BHO

Charles II: October 1675

Pages 328-377

Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1675-6. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1907.

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October 1675

Oct. 1. Sir Thomas Clutterbuck to Williamson. Expressing his surprise at finding that his Honour has entertained so great a dissatisfaction in him, and asking him to command him to wait on him, and he shall so far depend on his own innocence as to be able fully to vindicate himself from false suggestions which anyone may have endeavoured to insinuate to his Honour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 245.]
Oct. 1.
Newcastle.
Sir Francis Anderson to Williamson. I received yours of the 21st on the 25th. At the last assizes I was called on by the Mayor and Aldermen of this place to take upon me the mayoralty for the ensuing year at Michaelmas, which I could not avoid, it being my turn. The election will be on the 4th and the great guild for that year the 11th and the proclamation for the fair the 17th, all which, with the election of the Common Council and other officers in the Corporation cannot be done without the Mayor's being present, and will detain me till the 21st, after which I shall make all the haste possible to attend his Majesty's and your commands. [Ibid. No. 246.]
Oct. 1.
Yarmouth.
Richard Bower to Williamson. I received yours concerning Mr. Watson's freedom. It must be granted by the whole assembly of the bailiffs, justices, aldermen and Common Council. I moved to our bailiffs as your request that it might be granted him. They desired me to inform you they wished there were some greater matter wherein they might serve you, and that, if you would signify your pleasure by a line or two, it should be readily complied with. Therefore, if you please to give yourself this trouble, direct it to the right worshipful Edmund Thaxter and Thomas Bradford, bailiffs of Great Yarmouth, and I shall take care to deliver it and get it done. Lord Paston went out of town yesterday afternoon extremely satisfied with his reception and entertainment, the great guns at the fort and the gates bidding him farewell. The bailiffs and justices with some others of the town waited on him two miles from the town, where they took leave of him. [Ibid. No. 247.]
Oct. 1.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The outward-bound ships now in the Downs are above 100 sail, most stout ships. The wind variable between N.W. and S., but all day little wind, southerly with great fogs. [Ibid. No. 248.]
Oct. 1.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. We have to-day advice from Exon that the weavers thereabouts, understanding that some weavers were transporting themselves for Ireland, to which purpose they had brought into the King's warehouse at Topsham several instruments to be transported with them to Ireland, went to Topsham, broke up the warehouse, and took away or destroyed those instruments. [Ibid. No. 249.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 249 i.]
Oct. 1. Caveat that no grant pass of any walks in Windsor Forest, particularly of New Lodge walk, without notice to Prince Rupert. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 16.]
Oct. 1.
Whitehall.
Proclamation. After reciting that it has been represented by the petition of Martin Stampe and proved by credible witnesses that Timothy, his brother, was in Dec., 1672, taken by a Spanish manof-war, and his ship, the Humility, and the goods therein were carried into the Havana, but the governor restored the same with a promise of satisfaction for the damages sustained and a protection against all Spanish ships, yet during her restraint a man-of-war was fitted out, commanded by Don Philip Hellen, alias Fitzgerald, the King's natural born subject, who retook the said ship within musket shot of the Castle of Havana, and afterwards tortured and murdered the said Timothy and most of his men; some they hanged till they were half dead and then cut them with their swords and afterwards hung them up again, till they were almost dead, then cut them in pieces with an axe; others had their arms cut off and were cleft down with axes, and that afterwards the said Don Philip and his company shared the said ship and goods, and that the like barbarous cruelty the said Don Philip has since exercised on others of the King's subjects, commanding the said Don Philip within six months after the publication thereof to surrender himself to one of the Secretaries of State or to the Governor of Jamaica or of some other foreign plantation to undergo such order as shall be given concerning him, and, if he fail to do so. offering a reward of 1,000 pieces of eight to any who shall apprehend him and bring him dead or alive before a Secretary of State or governor as aforesaid, and commanding all persons to be diligent to search for and apprehend him and declaring that any subject who shall thereafter conceal or harbour him shall be proceeded against with the utmost severity. [S.P. Dom., Proclamations, Vol. 3, p. 338.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 250.]
Oct. 2. Affidavit by Ippe Hillkes of Milton, Kent, Dutch hoyman, that John Martin, now prisoner in Newgate, is a Dutchman, born at a village called Terherna near Sneek in Friezland. [Ibid. No. 251.]
Oct. 2. Declaration of his Majesty's pleasure that no interest be charged on 2,000l. lent by him to Symon Smith towards empaleing the Great Park at Windsor. [Ibid. No. 252.]
Oct. 2.
St. Mary Hall. Oxford.
Dr. Christopher Wase to Williamson. He writes at the request of a neighbour, Master Shepheard, keeper of the Greyhound inn, who also holds a coffee-house in St. Mary's Lane, for which he desires the like newsletter as comes to Short's, promising to pay the usual allowance. The person is responsible and would gladly have it superscribed to Wase's chamber in St. Mary Hall and in his name, till the direct address be agreed. [Ibid. No. 253.]
Oct. 2.
Cannon Pyon.
John Barneby to Williamson. I received yours and in obedience to his Majesty's commands and your directions have taken all possible care to lay aside whatever may obstruct my attendance against the time prefixed, hoping to be somewhat sooner up than the limited day. [Ibid. No. 254.]
Oct. 2.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat is arrived and there is no news. The wind is most westerly. [Ibid. No. 255.]
Oct. 2.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About midnight the wind came up E.S.E. and this forenoon N.E. All the ships are sailed, being about 60 stout ships and as many smaller. Not a topsail gale at N.E. [Ibid. No. 256.]
Oct. 2.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Some business drew me lately into Cornwall, which was the cause you have not heard from me these three weeks. I desired a friend, if any news happened in my absence, to write it, but he has written nothing. All that happened was the coming of a Dutch fleet into Portland Road, that went thence to Cowes, from whence they were setting sail last night, as a small vessel of our town come thence informs us. What more was the coming hither of Lord Shaftesbury, Lord Ashley, and Mr. Moore, who stands in opposition to Lord Digby, but I question whether he will carry it, my Lord having had a long time before the other appeared to make his party and having got most of the gentry. The other trusts much to the commonalty, Lord Shaftesbury appearing for him. I have had no newsletter from the office these three weeks or month. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 257.]
Oct. 2.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 29th arrived the Windsor of this place from St. Malo. The master says that place is in much quietness, but at Morlaix several of the mutineers have been executed, and that a great difference happened between the Grand Provost and some of the officers of the Due de Chaulnes, which went so high as discharging of pistols and using their swords. Some killed and wounded. At Rennes they stand out so far as not to admit the Duke with any force till they have a pardon for what is past. [Ibid. No. 258.]
Oct. 2.
Bristol.
Thomas Cale to Williamson. All that offers by this is the death of Sir Thomas Geere this morning of a fever at his house at Barrow and that of Mr. Thomas Smyth, brother to Sir Hugh, at Ashton. [Ibid. No. 259.]
Oct. 2.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Mayor of Harwich. Enclosing a copy of a memorial presented by the French Minister complaining of the seizing of a French captain and his prize at Harwich, as he alleges, without any just cause, and desiring him to give his answer to it as soon as he can with a clear state of the case. [Precedents 1, f. 112.]
Oct. 3.
New Sarum.
John Stronge, town clerk, to Mr. Hewett. Requesting him to procure the insertion in the Gazette of the prefixed account. On Monday, 20 Sept., the river Avon about two miles from this was first begun to be opened in order to make it navigable from Christchurch to this city, according to an Act of Parliament. The Bishop of the diocese, accompanied by the Mayor, and diverse persons of quality passed in their coaches to the riverside followed by great numbers of horse and foot, where the Bishop dug the first spit, the Mayor and other persons of quality doing the like and giving liberally for the encouragement of the workmen, when all tokens of joy were expressed by the people. We have great hopes so good and public a work will have an answerable success, which is the less doubted as a prosperous essay and a very fair advance have already been made, and the completing thereof has been undertaken by the great care and industry of Samuel Fertre, one of his Majesty's servants. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 260.]
Oct. 3.
Preston.
Col. Richard Kirkby to Williamson. To-day I met here yours of 28 Sept., being thus far on my way towards London. On Wednesday from Wigan Sir Roger Bradshaigh, Sir John Otway, Mr. Banks and myself set forth for London. I doubt not we shall kiss your hands before the opening of the Parliament. I have had health enough to perform many troublesome journeys in the service of my sovereign and my country since my coming to these parts, the just account whereof I reserve till I see you, only telling you that, in all parts of the kingdom where I have been since I left you, I have always met with generous and loyal declarations of all duty, obedience, and affectionate well wishes to the King, as also a continual remembrance amongst your friends of your Honour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 261.]
Oct. 3.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. This morning the wind came up at East and the outward-bound fleet of about 200 sail sailed out of the Downs to their several parts. Capt. Harman in the Sapphire also sailed with the Turkey ships under his convoy, so that there only remain the Greyhound, the Hunter, and the Soldados. [Ibid. No. 262.]
Oct. 3.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 263.]
Oct. 4.
Whitehall.
Order by the Commissioners for Tangier that an extract from a letter to them dated 18/28 July, Cadiz, be communicated to the Committtee for Plantations and Trade. Prefixed,
The said extract, viz., the Spaniards do their utmost to hinder the growth of Tangier by harsh treatment of those who used to bring lime, &c., thither and lived in the opposite towns, by orders that none of the produce of Barbary be admitted into Spain, unless it has paid customs at Centa and by forbidding the landing in Spain of all English goods which have come from Tangier. Noted as received from Mr. Bridgeman 6 Oct. [Ibid. No. 264.]
Oct. 4.
Piccadilly.
Secretary Coventry to Williamson. I am informed that the establishment for Ireland is to be signed to-day and that the Lord Treasurer pretends to the counter-signing of it. I have been often assured that that has been constantly hitherto performed by the Secretary. You can best know, having all the precedents in your custody. My indisposition not permitting me to attend in person, will you inform his Majesty how the practice has constantly been, and, if it has always hitherto been performed by the Secretary, I hope he will not now take it from the office without a hearing at least. [Ibid. No. 265.]
Oct. 4.
Shotsham.
Sir William D'Oyly to Williamson. Informing him that he will give ready obedience to his Majesty's commands in Williamson's letter of the 25th. [Ibid. No. 266.]
Oct. 4.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Last night put into the Downs the Portsmouth yacht by contrary winds being bound for Ostend with the Countess of Glasscoth (? Glasgow), who being somewhat indisposed came ashore and took my house for her entertainment till the wind presents fairer for her crossing. Wind S.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 267.]
Oct. 4.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. At Spithead are two Dutch privateers which have taken a French merchantman laden with white sugar. [Ibid. No. 268.]
Oct. 4.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Yesterday came in here a small privateer of Cherbourg, which last Saturday night off Portland came near a stout ship, part of the Dutch fleet that was at the Isle of Wight, and, as they say, boarded her, but the Dutch ship presently killed eight of the Frenchmen, went aboard their frigate, threw their guns overboard, hacked their foremast but did not cut it down, took away their kettle and other things and so left them, being outward-bound. I have had no letter this day or this month from the office. [Ibid. No. 259.]
Oct. 4.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.E. [Ibid. No. 270.]
Oct. 4.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Shipping news, much of it the same as in the next letter. [Ibid. No. 271.]
Oct. 4.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Six vessels laden with pilchards for Cadiz, the Canaries and Leghorn put out of this harbour at 4 p.m. on the 1st, the wind N.E. which so continues.
The 1st came in here the Blackmore of Dartmouth from Newfoundland with six more in her company, which was separated from them, but they believe they are passed up the Channel, for they made more sail than these. They have generally made a good year of fishing, and many ships were gone for the market before they came away. A small vessel from Bayonne reports that off Rochelle they met with two French men-of-war of 50 and 80 guns, many of them brass. They took from them some lemons, but paid for them. They have given chase to several capers, but cannot come up with them. The 2nd came in the Dispatch of Leith with salt and brandy from Rochelle, which off Belle Isle met a Biscay caper that took from them two hogsheads of brandy and most of their provisions and clothes and beat the men very much. The 3rd came in here the Katharine of London from Bordeaux. She had been taken last July by two Fountera (?Fuenterrabia) capers, which carried her into St. Sebastian, and she was not cleared till 18 Sept. last. They were all kept-15 days in prison, and the master and ten of them in a dungeon. She came from thence the 25th and says the captain-general was not then gone for Madrid, being somewhat indisposed. The Costly Jewel of Dover came in here laden with wheat from Nantes, which reports that the French had stopped there an Hamburger of 200 tons. Last Saturday and Sunday came in about 30 merchantmen from France and bound for France, wind N.E. which so continues. [Ibid. No. 272.]
Oct. 4.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Arthur Magenis, praying a grant (he placing deficiencies on it) of a parcel of his ancient inheritance granted by Queen Elizabeth to his ancestors, and not granted to any of the uses of the Acts of Settlement nor contained in the Lord Lieutenant's books of concealments. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 49.]
Oct. 4.
Whitehall.
Passes for the Sieures Ducker and Bregel with their servants, &c., to come from any port of France to any port of England. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 83.]
[Oct. ?] Folliott, Viscount Powerscourt, to the King. Petition stating a former grant to the petitioner dated 15 April, 1663, of lands in co. Wicklow, from which he received no benefit, and that he has now legal debentures from Adventurers and Soldiers to the value of 5,000l. and praying a grant to place those deficiencies on such lands as he shall discover, which are liable to satisfy the same, and that he may out of such discoveries be satisfied at the Act rates for the same, and letters patent passed to him as other Adventurers and Soldiers have. At the foot,
Oct. 4.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 186.] Annexed,
The Lord Lieutenant's report in favour of granting the prayer of the petition, 7 Oct. On the back,
Further reference of the above petition and report to the Lord High Treasurer, 16 Oct., Whitehall, and his report agreeing with that of the Lord Lieutenant. 15 Nov., Wallingford House. [Ibid. No. 186 I.]
Other copies of the above references and of the Lord Lieutenant's report. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, pp. 49, 55.]
