in Flanders, but a vessel from Ostend arrived in the Downs yesterday told us that the cause of them was that the Dutch fleet of war with the merchantmen bound for the Straits saluted Ostend, and the return of thanks and next day's rejoicing for the victory the confederate army obtained against the French, which, they report, was to the loss of 15,000 by the French. Wind S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 178.]
Aug. 10.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W. Yesterday sailed the Cleveland yacht for Havre with Sir Anthony Deane and Mr. Hewers, who will be there this forenoon as the wind has been. [Ibid. No. 179.]
Aug. 10.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The masters of those from Brittany report that there were in a body 30,000 peasants in arms with cannon, well disciplined and armed, besides several other bodies, and that the Governor of Brittany had secured himself in Port Louis. A ship of London for Virginia arrived here this evening. [Ibid. No. 180.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 180 i.]
Aug. 10. Caveat that no approbation pass for any new Recorder of Abingdon without notice to Thomas Holt, the present Recorder, at Reading. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 13.]
Aug. 10.
Windsor.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Francis Clarke of London for payment of 938l. 11s. 8d. due to him for halfsubsidy and Argier duty for foreign goods exported, &c., since the King's return, interest, principal and solicitation put together. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 40.]
Aug. 10.
Windsor.
Pardon to John Underdowne for transporting wool, with restitution of lands and goods. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 77.]
Aug. 10.
Windsor.
Secretary Coventry to the Lord Mayor of London. I have acquainted his Majesty with your letter of the 9th, who is very well satisfied with your care and fidelity in suppressing so unreasonable a riot, and desires you to continue both. We hope here the heat of it is over, and you will have all assistance from Lord Craven as likewise from the militia, and, if necessary, you may likewise apply to the Lord Keeper, the Lord Privy Seal and Secretary Williamson, who will call a Council and advise of any further orders needful, and, on notice to his Majesty, he will take all courses proper for the evil, if it shall increase, but he supposes that continuing what you have done will show those people their folly. In the meantime I cannot but repeat how much he is pleased with your discretion and care hitherto in this affair. [Precedents 1, f. 93.]
Aug. 10. R. M. to Sir Francis Radcliffe. I hope mine of the 2nd came safe to you. We are since filled with reports from foreign parts. Every day offers variety of occurrences. The newest thing is the defeat of M. de Crequi. He advanced with about 12,000 horse, foot and dragoons to raise the siege of Treves. On his advance the Duke of Lorraine with the Lunenburg troops drew out, and engaged the French, who were totally routed after a very bloody engagement for some hours, their cannon and baggage taken and de Crequi slain. Here is also confirmation of the death of Turenne and his army with more circumstances, which some will not believe, though they are filled with great consternation, admitting that they believe that Turenne's army is spoiled, &c. It's said the French in the engagement lost at least 10,000 or 12,000 men, above 50 principal officers, their general and lieut.-general slain, their major-general a prisoner, several standards and many colours, baggage and great part of their artillery taken, besides what they blew up at their decamping. The full issue is not yet known. Brittaneers increase by these losses. Some begin to talk as if the Prince de Condé would [? seize] Brittany and set up for himself. The Fr[ench King is much] amused at these things: the death of [Turenne made him] almost out of his wits; he [threw] himself upon his bed and was in great astonishment, and some here are greatly perplexed, if not distressed.
The weavers of London seem to be encouraged also against the French, for to-day a great company of them fell upon the French weavers, broke all their materials, and defaced several of their houses, and greatly disturbed the City and Governors, who were all up to appease the matter, but it's done. I like not the beginning, I dread the issue of such attempts. May our Governors be wise and encourage our natives more than foreigners. Some new honours are lately conferred, the French Madam's son made Duke of Richmond and Lenox, Cleveland's, Duke of Grafton. I wish you may take true measures of things, which have a quite other face, than some few days since. Some begin to be very confident of their interest, and, for ought is seen, not without ground. Things will be sudden and many will be surprised, that look not to their watch. The bridegoom will find many without the wedding garment. You apprehend me. He that would have favour from the King must make the King's favourites his friends or his cause will have ill success. I dare not without your leave speak my mind, which is more for your sake than mine, for I fear ne'er a Frenchman in the world. We are above them, and they will tumble under our feet, maugre all vain confidence.
The Germans are still in pursuit of the French. The Governor of Treves also is killed, who, going on a high wall to view, it fell down and buried him in the rubbish, so he himself was lost before the town. [Torn. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 1, No. 4.]
Wednesday,
Aug. 11. Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived the Elizabeth from St. Malo and the Mary Anne from Morlaix, which places are very quiet, but in other parts of the province the disturbances continue and they threaten the gentry to burn their houses and other mischiefs to their persons, if they take not their parts. The latter met Ostend privateers both out and home, but they did him no damage though laden with horses when outward bound.
This morning arrived the Joan from Croisic and the Concord from Barbados. We hear by the first that several of the Blue Caps, for so the mutineers are known, were brought to Port Louis, where the Duc de Chaulnes, Governor of Brittany, is, but it is supposed no execution will be done on them till the meeting of the States at Dinham (? Dinant) the 25th prox., where the King intends to be also, if the great losses he has lately had in his armies hinder not. By the latter from Barbados in 6 weeks we hear that they had just then discovered a design of the native negroes and other slaves of an intended massacre of their commanders, owners, &c., which had been carried on with greater secrecy and cunning than ever any in that kind, even to the time of the intended execution. Good plenty of sugar there, but few ships. Five sail of London intended to sail in a week after. Those that rose up and killed their commander, Capt. Swanly, were executed before their coming away after a trial at the assizes. The Joan last Monday met with two Dutch men-of-war and three fire-ships sailing southwards, 6 leagues off the Start. Their design they would not discover. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 181.]
Aug. 11.
Windsor.
Dispensation to Gabriel Quadring, M.A., Fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge, to depart the realm and travel beyond seas so long as shall be permitted by the statutes of the college, without prejudice to his fellowship or otherwise. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, p. 187.]
Aug. 11. Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley for delivering 100 barrels of powder for the use of Jamaica, the vessel in which a supply was lately sent having been wrecked. (Calendared in S.P. Col., America, &c., 1675–6, p. 269.) [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 132.]
Aug. 11.
Past 2 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Lord Mayor. I was ever of your opinion that this matter was not handled as it ought. I am going to the Lord Keeper and the Lord Privy Seal to Kensington to bring them to town with me to be at the Council Chamber at 5. We shall desire to know how things stand from your Lordship. At the same time I give notice of this to Sir J. Robinson. I find it spreads extremely, not only as to place, but as to matter of the disorder. They talk of falling upon other trades, in which they pretend grievances. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 46.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir John Robinson. To the same effect as the last, and desiring him to let the Lords of the Council hear from him what passes, and, when he has read the enclosed, to speed it away by a careful messenger to Sir W. Hickes. [Ibid. p. 57.] Enclosed,
Wednesday,
Aug. 11. Near 3 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir W. Hickes. The disorder that has been on foot these two days among the weavers is spreading itself towards your parts. I hope you will take early care to suppress it, as it shall attempt to break out within your jurisdiction, by seizing half-a-dozen of the ringleaders, with the best proofs you can get of their acting in it. The Lords of the Council will be in the King's absence attending generally here in town, to whom you will therefore give from time to time an account of how this matter moves. [Ibid.]
Aug. 11.
9 p.m. The Council Chamber, Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. Having received yours of last night about 11 this morning, and finding by all accounts that the disorder of the weavers grew hourly greater, as you will see by the enclosed, I presumed to warn a meeting of the Council for 5 this evening, and sent notice to the Lord Mayor and Sir J. Robinson to give the Council an account of what had passed, and in what state the matter is. Accordingly they attended, and it appeared plainly that hitherto there has not been that vigorous care and activity in the civil magistrates, nor even in the militia of the Hamlets and Southwark that there ought to have been. I hope they have been so well scowled (sic) for their negligence by the Lord Keeper, that we shall find the effects of it to-morrow. In the meantime the Lords have thought it but necessary to issue a proclamation for dissipating these riotous assemblies, which is now printing, to be published to-morrow morning early. The Duke of Monmouth being here, I hope things will be a little better ordered than hitherto. There is a party sent particularly to Stratford near Bow, where we are told the rioters are got together to the number of 2,000. The thing is in itself, as far as we can see, but a foolish thing, without any design or foundation more than the interest these common weavers have to suppress, if they could, the use of this engine. But it is unluckily spread into so many parts, that it looks scandalously to the government that it is not suppressed. The Council have appointed to sit again to-morrow morning, after which you shall know what has passed since this. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 43, p. 48.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Caceat on behalf of Col. Vernon, the Duke of Ormonde, H. Seymour and others, that no grant pass of the manor or demesnes of Tutbury, Castlehay Park, and others, co. Stafford, till notice be given to Sir J. Williamson. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 13.]
Aug. 11.
Whitehall.
Proclamation for the immediate dispersion of the riotous assemblies of weavers in and about London, under pain of their being proceeded against as traitors. [S.P. Dom., Proclamations 3, p. 357.]
Aug. 11.
Windsor.
The King to the Lords Justices of Ireland. Warrant for a grant of a baronetcy to Robert Reading in terms similar to that of 12 June, calendared ante, p. 162, but omitting the remainder to his daughter and her issue. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 333; and S.P. Dom., Entry Book 21, p. 170.]
