BHO

Charles II: September 1675

Pages 281-328

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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September 1675

[Before Sept. 1.] Notice to Williamson to meet the Committee of Correspondence at the African House on Wednesday, 1 Sept., at 8 a.m. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 66.]
Sept. 1. Lord Morpeth to Williamson. Recommending the bearer, formerly his father's cook. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Sept. 1.
Careby.
Edward Sculthorpe to Williamson. Requesting his assistance in procuring for his son the living of Collie Weston, Northants, which is in the Lord Keeper's gift and is likely to fall vacant, the incumbent being desperately ill. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 68.]
Sept. 1.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. Requesting the continuance of his letters of news, and offering to send him the news of that place in return by each post. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Sept. 1.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. A fleet of about 40 sail passed about 3 yesterday afternoon by Portland westwards judged to be the Dutch fleet. [Ibid. No. 70.]
Sept. 2. Sir Edward Mansell to Williamson. Your news was very welcome, guessing how acceptable it will be to the whole nation to be so probably secured of one of their greatest fears, which, I hope, may put us in so good a temper about next meeting that we may be able to do something. [Ibid. No. 71.]
Sept. 2.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Both light and laden ships pass daily, the wind being now much northerly. [Ibid. No. 72.]
Sept. 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday evening arrived one of our packet-boats. The master informs me that it is reported at the Brill that the Prince of Orange has had three or four towns, which the French had got from the Spaniards, delivered up to him, and that the Dutch Gazettes write of a late great victory of the Imperialists over the French. By a letter I saw the places surrendered to the Prince are said to be Binch, Charlemont, and the Castle of Louvain, that the French army under the Prince of Condé is retreated to Brisach, that in the last encounter, either the Prince of Condé himself or his son was slain, that the Hollanders after the taking of Philipsburg and two or three towns more, which I have heard named, are already marching Count Montecuccoli directly to Paris.
I was informed by one lately come from Strasburg that the French had caused to be hanged two or three of the chief inhabitants of Treves over the outside of the walls, which had so incensed the Germans, that they will not accept of the surrender of it on any other terms than that the French there shall deliver themselves up prisoners of war. Justice is pretended in this case, if the story be true, but it is doubted revenge is intended. [Ibid. No. 73.]
Sept. 2.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N. No news. [Ibid. No. 74.]
Sept. 2.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind northerly. [Ibid. No. 75.]
[Before Sept. 3.] Notice to [Williamson] that a Court of Assistants of the Royal African Company is appointed at the African House, Throgmorton Street, at 3 p.m. on Friday, 3 Sept. [Printed. Ibid. No. 76.]
Sept. 3.
London.
John Moore to Williamson. Praying him to appoint a time and place when he may wait on him. [Ibid. No. 77.]
Sept. 3. M. Warton to Williamson. Giving him all the acknowledgements imaginable for keeping him in his memory. We have a discourse here, as if the Parliament shall not meet at the appointed time. Please let me know when our master resolves as to it. The prevention of a journey would give an old man ease, and it would be pleasurable to hear Whitehall to be the check for treasure (for little money is to be found in the country), lest, if they meet, there will billing for it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 78.]
Sept. 3.
Strensham.
Sir Francis Russell to Williamson. Beseeching him to accept his most humble and obedient thanks for having him in remembrance, and supposing that in October he shall have the honour of waiting on him in town. [Ibid. No. 79.]
Sept. 3.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Sept. 3.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Many more are in sight, supposed to be part of this fleet. On Sunday sevennight a servant woman and a girl having a prejudice against the mistress of the house conspired to poison her. They put mercury into her broth, and, after she had eaten a little, she found herself sick. She leaving the broth, her husband ate some of it, which also made him sick, after which their daughter took up more broth to what they left and ate it all up. They were poisoned, and the next day the woman of the house died, since which the daughter is dead, and the old man is very ill, and supposed not to recover. The Mayor has secured the two servants, who will be sent to Exeter Gaol on Monday. [Ibid. No. 81.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 81 i.]
Sept. 4. Certificate by Sir W. Peake that Gunter Oulson, an alien born in Norway, took before him the oath of allegiance and supremacy that day. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Sept. 4.
Rugeley.
William Chetwynd to Williamson. How could you find out such a trifle busied amongst haymakers and reapers ? Surely it was a frolic to play with flies. I have scarce been sober since I had yours. You have been steeped five days in the best claret, sherry, hoccomore (hockheimer), rinko (Rhinegau), &c., I was master of, which has made you fresh in our memories. Dr. Smallwood, the thrice worthy Dean of Lichfield, Sir Robert Holt, my cousin the member, and the cripple captain have all swallowed you. A glass of wine with a dram of Sir Joseph in it works beyond antimony or crocus metallorum. To-day two blades have been here that have put hard at me, so that I am almost come to the opening of my doublet. Without doing that, you know the heart of your dog and slave. [Ibid. No. 83.]
Sept. 4.
Cockermouth.
Miles Pennington to Williamson. I intercede on behalf of William Tubman, an honest man, expert in the laws and fit for the management of what shall be desired by me, which is that you will be instrumental in procuring to him the land-waiter's place which Roger Ives in Newcastle, lately deceased, had, the disposal whereof is in the Lord Treasurer, if he please, otherwise in the power of Sir William Lowther, Mr. Garraway, and the other Commissioners of the Customs, so, if any coal-waiter or other Custom officer obtain it, then that the above person may be admitted to the vacant place or to the first that falls. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 84.]
Sept. 4.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Williamson. By the packet-boat arrived to-day came over 14 poor soldiers, who were taken by the Dutch and were of the Duke of Monmouth's regiment. These poor people are a continual charge not only to myself in particular, but to this town in general, for they are so poor that not one in ten has a penny, so that the burden is greater to this town than all our own poor, which the town has desired me to pray your help in.
I have also advice that the Princess Dowager is dead at the Hague.
I thank you for getting my former bill ordered by the Lords of the Admiralty to the Navy Commissioners, but as yet I cannot get it assigned. I hope you believe I would do his Majesty all the services I can, but my chargeable and long forbearance is heavy to be borne. I pray your favourable assistance, else it will almost break me. [Ibid. No. 85.]
Sept. 4.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Early this morning one of our packet-boats arrived. We are informed that it is commonly reported that the Prince of Orange and the French army often face one another, and that he offers the French battle, but they refuse it. It must needs be so, if it comes from Holland. Last Sunday the Princess Dowager of Orange died. The wind is most northerly and has been so these three days. [Ibid. No. 86.]
Sept. 4.
Windsor.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. He has heard of the death of Dr. Tomkyns, late canon residentiary there, and has formerly written in behalf of some persons to be admitted canons, but finding that James Lake, senior prebendary there, whom in ordinary course they would elect, is a sober, learned, and grave divine, and eminently qualified for preferment, and a great sufferer for loyalty, he is unwilling to prejudice him, and therefore intends his former letters not to exclude him, if they wish to elect him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27,f. 74.]
Sept. 5.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. A great fleet now in the Thames are coming down outward-bound to all foreign parts, some are also in the Gore, Margate road, and at the Nore. At least ten sail are in the Downs, bound for Holland, English ships, masters and men. The wind fresh at East. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 87.]
Sept. 5.
Windsor.
The King to the Commissioners for regulating Hackney Coaches. Being informed that William Sermon, who had a licence to drive a hackney coach, and his widow, who after his death kept the said coach, are both deceased, and that the said Sermon was very nearly related to the wife of John Bartlet, one of the King's coachmen, directing them to grant him a licence to drive and keep a hackney coach in the room of the said Sermon's widow. [Precedents 1, f. 103.]
Sept. 6.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. To-day arrived two ships in 13 days from the Sound. They report the war between the Danes and Swedes absolutely broken out, and all Swedish shipping and goods seized in the Sound. At their coming from thence the report was very strong that the King of Sweden was poisoned. They put in at Oastrise (Osterrisör) in Norway, where was the like report of the King's being poisoned. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 88.]
Sept. 6.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. About 12 months since Colonel Whitley desired Mr. Page to propound to me my managing the Post Office here again, as I did formerly. Accordingly I then came from London in order to settle the office so as might be best for his Majesty's service and your content, and, when I returned to London, the Colonel pretended he could not alter the existing settlement, but gave me no reasons to this day, so my labour and charge were lost, and myself incapacitated for doing you the service I then promised myself to do. I am forced to give you this account, for, at my last waiting on you, you expressed your displeasure at the ill keeping of the list of the ships in the Downs, and demanded who I employed to write it, by which I find you understood I was in the employment of the Post Office, and so responsible for the ill management thereof. The premises will, I hope, so satisfy you, that I shall not fall under your displeasure for miscarriage in an affair I am not concerned in. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Sept. 6.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Thanking him for the correspondence letter of the 4th just received. About post time yesterday arrived a ship from Barbados, which confirms the news of the rising of the blacks. The greatest number together was 500, at the head of whom was one they chose for their king. All their ringleaders were hanged, burned or beheaded, and they brought into their former obedience.
It blew very hard last night but no harm was done to the fleet in the Downs. God has sent us a very pleasant wheat harvest all our county over with very much good corn. The barns at most places are not able to hold it all, but they put their gray corn, viz., peas and tares, in stacks. Barley is very much in barn and that also stacked for want of barn room. Wind last night and now E.N.E. It blows yet more than a topsail gale. [Ibid. No. 90.]
Sept. 6.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 91.]
Sept. 6.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The 4th passed by about 40 great ships to the southward, supposed to be the Dutch fleet. Several small vessels are in the harbour, amongst them two French sloops of Brest, both bound to cruise for intelligence. Two from Bordeaux report that 5 leagues off Ushant they met with 3 Algier men-of-war, one of 36 and the others of 30 guns each, each treble manned. They took from them some wine and brandy and other provisions. Wind still E. [Ibid. No. 92.]
Sept. 6.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 2nd came in here two small French men-of-war from Brest, and, as soon as they came in, the two captains took horse for Plymouth when they understood that part of the Dutch fleet lay there. They came back again the 4th and put to sea this morning with intelligence that the Dutch fleet are passed by for the Straits, being sent out for that purpose. Yesterday came in here some vessels from the East, that say that the Dutch fleet passed before this harbour on Saturday night about 9, in two squadrons, in one De Ruyter with 10 men-of-war, and about 40 merchantmen, and in the other 4 men-of-war and about 30 merchantmen, the wind at N.E. (News of the three Turks men-of-war as in the last). They had been about 30 days out of Argier, and had met with no prizes, so they were forced to take these goods from them for a receipt. They did not in the least abuse the masters or men by words or blows. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 93.]
Sept. 6.
Windsor.
Pass for Lady Goring of Burton and her son-in-law, Richard Biddulph and Anne, his wife, to travel to France with their servants and 40l. in money with a clause that none of them shall keep company with Jesuits or resort to any of their seminaries, and that they shall return when recalled. [Precedents 1, f. 104.]
Sept. 6.
Windsor.
The King to the Bailiff or his Lieutenant and the Jurats of the Royal Court of Jersey. Whereas John Fautrat of Jersey has represented by his petition that, having right to certain lands, houses, &c., descended to him by the decease of his ancestors in Jersey, part of which had been long since purchased by his father from Aron le Tubelin, who died very much in debt, so that after his death his estate real and personal came under renunciation, and a decree was, according to the custom of Jersey, had on his children's estate. which the petitioner being informed of, he gave express orders to his proctors that, in case it should come to his turn either to renounce or declare himself tenant of the said inheritance, they should not renounce, but in his name declare themselves tenants of the whole estate, real and personal, of the said le Tubelin and his children, but that, when it came to the petitioner's turn, his said proctors contrary to his express orders renounced to the petitioner's right in the said inheritance to his very great damage, and also represented that our subjects there can no other way be relieved in such cases but by the royal prerogative, reserved by the ancient laws and custom of that island, exercised by our ancestors, Dukes of Normandy, which the laws of Normandy term Relief du Prince, and therefore prayed us to interpose and grant him our Royal Relief, and whereas we referred his petition to the Attorney-General, who, having considered the same and likewise the laws of Normandy and a precedent in the like case, has reported that we may fitly grant our royal letters on the petitioner's behalf, we accordingly require you to admit the said John Fautrat to be tenant of the inheritances of the said le Tubelin and his children, notwithstanding the renunciation entered upon record, or your having admitted any other tenant of the said inheritances, and to take care that he be put in the very same capacity, as he was at the time his proctors renounced to his right to the said inheritances, and that he may reap the same benefit of the laws and customs of Jersey, as if no such renunciation had been. [2½ pages. Ibid.]
Sept. 7.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Saturday with an easterly wind, which has continued ever since, passed by us for the Thames a great fleet of laden colliers.
About 8 Sunday evening one of our packet-boats arrived. The passengers inform us that Treves was taken by storm (the day I could not learn), that Monsr. Crequi had fortified a church in the town, that on the first entering of the Germans they gave no quarter, till they met with a stop at the church, that there Monsr. Créqui made his capitulations, &c. I could not attain to a perfect account of it, notwithstanding by this packet-boat came over some English soldiers, which were then in the town. All I learnt from them was that they escaped with their lives by retiring to the contrary part of the town to which it was entered. I had not your Saturday's account. How it miscarried I know not. I presume I should have met with a full account of Treves, which I desire I may have in writing if not intended to be made public. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 94.]
Sept. 7. Major Nathaniel Darell to Williamson. Three Hull hoys laden with lead are ashore on the Buoy of the Shoe. The King's yacht that ran ashore on Grain Sand is got off. A worthy gentleman of this country and a faithful servant to Mr. Secretary Williamson, Mr. William Slaughter, a true honourer of you at Queen's College and the best and loyalest spiritual father we have, is now drinking your health. [Ibid. No. 95.]
Sept. 7.
Dover.
Francis Bastinck to Williamson. About 10 to-day arrived the packet from Nieuport, bringing over several English and Dutch gentlemen, who say the report in Flanders is that the Prince of Orange intends to besiege Charleroy, and, on the success of the Germans, 'tis altogether discoursed of the Confederates invading France. [Ibid. No. 96.]