Oct. 5. Sir L. Jenkins to Williamson. I should not have sent the bearer, but have waited on you myself, had I been anything instructed in the Swedish matter of fact. They appeared before me yesterday, but each did not know (at least pretended they did not) what the other had to say. I ordered them to exhibit in writing their respective pretensions by this morning, but they did not call on me at the hour I appointed, so that I know not what is either done or intended. 'Tis possible that, since this is a cause of action arisen before their war, his Majesty may the more easily decline making a matter of state of it and leave it to his Courts of Justice. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 273.]
Oct. 5.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. To-day Mr. James Cooke was chosen Mayor for this borough. After tempestuous winds, now is fair pleasant weather. Wind southerly. [Ibid. No. 274.]
Oct. 5.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. I had a letter from the Brill, of which the abstract is as follows:—The Spaniard had retaken Augusta in Sicily from the French, and Monsr Vivonne had beheaded the governor of it. Monsr Vivonne, commanding 40 French ships near the Straits mouth, was with them returned to Toulon to refit, and then for sea again. At Nantes, Dunkirk and Havre war was proclaimed against Hamburg, but not at Paris itself. The Prince of Orange lies with his army about Hannoyt (Hainault), and the French about Sombref, two leagues from Charleroi. It is reported that the Prince's army will go into winter quarters 8 Nov. next. The Prince of Conde had laid all his horse into fresh quarters, reserving four men out of each troop for his guard, so that in a few days he will have his horse in a brave condition, and 10,000 new horse to be joined with him.
The French King is inclinable to call in his proclamation granting liberty of fishing to the subjects of the States.
Wind southerly. At 10 last Saturday morning the packet-boat was not come in, when I sealed my letter of that day, but riding abroad some miles out of town I saw her come about the fort. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 373, No. 275.]
Oct. 5.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. In my last I gave you an account of the arrival of the Portsmouth yacht with the Countess of Glasscoeth, but since I understand she is the Countess of Southesk. This morning the wind presented and she embarked for Ostend. [Ibid. No. 276.]
Oct. 5.
Plymouth.
George Dyer for his master Capt. Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind S. [Ibid. No. 277.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 277 i.]
Oct. 5.
Whitehall.
Patent for 14 years to Richard Reeves of an invention for casting and spreading of light by a new and unusual figure of foiled glass polished without grinding with pipes of glass to hold candles or lamps. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 84.]
Oct. 5. Sir Maurice Eustace to Williamson. At my last being at Court, having obliged myself to pay a sum of money to the Duchess of Cleveland, which I was unable to do till I was paid 1,750l., which by a report from the Lords of the Council here appeared due to my uncle, his Majesty graciously inclined that it should be paid out of the fund for the sea regiment, but, discoursing with Lord Arlington about it, we found that money was fully charged and no other fund was then remaining, whereupon I left the letter with Mr. Bridgeman, till some probable way might be thought of for my satisfaction. Now that the establishment is capable of enlargement by the increase of the revenue, I hope it may not be unseasonable to beg you to move his Majesty to have this inserted, or, if the establishment be made up, that you will obtain a letter with a clause to insert it on the establishment here, which will hasten payment to her Grace. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 187.]
Oct. 6. Certificates by Sir W. Peake that John and Cornelis Bart took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, Nos. 1 and 2.]
Oct. 6.
Horseheath.
Lord Alington to Williamson. Informing him that he shall not fail to be at the opening of the Parliament. [Ibid. No. 3.]
Oct. 6. William Chetwynd to Williamson. Your deputy has received more bruises by drinking your health than the Count de Vaudemont at the siege of Treves. He, fearing to be thought of the French faction, because he came sometimes to Whitehall, resolved the last campaign to renounce claret and associate himself the Mynheers' bag-rag, Moselle, Hoccomore (hockheimer) and Rheingaw. With these confederate forces he sat down before a body of men of your acquaintance, raised four batteries and played very violently into them with Romer and Ramakin. The encounter grew hot and desperate, but, though he received several shots in the face, which made their way through him, yet he was at the point of reducing and carrying the party, when a great Sir Joseph, a brimmer to your Honour (an unfortunate shot like that at Saltzbach), hit him just in the mouth. Down dropped the deputy. At first it was thought this shot had disabled him in his upper and lower tier, anglieé dashed out his teeth, but on diligent search only the end of his tongue was missing which was found next morning amongst the rubbish of his mouth, and he restored again to his utterance. This is the fruit of conversing with Rhenish to drink forsooth our secretary's health, who, I think, has got his Majesty's letters patent that none but his shall be drunk in that liquor, or those whom he shall authorize under his hand and seal. The Germans are much obliged to you for bringing their drinks so much in fashion and doubtless on the next vacancy you'll stand fair for the Electorship of Cologne. If it prove, I'll beg to be your Furstemburg, and then I shall be Prince William. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 4.]
Oct. 6.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. These two or three days several laden ships have passed by plying to the southward, the wind being much southerly, blowing hard. [Ibid. No. 5.]
Oct. 6.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. About 2 this afternoon the Maryland Merchant coming in for the Downs borrowed so much on the shore of the North Foreland, that she is grounded, it being on a dangerous place, and it is very much doubted if she will get off, but many boats are gone to her assistance. Wind W.N.W. [Ibid. No. 6.]
Oct. 6.
Whitehall.
Patent for 14 years to Goodwin Wharton of certain new inventions for buoying up of ships, and the more easy landing and lading of goods. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 83.]
Oct. 7.
Whitehall.
Order in Council. After reciting that the 1st instant the Lord Treasurer was directed to cause the Commissioners of the Customs to examine the allegations of Edward Colston and Richard Stanley touching the freedom of the Victory of London and their report dated 7 Oct., Custom House, London, that the Victory being foreign built was a prize taken in the late war and adjudged to his Majesty at Tangier, where she was bought of the Prize Commissioners for valuable consideration for the petitioners, who have expended upwards of 1,000l. in fitting and repairing her in England, and that she is now on a voyage from Lisbon to Venice and is intended thence to Zante and Cephalonia to lade currants for this port, where in strictness of law she and her lading are subject to forfeiture, the importation of commodities of the Ottoman Empire being restrained to English built shipping: that Secretary Williamson prepare a warrant for his Majesty's signature for making the said ship a free ship, to trade and enjoy all the rights, privileges and immunities of an English built ship. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 7.]
Oct. 7. Certificate by Sir John Frederick that Anthony Nyssen took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 8.]
Oct. 7.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. The wind blows a stiff westerly gale. I hope my letter of 30 Sept. came to your hands, in which I had in short represented my case which I had more amply represented to Sir R. Southwell by one of the same date. Prince Rupert's yacht, bound, it is said, for the Rhine, is here at present. Before sealing this, she was gone without the fort. [Ibid. No. 9.]
Oct. 7.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. In my last I gave you an account of the ship aground on the North Foreland, but by the favour of the weather and the assistance of men and boats, she is got off again with little damage. [Ibid. No. 10.]
Oct. 7.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last night arrived a vessel from Bilboa, which says that the Spaniard, French and Dutch capers in the Channel and Bay of Biscay plunder all Englishmen under the notion of Loonedrogers or pretended Englishmen. Several other vessels lately coming in make the same complaint. 'Tis reported by many masters of ships that those that sail from the Downs to Holland and Flanders are very ill-treated by the capers. Another great fleet is come and coming down from the Thames bound to all remote parts. It blows very hard at south-west. [Ibid. No. 11.]
Oct. 7.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind S.W. Since my last advising of two Dutch privateers surprising a French West India merchant ship homeward-bound laden with sugars, &c., they put within the Isle of Wight and tarried two or three days at anchor at Spithead, and are since sailed for Holland. [Ibid. No. 12.]
Oct. 7.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 13.]
Oct. 7.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Shipping news. [Ibid. No. 14.]
Oct. 7.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. A small vessel of this town arrived here this week informs us that the Dutch have attacked Brouage near Rochelle, and that four men-of-war of theirs were lying off Belle Isle, and upon this unexpected news, which they allege came to Bennick (? Pornic), a small port in Brittany where they were, the King's forces, that were ordered to quarter in several parts of Brittany to suppress the late rebellion, were commanded to march with all speed towards Brouage, but we are not too ready to give credit to it, it being a place of so great strength, and there being no intelligence of any considerable fleet of the Dutch in these parts. [Ibid. No. 15.]
Oct. 7. Memorandum that Lord Berkeley took leave of the King that day in order to his journey for France. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 26, f. 208.]
Oct. 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of the Earl of Orrery, praying an order to the Lord Lieutenant to place some unsatisfied debentures to the quantity of 8,000l. on such lands as he has or shall discover in Munster, &c. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 49.]
Oct. 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Marmaduke Darcy, a gentleman usher of the Privy Chamber, praying he may be placed on the Civil List for all or part of 3,000l. ordered in the late Act of Settlement. [Ibid.]
Oct. 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Sir William Talbot, Bart., desiring the quit-rents of his ancient estate. [Ibid. p. 50.]
Oct. 7.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Ellen, Lady Kinsale, desiring 337l. in behalf of her son Patrick, Lord Courcy, which was referred to the Lord Treasurer (see ante, p. 173) who has reported it was most proper to be paid out of the Irish revenue. [Ibid.]
Oct. 7. Warrant to the Lord Keeper to seal Lord Berkeley's commission to go as ambassador to France. [Precedents 1, f. 112.]
Oct. 7.
Newmarket.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant for a grant to Richard Aldworth of the offices of Craner, Wharfinger and Packer in the port of Dublin, and all and singular the bays, creeks and other places belonging thereto, to hold the same for his life from and after the determination of the interest of Thomas Tilson, the present holder. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 406.]
Oct. 8. Order by the Earl of Arlington—after reciting letters patent of Charles I., dated 23 April, 1645, Oxford, granting to William Bishop the office of serjeant-at-arms attending the Speaker in reversion after John Hunt, Michael Crage and Richard Bishope, who are all now dead—that the said William Bishop be sworn into the said place, and nomination by the said Earl of him to attend the Speaker. [Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 16.]
Oct. 8.
Worcester.
J. W. to William Berry, stationer, at the Globe between York House and the New Exchange, Strand. You may get good gain, if you get engraven a very long chimney large enough for Cardinal Wolsey's kitchen at the fullest length of a sheet of royal paper, and on several marbles or chimey pieces get the following epigrams printed fairly:—
1 The two too Long Parliaments.
Long Parliaments a curse: those took away All from the King, the people these betray.
2 The Chimney Parliament.
Ware censuring the Chimney Parliament; More prayers th'ave had, than that which was too long.
Poor cottagers do pray they may repent, And all that say not twice Amen do'em wrong.
3 Tanquam pro aris focisque fortiter dimicandum est.
Conventum hic celebrat Longum, favet ille Focali: Vendidit ille aras: vendidit hicce focos.
4 The Chimney Frame.
Search histories and chronicles before And since our Magna Charta none can name A Parliament or rump, which robbed the poor, And wronged freeholders like this chimney frame.
5 The Rump and Hearth Parliaments.
Long Parliament ends in a stinking rump, So may Hearth Parliament, for good wits jump.
6 For King and Parliament.
Some for the King, some are for Parliament; I am for both, the best of both I meant.
Good Parliaments may heal the faults of kings But a bad Parliament's the worst of things.
7 The universal Medicine for all England.
To heal all England next election thus; No Court pimp, chimney pier, nor incubus.
When you choose next, Choose by the text—Exodus xviii. v. 21.
My cousin Worden or my cousin Prick may assist you in the design and in the sale, and the last and the Latin epigram will hold out in esteem for a long age and better and better.
High shoes redeem from woodden shoes,
Else England grows too weak for ploughs,
England, stand for your juries, 'tis your right,
That lost, bid lives and liberties good night.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 17.]
Oct. 8
Stockton
Richard Potts to Williamson. High blowing winds day by day, S. and by W. [Ibid. No. 18.]
Oct. 8.
Yarmouth
Richard Bower to Williamson. To-day our head bailiff inquired if I had heard from you concerning Mr. Watson's freedom, from whom I had no sooner parted but I met Mr. Watson, who, I perceive, despaired of gaining his desires and so returned home. I understand from him he has no employment in the King's service, but only made Mr. Chiffinch and Dr. Wren his friends towards procuring the King's letter. Mr. Osborne, your servant that was and may be now, is here with the Royal Oak lottery. I have met him several times on the quay, and have invited him to my house but he never came. Our herring fishery proves the best ever known, for never was the like quantity brought into the town so soon, which will occasion many more ships to go for the Straits than formerly. I have one I design thither, which will be launched next Tuesday, of about 150 tons and 10 guns. If you would adventure this way I would spare you a part of her. [Ibid. No. 19.]
Oct. 8.
Plymouth
George Dyer for his master Captain Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [Ibid. No. 20.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 20i.]
Oct. 8.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Sir Thomas Armstrong of all offences concerning the killing of — Scroop or any other person with restitution of lands and goods. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 145.]
Oct. 8.
Whitehall
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of the Earl of Anglesey, setting forth his losses in Ireland and hard measure in the Court of Claims, and the non-payment of his pension of 600l. a year there, and praying his case may be examined with the means of relief he shall offer. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 52.]
Oct. 8.
Newcastle
Sir Francis Anderson and William Christian to Williamson. When we waited on you, some discourse was offered relating to the election of knights for Durham, and, since our coming into our county, we have fully informed ourselves of the particulars relating thereto. Three stood. Col. Tempest and Mr. Vane we find to be returned, the latter of whom within 48 hours of the election was publicly known to be dead, but was thought by many to be so before the end of the election and sealing of the indenture. Sir James Clavering, who had the best interest of the gentry with Col. Tempest, had 756 votes for him, a great number for so little a county and all of the best qualified electors. Mr. Vane had but 99 more, how well fitted to give votes we know not. The report of the county is Sir James was not well dealt with, and, had Mr. Vane lived, the election had been disputed by Sir James, but, Mr. Vane being dead, it is here the sense of most people that there will be no need of a new writ, but that the sheriff may make a return for Sir James on a motion in the House, it being a parallel case with that of Sir E. Spragg and Mr. Papillon. We hope, as you see just cause, you will assist in the coming on so good and advantageous a business to these northern countries, Sir James being as well qualified both for his Majesty's and country's service as any person whatsoever, and having, as he and we all conclude, a just right of election, he is willing to stand by that and not any other way, to give himself or his friends the trouble of attending or waiting at Committees, if he may not enjoy that kindness and favour really designed him by the country. Our great desire that those well-known as fit for his Majesty's service may be taken into the House puts us on the confidence and your Honour the trouble of this, hoping your good assistance on the motion to be made in the House may put a conclusion to the matter and thereby receive so good a member. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 21.]