Aug. 12. William Webb and Bartholomew Fillingham to Col. John Lamplugh of Lamplugh. As an arrear is still due from him on his whole account for the 18 months' assessment, which should have been paid and the account passed long since, desiring him to take some speedy care therein, for it cannot be much longer retarded without prejudice to himself. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 182.]
Aug. 12.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Upwards of 60 light colliers are now at anchor in this bay, and yesterday passed by southward betwixt 30 and 40 laden ones. Wind N.N.E. [Ibid. No. 183.]
Aug. 12.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. This morning one of the packetboats came in, and we are told of a fight, wherein they say the French had the worst, which I believe was that of M. Créqui's. Two Brandenburg men-of-war are at the Brill. The master tells me the sea is very full of capers. The wind has been lately most westerly. At present it is N.W. Before I had sealed this, came this enclosed and the Gazette which I here present. [Ibid. No. 184.]
Aug. 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. Last Tuesday anchored between this and the Isle of Wight two Dutch privateers, one formerly the Merlin galley taken from us, the other a small frigate. They had been nine months cruising in the West Indies, and had much wealth aboard in goods and money and refused to sell anything. After taking in some fresh provisions they sailed for Holland the same night, fearing that, if it were noised abroad that they were arrived, French men-of-war would look out for them. The commanders reported that they had been at Jamaica, and all things were in a good condition there. They had taken four French prizes, sunk and burned three, and preserved the fourth to bring the men home. That ship they lost in a storm. Some of their own and some Frenchmen were on board. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 185.]
Aug. 12.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. I have received none of yours this fortnight, the occasion I know not, having continued my correspondence. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 186.]
Aug. 12.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news, some of it the same as in the next. One from St. Malo arrived this morning tells us the French king has 6,000 men on their march for Brittany, where the discontented party are very numerous but in no body. Their prejudice is altogether against the maltotiers, as they call them. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 187.]
Aug. 12.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 10th came in here two Dutch men-of-war, the Zerick Zee of 26 and the Brownfish of 8 guns, come to convoy a vessel from Surinam that has lain here about two months. It is about 8 days since they came out. They report that six men-of-war came out after them, having under their convoy two East Indiamen and several other merchantmen bound for the Straits, and they believe they may be at this time about the Lizard. The men-of-war and merchantman are put to sea to-day, wind W.N.W.
Yesterday came in two French merchantmen from Martinico, St. Christopher's, &c., both of Havre, homeward-bound. It is about six weeks since they came from thence. They had for convoy a French man-of-war of 60 guns, which kept them company till six days before they came in here. They lost her in foul weather, but they all concluded that, if they should be separated, they should make for this harbour, where they were to stop till they should all come together, so they expect her here every hour. [Ibid. No. 188.]
Aug. 12.
Windsor.
For the corroboration of the title of Dr. John Bradford, chaplain in ordinary to the King, to the rectory of Sefton, Lancashire, warrant for the presentation of him to the said rectory. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 73.]
Aug. 12.
11 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. Last night I gave you an account of what had then passed in the matter of the disorder, and by an express of this morning you will have received from the Duke of Monmouth the accounts given of the last night's passages by the parties sent out. Since that, things have continued very quiet, save that even here in Westminster a rabble of near a hundred got together, and burnt one of those engines. Five or six of the actors in it were met with by some of the Guards and upon examination stand committed by the Council. Though the thing appears to have been first begun perfectly out of malice to that engine, and the way of working by it, yet the remissness of all sorts of inferior officers has been everywhere so infinitely great, that, had not the Council took it up as they did, nobody knows where the disorder might have ended. Indeed it's a shame to see the negligence and folly of some, in whose care the matter more particularly was. We have appointed to meet again to-morrow morning, as well to enquire more thoroughly into the miscarriages past, as to prevent the further spreading of the ill for the future. I enclose a printed copy of the proclamation which has been this day published in the City, and in Middlesex, Essex, Surrey and Kent, that is, upon the places in those several liberties where the disorders have been committed. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 49.]
Aug. 13.
Near Midnight. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the King. I have taken leave to give your Majesty an account these last three days through Secretary Coventry of that part of our business here which is particularly incumbent on me, without presuming to trouble your Majesty with it yourself, and leaving your Majesty to the Duke of Monmouth's letters for what relates to that part of it. This whole day things have been very quiet everywhere, as far as we can hear, save that one information told us one knot of the weavers had got down to Greenwich in search of a frame or two there. Your Majesty will see in the enclosed extract the heads of what has passed of any moment at the Council.
The Dutch letters are arrived, but without anything material. Those of Flanders may be here to-morrow, though the wind be westerly. That from Gand is from the B[aron] de V[ic] feigned as if written to Don Pedro Ronquillo, which is a way of address we agreed on as one of the safest against all accidents on the other side. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 189.] Enclosed,
Aug. 11–13.
The Council Chamber Whitehall.
Proceedings of the Council for suppressing the tumults of the Wearers. 11th. A proclamation ordered for the suppression of viots. Orders to the Duke of Monmouth and the Earls of Northampton and Craven to have the forces in readiness to march about and disperse the tumult and, in case of resistance, to proceed with them as enemies to his Majesty and the Government. Order to the Lord Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen to march with their train bands and militia into the Hamlets, Southwark and elsewhere, for the suppression of this tumult and seizing the offenders.
Major Thomas Beckford and [Richard] Humphryes, a sergeant in Sir Thomas Byde's company belonging to the militia of the Hamlets, were sent for in custody of a messenger, for refusing to assist in the suppression of the rabble.
12th. Forenoon. The said major and sergeant were committed to the Gatehouse for forbearing to assist the civil magistrate and refusing to obey the directions sent by the sheriffs for appeasing the tumult.
12th. Afternoon. John Hunt, Nehemiah Pope andHooper, weavers in Cabbage Lane, Westminster, sent for in custody of a messenger for being present at the burning of Pemberton's loom, and in a riotous manner disturbing the peace, and Hunt and Pope were committed to the Gatchouse.
Isaac Dandy and seven others sent for in custody for being of the number of the tumultuous rabble.
John Mason, a weaver, sent for in custody for encouraging the rabble in Swan Fields to persist in their tumultuous actings to the disturbance of his Majesty's peace and government.
Peter Collins, sent for in custody for encouraging the rabble in their tumultuous actings, committed to Newgate.
William Empson, a wearer in St. Anne's Lane, Westminster, sent for in custody for being one of the vioters and encouraging the rabble in their tumultuous proceedings. George Knight, his servant, in custody with him.
Captain Cusdell, a captain of the militia, living at Hogsden, sent for in custody for refusing to appease the rabble, when they broke down William Crouch's house in a tumultuous manner.
John Curtis, a soldier, for inviting some weavers to burn an engine, brought in custody, examined, and committed to the Guard.
Also James Belloon and five others, seized by the Guards, brought and examined and to be discharged as their masters were taken.
Letter to the Recorder to appear at 9 to-morrow with the Justices of Middlesex and the Constables of the several wards where the tumults were made.
Order to send Sir J. Robinson the narrative of Sheriff Herne and the extract of the depositions against him for countenancing the weavers in their proceedings and to attend with his answer at 9 to-morrow.
13th. The Recorder with the Justices of London and Westminster appearing were sharply admonished for their remissness and commanded to observe several directions touching the suppression of the disorder, seizing the offenders, sending all examinations to Mr. Attorney for the better preparing a commission of Oyer and Terminer for their speedy trial, and that each of them send to the Board an account of all that has happened in their precinets from the beginning.
The like order sent to Sir W. Boreman on his advice that great disturbance had been given by the like rabble at Greenwich, to disperse the proclamations and intimate the directions given to the deputy lieutenants and justices thereabouts where the mischief was likest to spread.
Capt. Cusdell of Hogsden sent to the Gatehouse for neglect of his duty. His ensign and sergeant sent for, for letting one of the rabble committed to them escape.
Hooker, Empson and Knight brought in custody, and examined and dismissed till further order.
Cannon and Layton ordered to be taken into custody for words touching the framing a declaration, and other words of adhering to Sir John Robinson.
John Mason, a weaver and Fifth Monarchy man, brought in custody for some desperate words to be further proved against him to-morrow.
Captain Holden ordered to apprehend one of his soldiers who owned to have had his share of 10l. for abetting this tumult.
The Lord Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen attend, representing all was quiet, but are roundly admonished to greater care and circumspection.
Sir J. Robinson attended, but praying time till to-morrow to make his defence, the Lords, after some serious debate touching his behaviour in this matter, granted him his desires herein, and as he is allowed to bring his witnesses with him, so Sir Nathaniel Herne, the sheriff, and such others as have testified against him are summoned at the same time to attend. 2½ pages. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 189 i.]
Aug. 13.
Windsor.
Warrant for swearing Gervas Price to be Gentleman of the Bows in reversion after Lodowick Carlile, who is very dangerously sick without hope of recovery, Price having by the King's special appointment performed the duty of Gentleman of the Bows with constant diligence and attendance, but without any benefit, for above 20 years past, and having long been promised the said office when it should become void. [Precedents 1, f. 94.]
Aug. 13.