Sept. 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. The body of the Lord Ambassador Lockier (Lockhart) continues here aboard the vessel that brought it from France, which with the Merlin yacht goes for Scotland when the wind favours. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Sept. 7.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Last Sunday morning De Ruyter came before this harbour with part of his fleet, and took with him the remainder which came here before and the Dutch East India ship which has lain here so long. [Ibid. No. 98.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 98i.]
Sept. 8.
Coleshill Hall.
Sir Robert Holt to Williamson. We have here, by the help of a strong imagination, killed all the French over and over, routed Condé horse and foot, taken bag, baggage and cannon; and we say the enraged Mounsieur, who burns his Reinickes faster that they can make them, has by villanous love powder sent the Prince and his son, the Duke d'Enghien, on an errand to Collie Weston, the receptacle of the departed Hawkes. If all this and five times as much more be not as great truths as ever Knox or Buchanan delivered, I'll never believe Jack Presbyter again, to which we add that you are so Mounsieurefied at Court that you dare not let the Parliament sit, the certainty of which is indeed the errand of this paper, and which if you please to grant, you will highly oblige me. I was at Will Chetwynd's, where we sacrificed a moumper a vostre sante. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Sept. 8.
Beamish.
William Christian to Williamson. I humbly beg pardon for my long silence, but my absence from home, and the great indisposition of myself, wife and whole family for the sufferings of my poor little boy, your godson, who has been these several weeks extreme ill and weak, put me past all thoughts either of obligation or manners. He is now pretty hearty again, and begins to eat, for this last month he has taken nothing but the breast and that but sometimes. I am now removing to Newcastle with my family, Sir Francis Anderson being chosen Mayor and myself sheriff of that town and county. My wife keeps house for us both. The town allows us 550l. per annum besides all perquisites, which may be twice as much, as I am informed.
Mr. Vane stands in his brother's room, and has, as is said, made my Lord of Durham and most of the gentry of his side. Since the assizes I have not seen any of them, having been out of the country till Saturday last.
My friends at Durham keep constant in their kindness to me. If the writs come for that town, I doubt not to have as good an interest as any, and be thought fit to serve my King and country by those who have the electing of members there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 100.]
Sept. 8.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. This morning came from the Thames Captain George Purvis of Limehouse, to whom I delivered the packet for Sir William Berkeley, he being bound to Virginia, and to the place where that Governor lives. He has promised great care in delivery. About five days hence will one come down bound for Maryland, and about 14 days hence more bonnd to Virginia. The wind has been very high these three days and nights, but not any prejudice to any ships in the Downs. More than a topsail gale at E.N.E. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Sept. 8.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Clerk of the Signet. Desiring him to enter a carcat that no grant pass of the office of Serjeant-at-Arms to the House of Commons till notice be given him. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 14.]
Sept. 9. List of the prisoners for judgment at the general gaol delivery holden for the City of London, and at the Middlesex Sessions held at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey on that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 102.]
Sept. 9.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No news. A strong N.E. wind. [Ibid. No. 103.]
Sept. 9.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Sept. 9.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind W.N.W. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Sept. 9.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 7th came in the Abraham of London with salt from Burnesse. There came out with him the Queen of Swedland of Stockholm and the Queen of Poland of Dantzig. Off Ushant four Argier men-of-war came up with them, and took both the said vessels, and came on board this vessel, and took away most of their provision, and carried their cook, a Dutchman, on board the man-of-war, and gave him several blows on the soles of his feet to make him confess that they belonged to Allents (?aliens) but the master telling them they should have a care they did not break the peace, they left the man and some other Allents he had on board. There also came in the Rebecca of London loaden with tobacco and furs from Virginia. They say all things are well there, and that provision begins to grow plentiful. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 106.]
Sept. 9.
Windsor.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Windsor. Recommending for their first vacant benefice Dr. John Durell, canon residentiary there, and his Majesty's chaplain, who has deserved well by services to the late King and himself, and by his writings in several languages in defence of the Church of England. He is the senior canon who has no benefice in the donation of the said church, except the Bishop of Chichester, who is otherwise provided for, and has no living with cure of souls. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 187.]
Sept. 9. Warrant for respite of any sentence on Sir Thomas Armstrong, if found guilty of killing—Scroope. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 144.]
Sept. 9.
Windsor Castle.
Warrant for a patent creating the King's natural son, Charles Lenox, Duke of Lenox, Earl of Darnley and Lord Tarbolton in the kingdom of Scotland, with remainder to the heirs male of his body, the Dukes of Lenox having for many ages been eminent peers of Scotland, and it being his Majesty's pleasure that the titles which belonged to the Dukes of Lenox and are now descended on his Majesty as heir male to the late Duke of Lenox should not be suppressed and confounded in his royal person, but that they should be kept up and settled on a person of near relation. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 333.]
Sept. 10.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The wind is come northerly this forenoon with rainy weather. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 107.]
Sept. 10.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 108.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 108i.]
Sept. 10. J. Bellman (? Williamson) to —. Yours of the 3rd, 6th. 10th, 13th and 17th of this month have been received and Madame thanks you for the pains you are taking about the lace she wishes for from those countries. She begs you to continue them. She will remit you by the next ordinary 100 Jacobuses in addition to what your sister of Kerry is to send you from here. The 150 Jacobuses which you are to employ for the pictures at Antwerp will be supplied you at sight. [Copy in the hand of one of Williamson's clerks. French. Ibid. No. 109.]
[Sept.?] Margaret, Lady Herbert, widow of Sir Edward Herbert, to the King. Petition praying for a lease of certain lands now in jointure to the Queen in the parishes or manors of Chertsey, Weybridge and Walton on Thames for 99 years in reversion, to commence after the terms which shall be unexpired at her Majesty's decease by virtue of any lease made by her since. Her husband having been in the late and the present King's service in the late rebellion, she had no benefit of his or her own estate for 20 years, whereby she contracted great debts, and was damaged 20,000l. in her own estate. At the side,
Sept. 11.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord High Treasurer. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 110.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 45.]
[Sept. 11.] Memorandum to enter caveats at the Secretary's office, that nothing be done by the patentees of Connecticut to the prejudice of his Royal Highness' interest at New York before notice given to Sir John Werden, his secretary. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 111.]
Sept. 11.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. We are informed by several masters in our ships from Holland that two Dunkirk capers have taken 8 or 10 Holland busses with two frigates, their convoys. [Ibid. No. 112.]
Sept. 11.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No news. A.N.E. wind has made tempestuous weather these three or four days. [Ibid. No. 113.]
Sept. 11.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. All of note here this week is the sailing of about 24 merchant ships to several places of the Straits and West Indies, and the muster of our City train bands last Thursday. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Sept. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Gonville and Caius College. As Thomas Fuller, junior Fellow of their college, has gone beyond the seas, and wishes to remain there 3 years without any other loss than the ordinary deduction of his stipend usual in cases of absence, ordering their compliance with his request, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 76.]
Sept. 11. Caveat that nothing pass in favour of the patentees of Connecticut in America to the prejudice of the Duke of York's interest at New York before notice given to Sir John Werden. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 14.]
Sept. 11.
Whitehall.
On the petition of Viscount Ranelagh and his partners praying his Majesty by a further order of reference to empower the Lord Keeper, the Lord High Treasurer, and the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland to hear and examine what difficulties, queries, and proposals are or shall be offered to them relating to the petitioners' undertaking, and to state and settle the same, reference thereof to the above three lords, who are to report their opinion to his Majesty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 44.]
Sept. 12.
Bawdwins, in Kent.
Sir Richard Ford to Williamson. The clerks of Christ's Hospital found me here yesterday by order of the President to invite me to attend him to-morrow, when by your order the petition to his Majesty for the disposal of the children of his royal foundation is to be presented, which I should have most readily obeyed, if some indisposition of body had not unhappily prevented me. Therefore I presume to enclose you this paper, which I should otherwise have personally delivered, which I submit to your judgement, and doubt not you will put the charity and honest intention of it in the balance against the ignorance or mistakes of it. [S.P. Dom., Car.II. 373, No. 115.] Enclosed,
Proposals for rendering more useful the royal foundation for the maintenance and education of 40 poor children in the mathematical arts and narigation.
Those who shall be reported by the Trinity House to be sufficiently ripened to be put into the practice of navigation be thus disposed of:—
1.One to be assigned to each of the commanders of the Navy to be his clerk and keep the journal of his navigation, receiving a midshipman's pay.
2. The master and pilot of each ship to be specially commanded to exercise them in the practice of navigation, and making drafts of land and soundings of ports.
3. If there be more boys than can be thus disposed of, that the Royal African, East India, Turkey, Russia, and Eastland Companies be recommended to entertain them in such manner and with such salary as is proposed for his Majesty's own ships.
4. The boys who have made their first voyage to East India be sent the next voyage in the service of one of the other companies and so successively, till they have seen the navigation of all parts of the world.
5. The Trinity House to keep an account under what commanders the boys are placed for the first voyage, and to take care on their return they are sent on another successively.
6. In the interrals of their voyages the boys to reside in some of his Majesty's yards.
7. The boys to wear perpetually a badge to remind them of what they owe to his Majesty's bounty, and to make it known to all nations. [Ibid. No. 115i.]
Another copy of the above paper. [Ibid. No. 116.]
Sept. 12.
Portsmouth
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.E. By these easterly winds 30 or 40 Dutch ships with a convoy are put into Cowes Road, all homeward-bound, from the Straits and other parts. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Sept. 12.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing an account of some Turks men-of-war in the Channel. Several small vessels arrived to-day. [Ibid. No. 118.] Enclosed,
Two Turks men-of-war, the Orange Tree and Dudley Tree, of Argier (two more of them were cruising at sea) took out of the Exchange of London, from Burnesse with salt, bound for Amsterdam, off the Scames and West Penmarks six men, viz., three Dutchmen, one Shetlander, one Scotchman, and one of Ipswich, 5 Sept. [Ibid. No. 118i.]
Sept. 12. Note that the King has granted the goods of Mr. Sembale, who killed Sir Richard Sandford 8 September, to Mr. Randue. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 15.]
Sept. 12. Notes by Williamson. The King.— References, on Lord Ranelagh's, Lady Herbert's, Bradshaw's petitions. Pensions to spies, De Vic, Pardens (?) but 100l. per annum, Nipho, Stoupe in France, Blood. The Blue Boys, address ready the 15th. Lord Keeper, Lord Treasurer, &c. Sir Stephen Fox's paper of information. The order about foreign points, &c., Sir G. Downing's sense upon it. Duke of York, Lord O'Brien's compliments, have sent Lady Herbert's petition.
Resolved: The two points of the Marine Treaty to be sent to the late Commissioners, &c., for their opinion. Letters to be written to the parties in war to dispatch their ambassadors to the assembly, to send papers for respective ministers. To the two Northern Kings, their falling out, they were never in the war, &c., knowing how well disposed they have been ever to the peace, to offer the King's mediation.
Sweden.— The Ambassador to have the business of the capers reminded to him. N.B.—A severe rule in the treaty 1664–5. His note to me. Our treaty with them to be drawn up by the Committee of the Board, &c. Protestant church at Riga, &c., as they have one Lutheran here, &c.
Denmark.— Their minister to be warned of the capers.
The Foreign Committee. Holland.—1. The negotiation of the peace. i. What function to Sir W. Temple either as to the treaty, as to the preliminaries, as to the conditions of France. V[an] B[euningen] has orders to press our ambassadors to part for the assembly. Sweden presses them. The Chancellor in Sweden the minister. To write to the parties to send their ambassadors. ii. As to the defensive treaty, they think it falls short. Ready upon both, when Sir W. Temple speaks out. 2. The two remaining points of the general Marine Treaty. 3. Du Moulin sent to Montecuccoli. 4. Surinam:— matter well executed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 366, p. 25.]
Sept. 13.
The Hopewell, in the Downs.
Thomas Atterbury to Williamson. Last Tuesday we sailed from Gravesend, wind then N.E., and this afternoon anchored here, having had bad weather. The wind is now so fair for us, that I fear we shall not stay to receive letters from shore. We are told that within eight weeks we shall be at Bermuda, from which you shall not fail to have a particular account of the whole voyage. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 119.]
Sept. 13.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning a flyboat from Ostend coming in at the South Foreland borrowed so much of the shore that she ran aground on a sandbank near Kingsdown, and there sat one whole tide, but with the help of Deal boats and men she is got off this high water and is come into the Downs. She is little damnified. She is a lowndroger bound for London. The Garland, Speedwell, and Deptfordketch are all ready to sail to convoy the herring fishing at Yarmouth, and only stay for a wind, which is at present N.E. and by N. [Ibid. No. 120.]
Sept. 13.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Giving an account of the Ostender as in the last. The winds have been very high these eight days. The storm ended last night. A topsail gale at N.E. [Ibid. No. 121.]
Sept. 13.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind has continued E. for several days. Shipping news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 122.]
Sept. 13.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 10th came in the Benjamin of and for London from Bordeaux with wines. They speak of the Argier men-of-war on the coast, and saw four about Mount's Bay, and suppose one or two were at anchor there. There is also here the Owners' Delight of and for London with tobacco from Antigua. They say that place is in a very good condition and all things plentiful. Yesterday came in the James of Waterford from Havre loaden with dogs for St. Sebastian for the King of Spain's use. Several vessels here homeward-bound are putting to sea this morning, the wind N.N.W., and, if it come more westerly, I believe the rest will put to sea this afternoon. [Ibid., No. 123.]
Sept. 13. Notes by Williamson of the tenders made by various persons for the farm of the duties on proceedings at law for three years from 22 Oct. next, and the conditions made by them. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Clerk of the Signet. Desiring that no grant pass of the office of searcher of the ports of the City of Dublin and of Wicklow, with the members thereto belonging, without notice to him, with note that notice is to be given to Mr. Gould at the King's Head, Pall Mall. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 15.]
[Sept. ?] William Scott to the King. Petition, stating a grant by the late King in the 19th year of his reign to Richard Marcum and the petitioner and to the survivor of them of the office of searcher, gauger, and packer of the ports, creeks and bays of the City of Dublin and of the Skerries and Malahide and of Wicklow, and that he is informed that some persons have a design, by misinforming the King that the petitioner is dead or otherwise, of getting a grant of the said office, and praying therefore that a caveat be entered in the Signet Office that no grant of the said office be made without notice to the petitioner. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 180.]