Oct. 9.
Harwich
Silas Taylor to Williamson. These blustering westerly winds not only forbid the arrival of the packet-boats, but have done mischief among our trading ships. A ship of this town lately perished in her voyage to Newcastle, and another that sailed hence last Monday is believed to be lost. The Portsmouth yacht, as it's said, came into this port last Thursday at night and sailed yesterday morning. Notwithstanding the weather a very considerable fleet of laden colliers is passing by for the Thames, betwixt 40 and 50 in one body and others are coming up. [Ibid. No. 22.]
Oct. 9.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. To-day went hence for Havre a Dutch flyboat laden with masts and deals brought in as prize two years ago by a French privateer, they not daring to venture her out before.
On the disorder committed in our harbour about a month ago, the Governor of Dover Castle's officer has seized the French vessel, on pretence of piracy, supposing her to act without commission. The Governor ordered the Mayor of Rye to send him an exact account of the whole proceeding, which is done. When the matter is decided whether she be deemed forfeited or not, in the order adjudging her to the first proprietor or the Governor, I entreat there may be a clause for payment of the expenses incurred here on account of the wounded man who was brought here out of her both as to his diet and cure. He is like to recover though wounded so desperately, as one shall not often hear of. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374. No. 23.]
Oct. 9.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The 7th arrived the Concord of this place in three days from Rotterdam and the Adventure of this place in 24 hours from St. Malo. By the first we hear that the Prince of Orange's army has a great sickness and mortality amongst them and many deserters for want of pay. Their fishery from Greenland was arrived very considerable. The Dane has declared war against some of the Hanse Towns as Lübeck, Hamburg, &c. From Brittany we hear that the Duc de Chaulnes looks very diligently after the heads of the rebels, but at Rennes they would not admit his force with him into the town, but are at some terms with him. They are fitting out ships with letters of reprisal on the Hamburgers for some losses they pretend they have sustained by them. [Ibid. No. 24.]
Oct. 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir L. Jenkins. The King commands the enclosed paper sent me by M. de Ruvigny be transmitted to you for your opinion. I am not assured how the fact truly stands, so as to build your judgement upon it, but I have directed those interested in the lading of the hoy to attend you for more perfect information. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 55.]
Oct. 9.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Master of the Rolls. The day for the meeting of the Parliament being now come, his Majesty desiring much a full house this sessions has particularly commanded me to signify his pleasure, that you order your affairs so that he may have you here at the first meeting of Parliament, and to let you know he would speak with you at your first coming to town, which I am again to press you may be Tuesday night at furthest. [Ibid.]
Oct. 9. Memorandum that the King at the suit of the Duke of Ormonde has promised the parsonage of Worthin, Shropshire, in the diocese of Hereford, to Edward Jones, chaplain to his Grace, on the death of the present incumbent. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 16.]
Similar memorandum. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 25.]
Oct. 9.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Keeper and Secretary Coventry of the difference between the Earl and Countess of Lichfield and the Earl of Rochester, his Majesty having signed a warrant for a grant to Sir Walter St. John and three others of the office of Ranger of Woodstock Park, after the determination of the Earl of Rochester's estate, during the lives of the Earl and Countess of Lichfield, and also a grant to the same persons of the offices of steward and lieutenant of the manor of Woodstock, keeper of the Great Park, Ranger of the Forest, Lord Warden of the bailiwick of the Forest of Woodstock, &c., during the said lives after the determination of Lord Lovelace's estate therein, and it being desired that a caveat, put in on behalf of the Earl of Rochester, on supposition that it might prejudice his right in the rangership which he has during pleasure, might be withdrawn, as the said grant will in no manner prejudice his right. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 51.]
Oct. 9.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the Lord Treasurer's report dated 30 Sept., Wallingford House, on the reference to him of the Earl of Inchiquin's petition desiring a grant of the castle, town and lands of Kilnecarra and other lands in the barony of Barrymore, co. Cork, of which he and his father had been for several years in actual and quiet possession, which was, that, though there does not appear any particular inconvenience if his Majesty should strengthen the petitioner's title by a grant as desired, yet, that, if his Majesty be pleased to give directions to the Lord Lieutenant for passing such a grant, it may be requisite that a clause be inserted in such directions that such grant do not pass, if on further examination he should find any inconveniency in it. [Ibid. p. 52.]
Oct. 10.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Last night arrived a ship from Virginia, which came thence 28 July last. He reports of the great loss of their Indian corn and tobacco, and that their hogs and other beasts died much above the major part, and that the New England men that brought them corn and other provisions exacted very much on them. There are about 80 ships in the Downs; at least 50 under sail outward-bound. Wind variable between N. and N.W., not a topsail gale. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 26.]
Oct. 10.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. An Ostend privateer took a small French vessel laden with salt and brandy. The French master compounded with the privateer and she's brought in here. Some of the place, having advanced the sum agreed on with the privateer, for their security took the vessel and goods into their custody. [Ibid. No. 27.]
Oct. 10.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Keeper and the Lord Chief Baron of the petition of Sarah, Viscountess Castleton, representing that endeavours are made to pass a grant for three lives in reversion of the office of Remembrancer of the Exchequer, of which his Majesty granted to her late husband, Lord Fanshawe, four lives, and, Baron Bertie being made a judge, the petitioner's son, an infant, is deprived of a life, and therefore praying that any such grant may be stopped till the petitioner be heard. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 53.]
[Oct. ?] Philip Wickham, the elder, one of the sergeants at mace of the town of Cambridge, to the King. Petition, showing that his son Philip Wickham, the younger, returning on foot from London to Cambridge met one Henry Morley, and at Tottenham High Cross took a horse of John Shipman's, and rode him till within two miles of Cambridge and there they turned him up, that Morley is since fled, and that Shipman, hearing his horse was near Cambridge, came and took him out of the hands of William Butler of Barnwell, who had got him out of Trumpington pound, and Shipman had the petitioner's son apprehended and indicted for stealing the horse, and that at the last Cambridgeshire assizes he was condemned and sentenced to death, but was reprieved for a short time by Sir William Ellis, one of the Justices of assize, and praying a pardon, inasmuch as his son, till he met the said Morley, had always lived soberly and industriously.
With certificate at foot signed by 15 Justices of Cambridgeshire that the petition is in substance true. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 28.]
Oct. 11.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last Saturday, the wind being N.W., upwards of 100 sail, bound for France, went out of this harbour. Here are now Capt. Harman in the new Sefayr (Sapphire) frigate, and 23 ships for the Straits, 13 for the Canaries, 3 for Guinea and 3 for Virginia. The wind is now S. [Ibid. No. 29.]
Oct. 11.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 7th came in here the Turkey Merchant, the Levant, the Mary and Martha and the Golden Fleece with several others bound for several places in the Straits convoyed by the Sapphire. The 9th about 80 merchantmen put to sea bound for several ports in France, wind W.N.W., which so continued till this morning, when it came about to S.S.E. so it is believed they will be forced to put back. Yesterday about 30 sail were seen off this, supposed to be come out of Plymouth with the last winds, so that, if the winds hold, they will be forced to put back again. The Straits and the Canary fleet with those of Guinea, &c., are still in port. [Ibid. No. 30.]
Oct. 11.
10 p.m.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Earl of Suffolk. The King, suspecting you are too keen a jockey to leave Newmarket for the Parliament, commands me to dispatch this express to bring your proxy, which you will please sign thus in blank, though he designs it for Lord Maynard. I have sent you another blank, in case any other lord who has not yet disposed of his proxy should be with you. I know you are too full of the sports of that place to ask for news, or, if you did, there is none to send you at present. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 56.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
Pardon to Philip Wickham, junior, of Cambridge, barber, for horsestealing. Minute. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 84.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for inserting Amy Farthing, condemned at Cambridge, 23 Sept. last, for felony, in the next general pardon for transportation for the Norfolk circuit, and for respiting in the meantime the sentence of death passed upon her. [Ibid. p. 85.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for inserting John Martin, a prisoner in Newgate condemned for burglary, in the next general pardon without any condition of transportation. Minute. [Ibid.]
Oct. 11. Grant of naturalization to the Victory of London, a prize ship bought from the Commissioners for Prizes at Tangier by Edward Colston and Richard Stanley, merchants. Minute. [Ibid. p. 86.].
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to William Thomas, Clerk of the Cheque to the Band of Pensioners, of the personal estate of his kinswoman Peregrina Wingfield of Salop, forfeited by her having hanged herself last August, with a proviso that the debts due by her at her death be satisfied. [Precedents 1, f. 112.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that Daniel, Viscount Clare, had besought that the quit-rent reserved out of his lands in Limerick and Clare granted to him in feesimple by letters patent of 17 Dec., 1666, might be discharged, and that they might be charged with only the rent payable thereout in 1641, as the quit-rents according to the said letters patent are a great part of the yearly value thereof, and letters of the—day of this instant October directing a commission to be issued for remitting quit-rents due out of such coarse and barren lands, so that the total remitted should not exceed 4,000l. per annum, and that he had on the general estimate of the quit-rents fit to be remitted out of such coarse and barren lands already designed to remit to the said Viscount by reason of the coarseness and barrenness of his lands 381l. 19s. 1d. per annum out of his rent of 816l. 13s. 10½d. per annum; authorizing and requiring him to cause letters patent to be forthwith passed containing a release and discharge to the said Viscount of 736l. 13s. 10½d. per annum out of the said yearly rent of 816l. 16s. 10½d. reserved by the said letters patent, and of the said sum so to be remitted 381l. 19s. 1d. per annum is to be reckoned as part of the said sum of 4,000l. authorized to be remitted, and 354l. 14s. 9½d. per annum is to be accounted as part of the 1,000l., which by the contract with the new Farmers of the Revenue the King has reserved power to remit without any defalcation to be allowed them, and further declaring that the yearly rent of 80l. per annum so to be reserved, be reserved out of such lands as the said Viscount shall desire and not out of his whole estate, except the lands on which it shall be reserved shall be insufficient to satisfy it, in which case his whole estate shall be liable to such rent, with a proviso that no lands be charged with a greater proportion of the said yearly rent than the quit-rent that such lands would be liable to pay by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, if they were subject thereto, and further directing that, if the said Viscount desires to surrender his said letters patent, new letters patent of the lands therein contained be granted him without any fine or mention of such surrender, he paying thereout the said sum of 80l. per annum, the said releases and discharges of the present rent and the reservation of the said 80l. per annum to commence from Christmas next. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 355.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that several lands in Limerick and Clare were formerly passed in certificate by the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation to Daniel, Viscount Clare, under a great yearly quit-rent, which lands pursuant to the said certificate were afterwards passed to him by letters patent of 17 Dec., 1666, and the last letter reducing the said rent to 80l., and that there is a great arrear due from the said Viscount for the said lands since they were passed to him in certificate, which has not been remitted but is due and payable, directing him to give effectual orders for casting up and stating what rent is now due out of the said Viscount's lands from the time he was possessed thereof either by proviso in the Act of Settlement or Explanation, certificate or letters patent over and above what has been levied or received thereout, and thereupon to give effectual order to the Barons of the Exchequer to seize the said lands for the said rent and arrears, and the same being so seized to grant the same in custodium to Thomas, Earl of Sussex, to be enjoyed by him till the whole sum in arrear for the said lands be satisfied and paid, the rent to be reserved in such custodium to be 80l. per annum, with a proviso that such seizure or custodium shall not extend to any lands the rents of which have been paid to the King or the said Viscount, but the same shall be held by the respective tenants or occupiers thereof freed from such seizure and custodium, and further the Farmers of the great branches of the Revenue in Ireland and Lord Ranelagh and his partners are to be allowed such defalcations as shall be due to them respectively by reason of the discharging of the said rent and of the granting thereof to the Earl of Sussex. [Nearly 2 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 358.]
Drafts of the last two documents. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, Nos. 188, 189.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the petition of Captain George Purdon stating that he as a Protestant proprietor is and has been seised of the lands hereafter mentioned in fee, which lands were never seized nor sequestered, and that he was in the usurper's time necessitated to draw out a decree of the said lands, and praying that a surrender thereof might be accepted and a regrant thereof made to him, a reference thereof to the Earl of Danby, and his report dated 30 Sept., Wallingford House, stating that he had advised on the said petition with the Lord Lieutenant, and cannot find that granting the request will be any prejudice to the King's service, and that the petitioner very well deserves his Majesty's favour; authorizing and requiring him to accept a surrender of the said lands and to cause letters patent to be passed containing an effectual grant to the said Captain Purdon in fee simple of all the said lands now in his possession and surrendered by him, being lands particularly described lying in the parish of Abbyowny, barony of Clanwilliam, co. Limerick, and in the parishes of Tuogonela (sic) and Inishcaltra, barony of Fulloe (Tulla), co. Clare, which were decreed to him as aforesaid in the usurper's time, he paying therefor 3l. per annum over and above the yearly rent now payable. [1½ page. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 363.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting a reference to the Committee for Irish Affairs of the petition of Sir Thomas Blake concerning the granting to him of the King's title to the lands decreed to Dame Ellinor Blake, his mother, he not having received the benefit intended him by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, and their report that notice had been given to the Agent for the Adventurers to attend them, and give in his exceptions, if any, to the said petition, and, he not appearing, they find that the petitioner's mother, Dame Ellinor Blake, was adjudged an innocent Papist by the Commissioners of Claims, and that the King by letters of 20 April, 1661, directed to the then Lords Justices, ordered that, notwithstanding he had accepted lands in Connaught, the petitioner should be forthwith restored to all the lands in Ireland, whereof his father, Sir Valentine Blake, was dispossessed by the late usurped powers, and by letters of 29 June, 1661, ordered that the petitioner should be restored to his father's estate as freely and in the same manner as the Earl of Clancarty, Richard Beling and others were, which was without any previous reprisals, and that by the Act of Settlement the petitioner was to have been restored to his said father's estate, and that by order in Council of 20 July, 1665, a clause was ordered to be inserted in the Act of Explanation then under consideration to restore the petitioner to that part of his estate which was not in the hands of Adventurers or Soldiers, but that by some mistake the same was omitted, and that the lands mentioned in the said decree lie in Clare, Galway and Mayo, which were no part of the satisfaction for Soldiers and Adventurers by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation and that they were of opinion that the King might grant to the petitioner all his title to the reversion of the said lands so decreed to his said mother, he paying the usual rents for the same, which report was read and approved in Council the 5th of this instant February (sic); for a grant to the said Sir Thomas Blake and his heirs of all the lands and hereditaments to which the said Dame Ellinor Blake was adjudged an innocent Papist as aforesaid and now has in her possession, being lands particularly described in Clare, Mayo and Galway, and to which by the said several letters and orders he was to have been restored, he paying such rents and services as shall be due for the same with a saving of the interests of creditors and relations, notwithstanding the orders of 28 July last and of the 1st of this instant October for stopping all grants or any other orders or directions to the contrary. [Nearly 3 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 376.]