Windsor.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I am your debtor for two of the 11th and 12th. The latter I received this morning. I hope the prudence of the Council will continue as successful as it has begun. I cannot but lament with you the reflections that will arise to the Government that a fantastical humour amongst one particular sort of workmen in London should continue a riot three days together without arms and the military power at last obliged to assist, whilst I had thought the ordinary guards of the City, if well intentioned, might have prevented the rising, at least the continuing of an insurrection so irrationally grounded and so unpoliticly designed. You will find by mine to the Lord Keeper the King's opinion as to the punishment of the offenders, viz., that it ought to be legal, quick and severe, at least to some of them, for, if they find safety when suppressed, what will they not hope when victorious? and what greater encouragement can there be to rebellion, than to have all the hopes imaginable if they thrive, and all the security in the world if they miscarry? I shall be very glad that your work this day may give you a true light into the reasons of the rising on their side, and the neglect of ours. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 190.]
Aug. 13.
Plymouth.
A. Goodyeare to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 191.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 191i.]
Aug. 14.
London
Sir J. Barckman Leyenbergh to [Williamson]. The Commissioners [of the Customs] answered this morning that it was not in their power to grant us the freedom to unload a part of the salt of the Swedish ships to be transported by others without the King's order. I have hereupon resolved to send an express to my Lord Ambassador that he may endeavour to get his Majesty's order for your Honour to direct them, which I hope to receive to-morrow, so that you may grant us your letter to the Commissioners Monday morning. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 192.]
Aug. 14.
Windsor.
H. Thynne to [Williamson]. Immediately on my arrival I acquainted Mr. Secretary with the commands you intrusted me with this morning and, as warmly as I could, represented Sir John Robinson's innocent intentions in this late unhappy affair, though I could not find much to say in excuse of his folly. I likewise laid before him the great inconveniences as to the public that would attend his total removal from his lieutenancy, all which Mr. Secretary immediately represented to his Majesty, who seems to be very far from the thoughts of removing him, and by what can yet be conjectured will not easily he prevailed with to do it. The bills you sent Mr. Secretary to get the King's hand to are not yet signed, he not having any opportunity of presenting them, but to-morrow he doubts not to get them with several others of his own signed and sent to your office. [Ibid. No. 193.]
Aug. 14.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. About noon to-day arrived one of our packet-boats from the Brill. They bring strange news, if true, viz., that the French have quitted Maestricht, and by a letter I saw that the Prince of Orange has joined the Imperial forces about Trier, which they besiege, that the French forces give ground in most places, that Admiral de Ruyter lies before Dunkirk with his fleet, that four Brandenburg men-of-war with 600 soldiers are lying near the Brill, which are not to break up their instructions till they come out at sea. They talk also of there being great hopes of peace betwixt France and the Hollander apart. A westerly wind and ill harvest weather. [Ibid. No. 194.]
Aug. 14.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. By command of the Council transmitting to him their enclosed order in the case of Sir John Robinson with the several papers relating to it, that he may present it on their part to his Majesty for his pleasure upon the matter. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 50.]
Aug. 15.
2 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the King. Enclosing the Holland letters, adding that his Majesty will have received from Secretary Coventry in what state the business of the late disorder of the weavers was yesterday left by the Council, and that since all continues very quiet and well. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 195.]
Aug. 15.
Windsor.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I thank you for yours of the 14th with the enclosed transactions in the Council. I presented them all to his Majesty and gave him a short account of the most material points, as I conceived, of the examination, but I do not know whether he has as yet leisure to peruse them so strictly as to come to a particular conclusion on each particular, but in the general he is very well satisfied that the sheriff has acted vigorously and resolutely in his service, and that Sir John Robinson has been to blame in complying too much with the rabble and too little with the sheriff, but yet he believes that whosoever commands by his commission in the Tower is to command the militia there and in the Hamlets by a power distinct from the sheriff's, but the sheriff has done so well in general that his Majesty would not lessen the commendation he deserves by stirring any further questions, and though, as I told you before, he agrees with the Council that Sir John has been in the wrong as to several particulars in the management of this business, yet his submission has been so humble and hearty, that his Majesty seems very unwilling to blast all his past services for some miscarriages in this particular occasion, which his Majesty imputes no way to an intention of disserving him, but to his wrong judging the way of serving him, so that, by what I can guess, there being no positive declaration of his pleasure as yet, Sir John's past services and present submission will prevail with his Majesty not to be severe against him. I return your three bills signed. His Majesty has commanded me to write his thanks to the sheriff, as I shall do this post. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 196.]
Aug. 15.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday it blew hard and rained, but all last night it blew a storm, yet, notwithstanding there were at least 30 ships great and small, no damage is done and no ships broke loose. The wind is yet very high at N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 197.]
Aug. 15.
Dover.
John Reading to Williamson. Concerning the arrival and departure of packet-boats and mails. [Ibid. No. 198.]
Aug. 15.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Aug. 15.
Windsor.
The King to Sir Robert Carr, Chancellor and to the Attorney of the Duchy of Lancaster. He demised, 1 April, 1661, to George, Earl of Bristol, for 99 years from the previous Lady Day, Lancaster Great Park or Ashdown Forest the Honour of the Aquila and other lands in Sussex, with the offices of steward of the said Honours and bailiff of the liberty of the Duchy of Lancaster in the said county, with leave to disafforest the said forest and convert the same into tillage, at the rent of 200l. a year, and on 22 October, 1673, demised the said lands to Sir John Packington, Reginald Graham, and George Legg, with the said reserved rent of 200l., for 31 years, at the yearly rent of 1s., which grant was intended for the advantage of the children of Colonel Henry Washington, deceased, for his faithful services to the late and present kings, but was ineffectual from non-payment of the said rent of 200l. per annum, caused by the unfruitfulness of the premises, which will not without much expense be reduced to a condition of yielding any advantage. Sir Thomas Williams of Eltham, Kent, now agrees to pay 1,700l. to the trustees of the said children, 1,000l. in satisfaction of other pretences to the premises and a yearly rent of 100l. 1s. 0d. He is therefore to have the grant of the same for ever in fee-farm, at the said rental. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 197.]
Aug. 15.
Windsor.
Warrant for a grant to Richard, Earl of Dorset, and Charles, Earl of Middlesex, of Broyle Park, Sussex, granted in 1661 to George, Earl of Bristol, for 99 years, but forfeited, because the said earl has not paid the rent of 100l. a year nor improved the same, to hold the same for the Earl of Dorset during his life and after his decease for the said Earl of Middlesex and his heirs in fee-farm under the yearly rent of 40s. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 199.]
Aug. 15.
Windsor.
Warrant to Sir Robert Carr, Chancellor and to the Attorney of the Duchy of Lancaster, to prepare a grant to Richard, Earl of Dorset, and after his decease to Charles, Earl of Middlesex, gentleman of the Bedchamber, of the rent of 100l. 1s. to be paid by Sir Thomas Williams, Bart., as the rent of Ashdown Forest, Sussex, in compensation for several advantages belonging to them from the said forest. [Ibid. f. 200.]
[Aug. 15.] Secretary Coventry to Sir Nathaniel Herne, Sheriff of London. Conveying to him the King's thanks for his loyalty, vigilance and conduct in suppressing the late riot. [Precedents 1, f. 95.]
Aug. 16.
Leicester Fields.
The Earl of Orrery to Williamson. I received yesterday a letter dated the 5/15th from Flushing from William Yorke, the Mayor of Limerick, telling me that his ship, the New Exchange of Limerick, coming from Bordeaux for Dunkirk laden with French commodities, was taken by a Dunkirk caper, Abraham Mimell captain. He carried her into Calais, and threatens to make her a prize. Her master is Anthony Verneer, a freeman of Limerick.
He desires me to move his Majesty for his letter to the President and judges of Calais that are concerned in war affairs to restore his ship and goods without putting him to charges and trouble needlessly. This Mr. Yorke is an honest man, a great trader, and one who chiefly keeps up manufacture and traffic in Limerick, for which end he went this summer for Holland, and has bought there with his own money six ships and one frigate for Limerick, for which he deserves all fitting encouragement.
The bearer, Mr. Francis Tyssen, an eminent merchant of London, will deliver you this letter, the gout disabling me from waiting on you. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 200.]
Aug. 16. Sir R. Carr to [Williamson]. I give you my hearty thanks for your letter and am heartily sorry I was not at the Council to attend you. Newton and Walden dined with me yesterday where your health was cordially remembered. They are to dine here again today and Hartop is expected, and then I suppose we shall send you some instructions, suitable to the present state of affairs. Pray tell Sir Christopher Musgrave I am his humble servant, and we are very mindful of him. I believe I shall not leave this till Friday, the 27th. [Ibid. No. 201.]
Aug. 16.
Sunderland.
Samuel Hodgkin to Williamson. A vessel of this town the storm before this foundered about 10 leagues off the opening of the Tees. The men and a passenger saved themselves in their boat, and after being in it 30 hours were taken up at the north end of the Dogger Sand by a Holland fisherman, who put them on board their convoy, from whence they were sent hither in a Tonning hoy. News is just come of a flyboat being overset about Hartlepool in the storm we had yesterday at N.E. and by N. We fear to hear of more losses. The master of the vessel that foundered says he saw two sunk by him. One had all lost, and the other's men betook them to their boat. The ships that come from France to Flanders complain much of the abuses they meet with from the French and Spanish privateers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 202.]