Sept. 13.
Westminster.
The King to Ralph Montagu, Master of the Great Wardrobe. Warrant for the delivery to Richard Smith, clerk of the cheque to the Yeomen of the Guard, of 120 livery coats, viz., 100 for the Body Guard and 20 for the Yeomen Warders of the Tower, to be made of fine red cloth guarded with black velvet, with a rose and crown, the letters C.R., motto and scroll on back and breast of each, all with silver and gilt spangles, and of 120 pair of red breeches of fine cloth guarded with the same velvet, 120 velvet bonnets with bands of crimson, sky colour and white ribbons, 120 pair of grey worsted stockings, and 120 waist belts of bough and 50 carbine belts, and for the delivery also to the clerk of the cheque of 120l. for provision of cloth for watching gowns for each man. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 334.]
Sept. 13.
Westminster.
The King to Sir T. Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance. Warrant for the delivery to the above named clerk of the cheque of 20 complete gilt partizans with leather cases for 20 Yeomen Wardens of the Tower. [Ibid.]
Sept. 14.
Leedes Castle.
Lord Culpeper to Williamson. Being come down hither to peruse some papers in order to your commands (of which you shall have a very speedy account as you desired) and [for] my necessary journey to Lincolnshire, Wales, and elsewhere, before the Parliament sits, I am informed that some near relations of mine, who presented a petition to his Majesty against me about midsummer last (of which no notice was ever taken to me, and therefore I looked on it as dismissed), not only persist therein, but, having given out speeches of the encouragement and promises given them, are now gone to London with the assurance to do me mischief. Though they fail to attain their ends, 'tis not to my advantage to have complaints of that kind, and audacter calumniando aliquid adherebit, but, when I see you, I shall convince you, not only how improper it is for his Majesty ever to concern himself in such businesses, but that this cannot affect me in any proportion to what is alleged. I do not say his Majesty cannot do it, for he can shut up the Exchequer, but I am of opinion that Secretary Coventry, who delivered the petition, if it be delivered, ought to be very tender of putting affairs of meum and tuum, as this certainly is, out of his just bounds. His Royal Highness spoke to me of it, but, when I showed him the releases and deeds which passed between us, and assured him that I would ever in law and equity waive all privilege of Parliament, he told me he was satisfied and would meddle no farther in it. My brother put in a bill against me in Hilary Term, and obtained a sequestration against me for not appearing, which I would not do, because the petition was then modelling, and I would not be molested in two places. If that had been withdrawn, I had done it immediately, and so will at a day's warning, and 'tis their own default, but, finding their case not relievable there, they would interest his Majesty in it.
I request that, if, without asking his Majesty, you find such a thing delivered and not dismissed, you would let him know that the Courts are the proper places for such suits, where the thing might have been in a fair way of determining ere this, I having promised his Royal Highness to waive all privilege of Parliament, which he thought exceeding fair, and where the validity of deeds, if questioned, may be asserted, and, if these are not questioned, there is no difference at all, for I am ready to pay what is due on them.
I could make an argument that his Majesty owes me much more on orders stopped in the Exchequer than all in question, and part for moneys lent to his own hands, but this is sufficient till I see you, which shall be at farthest before the Parliament shall have sat a week, in which time little business will be done.
By Tuesday next I shall have finished my paper, and at my return shall attend you for your pardon for this trouble.
If you have anything worth my knowledge herein oblige me by directing to me next door to the Coffee-house in Bow Street, Covent Garden, where care will be taken to send them to me. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 125.]
Sept. 14.
Holywell, Oxford.
Thomas Hyde to Williamson. I received your letter a fortnight ago with a black box and the Persian things therein, of which I had given you a more speedy account, but my right hand, being hurt by accident, has been so sore, that I could not always apply myself to business, and now I am forced to borrow a third hand.
I could have wished you had given me some light into the state of our controversy with the Persians, viz., about the ordering of the customs of Ormuz and the other ports in Persia and concerning the abuses complained of in the overseers of the customs and other businesses, and what has been transacted therein between them and us of late years. However, I have made a verbal translation as near as I can, and have sent a paper wherein are some things referring to the Persian letter, which paper may be communicated to any you think fit.
If there is like to go any ambassador or agent to Persia, as is required in the letter, I should take it as a favour if I may have notice of it.
As for making a catalogue of our MSS. which you once mentioned to me, it would be a work of some years, if I attempted to do the whole myself, and also a hard task for me, who have been so lately tired with nine years' hard labour in making and publishing the catalogue of Printed Books, whereby my health is impaired. However, if desirable, I can set it on work by other men's hands, if the University will allow me some assistants, &c., and I will oversee and manage the whole work, and also do my part, especially in the Eastern books, and it may thus be dispatched in some reasonable time. But I have no reason to be very forward in putting business on myself, except it is your desire, having been so slenderly rewarded for nine years' labour already, and am fed here only with empty promises of making my small place better.
But, seeing there are plenty of men who can make catalogues, I appeal to you as a patron of learning whether you do not judge my time might be much better spent in doing some things in my Eastern way of learning, for which perhaps few other men are to be found. Some of the things wherein I could willingly spend my time, and I hope to good effect, are the following, viz., To translate the History of Timur or Tamberlain out of Arabic, with additions by way of annotations out of Persian authors; to give a more exact Persian Grammar and Dictionary; to give a good history of the Persian kings out of their own authors, which was never yet done to much purpose, and to reconcile their chronology with the Greek; to translate out of Arabic the Geography of Abulpheda, Prince of Hamath in Syria, the most exact of all the Eastern geographers, whereby for the Eastern parts the errors of our maps would be detected and amended. Lastly, I would be sure not to omit to employ my Eastern learning towards the explication of some places of Holy Scripture, to which I may perhaps be able to say something which has not been said before, and to the business of Scripture the forementioned geography would also be subservient. If God grants me life and health, any of these things may be done, or all of them by degrees. But, besides the skill in the business to be done, the encouragement of some noble patron is also necessary, who can find out a way to sustain the person who should do the work. For otherwise, if a man is forced to work merely for his bread he cannot study what he himself would, but rather what others please, and is thereby constrained to spend his time in doing what perhaps is very different or altogether contrary to that wherein his talent chiefly lies. Therefore some of those preferments which would not require too much attendance and do not bring their work with them, as sinecures, donatives, masterships of hospitals and the like, would be most proper for such a person, who does not desire thereby to live idly, but is rather desirous to spend his time for the glory of God and the good of the public in his way of study, and I appeal to you whether some of those preferments are not sometimes worse placed.
If any of the things I proposed are thought useful, you know where to find the man who is ready to labour, if he may know where to find a patron to encourage him.
I make bold to communicate to you the enclosed papers printed as specimens of what I intended to publish entirely, by command of a person of quality now deceased, but the making the Catalogue of our public library hindered me from these and all other things. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 126.] Enclosed,
Two specimen pages of an Arabic History of Timour in the upper part of the page and of a Persian in the lower part, with a Latin translation of each, the Persian being written in the reign of Jehan-ghir, and of the first ode of Hafiz, with a Latin translation and a Latin translation of the paraphrase of a Turkish commentator. [Printed. Ibid. Nos. 126i. ii.]
Sept. 14.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Several vessels of this place laden with lead, butter, and coals are ready to sail for Rotterdam. Wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 127.]
Sept. 14.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday the wind forsook the East, where it had continued so long, and shifted into the N.W. where it continues. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. It's said an English French caper yesterday in our sight yet without the fort seized a Norway man, and left her after taking some goods out of her and setting her aground on the Cork. Should he return to this port, it is much questioned whether the magistrates here could take any cognizance of the fact. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Sept. 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. This morning sailed the Merlin yacht, convoy to the vessel that carries for Scotland Lord Lockhart's body. At Gravesend they are to take aboard Lady Lockhart with her servants and then proceed to Scotland. This wind carries away all the ships that were windbound in Cowes Road. [Ibid. No. 129.]
Sept. 14.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 130.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 130i.]
Sept. 14. Caveat that nothing pass of the estate of Sir John Drake forfeited for murder. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 15.]
Sept. 14.
Whitehall.
Commission to John Smithers to be boader and serjeant at arms of Dover Castle. Minute. With note that the like commission was given to John Beeching, 30 June, 1673. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 359, p. 38.]
Sept. 15.
Dovenby.
Thomas Benson to Williamson. I have never troubled you on my own account till now, but necessity calls me to it. A murrain fell among my cattle and devoured them, and I am not in a condition to recruit again without assistance. All my desire is to have a protection for 100 head of cattle from Ireland. I shall land them at Flimby, which is in no parish. It is a frequent thing, for 20 ship loads will come in all at once at Chester and none to question them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 131.]
Sept. 15.
Sunderland.
Samuel Hodgkin to Williamson. Yesterday my Lord of Durham came to see this town. He was met by the inhabitants about two miles off, who attended him to the town, and rode with them through the town to the seabanks, where he had the opportunity to see a considerable fleet of colliers pass by from Newcastle southward. He walked back to the town, where he was received and entertained by some persons of quality with a great demonstration of respect and honour. After a short stay he went to Capt. Conyers', where he dined, and the same night went to Durham. Wind W. [Ibid. No. 132.]
Sept. 15.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. About 6 last night the Garland, Speedwell and Deptford ketch sailed for Yarmouth, wind S., and this morning it came to S.W., which has brought in several small vessels from the westward, and also the Portsmouth yacht. Just as she came in, it shifted to N.N.W., so that she turns up through the Downs for the river. [Ibid. No. 133.]
Sept. 15.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. To-day Sir Robert Cann was elected Mayor, and Mr. Charles Williams and Mr. George Lane sheriffs of this city. [Ibid. No. 134.]
Sept. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Duke of Hamilton, Keeper of Holyrood House, for accommodating the Earl of Athole, Lord Privy Seal of Scotland, with the lodgings therein described in Holyrood House. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 335.]
Sept. 15.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Commissioners of the Treasury in Scotland for repairing the lodgings in Holyrood House assigned by the last warrant. [Ibid. p. 336.]
Sept. 15.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that by the commission appointing Lord Ranelagh and others Commissioners of the Treasury in Ireland, they were granted the use not only of the office of the receipt, but of the lower rooms of the new Custom House in Dublin, which they have ever since had the use of, and that their undertaking will determine next Christmas, after which the said rooms will be at the King's disposal, assigning the same after next Christmas for the use of the Vice-Treasurer for the time being, to whom the possession thereof is to be then ordered. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 335.]
Draft thereof in Lord Ranelagh's hand. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 181.]
[Sept. ?] John Martin, prisoner in the condemned hole at Newgate, to the King. Petition to be granted his life that he may be transported, he having been condemned for felony and burglary to the value of about 50s., it being his first fact, and he being a poor Dutchman, and his wife and children being like to starve. At the side,
Sept. 16.
Whitehall.
On the intercession of the Dutch Ambassador reference thereof to the Recorder of London, and what other judge sat on the petitioner. On the back,
Report by Sir John Howell that the petitioner was tried before himself and other justices on an indictment for a burglary, and the fact was very clearly proved, but it did not appear the petitioner was a stranger, but that being tried and found guilty he is liable to the same judgment as other burglars, and that the offence is grown so common, that, if the laws be not put in execution against burglars, no man can be secure in his dwelling, four others, all his Majesty's subjects, being condemned for the like offence this last sessions, who will think it hard to be executed for such an offence as that for which the petitioner should be pardoned or reprieved. 18 Sept. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 135.]
Another copy of the above reference. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 45.]
Sept. 16. Sir Nathaniel Herne to Williamson. As the Duke of Ormonde and several other honourable persons have promised to dine with him to-morrow, begging the honour of his company. He cannot give this notice personally, as he is to attend the sessions this morning. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 136.]
Sept. 16.
Edenhal.
Sir Philip Musgrave to Williamson. With your knowledge and approbation before my last coming from London I acquainted the king with the present condition of Cumberland and Westmorland and the state of the garrison at Carlisle, and he then let me know he would send my son Christopher to Carlisle, so qualified as to enable him to be serviceable in these parts. His Royal Highness also was of opinion that it was necessary, and told me he would speak to the King about it, and, as I remember, you told me his Highness had done it, but I have since heard nothing thereof, and, doubting that my son had been wanting to remind you of it, and that my age, my weaknesses, the length of the journey, and the winter will prevent my coming to the meeting of the Parliament in October, I thought fit to write you this. I have undergone hardship as much as any in times of rebellion, and have struggled with difficulties, more than now I am able singly to do, to serve my master since his restoration (you know my meaning). I have not sought great things for myself, nor envied those that have attained to them. It is enough that I hope I have hitherto discharged my duty both to God and my king in the public trust on me, and, if unwillingly I now fall short, I hope both will pardon me. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Sept. 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I congratulate your happy return to your winter residence. This morning one of our packet-boats brought over above 40 soldiers, most of them of Douglas' regiment from Treves. They commend the civilities of the Germans to them, not only readily affording them quarter, but they also had passports from the Duke of Lünenburg. Since your first commands I have constantly kept an account, not only of the soldiers brought over on his Majesty's allowance, but also the times of arrival and return of the packet-boats, as you formerly gave me orders. I know not whether it be your pleasure I should continue this last. The wind is mostly westerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 138.]
Sept. 16.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday I received two packets, in each of which were two packets in all for four colonies in New England. Three ships are coming down, in the first of which I shall send them. To-day arrived the commander of a ship for London, who came from France. He was met in the Channel by a Turks man-of-war, who boarded him and took from him a hogshead of French wine and most of his provisions, saying he was a great way from home and must not starve. Not a topsail gale at S.W. [Ibid. No. 139.]
Sept. 16.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter of the 11th, having received none in three weeks before. Wind northerly. [Ibid. No. 140.]
Sept. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance, to deliver to Peregrine, Viscount Dunblane, 6 small pieces of brass ordnance, lately belonging to the Little Francis, for his yacht, the Sophia, an indenture being taken for their return when required. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 137.]
Sept. 16.
Ham.
The Duke of Lauderdale to Lord Cardross. I have received your letter with a petition for his Majesty, who had disposed of 1,000l. sterling of your fine, before it came. He now commands me to tell you that, as he is resolved not to pardon the fine, so on your due acknowledgement of your fault to the Privy Council and your assurance that you will not be guilty of the like hereafter, he will take the remainder of your case into his gracious consideration. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 356.]