[Oct. ?] Note by Williamson that Lord Clare's letter was finally agreed to and Lord Barrymore's letter. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 190.]
[Oct. ?] Joan Jones, the wife of Francis Jones, a prisoner in Maidstone gaol, to the King. Petition for a free pardon to her husband, who was condemned for breaking open a house in the daytime and taking away 20s. worth of clothes, and was afterwards put into a pardon for transportation, as she, being a poor woman and having a great charge of children to provide for, must, without the help of his labour, inevitably perish through want. At the foot,
Oct. 12.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to Sir John Howell, before whom the prisoner was tried. At the side,
His report, that the prisioner with John Swanton being convicted before me (being then one of the Justices of Assize for Kent last March) for the crime above mentioned, both had judgment to be hanged, and Swanton was accordingly executed, being an old thief, but the prisoner, not having been formerly convicted of any such offence and being drawn into this by his companion's temptation, I reprieved him in order for transportation, but to make him sensible of his offence, and to deter him for the future, I caused him to be brought with his companion to the place of execution, and ordered that his companion should be executed in his sight, but ordered the sheriff to reprieve the prisoner and bring him back to Maidstone gaol, where he has remained ever since, and, if your Majesty shall have him put into a free pardon, I presume he will take heed how he falls into any such offence hereafter. 14 Dec. On the back,
Declaration by the King that he is pleased to grant the petitioner's request that her husband be inserted into the next free pardon for convicts without clause of transportation, 16 Jan., 1675–6, Whitehall. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 31.]
Oct. 12. Sir L. Jenkins to Williamson. Herewith goes my opinion on the Hamburg prizes. I cannot come up to Mr. Bankes' desire that we should contend to have the bottom free on pretence that the captor's commission was of older date than the war against Hamburg.
His Majesty by his proclamation of 8 Feb., 1667–8, has sufficiently declared that all places and tracts at sea that may be reasonably construed to be within the denomination of port, haven, road or creek, shall have the peace inviolably kept in them, but, I know not by what occasion, the word King's Chambers is not made use of there nor in any part of the proclamation. 'Tis true it is not mentioned likewise in King James'. But then I submit to what use was that solemn return made by a jury on oath in the Admiralty touching the King's Chambers which gave rise to King James' proclamation. That return, if there be any use of it on this occasion, is the first paper in your great Book of Proclamations. [Ibid. No. 32.]
Oct. 12.
Newmarket.
The Earl of Suffolk to Williamson. I received your express this morning with the proxies, before which Lord Oxford and I had ordered ours to be drawn up and sent to Lord Maynard this post. I am very glad his Majesty approves of what we desired. I beg you to let him know I can most willingly leave all things here, if I may be in any kind serviceable to him. I wish your business in Parliament may prove as pleasant to you as our innocent sports do to us here. [Ibid. No. 33.]
Oct. 12.
Newmarket.
William, Lord Crofts, to Williamson. Sending him by his messenger to the Earl of Suffolk his proxy in blank. [Ibid. No. 34.]
Oct. 12. Martin Hirst to Williamson. Reminding him to speak to Sir Charles Cotterell to move Sir Thomas Clayton, Warden of Merton, on behalf of his son, Martin Hirst, of Trinity College, who intends to stand for a fellowship at Merton at the next election, which, tis supposed, will be in next Easter term, when there will be four fellowships at least to be filled up. [Ibid. No. 35.]
Oct. 12.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Last Saturday afternoon sailed from the Tees 80 sail of this place laden with lead, butter and coals for Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Ostend and St. Valery with a fair westerly wind which still continues. [Ibid. No. 36.]
Oct. 12.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. We have had no packet-boat of late, all three are at present absent. The wind is northerly. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 37.]
Oct. 12.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. The wind came northerly last night. The Virginia, Straits and West India ships are under sail, and conclude it will veer easterly. 3 p.m. It continues northerly, very little of it. [Ibid. No. 38.]
Oct. 12.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind E.N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 39.]
Oct. 12.
Plymouth.
George Dyer for his master, Capt. Philip Lanyon, to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 40.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 40 i.]
Oct. 12.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Clerk of the Signet attending. Whereas by the late instructions of his Majesty to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland of 18 Sept. last it is declared that no patent for granting land or money or releasing or abating rents in Ireland shall be passed in England without the Chief Governor of Ireland having been first acquainted therewith, and his Majesty's pleasure is that this rule be entered in the Signet Office and in other offices here that it may concern, these are to give you notice of his Majesty's pleasure, that you may take care that nothing pass your office contrary to the said rule. With memorandum that the like was sent to the Attorney and Solicitor General of the same date. [Precedents 1, f. 114.]
Oct. 13. The Speeches of the King and the Lord Keeper to both Houses of Parliament. (Printed in Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII, pp. 4, 5.) [Printed. Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, Nos. 41, 42.]
Oct. 13. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which sufficiently appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII, pp. 5, 6. [Ibid. No. 43.]
Oct. 13, 14. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords on those days, which sufficiently appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII, pp. 5–7. [Ibid. No. 44.]
Oct. 13. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which sufficiently appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX, pp. 357, 350. [Two copies, one containing another copy of the King's speech. Ibid. Nos. 45, 46.]
Oct. 13
and Nov. 22.
Extracts from Commons' Journals of the proceedings on those days, on the first down to the beginning of the King's Speech, and on the second the whole (printed in Commons' Journals, Vol. IX, p. 357 and p. 382). Endorsed by Williamson, "Adjournments, Prorogations, House of Commons." With note by him " Whereupon Seymour, Speaker, was like to be questioned by the House for leaving the chair without a question." [Ibid. No. 47.]
[1675.]
Oct. [13/23].
Robert Wescomb to Antonio Phelippe Fernandes, merchant banker. London. I have had none from you since your first, having written several to you, which makes me suppose you approve not of what I wrote. Had I been there, I could make it appear that all I signified to you is grounded on many substantial reasons which cannot be made out by writing only to argue with you.
The galleons expected next month do not come till January or February, by reason the plate was not arrived at Panama from Lima, and this is attributed that some Indians of the Islands of Chiloe informed those of Chili that some white men inhabited in one of those islands, and they suppose them to be English, so that the merchants of Lima feared to embark their moneys. This information of the Indians the Governor of Chili communicated to the Vice-King of Lima.
These islands of Chiloe are about 60. They are 20 leagues from Baldivia towards the Straits of Magellan, and from them they have their timber for shipbuilding and many other necessaries for the trade of Chili to Lima. Though they are 60, there is but one inhabited by Spaniards, the rest with Indians, and he that is master of that island can master the trade of the South Sea from Chili to Lima. I have sent you States General's/581 declaration in the year '63, they having received the same abuses as you receive now daily. I gave it Sir W. Godolphin/260 above a year and a half ago to send it thither, that you may do as they have done, other ways you shall see daily more and more insolency used against King of England/348 for Spain/578 thinks you dare not do the least demonstration against them, and you are infinitely mistaken, for never expect any good or kindness, but such as you will force them to for fear. This is their nature and always has been. To prove it I can give you a hundred reasons, but will now mention only one. Can or could King of England/348 offend them more than they have done in the West Indies/314? What did it produce but such peace/478 as you never expected? Let King of England/348 show themselves as they ought and you shall see them immediately court and esteem you, and this can be done very moderately without any breach of peace/478, mentioning in your declaration those articles that justify your proceedings. This is the only way, if you think to get any reason from Spain/578.
Don Juan d'Austria goes at Longronny (? Logrono) to Italy, for his train marches to Barcelona, where he himself is expected by 8 Nov. What money he desires is sent him, and the Dutch men-ofwar are expected there daily, they having left Cadiz, only they delay in their voyage three months, as they did from the Texel to Cadiz. The Marquis de Leiha goes also to Rome, on which journey he is these 14 months, using all the art he could to lay aside that embassy to remain in the Court. But all could not do, he having many wishing him there hence. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 48.]
Oct. 13.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Attorney-General. Reminding him of the signification he gave him yesterday of his Majesty's pleasure in the case of Mr. Humphreys, one of the criminals in the weavers' business, that he should be freed from any further prosecution in the same manner the rest of his brethren had been. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 57.]
Oct. 14. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which sufficiently appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII. p. 7. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 49.]
[Oct. ?] Thomas Williams, citizen and goldsmith of London, to the King. Petition stating that the petitioner has for four years used the trade of a goldsmith banker in Lombard Street, and has been accustomed to advance money on tallies and orders on the revenues, that by reason of the necessary attendance and expense for receiving money out of the Exchequer, he could not value such tallies and orders at their proper sums, but with the allowance of the assignors has had a rebate proportionate to his trouble and expense, and, lest he may be thereby subject to the penalties in the statutes against usury, praying a pardon of all usury and usurious contracts. With certificate at foot by Edward Backwell and Jeremiah Snow that they know the petitioner to be a very fair dealer in the trade of a goldsmith-banker. [Ibid. No. 50.]
Oct. 14.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats arrived to-day. The master says the wind has been so contrary that he was forced back last week, and came away again last Sunday with two mails, and has been making his way ever since. They bring over no news. Wind for the most part W.N.W. [Ibid. No. 51.]
Oct. 14.
Harwich.
Capt. Thomas Langley to Williamson. Having several times experienced your kindness emboldens me to beg a further one about my damage lately suffered by the Swedes on their own coast to the value of 683l. The bearer can give you the full relation, having the several affidavits of the whole action, so, if you will favour me with your letter to the envoy in Swedland or with what else you shall think requisite, it will ever oblige me. [Ibid. No. 52.]
Oct. 14.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. No news. [Ibid. No. 53.]
Oct. 14.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind S.W. [Ibid. No. 54.]
Oct. 14.
Whitehall.
The King to the Minister, Elders and Deacons of the French congregation in London. Confirming on their petitition their choice of Peter Mussart, a person of ability and good conversation, as one of their ministers. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 76.]
Oct. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a pardon to Thomas Morris and Thomas Williams, goldsmiths, of Lombard Street, London, for all usury or usurious contracts, &c., and all penalties and forfeitures already incurred by reason thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 28, f. 145.]
Oct. 14.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Charles, Earl of Middlesex, and Thomas Felton, praying that a grant may be ordered to be passed under the Great Seal of Ireland to them and the survivor of them of a pension of 800l. per annum to commence after the expiration of Sir John Hanmer's pension of 800l. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 54.]
Oct. 14.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster of the petition of William Coryton, praying a lease of the chief rents of the manor of High Easter, Essex, parcel of the Duchy, amounting to 85l. per annum, for 50 years at some small rent. [Ibid.]
Oct. 14.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to William Watts for his life of the place of Tailor to the King in ordinary for his life, in the room of Claude Sourceau, deceased, for making all kinds of apparel for the servants of the Privy Chamber and footmen, the henchmen, the children of the Chapel Royal, Grooms of the Stables, Trumpets and Drummers, which they have of the King's gift, fee 2s. per diem, as likewise of Tailor for making of all kinds of apparel for the Yeomen of the Guard, the coachmen and littermen which they have of the King's gift, fee 1s. per diem. [Precedents 1, f. 115.]
Oct. 15.
Plymouth.
George Dyer to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Wind N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 55.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 55i.]
Oct. 15.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the petition of Sir Robert Vyner, Lord Mayor of London, praying a remission to him of the profits and issues of the offices of escheator and gauger for the year of his mayoralty. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 56.]
Oct. 15.
Spring Garden.
Sir Robert Southwell to Sir John Temple. The Lord Lieutenant being yesternight at the Irish Committee, I desired him to name what additional rent might be proper to add to Capt. Purdon's renewal of his grant, for the Secretary desired me to know of him how the blank should be filled up. The Lord Lieutenant then desired me to consult you for the rule, which as you settle shall be intimated to him. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 191.]
Oct. 15. Sir Robert Southwell to W. Bridgeman. Returning him Capt. Purdon's letter for filling up the blank according to what Sir John Temple proposes. [Ibid. No. 192.]
Oct. 16.
Jesus College, Cambridge.
Dr. Edmund Boldero to Williamson. In answer to yours of the 4th the reason that I did not sooner write to you nor the University presently obey his Majesty's letter in the way required was that they had a gracious liberty to refuse whatever letters should pretend to dispense with exercises or cautions, and they refused the longer lest this might be an ill example hereafter. But, because you particularly interpose, on whom they rely that nothing of this kind be brought into a precedent for the future, I will take the most effectual care I can that both degrees be conferred, and, if anything happen in it otherwise than you expect, you shall speedily have an account and know it does not rest on me. For the Bachelor in Divinity there must be a proxy from himself that another may be admitted for him. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 56.]
Oct. 16.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. We have no news, no packet-boat having arrived since my last. The wind is still westerly and has all this night blown a very fret and so continues. I presume you have had a fuller account of the tumult this week at Colchester than I have been able to get. I have received nothing but uncertainties and contradictions about it. I hear nothing to the contrary but that it is appeased. Postscript.—I received a very acceptable letter last night from Sir R. Southwell. I have nothing but my thanks to present to you also for that. Before sending this one of the packet-boats arrived. She has been ever since Wednesday coming. They bring no news. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 57.]
Oct. 16.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Last night the Portsmouth yacht came into the Downs and sailed for France this morning. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 58.]