Aug. 16.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. The ships I gave an account of in my last we judge are got down to their loading ports. About 80 light colliers are now at anchor in this bay, which anchored yesterday and last Saturday, the wind blowing northerly, a violent gale. Near 100 sail, we hear, went into Scarborough. We hear not as yet of any damage. The wind is yet northerly, but much abated. [Ibid. No. 203.]
Aug. 16.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. We have a rumour that Mr. Moore has or will speedily set up for the knight of the shire, Lord Digby only now appearing for it. I have sent to the West to enquire the truth, but having not the answers timely enough for this post, if it prove true, I shall inform you of it the next. Mr. James Gould, of Dorchester, a burgess of that town, is very aged and sick, and so, as I hear, is Sir Francis Wyndham of Trent, a Parliament man for Milborne Port in Somerset, at Bath. I have had no newsletter from the office these last two weeks. [Ibid. No. 204.]
Aug. 16.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 205.]
Aug. 16.
11 p.m. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Secretary Coventry. I had yours of yesterday, and am extreme glad that business of the Lieutenant of the Tower is like to have that issue you mention from his Majesty. Yet, I assure you, the part I take in it is infinitely more for the King's service (which, if I mistake not, is greatly concerned in it for many reasons) than for any particular goodwill I bear the poor man. I shall offer it to you as my opinion as well as my humble prayer, that you will continue to fortify the King in his intention of not turning him out. Yet, on the other side, it may be very fit to punish him in another kind, and to a degree sufficiently for an example to others in like occasions hereafter, which may at the same time serve to stop the mouths of those that I see among ourselves, as well as a sort of men in the town [that] had already executed the poor man. The truth is, we had much ado to bring some of them to hear him speak for himself, as I shall tell you more at large hereafter. In the meantime the Lord Keeper, who means to be at Court to-morrow night, will, I doubt not, tell you in sum, how that and all other parts of our late business have passed and that Sir J. Robinson is not the only man to blame in it. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 50.]
Aug. 16.
Windsor.
Warrant for swearing and admitting the Conde Don Francisco de Mello to be Lord Chamberlain to the Queen. [Precedents 1, f. 95.]
Aug. 16.
Windsor.
The King to the Lord Treasurer. Warrant at the desire of the Baron Sparre, the Swedish Ambassador, to order the Commissioners of the Customs to permit certain Swedish ships laden with salt for Stockholm to unlade their cargo on certain English ships going to the same place without paying any further custom than would have been demanded if the Swedish ships had continued their voyage without unlading, and also to permit the unlading of certain goods of the said Ambassador's on board a Swedish galliot he has hired at Rouen now in the Thames on board any English vessel going for Stockholm. [Precedents 1, f. 96.]
Aug. 17.
London.
Elizabeth Lennard to Williamson. Mr. Hardwin's importunity and my own concerns for want of my money embolden me to give you this trouble, because I have been often to wait on you concerning the warrant that was mislaid, and the hopes you gave me in looking for it. My humble request now is that, if the warrant is not yet found, you would get another signed, for the sufferers in the long want of their warrant, which prevents them and me of our money, are much necessitated. [S.P. Dom., Car II. 372, No. 206.]
Aug. 17.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. These last three or four days there has been stormy weather, the wind northerly. Now it is at S.W., windy fair weather. [Ibid. No. 207.]
Aug. 17.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. We had such a storm and tide last Sunday as has not been observed these many years. It has done us some damage but not very much. The wind was mostly northerly. Yesterday it was more westerly and brought us fair weather and the sight of many laden ships passing by for the River. We have neither packet-boat nor news since my last. [Ibid. No. 208.]
Aug. 17.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. About 1 to-day came hither Mr. Grenville, Col. Churchill and divers other persons of quality, who within two hours went hence in the Anne yacht for France, and without doubt will arrive at Dieppe by morning. The same time went 20 horses for France, convoyed by the Greyhound. [Ibid. No. 209.]
Aug. 17.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. There rode off St. Helens about 40 Dutch ships outward-bound with 7 men-of-war to convey them. The storm on Saturday night put them all from their anchors, and they went back again and left their anchors behind. About the same time came in two French men-of-war and went by to Cowes, where they now ride. [Ibid. No. 210.]
Aug. 17.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 211.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid., No. 211 i.]
Aug. 17.
Windsor.
Warrant to James, Earl of Suffolk, Deputy Earl Marshal, for conferring on the younger sons and daughters of the late Sir Bevil Grenville, viz., Bernard, Denys. Elizabeth, wife of Peter Prideaux, Bridget, wife of Sir Thomas Higgons, and Johanna, relict of Col. Richard Thornhill, the rights, privileges and precedency they would have enjoyed, if their father had been created an Earl by the late King as he intended, which was prevented by Sir Bevil's being slain with great honour at the battle of Lansdown. [Precedents 1, f. 97.]
Aug. 18.
The Council Chamber, Whitehall.
Order in Council for the discharge from the Gatehouse of Sergeant Richard Humphreys, committed for refusing to assist the UnderSheriff of Middlesex in suppressing the late tumult of the weavers. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 212.]
Aug. 18. John Cooke to [Williamson]. Secretary Coventry, hearing of a letter lately come from the King of Persia, has commanded me to enquire where it is, and, if I can procure it, to send it him. I learnt from the East India Company that Mr. Sheriff Herne delivered that letter to you in the Council Chamber last Friday. If you think fit to let me have it, I shall send it to Mr. Secretary, or otherwise please let me know what answer I shall return him. [Ibid. No. 213.]
Aug. 18.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Van Haen, De Ruyter's ViceAdmiral, in the Gonda of 76 guns, came Monday night into Portland Road. He came out with four more men-of-war, but on the back of the Isle of Wight they and their merchantmen last Saturday lost above 20 anchors and parted. They are to go for Plymouth and stay there for De Ruyter in order for Messina, as they say. He is yet here.
Voices are making for Mr. Moore, but I cannot learn he has written any letter about it, so I am yet in the dark. [Ibid. No. 214.]
Aug. 18. Warrant to the Keeper of the Gatehouse for the discharge of Sergeant Humphreys, committed for refusing to assist the UnderSheriff of Middlesex in suppressing the late tumult of the weavers. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 77.]
Aug. 18.
Windsor Castle.
The King to Sir John Nisbett of Dirleton, Lord Advocate. Warrant to prepare a signature for creating his natural son, Charles Lenox, a Duke, Earl, and Lord of Scotland, by the titles of Duke of Lenox, Earl of Darneley, and Lord Terbolton, with remainder to the heirs male of his body. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 326.]
Aug. 18.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland. Warrants for payment to Alexander, Earl of Morray, and to the Earl of Kinghorn of 500l. sterling apiece out of the fine of 1,000l. lately imposed by the Privy Council on Lord and Lady Cardrosse. [Ibid. p. 327.]
Aug. 18.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a gift to the Provost, Bailies and Council of Aberdeen and their successors for seven years, towards payment of the public debts incurred during the late troubles, of power to exact 4d. Scots for every pint of ale and beer brewed or sold within the said burgh and 2s. Scots for every pint of wine, aqua vitœ, brandy or strong waters vented, tapped or sold therein. [Ibid. p. 328.]
Aug. 18.
Windsor Castle.
Memorial of protection in the ordinary form to Margaret Forbes for two years. [Ibid. p. 330.]
Aug. 19.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Since my last on Tuesday nothing has happened here, nor is there any news by reason of the packetboat's not arriving here yet. The weather is fair and the wind westerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 215.]
Aug. 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. At St. Helens Road ride six men-of-war and a fire-ship with about 20 Dutch merchant-ships. The commander-in-chief is Captain Burkhead in the Osterweeke of 60 guns, another is equal to that, and the rest are between 30 and 40. They are part of De Ruyter's fleet, having been separated by bad weather. They suppose him with the rest of their fleet to be put in to some of our western ports. It was those that were forced to sea from St. Helens and left some cables and anchors behind, which they have since recovered. The commanders were ashore here, and were kindly treated by Sir Roger Manley, the deputy governor. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 216.]
Aug. 19.
Portsmouth.
John Pocock to James Hickes. Giving news of the Dutch fleet, as in the last. [Ibid. No. 217.]
Aug. 19.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 218.]
Aug. 20.
Stockton
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Wednesday the Bishop of Durham, being the Lord Lieutenant of this county palatine, had a general muster of all the train-band forces of this county nigh the city of Durham, where there was a very great appearance of all the gentry in the county, to the great satisfaction of his lordship, who caused all the forces to march orderly into the city, his lordship riding at the head of them, accompanied with all his deputy lieutenants. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 219.]
Aug. 20.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. Our Mayor, Mr. Thomas Green, having after 20 days' sickness of a fever departed this life last Monday, this corporation to-day elected Alderman Simon Taylor to be mayor till Michaelmas next. [Ibid. No. 220.]
Aug. 20.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. One of our pilots arrived last night from Ostend says at the beginning of this week a French party came and fired a village near Ostend, which very much alarmed the inhabitants.