Sept. 17.
Stockton.
[Richard Potts] to Williamson. Fair weather with a southerly wind. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 141.]
Sept. 17.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 142.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 142i.]
Sept. 17.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir G. Downing. I have sometimes heretofore discoursed to you two difficulties raised by M. Van Beuningen upon the interpretation and practice of our late general Treaty Marine, one as to the point of trade from enemy's port to enemy's port, and the other relating to the matter of revision of sentences. We are still put off in both by the Ambassador so as, at Sir W. Temple's taking leave on his last return to the Hague, his Majesty thought fit rather to put both those matters into his care. The enclosed extract shows what he has hitherto done, and the state they are brought to. His Majesty, before he will conclude anything in either of them, desires to have the opinion of the late Commissioners, your colleagues, and accordingly has commanded me to transmit them to you that you may meet and consider them, and the temperament Sir W. Temple proposes in both, and report your opinion to him upon the whole with what speed you conveniently can. I enclose a copy also of the Act of Declaration upon the point of trade from enemy's port to enemy's port, as we on our part are willing to give it, to which you will find what limitations and restrictions the Pensioner insists to put. Of which his Majesty particularly desires your judgement and opinion, as to the consequences any such limitation may have. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 52.]
Sept. 17.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Cornewall Bradshaw, late receiver of the hearth-money in London and Westminster, praying that 500l. paid by him to his predecessor by Lord Clifford's direction may be remitted him on his account. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 45.]
Sept. 17. Pass for Captain Toby Fitzgerald to go with his family to Modena. [Latin. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 78.]
Sept. 18. Certificate by J. Fenton, E. Warner and Ho. Williams that they are credibly informed by divers persons of quality that Major Choke has found out a great secret in his debanto berry necklace, which has proved very effectual in giving children ease in breeding their teeth, and that on discourse with him they find him an able and sober man. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 143.]
Sept. 18.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat arriving makes us void of news, the westerly wind being their hindrance. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Sept. 18.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day arrived the Expectation, an East India ship from Bantam, also three or four great ships from the Straits. De Ruyter is passing by the South Foreland for Holland, convoying a fleet of merchantmen of about 60 sail. [Ibid. No. 145.]
Sept. 18. Warrant to John Wickham, messenger, to take into custody Col. Philip Warner and to bring him before Secretary Coventry to answer what shall be objected against him. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 144.]
Sept. 18.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Prince Rupert as Governor and Constable of Windsor Castle to permit the officers of the works, Hugh May, comptroller, and John Ball, surveyor, to pull down and alter according the King's directions the outwalls and other buildings at Windsor Castle in several places for making the King's lodgings there more convenient. [Precedents 1, f. 109.]
Sept. 18.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a grant of 24 May, 1671, to Richard Lawrence of Chapel Izod, of several houses and lands in or near the said town for 41 years from 25 March then last at the rent of 42l. per annum, whereof 30l. was to be paid to James Jerome, minister of Chapel Izod, and his successors, and the other 12l. was to be applied towards the repairs of the King's house of Chapel Izod and keeping the gardens thereto belonging, and that there are some other houses and lands with one or more mills belonging to the King in the said town besides those leased to Richard Lawrence, and also after reciting a lease of 24 Feb., 1662[–3], to Sir John Stephens, deceased, of the town and lands of Lackinshonnie, Gurteen and other lands in the barony of Barretts, co. Cork, for 41 years from 25 March next, at the rent of 50l. per annum, and a lease of 19 Aug., 1667, to the said Sir John Stephens of the town and lands of Killknockane and Curryheen and several other lands in the barony of Duhallow, co. Cork, for 61 years at the rent of 10l. per annum, and a lease of 25 May, 1663, to Sir Edward Massey of the manor of Lieur alias Liex, with several other lands in the Queen's County for 99 years from Michaelmas then last at the rent of 12l. per annum, and a lease of 12 April, 1665, to Thomas Humes of the town and lands of Gurteen and other lands in the barony of Lower Ormonde, Tipperary, for 31 years at the rent of 19l. 14s. 6½d. per annum; for a grant to Sir John Temple, Solicitor-General of Ireland, in fee-simple of all the said lands and hereditaments belonging to the King, and not enclosed in the Phœnix Park and not contained in the said lease to Richard Lawrence with all the mills and weirs in Chapel Izod and the liberty of grazing six horses in the said Park, and also of all the lands contained in the above recited leases and the rents and reversion thereof, paying thereout the rents hereinafter mentioned, viz., for all the said lands at Chapel Izod, whether contained in the said lease to Richard Lawrence or not, 30l. per annum to be paid to the said James Jerome and his successors, and also paying per annum for the said premises at Chapel Izod an additional rent of 10s., for the premises contained in the lease of 24 Feb., 1662[–3], a rent of 40l., for those contained in the lease of 19 Aug., 1667, of 8l., for those contained in the lease of 25 May, 1663, of 10l., for those contained in the lease of 12 April, 1665, of 18l., with a proviso that, if the Lord Lieutenant finds that the inheritance of any of the premises has been already granted by the King or belongs to any other person, such lands shall be left out of the grant to Sir John Temple with a proportionate abatement of the rents hereinbefore directed to be reserved. [Nearly 4 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 359.]
Sept. 19.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. My occasions leading me 20 miles into the country, old men report they never knew a better harvest, and more corn of all kinds, than this was. At my return after post time, I understood the Expedition from Bantam arrived at noon yesterday, and stayed not above two hours. The captain died at St. Helena. They say the people there, who are very many more than formerly, live very plentifully. The ships are sailing. Little wind northerly. The New England ships not yet come down. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 146.]
Sept. 19.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W. The Dutch fleet I noted to stop at Cowes with the last easterly winds are sailed for Holland. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 147.]
Sept. 19. Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. Though we have not yet completely concluded on the Irish Farm, the obstructions are judged so easy to be removed that his Majesty has commanded me to write to you to provide the form of a warrant with blanks, which, as soon as the matters shall be adjusted, may be filled up and presented to him for his signature. [Precedents 1, f. 106.]
Sept. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a commission to the Earl of Athole and John, Lord Murray, his eldest son, to search for and apprehend the contraveners of the Acts of Parliament inhibiting the shooting and slaying of deer within the bounds of Athole, Strathardle, Glenshie, Glen Ilay, Rannoch, Apnadull and Weymes and Strowane, and to cause them to be tried when apprehended, and as they shall be found guilty or innocent, to cause justice to be administered upon them. [2 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 337.]
Sept. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Treasury Commissioners in Scotland for payment of 400l. sterling to Anne, Countess of Southesk. [Ibid. p. 339.]
Sept. 19.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to — Gordon of Geicht for two years. [Ibid. p. 340.]
Sept. 20.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Several ships light and loaden passed by us these two or three days. Last night and to-day is a very high westerly wind. We do not yet hear of any damage it has done. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 148.]
Sept. 20.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. Wind N.N.W. [Ibid. No. 149.]
Sept. 20.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. Pilchards are very dear, worth 4l. odd per hogshead. Not 10 hogsheads have been taken in our bay this season betwixt 16 boats. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 150.]
Sept. 20.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Giving the names of 6 vessels in the harbour to load pilchards. There is no news of the Turks on this coast of late. [Ibid. No. 151.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to a Member of Parliament. The King being firmly resolved that Parliament shall meet 13 Oct., that you may not be surprised with any contrary reports, nor be detained by the business of the sessions, which unhappily is near that time, has commanded me to give you this notice, and to desire you will not fail to be here at or before the time appointed, and I desire you will let me know as soon as you come to town, that I may acquaint the King how his commands to me have been executed. [Circular. Two copies and draft. Ibid. Nos. 152–154.]
Sept. 21. Robert Ives to James Hickes. We are all here ruined, for in two hours the whole town is burnt down to the ground, and very little goods saved. The fire began at 1 p.m. last Monday. With note by Hickes that this is from the Postmaster there. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 155.]
Sept. 21.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. These two days there have been and still continue very high blowing westerly winds. Yesterday morning a new ship of London going for Newcastle was lost a little southward of Tees mouth, the master and company all saved. [Ibid. No. 156.]
Sept. 21.
Harwich.
Thomas Langley to Williamson. Thanking him for his promised help in the damage he has sustained by the Swedes. There is in our view an English hoy with a French commission, as they say, and most, if not all, English, who has riding by him in his custody a Hamburger for London. Some say Hegisonn has bought a hoy and has left his privateer in Woodbridge Haven, some two leagues northwards of this place, and is gone.
I cannot but add the great complaint the poor soldiers make in Holland to my masters and men, more Scotch than English, who were in France in the Duke of Monmouth's regiment, and I cannot leave those poor creatures to starve, for my boat came in yesternight and had not one bit of bread left, we having so many hungry souls to feed. That you may be further satisfied with the want our poor countrymen are in, I send poor Dale's letter, who, I am informed, is very helpful, even beyond his ability. [Ibid. No. 157.] Enclosed,
Henry Dale to Thomas Langley. I am daily much oppressed by the poor English, whom you see flocking over in your packetboats for relief, and, there being no Englishman here but myself, all come to me for relief, which a greater purse than mine cannot maintain, and to case myself I hare been with some parcels of them by the burgomasters and with other parcels of them by the overseers of the poor, till I have made them all weary and have at last got this answer, that they were not obliged to maintain his Majesty's subjects, so that for my part, as they will not, so I cannot relieve them. Therefore you might do a very great deed of charity by letting Sir J. Williamson know these things, and by advising him to order somebody here to look after them, that they might be allowed something here daily from the time they come till the packet-boat goes away. This will be a very charitable work, and a very honourable act of his Majesty. If no care of these things be taken, 'twill be a great dishonour to our country. The Brill, [15]/25 Sept. [Ibid. No 157 i.]
Sept. 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last night one of our packet-boats arrived and brought over 17 soldiers, most of them of Col. Douglas' regiment from Treves, and but a few passengers, one of whom was one of his Majesty's kettle-drummers. They brought no news, only that the Prince of Orange and the French look often on one another, and that the Prince had last week offered them battle, and that his design was said to have besieged Maestricht or Liége, if the year had not been so far spent.
Yesterday and to-day have been very stormy, the wind yesterday W., to-day S.W.
I received a letter last night from Mr. Dale of the Brill, wherein he writes how hard these poor soldiers lie on him, he being the only English housekeeper there. I enclose the part of his letter concerning that affair, and the rather because he appeals to your particular charity and care, in which be pleased to afford us not only your commands, but your counsel. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 158.] Enclosed,
The said extract, being to the same effect and in places in the same words as his letter to Langley. [Ibid. No. 158 i.]
Sept. 21.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 159.]
Sept. 21.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 160.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 160 i.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir John Holmes praying his Majesty to direct the Lord Treasurer to purchase him the governorship of Hurst Castle for 500l. and to settle 10s. a day pay in lieu of the reversion of Mr. Warwick's place in the Customs. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 46.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to Richard Neville, M.P. (In the same words as Williamson's circular of the same day calendared ante, p. 302). [Precedents 1, f. 110.]
Memorandum that similar letters were sent to the following members at the same time: Sir Thomas Doleman, Sir Jonathan Trelawney, Thomas Coventry, John Birch, Arthur Spry, Sir John Brampston, Sir John Cotton, Lionel Walden, Sir Thomas Peyton, Sir John Tufton, Sir Edward Master, Sir Roger Bradshaigh, Richard, Lord Gorges, Sir G. Shakerley, Sir John Heath, — Stringer, Robert Spencer, Edward Nowell, Sir Francis Lawley, Thomas Jones, Sir Humphrey Hooke, Peregrine Palmer, Sir Francis Windham, Laurence Hyde, Thomas Knolles, Pierce Goringe. Sir Henry Puckering, Sir Francis Compton, Thomas Street, Sir John Hanmer, Sir Thomas Slingsby, Anthony Gylby, Sir Thomas Hanmer, Sir Edward Mansel. [Ibid.]
Memorandum that Mr. Secretary wrote with his own hand to these members at the same time: Thomas Cholmondeley, Sir Henry Vernon, Somerset Fox, Sir Job Charleton, Sir Philip Musgrave, and Samuel Sandys. [Ibid. f. 111.]
Memorandum that letters of the same tenor dated 30 Sept. were written to the following members: Thomas Herle, Robert Walker, Humphrey Bishop, John Strangewayes, Richard Harrison, Richard Leigh, John Mounson, George Johnson, Sir Edward Hungerford, Henry Clarke, Sir George Probert, Edward Philips, Sir John Norton, Sir John Robinson, Lawrence Hyde. [Ibid.]
Sept. 21.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a lease dated 28 Jan., 1671, to Sir Ellis Leighton, of all the houses within the precinct of the late Abbey of St. Katherine's by Waterford, and of divers lands, rectories, and tithes in the counties of Waterford, Tipperary, Kilkenny, Cork and Kerry, being all parcels of the possessions of the said Abbey, and also of the rectories and tithes of the parishes of Mothill (Mothel), Rathcormick (Rathgormuck), Meyntarge and Ballyclan in co. Waterford, parcels of the possessions of the late Abbey of Mothill, co. Waterford (except what therein is excepted), for 51 years, to commence immediately after the expiration of a lease thereof, dated 3 March, 1620, to Sir Laurence Esmond, at the yearly rents therein mentioned; for a grant to Edward Proger, Groom of the Bedchamber, in fee-simple, in consideration of his long and faithful services and of his sufferings for the King, and also of his surrender of the place of housekeeper of the palace of York, of the reversion of all the said premises contained in the said lease of 28 Jan., 1671 (except what therein is excepted), he paying thereout the several yearly rents reserved in the said lease to Sir Ellis Leighton. [Over 4 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 368.]
Sept. 22.
Whitehall.