Oct. 16.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Yesterday the Prosperous arrived here, which brings no welcome news from the garrison of Tangier. A copy is enclosed, which the commander of the Prosperous says came from the Governor, Lord Inchiquin. [Ibid. No. 59.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 59i.]
Oct. 16.
Swansea.
John Man to Williamson. The Weekly Letter and Gazettes have not come to my hands this month. All things in these parts are in quiet but very small trade in regard of the late bad weather. I hear of no considerable wrecks, only a small loaden collier of Barnstaple was cast away last week near this. [Ibid. No. 60.]
Oct. 16.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Recorder of London. Signifying his Majesty's pleasure that the murderers of Sir Richard Sandford, who stand convicted before him, be, for the exemplarity of the thing and the terror of the rest of their fraternity (which, it seems, is grown very great and presumptuous) executed in Fleet Street over against Whitefriars, where they committed the murder, on two gibbets, and there hung up in chains in some fit place abroad in the highway. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 56.]
Oct. 16.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to Gervas Price of the office of Gentleman of the Bows, for his life, with the yearly fee of 58l. 5s., Lodowick Carlile, the late Gentleman, being now dead. [Precedents 1, f. 114.]
Oct. 17.
Billing.
Dr. Lively Moody to Williamson. By a letter from Mr. Say I understand that the rector of Collyweston near Stamford is dying, and that the living is in the King's gift. He desired me to solicit you in his behalf. He comports himself well in his present mean capacity and you have several times mentioned him to me. 'Twould be a great act of charity in you to let it go that way. Some have asked why I do not put in for myself, being 'tis consistent with this living, where I have well near ruined myself. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 61.]
Oct. 17.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 62.]
Oct. 18. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 358, 359. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 63. 64.]
Oct. 18. Dr. Bréval to Williamson. All the formalities of my Doctor's degree, about which there has been so much delay, were performed at the last Act at Cambridge by the care of Dr. Turner, to whom you recommended the business, for which I am bound to pay you my thanks. The expenses being only 6 or 7 pieces, I have not thought fit to ask your assistance for such a trifle. The hope you have given me of the prebend at Westminster makes me spare you in everything else. However, as this is uncertain or at any rate very remote, and other benefices snitable for me may perhaps become vacant previously, I beg you to procure me one, and to remember always that having made me a doctor you are under a kind of obligation to provide for me, so that I should not disgrace that title. [French. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 65.]
Oct. 18.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. Last Saturday came into the bay 10 light ships, and four of this town are come into this harbour to lay up. Several others are laid up already. Yesterday morning came into this harbour a master and four seamen of Scarborough. Last Friday their vessel foundered to the northward of that town, and miraculously they saved themselves in their boat, having only one oar, which they sculled with. On Saturday morning they spied Flamborough Head 4 or 5 leagues off, and that night got near the shore 10 miles southwards of this, and made for this harbour where they arrived safely, having no provision at all when they left their ship. They were put from their vessel without any oar, but one of their oars followed the boat, which they took up. A handspike and a piece of canvas stood them in good stead sometimes for a sail, the wind shifting from S.W. to N., for otherwise it had been impossible but they had been quite driven off to sea and so all lost. [Ibid. No. 66.]
Oct. 18.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. About 10 last night the wind veered to N. and by E. The great Straits, Virginia, and West India men, who went out last Wednesday and next morning returned, sailed about 2 this morning having a topsail gale, so that now all the merchant ships outward-bound are sailed and the wind like to stand. [Ibid. No. 67.]
Oct. 18.
Dorchester.
Richard Biles to Williamson. Mr. Osborne of our town coming not hither to-day desired me to give you an account of what falls out as to the election of our new knight in place of Col. Giles Strangewayes. Lord Digby is at present in the field with his party, supposed to be by far the prevailing party. It's said at 2 Mr. Moore will go forth to him and begin to poll. [Ibid. No. 68.]
Oct. 18.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. Last week came in here about 40 small vessels, most of them bound for Bordeaux and sailed hence yesterday for France, and the Canary fleet also sailed yesterday. As I am writing, the Straits fleet are under sail with their convoy, the Sapphire, the wind being now N.E., so it will make a clear harbour. [Ibid. No. 69.]
Oct. 18.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. Shipping news to the same effect as the last. [Ibid. No. 70.]
[Oct. 18 ?] Bill for the better prevention of illegal exaction of money from the subject. (This must be the bill brought in 18 Oct., 1675 (see Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 359) as there is a clause about persons who do certain things after 29 Sept., 1676.) [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 71.]
Oct. 19. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 359. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 72, 73.]
Oct. 19. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 8. [Three copies. Ibid. Nos. 74–76.]
Oct. 19—Nov. 20. Extracts from the Journals of both Houses concerning appeals depending in the House of Lords from Courts of Equity, &c. Those in the Commons fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX. Those in the Lords fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 77, 78.]
[Before Oct. 19.] Notice to Williamson of a Court of Assistants of the Royal Company to meet at the African House at 3 p.m. on 19 Oct. [Printed. Ibid. No. 79.]
Oct. 19.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. No news but the continuance of fair weather. Wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 80.]
Oct. 19.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. No packet-boat has arrived since my last. I return my thanks for the printed speeches. Wind N.W., fresh. [Ibid. No. 81.]
Oct. 19.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. The Smyrna and Straits fleet convoyed by the Sapphire sailed at Falmouth yesterday morning with a fair wind for the southward. [Ibid. No. 82.]
Oct. 19.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a bill constituting Sir Robert Howard Keeper of the Game in the grounds and woods in and about the manor of Oatlands, Surrey, that is to say from Weybridge to Byfleet Bridge, from thence to Cobham Bridge, from thence to Esher Bridge, from thence to Mosley, from thence to Thames side, from thence to Shepperton Ferry, and from thence to Weybridge, for his life with the fee of 12d. per diem., and 26s. 8d. yearly for a livery. [Precedents 1, f. 116.]
Oct.
Before the 20th. Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting that Katherine Dowdall and her sons, Edward and Henry, by decree dated 4 Aug., 1663, of the Commissioners for executing the Act of Settlement, were adjudged innocent Papists and were thereby restored to the manor, town and lands of Brownstowne and the town and lands of Kelloge in the barony of Duleek, Meath, to be held by the said Katherine for her life, and after her decease by the said Edward and the heirs male of his body with remainder to the said Henry in tail male, and that, the said Katherine being since married to Dr. Laurence Taaff, the said Laurence and Katherine have besought a grant of letters patent for the said lands to them and to the said Edward and Henry Dowdall, according to the estates so decreed to them; in case he finds that the said Laurence Taaff and his wife by themselves or their tenants are now in possession of the said lands, for a grant to the said Laurence and Katherine Taaff and Edward and Henry Dowdall of the said lands, &c. of Brownstown and Kelloge to hold the same to the said Laurence Taaff and Katherine, his wife, during the life of the said Katherine with remainder to the said Edward Dowdall in tail male with remainder to the said Henry Dowdall in tail male, paying such yearly rents as the lands possessed by Adventurers and Soldiers in the province where they lie are liable to by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation. [The day of the month is left blank, but the warrant was entered 20 Oct. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 365.]
Oct. 20. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 9, and the Ninth Report of the Historical MSS. Commission, Appendix, p. 57. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, Nos. 83, 84.]
Oct. 20. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 360. [Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 85, 86.]
Oct. 20. Notes of the proceedings in both Houses that day, which fully appear as above. [Ibid. No. 87.]
Oct. 20.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. Last Monday the poll began and ended yesterday, Lord Digby carrying it against Mr. Moore. [Ibid. No. 88.]
Oct. 20.
Lyme.
Anthony Thorold to Williamson. The great appearance and number of voices for Lord Digby so far exceeding Mr. More's, notwithstanding Lord Ashley's interest, as 1,700 and upwards for my Lord, and but 520 for Mr. More on a poll concluded yesterday at Dorchester, my Lord by the sheriff was proclaimed shire knight. This is much to the trouble of the Nonconformist party in this county, who were very confident of their strength for Mr. More.
These late northerly winds have carried most of our ships to sea. I thank you for the King's speech and letters which are most acceptable during the session. [Ibid. No. 89.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
Commission for Charles Churchill to be lieutenant in Capt. Cutler's company of foot in the Duke of York's regiment. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, f. 140.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
Warrant for Charles Churchill, lieutenant to Capt. James Graham's company in the Duke of York's regiment, with his servant as a soldier to be passed in the ensuing musters till further order. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 18.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Charles, Earl of Mountrath, by his guardian, Alice, Countess Dowager of Mountrath, praying that an intended grant of his quit-rents to Col. Fitzpatrick may be countermanded, and that they may be granted and released to him and his heirs, amounting to about 200l. per annum. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 57.]
Oct. 20. The King to James, Earl of Suffolk, Deputy Earl Marshal. Declaring the arms, crest, and supporters granted to his natural son, Charles Fitz-Charles, Earl of Plymouth, and requiring him to cause the declaration to be registered in the College of Arms. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 86.]
Copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 90.]
Oct. 20. Report by the Lord Lieutenant on the petition of the Earl of Middlesex and Thomas Felton referred to him 14 Oct. (see ante, p. 351) that his Majesty by letters patent of 23 Dec. last granted to Sir John Hammer a pension of 800l. a year for 3 years, to be paid out of the Irish revenue, and by letters of 9 March last authorized the Lord Lieutenant to pass letters patent granting to the petitioners and the survivor of them the said pension to commence from the expiration of the said grant to Sir J. Hammer, which letters being defective in form letters patents could not be passed on them. If his Majesty continues inclined to gratify the petitioners, it is necessary that new letters be signed pursuant to the late instructions concerning grants of money or lands in Ireland for passing such a grant as aforesaid. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 193.]
Another copy thereof. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 57.]
Oct. 20.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Lieutenant. Warrant, after reciting the warrant dated 8 Nov., 1672, for the grant of a pension of 100l. per annum to Capt. John Cassells and Rose, his wife, for their joint lives and the life of the survivor (calendared in S.P. Dom., 1672–73, p. 140), which grant was accordingly passed, in consideration that Capt. John Cassells was slain in the king's service at sea, for a new grant of a pension of 200l. per annum to the said Rose, his widow, for her life in lieu of the former pension. [S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 366.]
Oct. 21. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 361. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, Nos. 91, 92.]
Oct. 21.
Wallingford House.
Report by the Lord Treasurer on the reference of the petition of William Denny, rector of East Harling, Norfolk, that he had seen a certificate under the hands of the Chancellor of the diocese, the Archdeacon, and two Doctors of Divinity that the parsonage of East Harling is in a very unhealthy place, and that Mr. Denny for that reason obtained a dispensation for non-residence and lived within a mile and performed his duty as minister, notwithstanding which a troublesome person has sued him on the statute of non-residence and recovered 80l., whereof a moiety belongs to his Majesty, by remission whereof he would do a gracious and charitable act. [Ibid. No. 93.]
[Oct. ?] Lord Berkeley of Stratton to the King. Petition stating that he has served the Royal family for about 50 years in consideration whereof the Mastership of the Court of Wards was conferred on him by the late King, which grant was confirmed by his Majesty, that he received no compensation on the abolition of the Court of Wards, that in the beginning of the Long Parliament he laid the design of reducing the Army in the North to their obedience and drew the petition or remonstrance declaring their full obedience to his Majesty, for which he was first forced to fly, and afterwards put into the Tower, and had an office in the Common Pleas he had purchased worth 1,000l. per annum taken from him and so detained for 20 years, and he was the only man in the army that lost his arrears amounting to 1,500l., that, whilst he was Governor of Exeter, he lent his Majesty and his father 10,000l. and supported her Royal Highness and her numerous family there, and made her escape into France at his own charge, that since the restoration he has paid many debts for clothing the army amounting to at least 800l., that in 1667, when the Dutch fleet came to Chatham and their forces landed in Suffolk, he was employed in that service at his own charge amounting to 1,000l., that his office in the Tower and his troop of horse in Ireland were discharged without the same consideration to him as others had, and that, when the Presidencies of Munster and Connaught were abolished, Lord Orrery had consideration for his, but the petitioner had not, and praying that his pension of 1,200l. per annum in Ireland might continue for his wife's life and that it and the arrears thereof might be put on the present Irish establishment. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 94.]
Oct. 21.
Whitehall.
Reference thereof to the Lord Lieutenant. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 56.]
Oct. 21.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Most of the news from Holland by a packet-boat which arrived yesterday we had again at night by the printed Gazette, except the enclosed little or nothing sent me out of Holland dated the 26th N.S. The wind continues N.W. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 95.] Enclosed,
We say in order to a peace the mediators have made these propositions:—1. That the French shall restore to Spain Limburg and all its dependencies; 2, and Macstricht to the States. 3. That there shall be given by France a sovereignty to Lottharing (Lorraine). 4. That France shall pay the Prince Palatine four millions of money for his damages received in the present war. These and many more such impertinent demands are too troublesome to relate. The French army on this and the Spanish borders are in a better condition than some will have it, for, it seems, they are resolved to see both the Spanish and the Prince of Orange's armies in garrison before themselves. From Paris the 18th 'tis said the French King is indisposed by an ague. The Spanish and Dutch forces lie encamped, as they say securely, between Diest, Louen (Lourain) and Thienen, but yet not so hard to be attempted, but that the French, especially Marshal Montmoreney, have made divers bridges over the Mehaiguel and have sent forward 1,500 horse, intending to secure those passages and then to march up with his gross to attack them. The Prince of Orange was expected at the Hague last Tuesday, and for his reception the 12 companies of the train bands were in their arms from 4 in the morning till almost night, but he is not come yet. [Extract. Ibid. No. 95i.]
Oct. 21.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. The wind being S.W. several ships from the westward are come into the Downs. Two Dutch men-of-war have brought in a French privateer, which they took off Dungeness by the advice of two Englishmen which the said privateer had plundered the day before. The Kitchen yacht passed through the Downs from France and is gone up the river. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 96.]
Oct. 21.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. No news. [Ibid. No. 97.]