The master of a ship from Barbados reports that the negroes there had made an agreement to rise and cut off all the English, but a negro woman, having an affection for her master and mistress, discovered the plot, and on examination they found it to be true. Six of the negroes were burnt and eleven had their heads cut off. They were upon further examination when the ship came away about 1 July last.
About 5 June the Advice of London, Capt. Robert Swanly late commander, arrived at Barbados. They came directly from Ireland with provisions to that island. Swanly was very well known to be an over severe commander, given to drink and basely to pinch his men, insomuch that they were almost starved. His men and he had high words, they on the deck and he in his cabin. At last he ran out of his cabin. Two of his men and a passenger, a very pretty young man, fell on him, and with what first came to hand struck him so that they almost killed him, and then heaved him overboard, where he suddenly sank, being so amazed with blows. They made slight of it, but about the beginning of July the two seamen were hanged at Barbados on gibbets and there continued. The passenger was also hanged on a gibbet, but was cut down and buried.
The wind continues S.W. 64 outward-bound ships great and small lie wind-bound in the Downs. After the great fears of overmuch rain God has sent us dry, calm, pleasant harvest weather. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 221.]
Aug. 20.
Plymouth.
Capt. Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 222.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 222i.]
Aug. 20.
Windsor.
Warrant making free the Hope of London, a Scotch prize. Minute. [Precedents 1, f. 96.]
Aug. 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The master of one of our packetboats arrived this morning informs us that a great fleet of Dutch herring busses have been fishing towards the North with two menof-war as their convoys, and that two French men-of-war (some say both of them less than either of the Dutch) attacked and took them both, and might have brought away all their busses, if they had had men enow to man them.
In sight of us all this morning (the wind westerly) are passing by a very considerable fleet of laden colliers for the Thames. About 1 p.m. another of our packet-boats arrived, but brings no news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 223.]
Aug. 21.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Pray let the enclosed be immediately delivered to Mr. Bridgeman. The outward-bound fleet in the Downs I acquainted you was 64 sail. Three or four came down to-day, all lying wind-bound. Tis reported here that Lower Normandy is in arms against their King. Very little wind at N.W. [Ibid. No. 224.]
Aug. 21.
Deal.
J. Shadwell to [Williamson.] In excuse of my tardy going to Tangier I beg leave to tell you that my first promise was not broken but prevented by a distemper which fell on me, and disabled me for travel, and I cannot but say the Yarmouth, which your courtesy designed for me on her second coming about to Portsmouth, did not play me fair, which will cost me 50l. I am now at Deal and my family are in the Guinea frigate, now a merchant, which conveys me to Cadiz. We wait the first fair wind, and it will be a favour if you will order Capt. Harman to call for me there and carry me to Tangier. I ask this with the more confidence on the relation and known kindness you have for Thetford, which gave me my first being. [Ibid. No. 225.]
Aug. 21.
Dublin.
Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor, to Williamson. Thanking him for having directed Mr. Yard to furnish him with the Weekly Intelligence, and begging him by his commands to make him capable of performing him some service. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 179.]
Sunday,
Aug. 22.
John Creed to Williamson. Requesting him to attend a sitting of the Lords Commissioners for Tangier at 4 to-morrow afternoon. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 226.]
Aug. 22. D. P. to [Williamson?] I had but last night my letters from Windsor, in which I had the enclosed news from Poland, which I present, there being somewhat of concern in it. I should have had them sooner, if they had not come under my Lord's cover and been kept there two or three days. I question not but you have heard he is named a plenipotentiary for the congress of peace with Marquis de Mansera, a grandee of Spain, and Mr. Christian of the Council of Brabant, which is now at Madrid. Our secretary had been at Antwerp and all that he could negotiate in five or six weeks has not been above 6,000 crowns, which are not yet come here. 'Tis but a poor business and scarce enough to discharge what is due already. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 227.]
Aug. 22.
The Guinea, in the Downs.
J. Shadwell to Williamson. Your kindness is the author of my boldness in begging your remembrance of me in the Irish establishment, whereof my Lord of Ormonde promised me to remind you, and I am sure the Duke, my royal master, will own me so far as to take it kindly from you. After the slip the Yarmouth gave me, I have plied the first opportunity, and I hope it will not be many hours ere we sail. It would quicken my arrival at Tangier if Capt. Harman might have orders to take me in at Cadiz, which was my request to you in mine yesterday. [Ibid. No. 228.]
Aug. 22.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N. Friday the Cleveland yacht came in here from Newhaven (Havre), where he left the Merlin yacht, waiting to bring over the corpse of Lord Lockier (Lockhart), which he heard was come to Rouen, before he came away. This captain had a gold chain and medal weighing about 200z. presented him, and brings another for Capt. Clements, commander of the Greyhound, of the like weight, being for conveying over the two French yachts built here by Sir A. Deane. He brings word that the French give the English great honour for their late service against the Imperialists, that by their means they retreated over the bridge, but that many were slain in that action, and that they are in great fear of De Ruyter's fleet purposing to land men and furnish ammunition to the mutineers in Brittany. [Ibid. No. 229.]
Aug. 23. Certificate by Sir W. Peake that Thomas Simon took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [Ibid. No. 230.]
Aug. 23.
Edenhal.
Sir Philip Musgrave to Sir Christopher Musgrave, Dean's Yard, Westminster. Last Saturday I returned from my week's troublesome attendance at Carlisle on great men. My Lord Marshal was very civil to me, and, I have heard, speaks of me at the same rate, when I hear him not, and blames somebody much for suffering those designs of [Sir] G[eorge] F[letcher] to make rents and divisions in the country, which, I suppose, makes that person pay the like outward compliments to me publicly and privately, which I have not been wanting to answer, for I easily discover the design, which is, to make known to great men above, how much he courts a good understanding with me, but underhand he is the same as formerly, as appears by the success at the Assizes of such matters as I wished well to, of which Basse will give you a particular account, and it will be apparent to you, that the justice of a business prevails not among us here. Lord Carlisle and I have several times discoursed of the disputes betwixt G. F. and me. I have spoken freely and once he told me he was ill put to it betwixt us, for I was jealous of him, and the other was angry if he did not assist him in all his designs. Last Saturday his lordship moved me again that all disputes might be laid aside. I told him I should be well content to live in quiet, but I would not meddle in the matters betwixt G. F. and the officers of the Custom-house, for I was not concerned in it till his lordship made me a party before the Lord Treasurer. Immediately after he took G. F. and me aside, and said he wished a better understanding betwixt us. I answered, in any concern of my own I would submit it to his lordship. The other said nothing to that, but fell upon the business of Scotch cattle, and what I said at Penrith sessions at Michaelmas. I told him Mr. Simson knew what I said, for he took it in writing. My lord perceived the discourse grew warm, so let the matter fall, and went to the Bench, for this discourse was in the low end of the Common Hall, the judge sitting and several gentlemen at such a distance, as they probably took notice the conversation was not agreeable. At my taking leave my lord told me he intended me a visit at Edenhal, and, though at the Sheriff's house, went to the door with me. I consider G. F.' s stories are all heard, and pass for truths, none but myself here and you at London averring the truth of passages in the matters of the Custom-house. Wherein Basse is most concerned, I thought fit to give him a fair occasion to come to Lord Carlisle, that, if opportunity be offered, he may aver the untruths that are discoursed in the coming over of 10,000 Scotch beasts after 24 Aug. last year, his and the officers of the Customs taking bribes for so doing, and that the cattle rescued from Simson and his officers (on which the indictment was framed and twice found Ignoramus at Penrith) were first seized by Simson's officers. The contrary is sworn and will be made good. The occasion I take to send Basse to Lord Carlisle is with a short letter taking notice of his intended visit to Edenhal and inviting him to dinner, for he put this compliment of an intended visit so publicly on me, that I can do no less in civility. By this long narrative you will see I am kept to this hard play of complimenting one that I judge no friend, his power here much above mine, the instruments he uses here not daring to oppose, all cowed, though they see well enough his way, and value not G. F. I cannot use tricks, plain dealing must do my business or I must suffer. It is time therefore you hasten on the dispatch of your affair, for, till that be done and publicly known, it is vain for me to appear in any public affairs, and I desire you to let Secretary Williamson know as much. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 231.]
Aug. 23.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last week came in here about 20 small vessels. I beg your pardon for informing you of the miscarriage of your intelligence, for Lord Arundel sent for it, which I knew not till now. [Ibid. No. 232.]
Aug. 23.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 20th came in here the Rebecca of London from Havre, bound for Kilburry in Ireland. They have five or six Irish passengers, who were soldiers in the French service, and are returning home. The 21st came in here the Thomas and John of London with salt from Rochelle. They report that the mutineers are still up in Brittany and that the French King is sending an army against them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 233.]
Aug. 23.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. If anything worth your knowing occurred here you would hear from me, though I have not had a letter of intelligence from the office these two months. By the master of a small barque of this place, which came from Port Louis last Saturday, we are informed that the rebels in Brittany continue in bodies in several parts, and the women only are left in many parts to reap and get in their corn, and that the Duc de Chaulnes is at Port Louis with a small party which he has to guard his person and house from the rabble, but he expects daily a considerable body to endeavour a suppression of the rebels by fair means or by force. [Ibid. No. 234.]
Aug. 23.
Windsor.