Order in Council on the petition of Francisco Tereeso and Theodore Jacobsen, merchants in London, his Majesty's subjects, for relief, which set forth that about two years since the City of Hamburg in her way from Russia to Leghorn was cast away near Boffin in Ireland, that the petitioners being authorized thereto expended 3,650l. 7s. 3d. for salvage of the goods and in making out the propriety to be in persons in amity with his Majesty, for securing which sum the said goods were made over to them and shipped for Hamburg, to be sold there and the petitioners to be reimbursed out of the proceeds, and that the agents for merchants in Italy concerned in the said ship and goods have attached the moneys ordered for the petitioners' satisfaction: that Mr. Secretary Williamson prepare a letter for the King's signature to the Senate of Hamburg in the petitioners' behalf. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 161.]
Sept. 22. James Hickes to Williamson. Last night I received your letters and Lord O'Brien's to Mr. Warburton; the other for Sir Philip Monckton went to Doncaster and the other two into the west. This morning brings us the sad news of Northampton being burnt. The fire began betwixt 1 and 2 p.m. on Monday and burnt it down in two hours, as our postmaster writes, not the tenth part remaining as reported, but how it began not said, but utter ruin to all, little goods being saved. [Ibid. No. 162.]
Sept. 22.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning came into the Downs the John and Elizabeth ketch from Barbados. The master says that, before he came away, there were several attempts at rising by the negroes, and for example several of them have been put to death, some burnt, and others to several other deaths and punishments, and guards and watches are kept to prevent the like for the future. Wind still S.W. The Queen's frigate is going out to cruise to the Northward. [Ibid. No. 163.]
Sept. 22.
Whitehall.
The King to the Dean and Chapter of Hereford. Recommending Stephen Philips, B.D., for the place of canon residentiary, void by the death of Dr. Seddon. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 188.]
Sept. 22. Caveat entered at the Signet Office that no pardon pass for the murder of Sir Richard Sandford. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 15.]
Sept. 22.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland of the petition of Sir George Carteret praying a letter to the Lord Lieutenant and the Court of Exchequer in Ireland to give effectual order for his discharge on record from the balance of his account as Vice-Treasurer and Treasurer-at-War in Ireland, his Majesty being paid or secured for what is behind. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 46.]
Sept. 22.
Whitehall.
Pardon to William and John Cooke and John Hoskins for all offences of forgery, perjury and subornation of perjury committed by them or any of them concerning the making, publishing or witnessing of a writing purporting to be the last will of Edward Cooke, deceased. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 78.]
Sept. 22.
Whitehall.
Rules and instructions from the King for the Lord Lieutenant. 1. We declare that we will sign no letter for granting any money or lands or releasing or abating any rents or other sums due to us in Ireland, but on a petition to us, which is to be first either recommended by you, or to be transmitted to you and your opinion is to be had before any order or letter be signed thereon.
2. Afterwards such petition shall be referred to the High Treasurer of England, who is to be informed of what you shall write, either in recommending it or on its transmission to you, and his report is to be had thereon.
3. You shall give no orders on any letters for granting money or lands or releasing or abating rents in Ireland, which shall come from us in any other form, or wherein these rules shall not be observed.
4. You shall give no orders on any letters whatsoever from us for discharging any part of the revenue or for granting away any moneys till the Civil and Military List and all other sums due on the establishment be fully paid.
5. You shall give no orders on any of our letters for increasing the establishment or inserting any new sums or payments thereon till it shall appear to you that the revenue is sufficient to answer such increase.
6. Whenever there shall be any letters from us for disposing of any money to any public uses, and others at the same time for payment of any money to any particular persons, the public letters shall be obeyed and preferred before the private.
7. If the revenue shall at any time not hold out to pay the whole establishment, it shall not be applied to the payment of any pensions till the rest of the Civil and Military List be paid, and, if afterwards the same will not hold out to the payment of all the pensions, a proportionable abatement shall be made from each of them.
8. No letters or directions from us for the payment of any money shall be directed immediately to the Vice-Treasurer, but to the Chief Governor or Governors for the time being, and no payments made by him on any such letters and directions without the Chief Governor's warrant thereon shall be allowed on his accounts.
9. No patent for granting land or money, or relasing or abating rents in Ireland shall be passed in England without the Chief Governor of Ireland being first made acquainted therewith, and this rule is to be entered in the Signet Office and in other offices in England that may be concerned therein.
10. Neither you nor any other Chief Governor of Ireland shall issue any orders on any letters signed by us for granting money, lands, pensions, titles of honour, or employments in Ireland, unless they have been first entered at the Signet Office here in England, whereby the great disorder in procuring a grant for the same thing to several persons may and will be prevented. [3 pages. Two copies. S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, Nos. 182, 183.]
Sept. 22.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that Lucas, Viscount Dillon, has stated by his petition that Thomas, late Viscount Dillon, his uncle, was by the Act of Settlement provided to be restored to his ancient estate, and was restored accordingly by the Commissioners of the late Court of Claims, and that by the Act of Explanation his estate is made liable to a new quit-rent, and that on several applications by the said Thomas, Viscount Dillon, the King ordered the discharge and release of such new quit-rent, reserving only the ancient crown-rent payable 22 Oct., 1641, some of which releases and discharges passed the Privy Seal but were stopped at the Great Seal, by reason of some general obstructions, whereby the said Viscount could not have the benefit of such releases and discharges, that he soon afterwards died and was succeeded by his son, Thomas, Viscount Dillon, who also died soon afterwards without issue, whereby his honour and estate descended to the petitioner, a reference thereof to the Commissioners for Irish Affairs, who consulted Lord Ranelagh, who informed them the new quit-rent payable out of the estate so decreed to the late Viscount comes to 700l. 18s. 10½d. per annum, and that the ancient Crown and composition rent out of the said estate came to 245l. 5s. in 1641, so that the said new quit-rent exceeds it by 455l. 13s. 10½d. per annum, of which the petitioner desires to be discharged, which if granted, the present farmers are to be allowed by way of defalcation for the said remittal for 7 years 3,189l. 16s. 10d., which was reported to the King in Council 28 July last:—requiring and commanding him to cause effectual letters patent to be passed to the said Lucas, Viscount Dillon remitting and releasing to him the said 455l. 13s. 10½d. per annum of the said new quit-rent, which release is to enure from the commencement of the present farm of the revenue, reserving to the Crown 245l. 5s. out of the said estate, and that the present farmers of the Irish revenue be allowed for the same remittal by way of defalcation. [2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 341.]
Sept. 22
Whitehall
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Whereas by our declaration for the settlement of Ireland dated 30 Nov., 1660, and confirmed by the Act of Settlement, it is declared that, if any entitled to the peace thereinmentioned have obtained decrees for lands in Connaught or Clare in lieu of their former estates and have not been possessed of lands according to such decrees, if by 1 Nov., 1661, they should not be possessed of such decreed lands, they should immediately after that day be otherwise satisfied for the same, and whereas by the said declaration it is further provided that such transplanted persons as should be dispossessed of their decreed estates in Connaught or Clare by virtue of such declaration should be reprized out of other lands of equal value in the said province or county or elsewhere, before being dispossessed of their said estates, and whereas there is another clause in the said declaration that, because we are too credibly assured that in the decrees and judgments given for forfeited lands in the said province and county much injustice and fraud has been used, we shall recommend the whole review of that business to our Chief Governor and Privy Council and Commissioners or some of them, in order that whatsoever irregularity should be found in these proceedings may be rectified, and the just part thereof confirmed, and whereas in our instructions mentioned in the Act of Settlement there is another clause to the effect that such transplanted persons, who being within the rules of reprizal have been removed from the lands to which they have been transplanted without any reprize therefor first given, be forthwith reprized before all other reprizable persons, and whereas we are also informed that the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation did not proceed to the adjudication of any of the claims of the said transplanted persons according to the said clauses in our declaration, or to the settlement of any of their estates or interests, except only the interests of such Protestants who before 1 Sept., 1663, purchased lands in Connaught or Clare from the said transplanted persons, so that the estates of the said transplanted persons which continued in their own hands and were not before that day purchased by Protestants remain subject to much doubt and uncertainty, whereby the improvement of such lands has been very much hindered and such of the said transplanted persons as have been dispossessed of the lands set out to them have not been yet reprized for the same, for remedy thereof we hereby authorize and empower you to cause a commission to be issued to such commissioners as you with the advice of the Irish Privy Council shall nominate, authorizing them to be Commissioners to hear and determine the claims of all transplanted persons in the said province and county touching the decrees they had or the lands set out to them in lieu of their former estates, except only such lands as have been already disposed of by certificate of the said late Commissioners for executing the said Acts and to examine what irregularities there have been in the setting out and disposal of the said lands and to confirm the just part thereof, and to enquire of all lands forfeited to us in Connaught or Clare and to dispose of such forfeited lands as shall be in our disposal towards the satisfaction and reprizal of such transplanted interests as remain unsatisfied, and to grant certificates thereof in order to the passing of letters patent thereon in such manner as certificates were granted by the said late Commissioners, and to observe such instructions as you and the Privy Council there shall give them from time to time, and we authorize you without any further warrant to pass letters patent on the said certificates to the persons therein concerned according to such estates as shall be thereby adjudged to belong to them in such manner as letters patent have been usually passed on the said certificates of the said late Commissioners. (Power to the Commissioners to administer oaths and rules to be made about the fees to be paid them.) And, because there are no further trials of innocency to be had, and yet many transplanted persons, in whose decrees of transplantation some irregularity may probably be found, might, if it had not been for such decrees, have had their claims heard in time and their innocency declared and their old estates restored, whereas the acceptance of such decrees occasioned the postponing of their claims, and that consequently excluded them from the benefit of their innocence, therefore, if any such transplanted persons shall be found, of whose innocence by reason of their minority or absence during the late rebellion or otherwise there shall be vehement presumption, the irregularity of their decrees is not to be strictly inquired into, but they and all claiming under them are to be preserved as much as possible in the benefit of such decrees, and, if they have no lands pursuant to such decrees, they are in the first place to be provided for, so as those decrees do not contain a greater quantity of land than that to which but for such decrees they would in all probability have been restored, and such Commissioners are to be named as have no interest in any lands in Connaught or Clare purchased from or derived under transplanted persons, and they are to be restrained from purchasing directly or indirectly any estates or titles subject to their enquiry, and we recommend you to appoint such time and place for the execution of the said commission and to use such moderation in the settlement of the fees as may be most for the ease of the subject and lessening of the charges of the persons therein concerned, and, that no person be disappointed of his just satisfaction by his cause being heard too late after the whole stock of lands in Connaught and Clare be disposed of, it may be fit, before any lands be set out to any transplanted person for any deficiency or reprizals, to cause an exact survey to be made of all the lands within the extent of the commission which shall not be adjudged to the several persons in possession thereof, and shall be liable to satisfy such reprizals or deficiencies, and also a due calculation of all the just demands which are made out of that stock, and, before any distribution be made towards satisfaction of such deficiencies or reprizals, to compare both together, that so right measures may be taken in the application thereof, and such further instructions given as the nature of the affair shall require. [Nearly 4 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 348.]
Sept. 22.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for the creation of the manors of Hamilton's Hill and Tollymore in favour of Capt. William Hamilton and James Hamilton as prayed in their petition recited in the letter of 11 May, calendared ante, p. 119, with the clauses usual in letters patent for the creation of manors. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 352.]
Sept. 23.
Northampton.
Jo. Willoughby to Williamson. I presume you cannot but have heard of the fatal destruction of our poor town by the sad fire last Monday. In less than one hour it set fire on all parts of the town, and in six hours reduced the whole bulk of the town to ashes, leaving only some few houses on the outskirts standing. The whole loss is supposed to amount to some hundreds of thousands of pounds, of which you shall receive a more particular account, when the noblemen and gentlemen of the country with the magistrates of the town have taken a survey thereof, in order to which and other things they have appointed a meeting here next Saturday. In the meantime we have endeavoured to prepare inns fit to receive them and any travellers that shall come, which will be done by converting some gentlemen's houses and others into inns, which the charity and commiseration of the owners has permitted to be done, lest the want of those conveniencies should discourage all persons from repairing thither, and thereby force the inhabitants to leave the place desolate, and in danger of being out of a possibility of being ever rebuilt, which by a public assistance may yet be effected. We therefore beg you to cause to be inserted in the two next Gazettes something to the following effect:—Whereas by a late and lamentable fire last Monday, 20 Sept., the whole town of Northampton was reduced to ashes, leaving very little standing except some of the outskirts, yet these are to give notice that by converting some gentlemen's houses and others into inns there is very good accommodation for all persons who shall have occasion to come to the town and that all markets and fairs shall be kept there on the dates they used to be. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 164.]
Sept. 23.
Billing.
Dr. Lively Moody to Williamson. We are all amazed at that dreadful fire at Northampton last Monday about noon, which in a few hours consumed most of the town and All Hallows church, some of the remoter parts, which contained the gentlemen's houses, I had almost said, only remaining, for here and there and elsewhere we see a house standing and that's all. I have seen something of the ruins already, and intend to see the rest on Saturday, when there will be a meeting of the nobility and gentry to consider what's fit to be done. [Ibid. No. 165.]
Sept. 23.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last Monday we had a violent storm, wind westerly. We lost a vessel of about 160 tons on Newark, a sand off this town. Several of our fishermen we yet hear not of, whom we are afraid are lost. The same evening landed out of a packet-boat about 50 Scots that came from Treves. The convoy for the fishery are at an anchor in our road, being two small frigates and a ketch, who design to go off to the fishery to-night. A French caper of about 12 guns has been among the busses, and, it's reported, has plundered several of them, and taken out the masters. [Ibid. No. 166.]
Sept. 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday one of our packet-boats arrived, having set the mail ashore at Lowestoft with 46 soldiers out of 51 he brought out of Holland. Five poor soldiers of Douglas' regiment were landed here. The wind southerly. [Ibid., No. 167.]
Sept. 23.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. The Cleveland yacht sailed yesterday for France, and carried over Lady Goring with other ladies of quality. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 168.]
[After Sept. 23.] The Justices of the Peace for the town and University of Cambridge to the King. Petition, showing that Amy Farthing, a young maidservant, was found guilty at the sessions held there 23 Sept. on the evidence of a single witness of stealing 39s. out of her master's cupboard, and was sentenced to death, and praying for her reprieve and an order for her transportation. Signed by James Robson, Mayor, Roger Pepys, Recorder, James, Bishop of Worcester, Sir Thomas Selater, James Duport, Theophilus Dillingham and four others. [Ibid. No. 169.]