Oct. 21.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. The master of a small vessel from Morlaix reports that the Governor of Brittany was about a fortnight since with his army in and about Morlaix, about 30,000, besides 10,000 of the country that came in to his assistance, and being in the town the new comers, on the firing of a pistol thought they had been betrayed, and some began to draw for their defence, and at last fell to such fury, doubting they had been betrayed by each other, that many were destroyed, before they could understand each other. They apprehended about 15 of the old mutineers with whom they dealt very severely, breaking their arms and thighs with a sledge and after gave them another blow over the breast and then hanged them and afterwards carried them to the crossways and there hung them up in chains. Wind N.W. [Ibid. No. 98.]
Oct. 21.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to James Hickes. Giving the same news as the last. [Ibid. No. 99.]
Oct. 21.
Falmouth.
Thomas Holden to Williamson. The 19th came in here the Charity of Newhaven from the Bank homeward-bound. They report they have made generally a good fishing year. The same day came in the Dolphin of Havre of 26 guns in 8 weeks from Hispaniola loaden with tobacco. She has been out of France about nine months and has been cruising all along the coast of Guinea. Last night came in here 8 English merchantmen for Virginia, Barbados and Lisbon. [Ibid. No. 100.]
[Oct. 21?]
Plymouth.
List of ships arrived on 20 and 21 Oct. [Ibid. No. 101.]
Oct. 21.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a grant to John, Bishop of Rochester, to be High Almoner of all goods, chattels and debts of any persons becoming felo de se, and of all deodands in England, Wales, and the Marches, with power to seize and recover the same. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 77.]
Oct. 21.
Whitehall.
Secretary Coventry to the Warden of All Souls, Oxford. The King is informed that an objection is likely to be made against the election of Robert Lenden to a fellowship in that college, because he was born beyond the seas. His Majesty wishes that to be no obstruction, considering that the reason of his being so born was the loyalty of his parents, who were forced to fly from England in the late times, and the writer also himself recommends him, having witnessed the good services of his father, who died in the King's cause. [Ibid. f. 189.]
Oct. 21.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Lieutenant of the petition of Sir William Petty and Robert Marshall desiring that several particulars relating to their lands in Kerry may either be settled here, or that the Lord Lieutenant be ordered to settle them in Ireland, to examine the allegations when he shall come into Ireland. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 56.]
Draft of the above reference. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 194.]
Oct. 21. Order for making free the Staple Dale, a ship taken in the late Dutch war and adjudged prize in the Admiralty Court in Scotland in 1667. [Precedents 1, f. 117.]
Oct. 22. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 361. [Two copies. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, Nos. 102, 103.]
Oct. 22.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. The droughty weather has changed to rain. The wind continues westerly. [Ibid. No. 104.]
Oct. 22.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday I received two packets for the Earl of Inchiquin, Governor of Tangier, and for Mr. Bland at Tangier. There has been no ship in the Downs thither bound this week. I shall deliver them to the first thither bound. It blows hard to-day at S.S.W. [Ibid. No. 105.]
Oct. 23. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 362. [Ibid. No. 106.]
[Oct. 23?] Expedients proposed for lessening the price of coals and easing the coal trade, by allowing ships to take in beer and other provisions in and about Shields and not to be forced to send up to Newcastle for them, and when in distress to use any pilot or carpenter, though no freeman of Newcastle, and not be obliged to send for them to Newcastle, by building a free ballast shore at Jarrow-slike near Shields, so that vessels be at liberty to lay ballast there and not forced to carry it up a dangerous river to Newcastle, by reason of which greater dispatch would be made, more voyages made in the year, and thus coals, glass, salt and millstones rendered cheaper. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 362.) [Printed. Ibid. No. 107.]
Oct. 23.
Oxford.
Henry Oke to the King. Suggesting an advance of the duty on tobacco to 4d. per lb., to be collected at the Custom-house like the present duty, and beseeching a command to attend on some of his Majesty's servants in that behalf. [Ibid. No. 108.]
Oct. 23.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. At midnight last Thursday one of our packet-boats arrived, having first landed the mail and some passengers at Lowestoft. Wind westerly. [Ibid. No. 109.]
Oct. 23.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. To-day the Dutch man-of-war turned ashore 60 Frenchmen belonging to the French privateer he lately took. About 20 Englishmen belonging to the said privateer are not yet released.
This afternoon came in the St. Anne of London from Bilboa. In the Bay of Biscay a ship of good force came up with them, and commanded the master to come on board, who was so weak as to do so in his longboat with four of his men. They waited for the master three or four hours, and at last called to the ship for the master, and none of the ship's company would give answer, on which the mate was doubtful that he was some man-of-war of Tripoli or Sallee, and so made all the sail he could to get clear of him, and the master and men and boat are left. She belongs to Mr. John Paige, merchant in London. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 110.]
Oct. 23.
Weymouth.
Nathaniel Osborne to Williamson. A vessel of our town come from York Town in Virginia in 6 weeks brings news of no good crop like to be, and of the dearness of provisions there. The Maryland Merchant for Virginia is now come into our road. [Ibid. No. 111.]
Oct. 23.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Gilbert, Archbishop of Canterbury, to grant a dispensation to Michael Stanhope to accept the rectory of Bocton Malherbe, co. Kent, with that of Langton, co. York, which he now holds. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 27, f. 77.]
Oct. 23.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Mayor of Dover. Transmitting a copy of a memorial presented that day to his Majesty by M. de Ruvigny, with directions that he forthwith give his Majesty an account of the thing complained of therein, in order to give the injured party all just satisfaction and reparation. Noted, as sent under cover to Mr. Welsh and commended to his care. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 57.]
Oct. 23. Caveat, at the desire of Sir Edward Masters, that no mandamus pass for a fellowship in Queen's College, Cambridge, till notice given to Mr. Secretary. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 45, p. 16.]
Oct. 23.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the Lord Lieutenant's report on the petition of the Earl of Middlesex and Thomas Felton, calendared ante, p. 356. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 58.]
Oct. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant for a charter to Piedro, alias Peter, Fraser, eldest son of Sir Alexander Fraser of Durris, the king's first physician in ordinary, and the heirs male of his body, with remainders over, of the lands of Durris and Midbelty and the lands and baronies of Strachan and Culpersache on the resignation of the said Sir Alexander, with an erection of part thereof into a free forest to be called the Forest of Strachan, and with a grant of two yearly fairs and an erection of the whole into the barony of Durris and with a ratification of all charters and infeftments by the Archbishop of St. Andrews and the parson of Kincardine or any other superiors. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 356.]
Oct. 24.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind W. Capt. Roach, commander of Hurst Castle, with Holmes, a gunner there, both Irishmen, fell on Lieut. Richard Newman, lieutenant to Col. Halsey (Halsall), and most barbarously murdered him, stabbing him in several parts of the body. Roach is fled, the gunner is taken. This Newman was son of Col. Newman about Rochester. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 112.]
Oct. 24.
Whitehall.
Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance, to cause the bulwark at the east end of the terrace walk at Windsor to be pulled down and the materials laid up for the King's service, and to cause all the bricks now unused at Windsor and belonging to the Ordnance Office to be employed in the like service. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 29, p. 139.]
Oct. 25. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Lords that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 9, except that the cases mentioned as precedents are called Slingesby's and Cusake's instead of Slingesby's and Hale's as in the Journals. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 113.]
Oct. 25. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 363. [Ibid. No. 114.]
Oct. 25. Another copy giving the proceedings in both Houses. [Ibid. No. 115.]
Oct. 25.
Westminster.
Monsr. Van Beuningen to Williamson. Requesting him to let him know if his Majesty has appointed a day and hour to speak to the ministers of the Confederates on the subject of the preliminaries of the peace. [French. Ibid. No. 116.]
Oct. 25. Michael Warton to Williamson. Soliciting his favour on behalf of a kinsman of his, Mr. Pelham, that, if he be named in the list of sheriffs for Lincolnshire, he may escape the trouble of being fixed on, and, as they have it there that the Parliament will not long continue, requesting to know his apprehension of it, by which he may steer the better his resolves of a journey. [Ibid. No. 117.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
Sir Thomas Aleyn to Williamson. I was this morning to have waited on you, but was particularly engaged at the Sessions house, to give you an account of my fruitless application to Lord Essex concerning my leather patent in Ireland. His answer is that it is disposed of and he cannot help me, but I trust his Majesty may persuade, if not command. To that end I have lodged my petition with your servant and pray it may not be delayed, because I hear my lord is preparing for Ireland. [Ibid. No. 118.]
Oct. 25.
Pendennis.
Francis Bellott to Williamson. The wind all last week being W. brought but few ships into this harbour. Here is a French manof-war of 24 guns from Guinea and several plantations of the West Indies bound for Havre, supposed to be very rich. She lost a great many men on her voyage. Other shipping news. [Ibid. No. 119.]
Oct. 25. "A relation of what hath been hitherto discovered in the matter of the North East Passage," extracted out of the Philosophical Transactions, No. 118, published 25 Oct. [7½ pages. Ibid. No. 120.]
Oct. 26. Notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons that day, which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 363. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 121.]
Oct. 26.
Durham.
Anthony Isaacson to Williamson. Yesterday Mr. Christopher Vane was chosen without any competitor knight of the shire for this county. We have had a very great drought in these parts, the like hardly known at midsummer, and great winds of late, at present at N.W. [Ibid. No. 122.]
Oct. 26.
Stockton.
Richard Potts to Williamson. Yesterday Squire Vane was chosen a knight of this shire, who, it's said, takes post from Darlington to-day to go up to sit in the House. [Ibid. No. 123.]
Oct. 26.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Last Saturday night a storm arose about W. and N.W., making so great a tide with very much lightning last night that the sea came up a great way into our streets, and it continues violent still. It has done much damage to our wharves. All our three packet-boats are at present absent, nor have we any expectation of any returning as long as this storm continues. [Ibid. No. 124.]
Oct. 26.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. These two days the wind has blown very high, but last night it blew a whole storm of wind mixed with rain and hail. It being two days past the full and the tides at the highest and the wind at N.W. and N.W. and by N. made the sea come into our Beach Street or street next the sea, and much endangered all the houses next the sea, and broke several quays, which are made with great timbers and boards to defend us from the sea, but did us no considerable damage, the boats being all haled from the sea into the streets. The Virginia ships and others that sailed last Thursday outward-bound came in last Sunday. Notwithstanding the great rage and storm not any ship broke loose nor foul of another in the Downs. 'Tis said by old men they never knew such a rage nor the town in such danger before. No ship for Tangier is yet come in. Pray let me know if I shall send it by any ship bound to any near port or to Whitehall or keep it here till a ship comes thither bound. It blows a storm at N.W. and by N. [Ibid. No. 125.]
Oct. 26.
Deal.
Morgan Lodge to Williamson. Giving an account of the storm. [Ibid. No. 126.]
Oct. 26.
Rye.
James Welsh to Williamson. On receipt of yours of the 24th I went with it immediately to our Mayor, who encloses an answer to the French memorial or complaint, which is a very candid relation of that transaction, whatever the French have put in to the contrary, for I was not only present at taking the depositions, but was a spectator when the scuffle between the French and the Dutch happened, which was so far out of reach of our guns, that, though our town fired several guns at them to keep the peace, it would not restrain them, and, whereas they pretend they were pillaged by our townsmen, it is most notoriously false, for they never made any such complaint to our Mayor other than that they had lost some clothes and such like trivial things, but not accusing any of our townsmen. We were apt to believe that, if they lost any such, it was taken from them by the Dutch that boarded them as a just reward for their robbing one of their boats just before, for the French were the aggressors: nevertheless, had they come in within our protection, as our Mayor ordered them, they had been secure from this mischief which they brought upon themselves. When the Dutch left them, they set the French vessel on fire, which had certainly been burnt, had not the officers sent from our Mayor been more forward to put it out than the French. I hope this complaint will not procure them their vessel again but on condition of their defraying all charges, since they were the first that broke the peace in our harbour. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 127.] Enclosed,
Oct. 26.
Rye.
Certificate of the Mayor and Jurats of Rye that 22 Sept. last Aaron Peadle, the younger, Richard and Henry Lilbourne, Nicholas Earle, the younger, and Edward Gee deposed before them as follows. First Peadle deposed that being at the Gun Garden at Rye about 3 p.m. on the 5th he saw a French shallop board a Dutch longboat within the harbour's mouth, and about two hours after he met some Dutchmen in the town, who told him they were on board the said longboat when the shallop had her on board, and that the Frenchmen plundered them of their money and clothes, and presently after the deponent was ordered by the Mayor and jurats to provide a boat to command the said shallop to come in and not break the peace, and thereon the deponent provided Richard Lilbourne's shallop and the said Lilbournes and Earle went with the deponent in her, and, when they declared their message, as they were commanded, one of the Frenchmen presented a musket at them, and told them, if they came any nearer, he would fire; however the French shallop came something nearer to the town and anchored. When she was at anchor, and before the deponent's shallop had parted from her, two Dutch longboats came up and boarded her, and fired many small shot into her, but the deponent did not see the French fire at the Dutch boats. Three Frenchmen and a French boy came on board the deponent's shallop for shelter. (Depositions of the next three deponents, similar to the latter part of the above.) Deposition by Gee that he saw from the cliff as above described, and that, when the Dutch longboats boarded the shallop, he saw the flash of a small gun, which he thinks was fired from the shallop. [Seal affixed. Ibid. No. 127 i.]
Oct. 26.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.W. Capt. Roach, that murdered Lieut. Newman, fled to a house at Yarmouth in the Isle of Wight, left his horse there and borrowed a black cloak or coat for disguise, took a boat with four oars and went over presently to Hurst Castle, which he commanded, but he's fled. The two accomplices are in hold, Holmes, the gunner, and a servant to Sir R. Holmes. No shipping stirring either in or out. We had a great storm here last night. [Ibid. No. 128.]