Warrant for a bill erecting the office of powder maker, for making, repairing and stoveing all gunpowder and refining saltpetre with a salary of 6d. a day from the Ordnance Office; and for a grant of the same to William Buckler and his son for their lives and the life of the survivor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 133.]
Aug. 23.
Windsor.
The King to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance. William Buckler has represented by petition that he contracted with the Ordnance Officers for a great quantity of powder, saving his Majesty 20,000l. therein in the two last Dutch wars, that he spent 5,000l. in works and that in trying to bring the gunpowder to greater perfection he had 18 powder mills blown up, and prayed for some allowance in consideration of his services. The petition being referred to Sir Thomas Chicheley, who consulted with the principal Ordnance Officers, the report recommended a grant of 1,500l. from the Treasury of the Ordnance, which he is authorized to pay accordingly. [Ibid. p. 135.]
Aug. 24.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Saturday the Merchant's Love of this place sailed with coals, lead and butter for Amsterdam, and next day the Margaret of this place for Rotterdam with lead and butter. Wind S.W. with good harvest weather. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 235.]
Aug. 24.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last, so we have no news. The wind is constantly veering betwixt S. and W. [Ibid. No. 236.]
Aug. 24.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About 11 last night the Florentine anchored to the westward of the Goodwin in between 3 and 4 fathoms, but thought himself on the East side. He had not been long at anchor when suddenly the water fell from him and he came aground, at which they were all amazed and everyone began to shift for himself, and at last in two boats they got ashore. The ship was spied by our seamen as soon as day gave light, and suddenly about ten hookers (they are our great boats of about 5 tons) went towards her, and but two or three dared adventure to come nigh her. She came from Bergen and was bound for the Straits, her whole loading was stockfish.
10 a.m. She has been in a sinking condition these two hours, and now her hull is under water, quite lost without hopes of saving anything. Her master went off about 9 with help, but, before he could come to her, she was under water. They say she belongs to Mr. Gould of London and partners. She had 14 guns and but 20 men. The wind was S.W., very fresh, and one of our hookers was like to founder by reason of the high seas. 11 a.m. Not so much as her mast is seen, all sunk right down into the Goodwin sand.
The ships that went out last Sunday have ever since rode under Dungeness and are now forced in by reason of the contrary high winds. It blows very fresh at S.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 237.]
Aug. 24.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. The whole Dutch fleet continues at St. Helens Road waiting for a fair wind to carry them for Plymouth, the port appointed for De Ruyter's whole fleet for rendezvous. [Ibid. No. 238.]
Aug. 24.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Yesterday came in here three Dutch men-of-war, part of the fleet lately at St. Helens. They wait for the remainder of their fleet. When they come, they will sail with the Dutch East India ship, which has lain here so long. [Ibid. No. 239.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 239i.]
Aug. 25.
Lillingston Dayrell.
Thomas Atterbury to Williamson. Having with your leave seen the few acquaintance I have in this country, I found them on the one hand commiserating my misfortune and loss both of a good master and of the time I since trifled away, and on the other they professed themselves sensible of your kindness to me in admitting me to live thus long one of your domestics. I told them you had told me last Michaelmas I should be not only freely welcome to your house, but at liberty to depart when my unkind fortune invited me away. On this an offer was made me of going beyond the seas on a small account, that I shall trouble you with, when I come to London, which I have accepted rather than live longer troublesome to you. I have only my poor thanks and my whole self to lay at your feet for your succours to me, hoping that the merit and memory of my master may, if fortune blows me to Edgland again, keep me in your eye and good grace. [Ibid. No. 240.]
Aug. 25.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The fleet that sailed westward last Sunday and was forced in yesterday sailed again this morning. About 18 of the biggest merchant ships outward-bound remain in the Downs. The wind was this morning northerly. Not a breath of wind.
Postscript.—2 p.m. It being since fair weather several boats went off to the ship that sank on the Goodwin to see if they could break up her hold when it was low water, because the master said there were about 20 or 30 tons of lead in her, some pigs above 200lbs., which he took in at the North and carried to Bergen and there took in stockfish, which they did, and brought a pretty deal ashore, and hope, if this calm weather continue and the wind remain S.E., to get a good part out. [Ibid. No. 241.]
Aug. 25.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This being the first day of my return home from the service of the East India Company, there is little to acquaint you with. (News of the ship lost on the Goodwin as in Watts' last two letters.) This morning the wind came about again to N.E. so the outward-bound fleet of merchantmen are sailed again.
Postscript.—The wind is come about to S.W. and blows hard, which has caused the said fleet to bear up again for the Downs. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 372, No. 242.]
Aug. 25.
Windsor.
Warrant for the insertion in the next pardon without the proviso for transportation of John Smith of Flamstead, Hertfordshire, sentenced to be transported at the Berkshire assizes for stealing a horse, he being only in the company of Alexander Grigg, who has been executed for the said fact, and also for his release on bail in the meantime. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 142.]
Aug. 25.
Windsor.
Warrant for a gift to the Earl of Bath of the estate of [John] Rivett, of London, brasier, forfeited by his having become felo de se. [Precedents 1, f. 98.]
Aug. 25.
Windsor.
Warrant to the Governor or Treasurer of the almshouse of Ewelme, Oxfordshire, to permit William Durant to continue to receive the King's allowance of 20d. a week to the almsmen of the said almshouse, which is refused him unless he will reside at Ewelme, his habitation being at Burham, Buckinghamshire, forasmuch as by reason of his great age, he being 103, he is unable to remove. [Ibid. f. 99.]
Aug. 25.
Windsor.
Pass to the Mercury employed by John Parker and Benjamin Steele to transport 16,000 round shot to Tunis, which they are given leave to do, with a proviso that they or one of them is to give sufficient security not to transport the said shot except to Tunis. [Ibid. f. 101.]
Aug. 25.
Windsor Castle.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. Whereas by our letter to the Lord Provost, &c. of Edinburgh (calendared ante, p. 247), we took off our restraint and allowed them to proceed to an election, which we hoped should have reduced all to their former good temper, but being now informed that some in the Council factiously design to perpetuate their own faction, and have scattered reports traducing their magistrates and endeavouring to possess the people that they had betrayed their liberties for their obeying our letter in continuing in their offices, we therefore authorize and require you to intimate our positive pleasure to the magistrates and Town Council that Robert Baird, Dean of Guild, James Sutherland, Treasurer, and eight other persons be by them discharged from officiating as members of the Town Council or any other trust relating to the town, till our further pleasure be known, and that the remaining number, which makes a full quorum of the Council, fill up those vacant places with other sober persons, and that they be careful this year in electing such as are loyal, sober, and well affected to the government in Church and State, as they would wish encouragement from us. We well know what the carriage of some of the above-mentioned was at the late convention of burrows at Glasgow, and how they have endeavoured lately not only to traduce the last magistrates for obeying us, but also to misrepresent our proceedings, yet we delay any further proceeding against them, till we see if they will behave quietly and soberly in their private stations as burgesses. But, if they continue their faction in relation to the next election, we require you to proceed against them, for we think ourselves so much concerned in this affair, that we will not leave it off till our good town be governed by sober and loyal persons. You shall appoint some of your number to attend and see all this put in execution, requiring the 13 who are left on the Council and are a full quorum thereof to exerce as the Council, and that such as are chosen by them attend and serve as they will answer the contrary at their peril. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 331.]
Aug. 26.
The Vine.
Do[rothy Lady] Dacre to Williamson. Last winter you did me the favour to peruse the writings of my grandchild, Dacres Barrett, concerning the difference between Lord Loftus and him. The Lord Lieutenant is now in England, and, if he should now take his opportunity to do Lord Loftus a second kindness in moving the King for his letter to recommend the Parliament in Ireland to pass the estate to Lord Loftus by an act, as Lord Loftus did at his Majesty's first coming to England, on which the King being informed of my son's right recalled it, the Lord Lieutenant's partial report will vanish, which if it come to a full hearing, we do not fear Lord Loftus' bare allegations against our proofs. At the hearing before the Lord Lieutenant in Ireland, as our petition was read which my son's counsel was ready to prove, Lord Loftus' counsel to be short said they had granted them all but one, which they very well knew my son could not prove, viz., that the Council of State put my lord in possession of the disputed estate for the good service he had done the Parliament in keeping his castle in Yorkshire against the King's forces. My son has his petition to the Council of State, but by reason the acts done there are all lost, my humble request is, that, if his Majesty should be moved to it, you would give us notice of it, for I am confident the King will not do it but on a surprise, he has been so just in all the business. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 1.]
Aug. 26.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Several light and laden ships ply to and again. We have heard of little damage at sea the late blowing weather, but it has shalled much wheat and other grain. [Ibid. No. 2.]
Aug. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday one of our packet-boats arrived from the Brill. Ever since last Saturday they have been plying of it. They brought no news. Some soldiers of the Duke of Monmouth's regiment in the French army, that came over in her, being wounded in the retreat of the French army over the Rhine and left behind, say that Marshal Turenne was shot in the breast, as he was viewing the Imperial army through a perspective glass, and that, though that regiment was in the heat of all that service, not many of it were slain. Wind W.N.W. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Aug. 26.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. The Dutch ships are still at St. Helens waiting for a fair wind to Plymouth, the place appointed for their rendezvous. A vessel arrived from Barbados left all there in a thriving condition. The seamen that killed their commander, Swanley, are carried ashore and condemned to be hanged. The master reports that the said captain, putting the seamen to short allowance, meeting with a long passage, they mutinied, and one of the men struck him with a handspike that he fell down. Then another struck an iron fid with the handle of it into his brains. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373. No. 4.]