Sept. 23. Warrant for the reprieve of Richard Willson, prisoner in Newgate, condemned for a burglary, he having already discovered several malefactors in the like kind and promised to discover more. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 144.]
Sept. 23. Warrant for constituting 15 persons therein named commissioners for licensing hackney coaches. [Precedents 1, f. 106.]
Sept. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting letters patent of 27 April and 26 Aug., 1664, granting or intended to grant to Charles, Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, Earl of Falmouth, and his heirs, several forfeited lands in Ireland of the yearly value of 2,000l., paying such quit-rents for the same as are paid by Soldiers and Adventurers, after which he lost his life in an expedition by sea against the Hollanders, and that the King being pleased to continue the said advantage to his father Charles, Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, directed a clause to be inserted in the Act of Explanation enacting that he should hold and enjoy to him and his heirs all the lands and hereditaments so granted or intended to be granted to Charles, late Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, Earl of Falmouth, pursuant to which clause the said Charles, Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, exhibited his claim before the Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation for the lands in the said letters patent mentioned and obtained their certificate for holding and enjoying the same to him and his heirs under the several quit-rents in the said certificate mentioned, after which, the King, taking notice by letters patent of 19 Aug., 1667, passed under the Great Seal of England that, since the passing of the said Act of Explanation, several lands mentioned in the former letters patent of 1664 had been by the said Commissioners decreed and allowed to several other persons, who had obtained certificates and letters patent of them, by which the said former grant or intended grant became much less valuable than was expected, and being desirous as far as in him lay to confirm the estate of the said Viscount as to the remaining part of the said lands not disposed of to others by the said Commissioners, granted and confirmed to the said Viscount and his heirs all the remaining lands and hereditaments not disposed of to others and then in his possession under the yearly quit-rents payable for the said remaining lands in 1641, and at the entreaty of the said Viscount the King likewise by the letters patent of 19 Aug., 1667, granted and confirmed to Sir William Godolphin and Sidney Godolphin and their heirs in trust for the said Viscount and his heirs the new annual quit-rents and the arrears thereof payable out of all the lands and hereditaments mentioned in the said two letters of 1664, in whose hands soever the same were, and that the agents of the said Viscount, not being informed of the passing of the said letters patent in England, passed a patent of course under the Great Seal of Ireland dated 11 Sept., 1667, pursuant to the certificate of the said Commissioners wherein the former yearly quit-rents contrary to the former letters patent of 19 Aug. were reserved, which was in no ways agreeable to the intent expressed in those letters, and that thereupon some doubt has been made whether the said former quit-rents so granted away and discharged by the letters patent of 19 Aug. are not again become payable by the letters of 11 Sept., and that Sir Maurice Berkeley, now Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, son and heir of the said Charles, Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, has besought the King to continue the benefit of the said letters patent of 19 Aug. and that he might not be in danger of being prejudiced by the said letters of 11 Sept. through the mistake of his father's agents in Ireland, and that the King is satisfied that by the said letters of 11 Sept. the quit-rents so lately disposed of as aforesaid ought not to be payable otherwise than is expressed in the said letters of 19 Aug., and that by the said letters of 19 Aug. the King had covenanted to secure the benefit of the said grant to Charles, Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, and his heirs by such further letters patent as he or his heirs should desire:— Directing him pursuant to the intention expressed in the said letters of 19 Aug. to cause effectual letters patent to be passed containing a grant and release from the Crown of all right and interest in all the lands and hereditaments granted or intended to be granted by the said letters of 11 Sept., and of all the yearly quit-rents thereby reserved to the Crown and of all the arrears thereof to the said Sir Maurice Berkeley, now Viscount Fitz-Hardinge, and his heirs, reserving only to the Crown so much of the said yearly quit-rents as the yearly rent payable out of the said lands in 1641 shall appear to amount to. [Nearly 5 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 336.]
Sept. 23.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Sir Arthur Forbes of the title and dignity of a Baron and Viscount of Ireland by the title of Baron Clanehugh and Viscount Granard, to hold the same to himself and the heirs male of his body. [Ibid. p. 351.]
Sept. 24. Sir L. Jenkins to Williamson. Having been this fortnight under a domestic affliction that has not allowed him to stir from his lodgings, his poor sister-in-law that has been with him some years and taken care of his little ménage, lying in the extremity of a consumption, and waiting for these last seven or eight days for the happy moment of her change, he has sent the bearer to learn how pressing his commands may be and how long he will respite him to attend this last duty. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 170.]
Sept. 24.
London.
Sir Robert Vyner to Williamson. I have expected you with your friend, the stranger, every day this week according to promise, but hitherto in vain. You may yet make good your word and do it to-day. I'll stay till 2 or a little longer, if you'll say you'll come.
I received an order of his Majesty and the Council last night forbidding myself and the Lord Mayor for the time being to grant any passes for ships, though every little mayor or bailiff in every cagmag port in England may with consent of a small custom-house officer, which is a sign this town had no friends there, but it's no great loss. I believe I never get above 7 groats by the trade, but what I fear most is that this was done on some injurious complaint, which I would gladly have answered, for I never certified for any I was not well satisfied in, and refused divers, and I think the number amounts not to 10, and I had but a groat a piece.
The Irish letter for 3,000l. to Stratford is not done yet. I had the King's promise for it at Windsor. It's but common justice with others. If you appoint the captain that solicits you in it but one half-hour, you will be easily satisfied, and I am confident his Majesty will sign it, as he has done others of the like nature, this being the first placed in the Act. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 171.]
Sept. 24.
Tredegar.
William Morgan to Williamson. Thanking him for the great honour he has done him in letting him know the King's commands for him to attend 13 Oct. which he intends not to fail in, hoping to wait on him a day or two before, and assuring him his weak endeavours shall not be wanting that the meeting prove a successful one. [Ibid. No. 172.]
Sept. 24.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news. Wind southerly with rainy weather. [Ibid. No. 173.]
Sept. 24.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day came in the Sha[fte]sbury pink from Hudson's Bay. They carried a new governor for that new colony, but he, finding that affairs there did not please him, is returned home, and left the old governor there. The captain tells me that they found a French Jesuit there that endeavoured to convert the Indians to their religion, and to persuade them not to trade with the English, for which reason they have brought him away with them for England. Also they brought two Indians of that country, but one of them is dead, that came in this pink, but the other is in the Prince Rupert, that came from the same place, which by foul weather was separated from the pink off the Land's End. [Ibid. No. 174.]
Sept. 24.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 175.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 175i.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Capt. Izard (Izod). His Majesty, having received information of a certain privateer (as is said an Englishman, one Pawson, captain) who for some weeks past has lain lurking off that harbour under a French commission, and there committed several insolencies, contrary to the security and honour of his ports, and that particularly on the Hope of Hamburg bound from Hamburg into the river, wholly upon the account of his subjects, has commanded me to signify his pleasure to you, that upon receipt hereof, if the said privateer be found within reach of your guns, you immediately seize him, securing the captain or other officer commanding, with the said Pawson, who is said to be the owner of the vessel, and to serve as lieutenant on her, in order to a further proceeding against them, and, in case the said privateer be not within the command of the fort, but yet near at hand upon the coast, as it is supposed she will be, then his pleasure is that you assist those interested in the said Hope or whom they employ for recovering the said ship and for seizing and securing as aforesaid the privateer with her commander and other officers, in such way as they shall stand in need of. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 52.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland of the petition of Richard, Earl of Barrymore, praying to be put on the Irish establishment for satisfaction of 3,000l., due to Sir William Ryves as a fee to him as Speaker of the Irish House of Lords in the late King's time, and transferred to him by Dame Dorothy, the relict and executrix of the said Sir William, as a marriage portion to his wife, sole daughter and heiress of the said Dame Dorothy. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 47.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Patent for 14 years to William Walcot of his invention of making water corrupted fit for use and sea water fresh, clear and wholesome in large quantities. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 80.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting a grant dated 17 Dec., 1674, to the Loyal Indigent Officers of the benefit of holding and licensing all lotteries for 13 years, amongst which the Twirling Board and Indian Game are included, as declared by the Order in Council of 4 Aug. last, and that Thomas Killigrew, a Groom of the Bedchamber, had besought the King, as the reversion of the said lotteries, after the expiration of the said grant, of right belongs to him as Master of the Revels, and, as he is old and infirm and not likely to reap much benefit for himself from the said reversion, for a grant of holding and licensing all manner of lotteries from the expiration of the said term, for the term of 41 years for the benefit of himself, Charlotte, his wife, and Charles, Robert and Roger, his sons; for a grant to the said persons for holding and licensing all and all manner of lotteries for 41 years to commence from the determination of the said grant to the Loyal Indigent Officers, comprehending therein the said Twirling Board and Indian Game. [2½ pages. Precedents 1, f. 107.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Dr. Archibald Stevinston of the place of one of his Majesty's physicians in ordinary in Scotland. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 340.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to James, Marquis of Montrose, and his heirs male and assigns whatsoever of the annuity of the teinds of all his own lands. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 341.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter granting to Dame Anna Don, spouse to James, Master of Cranstoun, of an annual rent of 2,500 merks Scots out of the lands of Nether Crealling and other lands in Roxburghshire, and likewise granting to the said James in life-rent and to William Cranston, his son, and the heirs male of his body with remainders over, the lands of Nether Crealling and other lands in the said shire, on the resignation of the said James, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 342.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter granting to James Carnagie, minister at Rogertoune, and the heirs of his body with remainders over, the lands of Ardroche, and other lands in the parochine of Logie Montrose, Forfarshire; with the fishing on the water of Northesk contiguous to the said lands, on his own resignation, with a novodamus and a change of the holding from simple ward to taxt ward. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 344.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a gift of the office of Master Bower and Armourer to his Majesty in Scotland to Andrew Forrester, bower in Edinburgh, with a monthly fee of 20l. Scots and an honest stand of clothing yearly. [Docquet. Ibid. p. 346.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
Memorial of protection to Sir James Keath for 10 months. [Ibid. p. 347.]
Sept. 25.
Warwick Castle.
Lord Brooke to Williamson. Requesting him to propose to his Majesty Sir John Bowyer, of Knipersley, to be a deputy lieutenant for Staffordshire, several deputy lieutenants being dead since the first commission, he being hindered by sickness from attending his Majesty about it. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 176.]
Sept. 25.
Newbold.
Sir Philip Monckton to Williamson. When my servant gave me your letter, I was then thinking how I might wait on you on my coming to town, which I designed to be on 11 Oct., before I had your commands, but I shall do it sooner, if you signify to me your pleasure to that purpose.
You may remember that I told the House, how the design of the Long Parliament was to bring the late king into straits, and to that end they brought in the Scotch army, so I was afraid that the pressing his Majesty to recall his soldiers had something of that in it, for there was then no reason for it, for the French were not then to be feared, for they were on the defensive, and that Turenne would be worsted by the man with the hard name, as my tall neighbour, Sir Robert, called him, who endeavoured to render what I said ridicule, but for all his hard words of sound without much sense, that has proved true, as I fear you will find it true that the same spirit is on foot that was in '41, and how to obviate its designs I fear will require both your art and the industry of all his Majesty's friends.
As I had many thoughts for the service of his Majesty during his exile, so I have now of this, and should greatly fear, were it not for his fortune which has been wonderful since his escape at Worcester, which I hope will, and pray it may continue to his life's end. If at this Sessions it overcome three difficulties that occur to me, it will be most signal. The first is to remove that bone that has been thrown betwixt the two Houses, the next is to get money, and the third to preserve the Catholics from ruin, which you must do, the reason why I will tell you when I wait on you, and it must be so done as it may not seem to come from the King. An expedient may be found (I hope) for this, as well as just reason may be given for money, to the satisfaction of all that desire the peace of the nation, and continuance of his Majesty's government, which I hope may prevail, though this of money will have great opposition, and the cause of it I can tell you from the Cabal.
As for the bone, there must be a salvo found, in which all sober men may rest satisfied, that the business of the nation may not be obstructed by it, for, if at this juncture the Parliament faithfully serves the King, we may have a prospect of peace and prosperity to ourselves and posterity, if otherwise, contra. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 177.]
Sept. 25. Sir John Otway to Williamson. Acknowledging his letter and promising to observe his commands. [Ibid. No. 178.]
Sept. 25. Four lists of various members of the House of Commons, with notes against some that they would come or that they were ill, and in other cases with marks against some of probably a similar meaning. [Ibid. Nos. 179–182.]
Sept. 25.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. A packet-boat arrived yesterday morning with many poor soldiers of Douglas' regiment and little news. I question not but you will receive a good account of your commands to Capt. Izod. Wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 183.]
Sept. 25.
Landguard Fort.
Capt. Francis Izod to Williamson. On sight of his Majesty's order I sent the Hamburger and the privateer into Harwich harbour, the prize being without a penny disadvantage to the owners. The captain, one La Mott, is a prisoner in Harwich with the rest of his officers, though he stands stiffly to it that his commission is good and the Hamburger a lawful prize. [Ibid. No. 184.]
Sept. 25.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. I gave you yesterday an account of the arrival of the Sha[fte]sbury pink from Hudson's Bay, and to-day is arrived in the Downs the Prince Rupert from the same place. I was on board, and the captain tells me they were forced to winter there, and spend those provisions which they should have left there for the new governor and the men that were to stay with him, for which reason they were forced to bring them home again, and have left only four men there to keep possession of the place. I see the French Jesuit, which is a little old man, and the other Indian, that is living, is a very lusty man, which is to be presented to Prince Rupert. [Ibid. No. 185.]
Sept. 25.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Corney Frowde of the office of Weigher and Teller of the Mint for his life in reversion after Lancelot Perrott, the present holder. [Precedents 1, f. 107.]