Oct. 26.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 129.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 129 i.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
Presentation of Edmund Jones to the rectory of Worthyn, Salop. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 13.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
The King to the Lord Provost, Baylies and Council of Edinburgh. Expressing his satisfaction at the ample expression of their duty and loyalty in their letter which acknowledged his clemency in taking off the restraint on the election of their magistrates, and gave an account of the last elections having been duly carried on according to the rules of their set, and declaring that he would countenance and protect them in the faithful discharge of their offices, and would maintain and preserve the rights and privileges of the city. [S.P. Scotland, Warrant Book 3, p. 358.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
Commission, after reciting that the Duke of Ormonde had informed the King that, on a late address to him from the trustees for managing the security of the '49 officers, desiring him to revive the commission by which they formerly acted, and which was granted them by George, late Duke of Albemarle, and himself, he, considering the long intermission of the said trustees from acting in the execution of the said commission, communicated the matter to the Committee for Irish Affairs, when they sat by order to consider the whole state of the said security, and they referred the inquiry touching the validity of the said former commission to the Attorney General, and, though by his report there appears not any defect therein, yet the Duke, for avoiding all scruple, is desirous that the King should make an immediate delegation from himself and by his authority corroborate the proceedings of the said trustees in the future prosecution of their trust, and further reciting the passage in the King's declaration of 30 Nov., 1660, touching the securities for the arrears of the '49 officers, and that the said securities were by the said declaration entrusted to such persons for the uses therein mentioned as the late Duke of Albemarle and the Duke of Ormonde should appoint, and, that, although the greatest part of the said security has been already distributed and set out to the said officers by the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, yet, it being suggested that a very considerable part thereof was concealed and withheld which since is and may be discovered: Appointing the Earls of Cork and Burlington, Drogheda, and Anglesey, Lord Coloony, the Archbishops of Dublin and Tuam, the Bishop of Cork, Sir Arthur Forbes, Sir William Stewart, Sir Charles and Sir Hans Hamilton, Sir John Cole, Sir Theophilus Jones, Sir Oliver St. George, Sir Richard Gething, Sir George Rawdon, Sir William Flower, Sir Robert Ward, Sir George Lane, Col. Vere Essex Cromwell, Col. Francis Willoughby, Col. Randolph Clayton, Col. John Mayart, Col. Hayward St. Leger, Lieut.-Col. Francis Little, Lieut.-Col. Alexander Pigott, Serjeant-Major Arthur Dillon, Capt. John St. Leger and Laurence Parsons to be the persons entrusted according to the intents and purposes of the said declaration, and also appointing Richard Barry to be their registrar or chief clerk, which said trustees are to do everything entrusted to their care by the said declaration, and to set and let to the best advantage but to the ends expressed in the declaration the said securities, and to defend the said interest and sue and prosecute on behalf thereof, and to give such rewards to all as shall discover any part of the said securities as has been concealed as are warranted by the rules and resolutions of the Lord Lieutenant and Council of Ireland on a doubt by the late Commissioners for executing the Acts of Settlement and Explanation, which resolution has now the force of an Act of Parliament, with a proviso that this commission shall not be construed to revoke the said former commission granted by the Dukes of Albemarle and Ormonde or any of the powers or authorities therein contained. [Nearly 4 pages. S.P. Dom., Signet Office, Vol. 9, p. 372.]
Oct. 27. Accounts of the proceedings in both Houses of Parliament that day, which fully appear from Lords' Journals, Vol. XIII., p. 11, and Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 363, except the following:—The House of Lords in a grand committee resumed the debate concerning privilege in judicature when members of the Commons' House are concerned, and several precedents were cited and read, after which, the Lord Privy Seal offering to show them some precedents he had to prove their right in judicature, the House ordered it should be referred till he brought them. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 130.]
Separate accounts of the proceedings in both Houses. [Ibid. Nos. 131, 132.]
Oct. 27. Certificate by Sir W. Peake that Simon Heere, of London, mariner, took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy before him that day. [Ibid. No. 133.]
Oct. 27.
Lynn.
Edward Bodham to Williamson. In these parts we are in a very quiet, good, well-settled condition. These three days past have been very sad stormy weather, wind N.W., yet we hear not of any damage by sea or land, only one ship put ashore five miles from this, which, it is hoped, will come off without any great loss. [Ibid. No. 134.]
[Oct. 27.] Newsletter to Sir Francis Radcliffe, containing notes of the proceedings in the House of Commons on 26 and 27 Oct., which fully appear from Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., pp. 363–366, except the test proposed for purging the members of the House, which was as follows:—I protest "that directly or indirectly neither I nor any for my use to my knowledge have since 1 Jan., 1672 [–3], had or received any sum or sums of money by ways of imprest, gifts, loan or otherwise from the King's Majesty or any of his officers or sworn servants or any other persons by his Majesty's order, direction, leave, or knowledge, or by authority derived from his Majesty, or any pardon, discharge or respite of any money due to his Majesty on account or any grant, pension, gratuity or reward, or any promise of such, or any office or employment or any promise of the reversion of any office, place, or command of or from his Majesty, or out of any money, treasure, or estate of or belonging to his Majesty or of, by, or from any foreign ambassador, agent, or minister, or of or from any other person in the name or by the appointment or with the knowledge of his Majesty or any of them otherwise than what I have now in writing faithfully discovered and delivered to this House, which I have subscribed with my name, neither do I know of any such gift, grant or promise so given or made since the said time to any other member of this House but what I have also inserted in the said writing, nor have I ever given my vote in Parliament for any reward or promise whatsoever." [Two copies of part of the proceedings of the 27th. Admiralty, Greenwich Hospital 1, Nos. 5 and 6.]
Oct. 28.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. One of our packet-boats came out of the Brill last Saturday before the storm and came in this morning without anchors or cables. They lost most of their sails and are all almost dead and benumbed, seamen and passengers. The storm has been very dreadful. Wind N. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 135.]
Oct. 28.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N.N.E. No news. [Ibid. No. 136.]
Oct. 28.
Truro.
Hugh Acland to Williamson. No news. Wind N.N.S. [Ibid. No. 137.]
Oct. 28.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Sir G. Downing. Sir W. Temple, having received yours and your colleagues' last report on the point of trade from enemy's port to enemy's port, has made fresh instances to the States and brought them to agree to a declaration in the form enclosed. His Majesty commands it to be put into the same hands the last draft was to consider of it, and report their opinion how far it may be received without inconveniency. The first, the declaratory part, is word for word what we ourselves desire, the only question is upon the last clause, which exempts from the rule all cases before the late peace. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 58.] Annexed,
Declaration that vessels of either party to the treaty might trade from a port hostile to the other party to a port also hostile to the last-named party, and that, whether both ports belonged to the same prince or state or to different princes or states, with both of whom the last-named party was at war; with a proviso that the declaration should not apply to anything that had happened before the peace concluded in Feb., 167¾. [French. Ibid.]
Oct. 29.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Towards night yesterday the Virginia ships outward-bound weighed and sailed with a fresh wind between N.E. and E. It blows very fresh at E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 138.]
Oct. 29.
Plymouth.
Philip Lanyon to Williamson. Enclosing list of ships arrived. Yesterday a French privateer then going to sea met a Danish ship laden with deals consigned to a merchant here, and in this harbour took her and carried her away. [Ibid. No. 139.] Enclosed,
The said list. [Ibid. No. 139 i.]
Friday,
Oct. 29. Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to the Earl of Rochester. To-morrow being the day appointed by the Lord Keeper for hearing the matter in difference between Lady Lindsey (sic) and yourself concerning Woodstock, and the appointment having been made, as she says, with your knowledge, the King commands me to signify to you that you take order that some person, whomever you shall choose, be there to hear it jointly with the Lord Keeper, according to the reference formerly made. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 43, p. 59.]
Oct. 29.
Whitehall.
Sir J. Williamson to Lord Lovelace. Similar directions to appoint some person to hear, conjointly with the Lord Keeper and the person appointed by the Earl of Rochester, the matter in difference about the patent now passing for Woodstock. [Ibid. p. 60.]
Oct. 29.
Whitehall.
Commission to Thomas Cutler to be captain of the company whereof Captain James Graham was captain, in the Duke of York's regiment commanded by Sir C. Lyttelton. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 18.]
Oct. 29. Report by the Lord Lieutenant on the reference to him of the Earl of Mountrath's petition, calendared ante, p. 355, that it may seem reasonable that the grant to Col. Fitzpatrick of the quit-rents out of the petitioner's estate may be stayed, at least till the petitioner be heard, and that, in case the quit-rents be released to the petitioner as prayed, it ought to be part of the 1,000l. per annum, which the King has reserved power to himself to discharge as of grace by his contract with the new farmers. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 59.]
Draft thereof. [S.P. Ireland, Car. II. 335, No. 194.]
Oct. 29.
Whitehall.
Warrant to the Lord Chamberlain for swearing Robert Rustat, now Page of the Robes, at the request of his uncle Tobias Rustat, Yeoman of the Robes, to the place of supernumerary Groom of the Robes without any of the wages or profits of the said place, till a vacancy occurs among the present grooms, when he is to succeed without any further warrant, and in the meantime he is to execute the place and enjoy the privileges of Page of the Robes, as he does at present. [Precedents 1, p. 118.]
Oct. 30.
Past 12. Post-Office.
Col. Roger Whitley to [Williamson]. The Holland post has brought no letters from the Hague, Harlaem, Delft and Leyden, by reason of a great inundation last Monday and Tuesday occasioned by great storms of wind and rain, breaking of some dykes, &c. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 140.]
Oct. 30.
Bridlington.
T. Aslaby to Williamson. We have had very violent weather. Of four or five ships at anchor two were driven from their anchors, the Merlin yacht being one, with Lord Lockhart's body. She is now in this bay about weighing two of her anchors she left. [Ibid. No. 141.]
Oct. 30.
Harwich.
Silas Taylor to Williamson. Yesterday evening arrived one of our packet-boats which left the Brill Thursday afternoon. They stayed till three before they could have the mail. When they came away, the Harlaem and Hague letters were not come, so they came without them. The freshes within land, as well as the rage of the sea without, have overthrown their banks, ways, heads, sluices, &c., having done them much damage. At Amsterdam their streets were overflowed, and their cellars filled with water. They bring no news but concerning this inundation. Yesterday the wind most easterly, to-day more northerly. [Ibid. No. 142.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to Sir John Duncombe, Chancellor of the Exchequer. Directing that no interest be charged on Simon Smith for the 2,000l. lent him towards the empaleing of the Great Park at Windsor. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 42, p. 17.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Commission to James Graham to be captain of the company whereof Major Winter was captain in Lord Craven's regiment of Guards called the Coldstreamers. Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 44, p. 17.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Commission to Alexander Nowell to be ensign to Capt. Thomas Cutler in the Duke of York's regiment. Minute. [Ibid. p. 18.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Lord Treasurer of the Lord Lieutenant's report on the Earl of Mountrath's petition, calendared ante, p. 367. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 46, p. 59.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Reference to the Attorney or Solicitor General of the petition of John Wroth of Houghton Hall, Essex, paying a reconveyance to him of the advowson of Whitchurch, granted by Edward VI. to Sir Thomas Wroth, Queen Elizabeth and King James having since presented to it, but by lapse only. [Ibid. p. 60.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
The King to the Master and Fellows of Christ's College. Granting a dispensation for non-residence for two years to Thomas Burnett, M.A., Fellow of the College, who is going beyond the seas as Governor to the Earl of Wiltshire, to whom leave has been given to travel for that time. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 47, p. 13.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Pass for Charles, Earl of Wiltshire, eldest son of the Marquis of Winchester, to travel abroad for two years. [Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 87.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
Grant to Edmund Warcup to hold two fairs at Newbridge in the manor of Northmoor, Oxfordshire, on 20 March and 20 August, yearly for ever. Minute. [Ibid. p. 88.]
Oct. 31.
Deal.
Richard Watts to Williamson. Yesterday arrived a ship from Tangier. They report that a party went out of that city to fetch in some cattle, and that 205 of them were killed and the rest made an honourable retreat and killed a very great many of the enemy, and that one of our chief men is taken alive. Not a topsail gale at N.E. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 143.]
Oct. 31.
Portsmouth.
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson. Wind N. No news. [Ibid. No. 144.]
Oct. 31. Passport for the Sieur Durand, servant of the Duke of Hanover, to go to Hanover. [French. Home Office, Warrant Book 1, p. 87.]
Oct. 31. Passport for a person with 8 geldings for the Duchess of Orleans. [French. Ibid.]
Oct. John Lamplugh to Williamson. The great complaints of the poorer inhabitants in this county as well as in most of the counties in the North concerning the burden of hearth-money makes me presume to trouble you with this. Never was any assess or charge more unequal than this, for a poor estate of 40s. per annum is charged as much as one of 40l. or 100l., and great revenues pay no proportion. The greatest burden lies on the poorer sort, and now, strangers collecting, they are not so much favoured as formerly, and they would charge smiths' hearths and private ovens, which put us to a very great trouble, the complaints being more numerous than ever before. The Parliament now sitting, if you could prevail that what was intended to answer his Majesty's revenue be given him some other way, or be laid by way of assess, as the Royal Aids and assistance moneys were, it would be paid with far more cheerfulness and less trouble, for so all estates would bear their proportionable part. You'll thereby have thousands of prayers from the people and give his Majesty occasion to thank you for such advance of his revenue, for, as it is now, it makes not, as is said, above 250,000l. per annum, and is subject to decrease, for many yearly take away some of their hearths, and I heard it was computed to amount to 400,000l. If ascertained 350,000l., 100,000l. with so little trouble would be a considerable advance. I have intimated something of this to Sir John Lowther, one of the knights of our shire, who well knows the poor condition of our county, and who, I suppose, will address you herein. Endorsed, "Oct." Postmark, 5 Nov. [S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 145.]
Oct. The creditors of the Goldsmiths concerned in the Exchequer to the House of Commons. Petition for some effectual way for their relief by enabling them to find some course to receive their debts, they having placed, some the whole and some the greatest part of their estates in the Goldsmiths' hands, and having since the stop in the Exchequer not only failed to receive their interest, but also their principal, some of them being poor widows and orphans, some having made savings to maintain them in their old age, some having put their estates in the Goldsmiths' hands till their children came to age to apprentice them or bestow them in marriage, some having by loss of their estates having become debtors themselves and being cast into loathsome gaols, some having become distracted by misery and others having broken their hearts and died. Endorsed, "Oct. 1675," the last figure not being quite clear. [Printed paper. Two copies. Ibid. Nos. 146, 147.]
[Oct. ?] Reasons proposed to Parliament for reviving the Act for transportation of leather. By the late Act the breeding and feeding of cattle was encouraged, and the rents and value of lands improved; so that raw hides yielded a noble more on the average than they had done, and calf skins 6s. a dozen and bark in some places more than double the price and generally a third part.