Aug. 26.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Aug. 26.
Windsor Castle.
Caveat that nothing pass to the prejudice of the pretensions of Richard Royston and Robert Cleater, assignees of the interest of Col. Walter Slingesby, deceased, in the Royal Oak lottery, till they be heard. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 14.]
[Aug. ?] William Cooke, John Cooke, and John Heskins to the King. Petition for pardon for forgery, subornation, and perjury, in regard that William Cooke could get no benefit if the will adjudged to be forged had been found good, he being to pay in annuities and debts the full value of the lands demised to him thereby, and the petitioners having never been or reputed persons of evil fame or defrauders of people. At the side,
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney or Solicitor General. On the back,
Report by Sir. W. Jones, Attorney-General, in favour of granting the prayer of the petition, 20 Sept. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 6.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 44.]
Aug. 27. Certificate by Sir W. Peake that Henry Baltes, born at Saardam in Holland, took the oath of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 7.]
Aug. 27. [Sir J. Williamson] to —. Thanking him for his letters of the 14th from Bruges, the 16th from Ghent, and the 20th, 24th, 26th and 30th, and begging him to continue them with the zeal he is known to have for his friends. The Master wishes you to make some visits to the army in order to save appearances, and also to endeavour to penetrate more particularly into the affairs. You will be credited with 100 or 150 Jacobuses extraordinary on that head, which I charge myself to remit to you at sight. Only remember that your services are valued, and that people claim to deserve them. [French. Draft in Williamson's hand. Ibid. No. 8.]
Aug. 27.
Stockton
Richard Potts to Williamson. High southerly winds. No news. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Aug. 27.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Our Island (Iceland) fleet are all arrived, but not half fished. We have daily complaints from our ships of the great abuses they receive from the capers in abusing the masters and company and taking out goods. The engine that was some time since brought from London to deepen this haven is almost finished and fit to work, if the partners interested therein could agree amongst themselves. Those that covenanted with the town seem willing to stand by their contract, but the rest will not consent unless they and the town make a new contract, pretending they must be losers by the former. I fear they are ignorant of the number of the partners, and that there are two or three that will lay claim to a part, so that, if the town were willing to treat anew, they do not know whom to treat with. Our Presbyterians and Independents now agree as one, and meet in one place in greater numbers than formerly, and as public as if they were indulged, which some conceive they are, and they themselves nurse them up in this ignorance. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373. No. 10.]
Aug. 27.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Wednesday and yesterday the fleet of merchantmen, that I acquainted you were sailed the third time, came in again, and almost 80 sail outward-bound are now at anchor in the Downs. Last night two ships arrived from Cadiz. They say that three of his Majesty's ships have blocked up Sallee, and that all the Sallee men-of-war are in that harbour except three small ones, and that they hear not of any English ships taken by them. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Aug. 27.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 12.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 12 i.]
Aug. 27.
Windsor.
Warrant to Sir Stephen Fox for stopping so much of the pension of Col. Thomas Howard of Suffolk as may satisfy the debts incurred by him while lieut.-colonel to the Earl of Mulgrave's regiment to the lieutenant and several private soldiers of his company, amounting to 101l. 17s. 11d. for moneys received by him for the said company and not paid, and to cause the same to be paid to the persons from whom it has been detained. [Precedents 1. f. 100.]
Aug. 27.
Windsor.
Warrant to the Warden of the Mint in the Tower, after reciting that he has caused to be made and examined two piles of Scotch weights, each containing 512oz., whereof 12oz. are of less weight than 12oz. English by 4 dwt. 9 grs. English, for the delivery of one of the said piles to Richard Maitland, one of the generals of the mint in Scotland, by bills indented under the hands of the said Warden and General to be carried into Scotland by him and to remain with the officers of the Mint there. [Ibid.]
Aug. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The packet-boat which should have come from the Brill last Wednesday is not yet arrived, the wind yesterday and to-day being mostly southerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 13.]
[Before Aug. 29.] Invitation to [Williamson] to be present at the consecration of the Bishop Elect of Worcester at St. Peter's Church, Broad Street, on Sunday, 29 Aug., between 8 and 9 a.m., and afterwards to dine with his Lordship at Drapers' Hall. [Printed. Ibid. No. 14.]
Aug. 29.
Moore.
Sir C. Musgrave to [Williamson.] Conceiving you might have opportunity of speaking with his Royal Highness before I waited on you, my father's command engages me to send you the enclosed. I am sorry for the length of it. I wish he were not so dejected, though the indirect practices of that great man give too much occasion, for in two concerns I had the judge was treated with in one, and the jury in the other, the particulars of which are too tedious. You see how much my return into the country is desired by my father, and it seems the likeliest way of effecting what his Highness was pleased to declare in favour of me, but I shall always acquiesce in what you please to determine. The widow is still here with the richest, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 15.]
Aug. 29.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. The Dutch ships continue at anchor at St. Helens Road, where they ride very smooth with these winds. [Ibid. No. 16.]
Aug. 29.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. No news since my last. [Ibid. No. 17.]
Aug. 29.
Windsor Castle.
Secretary Coventry to the Bishop of London. The King granted away the estate of John Ryvett, a brasier of St. Sepulchre's parish, lately become felo de se; but being moved on behalf of his widow and the estate being small, he recalls his former grant and gives it it to her for her support. The estate is therefore to be reserved entire for the widow. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 201.]
[Before Aug. 30.] Notice to [Williamson] to meet the Committee of Correspondence at the African House on Monday, 30 Aug., at 9 a.m. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 18.]
Aug. 30. William Cooke to Williamson. I am forced to become a suitor for a pardon, being convicted of what I never was guilty of. Were Thomas Lamplugh in town, of whom I purchased Papcastle and Dovenby in Cumberland, I would oblige him to wait on you in my behalf, who is able to inform you of my having lived always like an honest man. I beseech you to favour me with a dispatch. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Aug. 30. James Hickes to Williamson. On Saturday night I received yours for Lord O'Brien and one from his lady, and have obeyed your commands by enclosing them to an officer in Dublin for their care and safe conveyance, and by the post to-morrow shall do it more effectually, and advise my Lord thereof that he may transmit his letters to such persons back or into any part of Ireland. The bad member in the office in Dublin, as formerly suspected, was one James Knight, who died two or three months past. [Ibid. No. 20.]
Aug. 30.
London.
Alderman Patience Ward to Williamson. The free access I have ever had with your Honour has encouraged this, though, when I reflect on my fruitless solicitations in the French treaty of commerce, my heart fails. The present is, like my former, about the manufacture of wool, whereto the soil and people here are so generally disposed, that the touch of it is esteemed as the apple of their eye, and it is accordingly secured by severest laws, and of that complaint, fall of rents and decay of trade, this seems to claim precedence, the decay of the woollen manufacture; this touches the landlord, the tenant, the merchant, the mariner, the whole.
The treaties with all nations eminently have been for vending the same, as that whereby we can maintain any commerce with a saving to this kingdom, which nevertheless has been greatly invaded lately by our neighbourhood and is in some places irrecoverable, obliging suitable considerations thereof. But, whilst that is doing, the present attempts of Ireland on the several sorts of manufactures claimed by prescription and possession as the property and right of the several counties of England is submitted to consideration, that the vieing of one with the other may not ruin both, for that the attempt multiplies the groans of England in the further decay of their darling manufacture and so forms animosities and hatred betwixt the kingdoms, whilst Ireland will as surely be disappointed of what it is made to hope, and unawares run into greater poverty.
The woollen manufactures made in England are thought double more than sufficient to supply the whole world we traffic with, or can fix any upon, and the want of vent in England, which has broke so many manufacturers that now hope to relieve themselves in Ireland under the management of some of greater purse than experience in this project, will prove as fatal to the one as injurious to the other, for they carry the disease over with them, or else it will most certainly meet them, and the complaint be changed from the decayed manufactories of England to the ruined manufacturers and manufactory of England and Ireland.
Wherefore I have thought it my duty to represent this account to his Majesty, and that if the same reasons moving laws against planting tobacco in England, reserving the trade with our plantations in America, prohibiting the wool of Ireland as well as that of England from transportation to any foreign parts, and many other like instances, may not well urge a restraint of such a manufactory of wool in Ireland for export on the reasons aforesaid, and it is to be noted that the present attempt is not on any new invention or improvement, but making the very sorts constantly practised in the several English counties.
It is humbly proposed that the manufacture of hemp and flax be recommended on such inviting and practical terms that it may be demonstrably the interest of Ireland to entertain. To this end it is proposed that a considerable impost on all sorts of manufacture of flax and hemp, capable to be manufactured in Ireland, imported from abroad into England, may be recommended to Parliament, so as an allowance may be made out of it to everyone that sows flax or hemp or manufactures it in Ireland, and that the said manufactures be custom free in Ireland and England (at least for a certain time in both, and in Ireland for ever) and that all flax and hemp seed imported from abroad be custom free in Ireland, and that this proposed manufactory may have all further encouragements that may occur, not injurious to England.