Sept. 25.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that Sir Robert Holmes, Governor of the Isle of Wight, and Col. Edward Roscarrock have by their petition prayed a grant to them and their heirs of several forfeited lands in Galway and Mayo formerly assigned to Sir Thomas Esmond, late of Limerick, Wexford, Dame Jane, his wife, since deceased, and Laurence, their son, now Sir Laurence Esmond, in lieu of their estate in Leinster or elsewhere, and that it was thereby suggested that the said Sir Laurence was declared an innocent Papist by the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, whereby he became restored to his former estate, and a reference thereof dated 19 May last to the Lord Lieutenant, who referred to the petition and reference to Sir John Temple, Solicitor-General for Ireland, and that by his report the lands petitioned for appear to be in the King's disposal, they not appearing to him to be confirmed to anyone by the Act of Settlement or Explanation, and that he finds no inconvenience likely to arise by any grant of the premises so as the quit-rents due by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation be reserved to the Crown, and further reciting the certificate of the Deputy Surveyor-General showing in what counties and baronies the said lands lie and their denominations and the acreage of each parcel, being all in Galway and Mayo and containing in all 2,927 acres, which by three orders of the Commissioners at Loughrea dated 21 July and 29 and 31 Aug., 1657, pursuant to a decree of the Commissioners at Athlone dated 19 Jan., 1656[–7], were assigned to Sir Thomas Esmond, and being all in Galway containing 500 acres, which by order of the Commissioners at Loughrea dated 22 Aug., 1656, were assigned to the said Sir Thomas, Laurence, his son, and Dame Jane, his wife, pursuant to a decree of the Commissioners at Athlone dated 19 June, 1656, and that the said Sir Robert Holmes and Col. Roscarrock had also besought the preference of placing deficiencies on the premises and that the same may be granted to them by way of reprizal according to the intents of the Acts of Settlement and Explanation:—requiring and authorizing him to admit them to place their deficiencies accordingly, and that by way of reprizal to direct letters patent to be passed containing a grant of all the lands, &c., contained in the said certificate to the said Sir Robert Holmes and Col. Roscarrock in fee-simple or to such other person as they shall nominate as the same lands, &c., were set out for Sir Thomas Esmond, deceased, by the final settlement of Ireland in 1655 and continued to be enjoyed by him ever since till he was restored to his own estate in Leinster and Munster, reserving thereout such yearly quit-rents as of right they ought to pay. [Over 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 343.]
Sept. 26. Sir John Dawnay to Williamson. Thanking him for his letter, and, though he is in a worse condition than ever to undertake a long journey, having been so much afflicted of late with stone and gravel, yet he shall be ready to hazard all, if be can be serviceable to the King and country, and he will wait on Williamson as soon as he arrives in London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 186.]
Sept. 26.
Durham.
Sir Gilbert Gerard to Williamson. Though my affairs struggled to detain me here, my wife being come down on purpose to put an end, if possible, to some disputes between us and the late Lord of Durham's executors, I shall, according to your commands, lay aside all business here and repair to London to be there before the Parliament meets. [Ibid. No. 187.]
Sept. 26.
Rotherby.
Sir W. Hartopp to Williamson. His Majesty being resolved of our meeting on the 13th, I hope they will be firm in his honour and happiness; I am certain my vote shall ever be so. I hope to be in London the 13th and shall be very impatient till I have presented you my humble service. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 188.]
Sept. 26.
Billing Magna.
Dr. Lively Moody to Williamson. Yesterday there was a great meeting of the nobility and gentry of Northampton in the Town Hall, where the discourse was chiefly managed (so much of it as I heard) by Lord Northampton and Mr. Justice Raynsford. The latter seemed chiefly to have an eye to the poor, his Lordship to the rebuilding of the town. At last two subscriptions were agreed on, and I hear about 100l. was subscribed amongst them for the poor and 250l. for the town. They all agreed in the end, but differed in the way, and 'tis hoped at the Sessions there may be a better understanding amongst them. In the meantime the place is the saddest spectacle I ever saw; of 840 houses 'tis thought there are not 140 remaining, and the most modest estimate of the loss is 200,000l.; in two or three days they will come to particulars. Mr. Knighton, an honest apothecary, will enter on his mayoralty on Michaelmas Day; indeed his losses are great and he's much dejected, but encouraged by the gentry. They had beautified All Hallows Church, and were setting up a fair organ, but the very walls are ready to drop down. Dr. Conant's house escaped, and to-day he preaches at St. Giles'.
The enclosed is a copy of a paper sent me last night. [Ibid. No. 189.]
Proposals concerning the rebuilding of Northampton. 1. That all present relief may be sent to some select persons who will distribute it equally. Agreed. 2. That course be taken for keeping up all fairs and markets, and to publish the same. Referred to a Committee. 3. That the Sessions House, Gaol and Bridewell be forthwith built at the country's charge. Referred to the Sessions. 4. That a true estimate be made of the whole loss and of every man's in particular. Referred to the Committee and report to the Sessions. 5. That his Majesty be petitioned for his charity to the town and for a general collection. Agreed. 6. That it be considered how to bring it in at the easiest charge. Referred to the Committee and Sessions. 7. That the moneys collected be put into hands who will give an account thereof to the general sessions for the county. Agreed. 8. That an Act be obtained for compelling persons to rebuild within certain times or to sell their interest at indifferent rates to persons who will be bound to rebuild, unless they be dispensed with by the general sessions of the county. Agreed that a Bill be prepared. 9. That by that Act all persons be restrained to certain models to be allowed by Lord Northampton. Agreed. 10.By that Act disputes between landlord and tenant to be settled by arbitration. Agreed. 11. To encourage rebuilding, that endeavours be made to have all new houses exempted from public taxes for 7 years. Agreed. 12. That persons intending to rebuild give in their names and the places where they intend to rebuild to the next general County Sessions, that further encouragement may be given them. To be part of the Bill. 13. That no freeholder, who had his house burnt and has a visible estate elsewhere, shall have any of the public collection unless he will oblige himself to rebuild it. Agreed. 14. A public register be made of all lords and gentlemen that shall be grand benefactors and of their gifts, that their charity may not be forgotten. Agreed. 15. That if any foreigner desire to rebuild, and the former inhabitant or owner refuse to rebuild, such foreigner shall have the freedom of the town gratis if he desires. Agreed. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 189i.]
Sept. 26.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. A vessel arrived yesterday from the Straits says that Sir John Narbrough has fired the Tripoli ships in harbour, and that people are in great confusion. Two or three other ships from St. Tobee's (Ubes) say that no Sallee menof-war have appeared on those coasts a long time. Captain Gillham, who has been gone three years to the North West passage, arrived here last Friday and another ship. They have brought two of the natives and left three English for hostages. Last week the wind was very variable from N.W. to S.W., but it blows now fresh westerly. Our harvest has been very dry, and we have had much corn, but all yesterday it rained hard. [Ibid. No. 190.]
Sept. 26.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 191.]
Sept. 26.
Portsmouth.
Sir Anthony Deane to Williamson. Having done my errand to France, and spent the time limited me to my full satisfaction I am returned home, where I must take 12 or 14 days to complete what I have observed in my journey, which I hope is little less than a full satisfaction to what you gave me in command at my departure. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Sept. 26.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. We have had a very great storm for four or five days, so that last Friday the post could not get over at Plymouth passage, but was forced to stop till Saturday morning, and then with much ado got over. At the same time a boat at Foy was cast away and five men drowned. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 193.]
Sept. 27.
Edenhal.
Sir Philip Musgrave to Williamson. Thanking him for the continuance of his kindness to himself and his son, and supposing he may possibly see him very shortly, for, his Majesty judging he might be of some small use to him in Parliament, though conscious of his own weaknesses, he put away those thoughts. [Ibid. No. 194.]
Sept. 27.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. Last Thursday our bailiffs and justices with several others of our house, hearing Lord Paston was come into the country, having chosen him Lord High Steward of this town, waited on him to pay him their respects and to invite him to dine on Michaelmas Day with our new bailiffs, who then take place. He accepted and promised to be with them about 4 tomorrow afternoon. Here are great preparations for his reception, and, though they cannot well spare time, it being in the height of their fishing, it is believed the number that will meet him will be greater than has been at any time to wait on any person of honour whatsoever. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 195.]
Sept. 27.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. Yesterday arrived here the Sara of Weymouth and the Samuel of this port with salt in seven days from Croisic. The masters inform me that the mutineers in that province are now quite dispersed on the appearance of some of that King's forces raised for that purpose. The principal Governor, the Due de Chaulnes, is at Morlaix 1,500 strong, and has executed some of the leaders of the insurrection. His being there puts a stop to trade at present, which this town much depends on, but, what may be taken a little ill, they quarter soldiers on the English agents, house-keepers there, as well as on their own people.
There are many privateers on the French coast, both Ostenders, Biscaners, and Dutch men-of-war. With these two came out above 20 English merchantmen for these western ports, but received no prejudice by them, but some Algier men-of-war were on board some of the fleet, but did them no other hurt than as it were begging for some of their provisions. It is certainly made out that six sail of them are in the Channel.
They continue to make what votes they can and all diligence imaginable for Mr. More for Shire Knight.
I desire your pleasure that the letters and Gazettes may come to me as ordinary, which of late I have not received. [Ibid. No. 196.]
Sept. 27.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news. I forgot to mention in my last that a small vessel went out of this port last week with 32 couple of dogs in her, beagles and lurchers, from Havre for St. Sebastian, a present for the King of Spain, five men attending on the dogs in very good liveries. [Ibid. No. 197.]
Sept. 27.
Bristol.
Sir John Knight to Williamson. Having received his letter of the 25th he will according to his order hasten up to London and will attend him 7 Oct. [Ibid. No. 198.]
Sept. 27.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The wind and weather have lately been very boisterous, and have brought into this road a vessel of Barnstaple of about 40 tons which came from Newfoundland with train oil and some fish and several passengers from the fishery. They report they have had a very prosperous and profitable fishing last season, and that all things are in a thriving posture in those parts. [Ibid. No. 199.]
Sept. 27. Approbation of Sir John Bowyer of Knipersley to be a deputy lieutenant of Staffordshire. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 16.]
Sept. 27. Caveat entered at the Signet Office at Lord Rochester's desire that no grant pass of the place of lieutenant or ranger of the manor and park of Woodstock. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 15.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Christopher Musgrave, praying a grant of a lease for 31 years, in reversion afters the lease in being and such estate as the Queen shall grant by virtue of her powers, of the lands called Wolliack, parcel of the Forest of Inglewood in Cumberland, and of several parcels of lands within the Honour of Penrith, and the said forest, whereof he is already possessed for several terms of years determinable on two lives. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 47.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Thomas Armstrong and Thomas Wyndham praying to be authorized to demand and receive certain sums collected by several clerks of the peace by order of the farmers of the imposition on proceedings at law at the rate of 2s. 6d. of every victualler for every licence, which being against law remain in the said clerks' hands, and cannot be paid back again to the people nor to the farmers. [Ibid. p. 47a.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney-General of the petition of Cornifis, Count Ulfelt, praying a patent for a new invention of coaches and chariots, which cannot overturn and go much easier than those of former fashion. [Ibid. p. 48.]
Sept. 27.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Keeper to cause the Great Seal to be affixed to an instrument of even date constituting the persons therein named to be Commissioners of Appeals in cases of reprisal. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 80.]
Sept. 27.
Kinsale.
Thomas Burrowes to Williamson. My long silence has been caused by my absence in the west of Ireland, discharging some vessels I was concerned in from the Indies. Here has been nothing worth your notice. Shipping news. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 184.]
Sept. 27.
Westminster.
The King to the Auditors of the Imprest for the time being. After reciting orders of 4 Feb., 1662[–3], with commencement from 1 Jan. preceding concerning the Office of Works, in which certain allowances and entertainments are set down, with the limitation that the same should continue to the existing officers, but that their successors should not have continuance of the same without further warrant, and grants of the offices of Surveyor of the Works to Sir Christopher Wren, of Comptroller of the Works to Hugh May, of Paymaster of the Works to Philip Packer and of Master Carpenter of the Works to Richard Rider, signifying his will and pleasure that the said officers should enjoy the allowances set down in the said orders from the time of their respective entertainments entered in the books of the said office in as ample a manner as any of their predecessors. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 340.]
[Sept. ?] Richard Reeve to the King. Petition for a patent for 14 years for his invention of a new and unpractised way of casting and spreading of light by an unusual figure of foiled glass polished without grinding with pipes of glass to hold candle or lamp. At the foot,
Sept. 28.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Attorney or Solicitor General. At the side, Report by Sir Francis Winnington, Solicitor-General, in favour of granting the patent, as he cannot discover that the invention was ever found out by any before the petitioner. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 200.]
Another copy of the above reference dated 29 Sept. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 47A.]
Sept. 28. Sir Nathaniel Herne to Williamson. To-day my office expires, and to-morrow I am to treat the Lord Mayor and Lord Mayor elect and half the Aldermen and their ladies, of which I would have personally acquainted you, but yesterday I had to attend the East India sales, and to-day I was to wait at Guildhall. If you will honour us with your company, it will oblige myself and the whole society. After the ceremony at my house the Aldermen wait on the Lord Elect to his, for whom I know you have a great affection. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 201.]
Sept. 28.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. High southerly winds continue, which hinder the going forth of six vessels of this place laden with lead, butter and coals for Rotterdam and Amsterdam. [Ibid. No. 202.]
Sept. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. By a packet-boat arrived last night we had several soldiers of the disbanded at Treves, but no news either from them or the passengers. The wind is southerly. The Pearl is in the Rolling Grounds, the Suadados in Hollesley Bay. [Ibid. No. 203.]
Sept. 28.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The ship from Newfoundland reports that all ships have generally made good voyages. [Ibid. No. 204.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 204i.]
Sept. 28.
Whitehall.
On the petition of John Bond, praying a privy seal for arrears on the Marquis of Winchester's fen lands belonging to the dissolved priory of Selby for 12 years from Michaelmas, 1660, to Michaelmas, 1672, at 8l. 0s. 3d. per annum amounting to 96l. 2s., his Majesty, having long designed the petitioner a recompense besides his annuity for his pains in his discoveries about the longitude, recommends it to the Lord Treasurer to consider the petitioner's request and to give such order for his satisfaction as he shall think fit. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 48.]
Sept. 28.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a patent in Ireland for 14 years to John Gedde of his new invention for the improvement of bees by inventing such commodious hives as shall free the owners from charge and trouble and the bees from the inconvenience of swarming and many other casualties. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 347.]
[Sept. ?] Richard Blome to the King. Petition, stating that the petitioner has finished his second volume called Britannia which he has dedicated to his Majesty, that his remaining two volumes, now ready for the Press, shall contain, the first the Arts of Cosmography and Geography, being a translation from the works of the famous geographer Varenius, wherein are handled all such arts as are useful for the true knowledge of the use of the globes and other mathematical instruments, the arts of navigation, dialling, making of maps, charts, &c.; the second, geographical and hydrographical tables of the known countries in the world, with their chief cities and seaports, and for his Majesty's dominions shall be added an alphabetical account of the cities, towns, &c., as they were drawn from the maps, showing in what county and hundred they are seated, and praying, in order to the finishing of this necessary work, a licence for the importation of 8,000 reams of royal paper free from all duties of customs excise &c., or of so many reams of other paper free from the amount of the said duties on the said 8,000 reams. At the foot,
Sept. 29.
Whitehall.
Grant to the petitioner of the licence desired. [Two copies, one of the petition only. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 205.]
Sept. 29.
Wallingford House.
Charles Bertie to Williamson. I have moved the Lord Treasurer for the payment of the remainder of your order for secret intelligence, and by our reckoning find only 300l. due to you, his Lordship having directed payment of 300l. in July and 400l. more this month, so, if you send any of your servants to-morrow morning, they shall have a letter to Sir Robert Howard for payment of the remainder. [Ibid. No. 206.]
Sept. 29.
Ingestre.
Walter Chetwynd to Williamson. I received your letter to-day and nothing could keep me from obeying your commands in attending the House, but my present incapacity, for I have for some months past been so rigorously treated by the stone and strangury that I am more a prisoner than those honest gentlemen who were formerly confined to five-mile visits. I am now in the doctor's hands, and, if it please God to enable me to undertake a journey to London, I shall hasten to pay my duty to his Majesty and my country. [Ibid. No. 207.]
Sept. 29. Sir Robert Holt to Williamson. I received yours and will not fail to render an exact obedience to his Majesty's commands, and I hope that all gentlemen that have a real service for their king and country will appear, and then I doubt not it may prove a happy sessions, though, if those reports we pick up here have anything of truth in them, there is a design to make this as ineffectual as the two last sessions were; nay, 'tis believed and hoped 'twill end in a dissolution. My brother knight, Sir Harry Puckering, I hear, will not fail. Sir Clement Fisher is ill of the stone, but you need not doubt of enjoying the good company of Mr. Swinnefield (Swinfen) and Dick Hopkins. Mr. Sercheverell (Sacheverell), I hear, is coming up full charged, and will no doubt disembogue bravely. [Ibid. No. 208.]
Sept. 29.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. In my last I gave you an account that Lord Paston was invited to dine with our new bailiffs to-day. The bailiffs with the new elects, knights, justices, aldermen, and Common Council with about 150 horse met his lordship at Kester (Caistor) two miles from this. He was attended with several coaches and about 40 horse. With him were Sir William Adams, Sir Neville Cateline, Captain Cooke, Captain Herbert and several gentry that I know not, and near 20 clergymen. He was led about the town, and, as he passed the forts, he was from everyone saluted with the great guns. The like was done from the ships as he passed along the quay, the common people also bidding him welcome with their shouts. Thus he was conducted to his lodging to our new head-bailiff's, who took his place to-day, where he was treated with a noble supper, and this morning our bailiffs, justices and aldermen in their scarlet gowns, with the Common Council in their gowns, met at our Guildhall attending his lordship's coming, who no sooner came but they accompanied him to church, he going between the two bailiffs. Sermon being ended, the way being long to our other hall, where they usually go to swear the bailiffs and justices, he was forced to take his coach, and so followed close in the rear of them, the waits playing all the way, and several chambers and guns fired as they passed along. When they came to the hall, my lord sat there between the bailiffs, till they had sworn the new bailiffs, the justices and the other officers. His lordship was pleased to be made free of this town, and had his burgess letter fairly drawn and presented with it. As they came to the hall they passed in the same manner to the bailiffs' to dinner, the ships firing as his lordship passed along the quay. Nothing was wanting at dinner that town and country could afford, where his lordship and those that came with him still are, and they go not out of town till to-morrow. I am confident his lordship would have had as many meet him as there are horses in the town, had it not been for rain, and the fleet's coming in at the same time very well fished. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 209.]
Sept. 29. Estimate of the annual expense, viz,:— l.
Navy 340,000
Ordnance 60,000
Forces and Castles 212,000
Tangier 57,200
Household 107,000
Privy Purse 38,000
Works 14,000
Treasurer of the Chamber 30,000
Band of Pensioners 6,000
Stables, horses, and studs 11,500
Wardrobe 22,000
Jewel House 5,000
Ambassadors, envoys, and for presents 50,000
Robes 5,000
Management of the Excise 10,000
Salaries and fees payable at the Exchequer 81,839
Post defalcations 5,000
Interest of moneys to the Goldsmiths 70,000
Interest of other money to be daily borrowed 30,000
Liberates at the Exchequer 2,000
Tents and toils 2,000
Tower Expenses 768
Casual disbursements not proper to be under any head 15,000
Healing medals 2,000
Secretaries for intelligence 5,000
Annual payments to the Queen and his Royal Highness 36,209
Pensions of grace 145,257
[Ibid. No. 210.] 1,362,770 (sic)
Sept. 29.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir L. Jenkins. The enclosed from the Swedish Ambassador having been read to his Majesty I am commanded to transmit the whole case to you for your examination and opinion. As far as the King can judge of it, it seems but reasonable the arrest should be taken off, but the whole is remitted to you to have the case truly stated as to point of fact, and then your opinion as to what is just and fit in point of law. I am very sorry for your domestic affliction. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 54.]
Sept. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant, after reciting that numerous murders, robberies and other outrages were frequently committed in the Border Counties of Scotland and England, and that the offenders privately convey themselves from one kingdom to another, and that there is none appointed to follow them and arrest them, or, if they should be taken in one kingdom and sent and remanded in the other where the offences were committed, so much time might elapse that they might have opportunity to escape, and that by the confederacy of such offenders and their friends the truth cannot certainly be found out by the assize and jurates of each kingdom nor due punishment executed on them; for the appointment of 49 Scots lords and gentlemen and 54 English lords and gentlemen as Commissioners to pursue and arrest all such offenders within the Border Counties and places and appointing the said Commissioners or any two or more of them, of which number one is to be Scotch born and one English born, to inquire by the oaths of good and lawful men of the places wherein such offences have been committed, and to hear and determine according to the truth of the fact of all the said premises according to the laws and customs of the place where the said offences shall be committed, and the rest of the loyal subjects both in Scotland and England are to aid and assist the Commissioners, with a proviso the Scotsman taken by the Commissioners be brought to the gaol and prison of Scotland and the Englishman to the gaol of England. [7 pages. S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 347.]
Sept. 30. Monsr. van Beuningen to Williamson. Begging leave to remind him of a poor condemned prisoner, who has only the King's grace and mercy as a refuge to avoid a shameful death, which awaits him to-morrow. He has a young wife and two children. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 211.]
Sept. 30.
Landguard Fort.
Capt. Francis Izod to Williamson. I beg pardon for my last letter, being in great haste to find out some other of the privateers in Harwich. Mr. Powsson, the owner of the said privateer, meeting with better friends than ordinary, escaped to London, but the captain, Le Mott, is prisoner in Harwich, the lieutenant, Hunter, in this place. Their poverty is very great, the common fate of privateers, and who shall pay for their subsistence I cannot imagine. As to their committing hostility or affronting the port of Harwich, it is a thing I never heard of, nor can any man justly charge it. I say this only to justify the honour of the fort, rather than to excuse such a sort of men, who may be guilty of enough in other places, and as for the Hamburger, which is now safe in the merchants' possessions, he was took at sea, and driven by bad weather into this harbour, where they continued by reason of bad weather, else they had been gone for France, before I received your directions. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 212.]
Sept. 30.
Fowelscombe.
John Fowell to Williamson. I received your letter, which I am obliged both to acknowledge and obey, though, besides the indisposition which you know I am subject to, I have very justifiable excuses. [Ibid. No. 213.]
Sept. 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last, the wind keeps S.W.
Ever since you laid your commands on me, I have not only kept an account of the going and returning of every packet-boat, but also a register of all those, who deserting foreign service come over on his Majesty's benignity in them. I know not whether it is your pleasure I should continue the first; I believe it is that I should not neglect the last. I have written by this post to Sir R. Southwell, taking in the 26l. 11s. 2d., which being due to me was not paid, being part of the two first years' salary of the last Dutch war from the Sub-Commissioners of Prizes. Above 100l. is due to me from the Lords Commissioners of Prizes, as by the account now sent up to Sir Robert may appear, for since that war a year and a half's salary is increased, having the charge on me which still continues of the Flying Hart of Rotterdam, with all her lading and rigging, which, with other charges as in the account, amounts to above 112l. Your assistance for attaining some proportionable satisfaction is my humble request. [Ibid. No. 214.]
Sept. 30.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day came in the Katharine yacht bound for Dieppe, but the wind being S.W. and blowing hard keeps him here. Last night a Danish vessel that has unladen deal boards at Sandwich went out for London. A little French sloop took him and carried him for Calais. [Ibid. No. 215.]
Sept. 30.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 216.]
Sept. 30.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Brooke. Enclosing his Majesty's approbation of his nomination of Sir John Bowyer to be a deputy lieutenant of Staffordshire. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 54.]
Sept. 30. Commission to Capt. Thomas Mansfield to be major to Lord Craven's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 16.]
Sept. 30.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Edward Owen, praying a grant of the estate of David Owen, forfeited for killing Henry Farmer, of Knucking (Knockin). [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 48.]
Sept. 30.
Whitehall.
Grant to Richard and Philip Dallow of the place of ostiary or porter of the Mint in the Tower, upon the surrender of a former grant thereof dated 31 March, 1674, to Captain Gilbert Thomas and Richard Turner. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 81.]
Sept. 30. The King to James, Earl of Suffolk, Deputy Earl Marshal. Declaring the arms, crest and supporters granted to his natural son Charles Lenox, Duke of Richmond, and requiring him to cause the declaration to be registered in the College of Arms. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 81.]
Sept. 30.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a revocation of a late grant to William Young of the custody of the Palace of Hampton Court and other the offices, fees, &c., therewith granted, and for a grant thereof to the said William Young and his heirs for the lives of Barbara, Duchess of Cleveland, and of George, Earl of Northumberland, and the survivor of them. [Precedents 1, f. 109.]
Sept. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Privy Council of Scotland. We have received your letter of 3 Sept. and your letter of that date to the Duke of Lauderdale with the papers enclosed relating to the insolent carriage of Sir Patrick Home of Polwart, for which you have most justly committed him. We last night perused the narrative signed by our Chancellor, by all which we find his carriage not only insolent in affronting the Privy Council, but also of a most dangerous consequence tending to the unhinging of our government exercised by you and ushering in confusion. We well remember his factious carriage formerly on many occasions, of which most of you were witnesses, and this act of his was not only premeditate, but is also owned by him in a long petition presented to us, which we here transmit, and, seeing he judicially confessed at the bar this whole matter and takes great pains to justify it, we require you to declare him incapable of all public trust, and that he remain a prisoner in Stirling Castle, till we declare our further pleasure. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 355.]
Sept. 30.
Wallingford House.
The Earl of Danby to the King. Report on the reference dated 22 July of the petition of Capt. George Purdon, which set forth that he is seised and possessed of some lands in Munster, which were never seized or sequestered, but continued in his possession as Protestant proprietor thereof, and that he in the usurper's time was necessitated to draw out a decree of the said lands, and that he now desires to surrender them to his Majesty and obtain his letters patent thereof, that, having advised with the Lord Lieutenant, he cannot find that granting such a patent as desired will be any prejudice to his Majesty's service. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 183.]
Sept. 30. The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for swearing and admitting Sir John Cole to be a Privy Councillor in Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 379.]
[Sept. or Oct.] The nobility, gentry and body of the county of Northampton assembled at the general sessions for the said county to the King. Petition for his charity and favour towards the restoration of the town of Northampton, which has been burnt down by a late dreadful fire, the inhabitants being thereby reduced to extreme poverty, their losses amounting to above 150,000l. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 217.]
[Sept. ?]
Whitehall.
The King to Sir Edward Griffin. As Anthony Seager, one of the forty Messengers of the Chamber, resigned his place to Richard Gammon, who was admitted 1 Oct., 1673, and Seager, having had his arrears paid until his resignation, was on the cheque roll of messengers paid several years before the rest, so that Gammon cannot be paid till the others are paid up to the time when Seager was paid off, signifying his pleasure that Gammon be paid 49l. 17s. 6d. yearly till the cheque roll comes even, and he can than be put in Seager's place. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 201.]
[Sept. ?] Warrant to the Recorder and Sheriffs of London and Middlesex to insert John Daniell, Robert Broadwater, and William Windsor, condemned for picking the pocket of Thomas Dudley of 15s. 6d., into the next general pardon for Newgate convicts, without the proviso for transportation and to release them on bail. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 144.]
Sept.
Deal.
Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of the King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 373./No. Date. King's Ships. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks
218 Sept. 1 6 3 0 N.
219 " 2 6 0 2 W.
220 " 4 7 0 0 N.E.
221 " 5 7 0 3 N.E.
222 " 6 7 1 0 N.E.
223 " 7 7 0 0 N.E.
224 " 8 6 2 0 N.E.
225 " 9 7 1 0 N.E.
226 " 10 7 1 0
227 " 11 7 1 0 N.E.
228 " 12 7 0 0 S.E.
229 " 13 7 3 0 N.
230 " 14 7 2 0 N.W.
231 " 15 4 1 0
232 " 17 4 11 2 N.W.
233 " 18 5 13 4 N.W.
234 " 19 4 8 1 E.
235 " 20 4 21 0 N.W.
236 " 21 4 20 0 S.W.
237 " 22 4 34 0 S.W.
238 " 23 4 36 0 S.W.
239 " 25 3 53 1 S.W.
240 " 26 3 49 0 S'.S.W.
241 " 27 3 63 1 S.W.
242 " 28 3 65 1 S.W.
243 " 29 The same list as the 28th S.W.
244 " 30 3 65 0 S.W.