There are great and just reasons for such an impost or even prohibition in order to such a new manufacture, viz., most of the countries whence we have our linen have lately applied themselves to manufacture wool, and cease to receive any due proportion of our manufacture as heretofore, and the overbalance of trade to be elsewhere, as it is now particularly with France to disadvantage of this kingdom of a million per annum; that our navigation may not be continued under the necessity of our uncertain friends for our sail cloths, which is a sort most easy to be made in Ireland; and that this kingdom be not further depopulated by drawing away more people, which are or may be more useful in their art well managed in England.
To conclude, it is requisite that what may be adjudged prudent be done with all diligence, lest Ireland become so fixed in the manufactory of wool (so destructive to England) that the case become irretrievable, or at least more difficult than at present, and that, till the Parliaments of each kingdom make some settlements thereof, intimations of his Majesty's pleasure be given concerning the same. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 21.]
[Aug. 30 ?] Samuel Hodgkin to Williamson. Yesterday arrived here two vessels from the Texel, which met with much foul weather, and fell in with a Dunkirk privateer who plundered them, but, one of their masters being acquainted with the captain, they came off with less damage than some others in their company. We have had several storms of late, and hear of some vessels lost and others damaged. Wind N.W. [Undated, but endorsed as received 3 Sept. Ibid. No. 22.]
Aug. 30.
4 p.m. Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. About 1 this morning arrived in the Downs a merchant from Januway (? Genoa). Betwixt Portland and the Isle of Wight he met with five Argier men-of-war. He was on board one of them, who treated him very kindly. The wind is just now come N.W. and by N. and the fleet of merchantmen are going to set sail. [Ibid. No. 23.]
Aug. 30.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Shipping news. From Brittany we hear that the Duc de Chaulnes, the governor, has got a good force together, and is looking after the mutineers, who now disperse and hide away. They had news there not only of the loss of Crequi's army, but also of some regiments since in Alsatia. To-day, being the election of our new mayor, William Smith was chosen, one of the greatest merchants of this port. Sir John Strode, Mr. Strangewayes and many other eminent persons in these parts were at the feast. We had the great guns for their welcome with other demonstrations of their affections. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Aug. 30.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 25.]
Aug. 30.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Requesting the continuance of news from him, as he himself has not failed to send intelligence and will do so in future twice or at least once a week. Wind N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 26.]
Aug. 30.
Windsor.
Warrant for a pardon to Sir John Croxton, outlawed for killing John Gilliot, a bailiff, who with other bailiffs endeavoured to arrest him for debts contracted by his wife before marriage and not known to him, he being then in the King's service under the Earl of Oxford, and having always conducted himself peaceably [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 143.]
Aug. 30
and Sept. 24.
Careats that nothing pass of the estate of David Owens', forfeited for killing Henry Farmer of Knucky (Knockin), Shropshire, the same being granted to Edward Owens. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 15, p. 14 and p. 16.]
[Before Aug. 31.] Notice to Williamson of a meeting of the Court of Assistants of the Royal Company at the African House, Throgmorton Street, at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, 31 Aug. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373. No. 27.]
Aug. 31.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. These two or three days there has been stormy and rainy weather, wind northerly, now pleasant fair weather, wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 28.]
Aug. 31.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. At 5 yesterday morning arrived one of our packet-boats. She was forced by bad weather to set the mail and passengers ashore at Lowestoft. They left the Brill Wednesday, and brought no news. Wind northerly yesterday and to-day. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Aug. 31.
Harwich.
Captain Thomas Langley to Williamson. Your former kindness emboldens me to trouble you with a petition which will be presented to you by my relation. My grievance, as you will understand after the perusal of it, is very hard. The 26th of last month Mr. Care of this town and myself sent in a ship of our own several goods for Gottenberg. When she was near her port and a Swedish pilot on board, the 7th instant a Swedish privateer took and plundered our ship, the master and company at their pleasure, and 10 or 12 hours after an Ostend privateer took our ship and the Swede and carried both into Krogero in Norway, and put our things into the hands of the Governor who evilly entreats our master and company. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Aug. 31.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday afternoon the whole fleet of outward-bound merchant ships sailed except some great ships with a bare wind then at N.N.W. It is since at N.W. If it blows they must come in again. The packet for the Governor of Virginia is yet in my hands, not one Virginia ship yet coming down, but expected. [Ibid. No. 31.]
Aug. 31.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. Yesterday morning passed by to the westward De Ruyter with his fleet of, 'tis thought, about 40 menof-war. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Aug. 31.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Yesterday the wind came northerly and the Dutch ships sailed, that lay all this time at St. Helens Road. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Aug. 31.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. No ships have arrived since my last. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Aug. 31. Grant of the King's right in the personal estate of John Ryvett, of St. Sepulchre's parish, London, felo de se, to Eleanor, his widow. Minute. [S.P. Dom. Entry Book 26. f. 201.]
Aug. 31.
Windsor.
The King to the Governor and Council of the Massachusetts Colony. Samuel Bellingham has presented us with a petition setting forth that Richard, his father, the late Governor of the colony, died about two years since, possessed of considerable estate, and notwithstanding his declarations a short time before his death of his intention to give his whole estate to his said son, his only son and heir, yet by the contrivance of some persons about him, taking advantage of the petitioner's absence (then in Germany by his father's consent to study physic), and his father being non compos, a will was signed by him, not only contrary to his said declaration but almost to his utter ruin, and also that he had by letter of attorney authorized Richard Wharton, a merchant of Boston, on his father's decease to enter in his name on his father's estate, not imagining it could be disposed from him, and the rather, because his father sold and engaged several lands in England which were entailed on the petitioner for the better settling of him in his possession there, and that, though the said attorney had entered several caveats against the probate of the will, yet contrary to law, through the interest of the persons named executors and trustees, probate thereof has been obtained, but that, as the same has not yet passed the General Assembly, he conceives he is not concluded by it, we therefore recommend you in a very special manner to allow the said Bellingham a speedy rehearing of his cause according to the laws of the colony, and further recommend you not to suffer the interest or credit of any parties to the case to obstruct a rehearing or to prevail above the merits, but that the same may be determined impartially, directing that an account be returned to us of your proceedings therein, and, being informed that some injuries have been offered to the said Bellingham's attorney in acting for him, we therefore recommend you to take care that the said attorney or whoever else shall be employed by the said Bellingham be protected from all attempts or injuries. (See S.P. Col., America &c., 1675–6, p. 271.) [Precedents 1, f. 102.]
Aug. 31. Warrant at the request of Walter and Samuel Tucker for making free the ketch called the Charity, of Lyme, an English built ship, which having sustained much damage at sea was rebuilt at Rotterdam, wherefore they fear difficulties may be made in admitting her to the rights and privileges of an English vessel. [Ibid. f. 103.]
Aug. 31. Creation of Sir Arthur Forbes to be Baron Claneheugh and Viscount Granard of the Kingdom of Ireland. Minute. [Ibid.]
Aug. The Earl of St. Albans to Williamson. Recommending the bearer, who was for many years brigadier of the Queen's company of Guards, of whom he had spoken to his Majesty, whom he presumes Williamson will find very willing to give him the recommendation he desires. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 35.]
Aug. Latin elegiacs and English verses on the death of Mr. Fisher from a fever, by Aldrovand Everard. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Aug. Latin elegiacs addressed to Williamson by Philip Musgrave. [Ibid. No. 37.]
[Aug?] Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. The Lord Chamberlain to the Queen complained to me last night that La Roche, a Frenchman, tailor to the Queen, though a nolle prosequi was put in by Order of Council, was still prosecuted and at last convicted, and put this letter into my hands to be sent by his Majesty's order to the Lord Treasurer for him to send to the officers of the Exchequer. Pray let me know what you think the legal and best way to save this poor man from ruin, to which his Majesty is inclined as thinking the thing reasonable, he being both a stranger and the Queen's servant. [Precedents 1, f. 98.]
Aug.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 373. No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
38 Aug. 1 4 6 1 S.W.
39 " (fn. 1) 2 3 10 2 S.W.
40 " 3 3 11 0
41 " 4 3 12 0 W.
42 " 5 3 12 0 S.E.
43 " 7 4 1 0 N.E.
44 " 8 4 1 0 N.E.
45 " 9 4 3 0 S.W.
46 " 10 4 5 0 S.W.
47 " 11 5 5 2
48 " 12 4 6 8 S.
49 " 13 4 9 0 S.W.
50 " 14 4 13 1 W.
51 " 15 4 12 0 N.W.
52 " 16 4 14 1 W.
53 " 18 4 20 0 N.E.
54 " 19 4 30 0 S.W.
55 " 20 5 32 1 S.W.
56 " 21 5 38 0 N.W.
57 " 22 5 0 0 N.N.W.
58 " 23 6 2 0 S.W.
59 " 24 6 0 0 S.W.
60 " [26?] 5 46 0
61 " 27 5 49 3 S.W.
62 " 28 5 49 0
63 " 29 6 49 3 S.W.
64 " 30 7 0 0 N.W. Most of the outward-bound merchant ships are at sail, the rest preparing.
65 " 31 8 1 2 N.N.W.

Footnotes

  • 1. Misdated 2 July.