The plenty of leather is greater and the cost of tanned leather is less here than it ever was, a third part more beasts being slaughtered by the non-observance of Lent and fish days, and a third part less leather spent by the disuse of walking boots, and half the shoes now worn being made of alum leather and foreign leather and cloth and other materials. Besides riding furniture for horse and man, by reason of the great use of stage coaches, makes nothing the consumption of leather it did formerly, and yet by the draining of the fens many thousand more cattle are bred and fed than heretofore. Made wares during the seven years of transportation allowed were as cheap as they were before or since, and workmen were as well employed, at least the odds of price and in workmen cannot balance the advantages otherwise accruing.
The ill consequences of the strict prohibition of transporting leather by a former Act were presently felt by a glut of it at home, and the sinking of the value of raw hides, bark and calf skins, and consequently by the fall of rents and customs, and thereby the late Act for transportation was made, which prevented the burying of many thousand skins that would not otherwise have answered the charge of dressing them.
The vend of manufactured leather abroad cannot take off any considerable part, nor so much as formerly, for the plantations that took off most of it now have artificers of their own, and may be supplied with leather from Ireland and elsewhere. Since the prorogation leather is advanced in Ireland a fifth penny. Besides, leather is generally transported where wares are prohibited.
At the last Sessions the Committee to whom the bill for continuing the Act was referred was satisfied that nothing material could be objected to it, and the bill passed the House and was sent up to the House of Peers and had passed into an Act had not the sudden prorogation (9 June, 1675) intervened. (On the back is a note by Williamson about no mandamus to Queen's College for Mr. Masters, about which a caveat was entered 23 Oct.) [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 148.]
[Oct. ?] The ordinary Shoemakers and old workers in and about London to the House of Commons. Petition, praying that nothing pass to their prejudice till their objections be heard, as some principal shoemakers, with a design to ingross the buying of leather into their hands, having combined with tanners in London and Southwark, who design to ingross the trade to the prejudice of the country tanners, endeavour to suppress the retailing of leather by any but tanners, or anywhere but in a fair or market, whereby the meaner shoemakers will lose many conveniences they now enjoy by the retailer, and the poorest will be driven to become journeymen for smaller wages. [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 149.]
[Oct. ?] Reasons offered by the Cordwainers' Company to prevent the renewing of the Act for transportation of leather unmanufactured, with answers to the pretended reasons for it.
It is untrue that all leather cannot be manufactured here, for all English grown and imported leather was here converted into wares for some hundreds of years before the said Act.
Leather was at as high a price for 20 years before the Act as it has been these last seven, and raw hides were dearer by 4d. or 6d. a stone before the Act than since, and bark has likewise been cheaper since. The reason is, because the transporter of leather buys in another way than the manufacturers did before the Act, for they bought by the score or dicker in the open fair or market, where the leather was viewed and sealed, and, if not tanned sufficiently, forfeited, and, if well tanned, yielded a price accordingly. Now the transporter employs factors in most counties, buys leather out of the tanners' yards, agreeing for so many hides at so much a pound, and the tanner gives them not half the time he ought by the statute, because the less tanned the heavier they weigh, bringing them not to fair or market to be viewed and sealed, and consequently spends not half the bark spent before the Act.
It is untrue that many tanners will not have employment, if exportation is prohibited, the consumption of leather being greater here than when it is allowed to be transported, and, if transported, it must ruin many thousand families that convert it into wares, there being a hundred to one more manufacturers than tanners and transporters.
As to the objection that less leather is consumed than formerly because cloth shoes have of late been worn, and alum leather, and that there is not so much neat's leather cut as formerly, cloth shoes are lined with leather generally of our own growth and alum leather is of our own growth, and more leather of our own growth is now and of late years manufactured than was known within living memory, because Spanish and Russia leather is altogether out of fashion.
As to the objection that shoes are prohibited and the rest of our leather manufactures in France, Flanders, and Germany, and that manufacturers are gone to the Plantations, 'tis true since the Act three parts of our trade of transporting shoes is lost, and, if the Act be renewed, the whole trade of transported leather in wares, will, it is believed, be lost in two or three years, for it is most certain, if they can get our leather, they will prohibit our leather wares in all places beyond the seas.
(Arguments against the objection that, if leather be not transported, there will be a great loss to the King in the custom thereof.)
Prayer that the bill may therefore be dismissed and the Act not renewed. [Printed. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 150.]
Reasons against the exportation of unmanufactured leather offered to the King. (This consists of the first and the last two arguments in the preceding paper, somewhat altered in the wording.) [Ibid. No. 151.]
Oct. A Paper offered to the Parliament in answer to certain reasons against reviving the Act for exportation of leather, lately presented to them.
First, it is untrue that all the leather has always been manufactured in England, for, till the more strict prohibition in 14 Car. II., abundance of unmanufactured leather was exported to Scotland and the isles belonging to England, besides much exported by stealth to foreign parts, and, though none has been lost by want of manufacturing, it has and will be an unspeakable loss to have all the leather kept at an excessive low value, as was found before the exportation thereof, and since the Act expired. Leather is not of the same import as wool, for many thousands will be employed in making leather, and the bark of the kingdom expended before it is exported, and being made leather, since it cannot be vended in ware, there is the same reason to export it in leather as to export cloth that cannot be vended in garments. The laws about trade have always been altered as necessary, nor do the shoemakers make ware according to law; if they did, a third more tanned leather would be used.
Secondly, before the sickness, the fire, or the Dutch war, by reason of the strict prohibition, leather was fallen exceedingly low in value, and afterwards, instead of growing dearer, it fell lower and lower, and therefore an Act was made to export it, which was not made during the Dutch war, as falsely asserted.
Thirdly, after the Act leather and raw hides advanced a noble a hide or more, and calf-skins a third, and bark near a half, but, since the Act expired, hides and bark are fallen near as much as they rose before, and will no doubt fall much lower, if leather be not exported.
Fourthly, before leather was exported by an Act, not so much shoes or other ware was exported by near a half as in former times, before the plantations had tanners and artificers of their own, and those that have not leather enough of their own, but have artificers, will not have ware but leather, and had it from Ireland during the strict prohibition, and have it now from thence, whereby leather there was and is much dearer than ours, nor has exportation of leather so much hindered vending ware as is pretended, for most of our leather was sent to places where wares never went and were prohibited to come, nor during the time of the exportation was there such want of employment here, for there was no want of leather, and the wages for making leather ware were as great or greater than ever, and it is not likely any would leave their country for want of employment, when they could have such wages at home.
Fifthly, it is asserted that 100l. exported in leather is 200l. loss to the kingdom, but this is only asserted and not proved, unless by the kingdom is understood the rich shoemakers and curriers of London, who would get after that rate, had they all the leather of the kingdom at their own price as they endeavour, and it is notoriously untrue that 100l. in leather makes 300l. in ware when manufactured, for the material of boots and shoes is twice the value given for making them, and, were the gain so great, there would be no advantage to the kingdom, but only to the shoemakers.
Sixthly, the last Act for exportation gives not liberty to buy leather for exportation but in open fairs and markets, so none can have our leather but from our markets, nor can the manufacture and consumption of leather be carried hence, except of so much as cannot be vended here, and certainly it is a benefit to export what cannot otherwise be vended; and, whereas it is said more leather and raw hides were heretofore imported than leather exported, and all was manufactured here, the very persons, who now assert this, asserted in the 14th year of the King that abundance of leather was then exported, and so procured the Act for the prohibition thereof, and, whereas it is alleged that Ireland always exported its leather and hides, and can do no more to hinder the export of our ware than formerly, Ireland of late has abundantly increased and improved their leather, and exports it more than ever, and the hides and leather that came from thence hither were not during the prohibition of ours, but during its exportation, and, since the Act expired, neither their leather nor hides come hither, for they are dearer there.
Seventhly, it is untrue that few but merchants and ingrossers will gain by the exportation, for the most gain must be to the kingdom, by exporting a commodity of our own growth at a competent price, that otherwise must fall to little or nothing for want of vent.
Very few tanners had any hand in printing reasons against retailing of leather, and those were drawn to it by the rich London shoemakers, whose design was to prevent a supply of the poor, and so force the trade from the poor to themselves, but the House of Commons at their last sitting passed a bill to provide for the supply of the poor, and therefore the rich shoemakers and curriers now oppose the whole bill, though then they declared they could say nothing against exportation, and the rich London shoemakers and curriers by opposing the bill design the ruin of the trade of the country tanners, shoemakers and curriers, as they have begun by seizing leather and shoes made in the country and sent to London, and the tanners that were against the retailing now perceive their mistake.
As to the vending of bad leather by retailing, the law provides that shoemakers, curriers and leather-workers shall be made searchers and sealers, and may prevent it, if they will, and there is no importation of wares made beyond sea of our leather, nor can it be reasonably thought there can be any, considering the charge out and in, nor is the best of our leather mostly exported but the worst.
Lastly, whereas they pray 7 years' trial whether they can vend it in ware, for 6 years after the prohibition they could not vend it in wares, and since the expiration of the Act they cannot do so, as appears, first because one third less of tanned leather is expended at home than formerly, second by the great increase of leather, thirdly by the lowness of the present price, and by its lying on tanners' hands market after market unsold. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 364.) [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 152.]
Oct. Reasons against the exportation of any English or Irish wool, with a proposal of other ways for advancing its price offered to the House of Commons.
Wool is one of the principal native commodities of England and Ireland. Therefore the chief benefit thereof ought to redound to the subjects of the same, and not to those of any other realm.
Its manufacture is one of the chief means for employing and maintaining the poor of this kingdom, and the profit from manufacturing it is very much greater than that from the wool itself, which is wholly lost to the nation and put into the hands of foreigners, if its exportation be permitted.
Multitudes of poor in this kingdom are ready to starve for want of employment, and there are enough people in England to manufacture the wool of both kingdoms, therefore its great cheapness does not arise from its being more than can be manufactured here, but from want of a sufficient vent for it when manufactured. This arises from the great restraint on trade by the East India and Guinea Companies, they having monopolized the sole trade of above half the world, and utterly excluding all other subjects from trading to any places within their charters, though they neither do nor can export near so much of our woollen manufactures as would be, were there no such monopolies, and also from the intolerable impositions laid on English manufactures by the French king and others, and at home by the East India Company, who have laid 10l. on every piece of woollen cloth, 5l. on every cloth rash, 3l. on every woollen or worsted stuff, and 5l. on every piece of bayes sent by any but themselves to any part within their charter. If therefore the House would take care that all impositions laid on our woollen manufactures by any foreign power since 1660 be speedily taken off, and that the joint stocks of the East India and Guinea Companies be dissolved, and those trades put under the government of regulated companies, into which any subjects might be freely admitted and might send out as much of our woollen manufactures and to as many places as they should see fit, it is conceived that the price of wool would speedily rise, the poor be employed and maintained, the clothier grow rich, trade be much bettered, navigation increased, and the riches and stock of the whole kingdom much advanced. On the contrary, the exportation of wool, though it may be for the profit of a few, would unavoidably tend to take away the employment and maintenance of the poor, to the poverty of the clothier, the damage of the merchant, the decrease of the navigation, and consequently the great loss and impoverishment of the kingdom in general. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 361.) [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 153.]
[1675? Oct. ?] Reasons against the exportation of English and Irish wool, offered to the House of Commons. (The first two paragraphs are almost the same cerbatim as those of the last paper.) The exportation is a principal cause of the growers vending it at so low a rate, because by one pack of English and Irish wool they improve abroad a double proportion of their own, as may appear by the variety of wool growing here, and also how useful every sort is for making all sorts of cloth and stuffs, and without them the like manufacture cannot be made anywhere abroad.
Here and in Ireland grows wool of all sorts, coarse, middle, fine and superfine, short, and long for the comb. Our finest in England grows about Leominster, which is as fine as any Spanish, and in Suffolk and elsewhere there is coarse. In every shire there is variety according to the pastures, fit to make all sorts of stuffs, nor is there the like in any other part of the world, nor can the like manufactures be made anywhere else without our wool, for, if it were all coarse, we could not make middle nor fine cloth, nor, if all fine, middle nor coarse; were it all short, we could make no worsted, if all long, no cloth.
First to make coarse cloth, we use all coarse short wool, but we take out of it the longest and coarsest for our warps and cheanes, and the finest for the obbs to shut upon it, which being the finest and shortest covers the cheane which is the coarser and makes a good ground, so when it comes to the mill the cheane is covered not to be seen. (The cheanes or warps is what is wound about the beams of the looms which goes through the slea and the obbs is what is wound about the quill and put into the shuttle and shut through the cheane and so beaten up in it, and the short fine wool gets a thick ground and covers the cheane, the long will not, but that is better for the cheane to hold working than the other.) When we make a second sort, we take the longest and best of the coarsest wool for the cheanes, and shut short middle wool on it, and thus you make a third, fourth, or fifth sort of fine or super-fine cloth, according to the goodness of the wool. The like may be done with the long wool for combing, with which may be made serges from 20s. to 10l. a piece by mixing the wool as aforesaid, taking always the longest and coarsest for the cheanes, which holds best in working, and the finest and shortest for the obbs. But this cannot be done in Spain, for the Spanish wool is so short, that it will hardly hold working, but take fine Leominster or Irish wool for the cheanes and shut the Spanish for the obbs, it makes excellent fine thin cloth, and thus the French and Dutch do with our wool. Neither can it be done in France, Flanders, Holland or Germany where the wool is generally coarse, without our wools, for ours spend all their coarse wools, because they use their own for warps for cloth and not for stuffs and shut our fine wool on it for their obbs. So when they make other sorts of stuffs abroad with silk or thread cheanes they must shut the English or Irish wool on it for their obbs, because their wool is so coarse it will not serve for stuffs, so it appears that with our wool they not only work up their own, but their silk and thread for the cheanes of their stuffs, which are sold as great rarities in England, though far better and more profitable ones are made here.
If the exportation of wool be permitted, it is not likely it can amount to the value if manufactured here, considering the custom on exported cloth, and on the materials for dyeing and dressing it imported. Neighbouring nations thereby employ in the manufacture thereof their own poor, supply foreign markets, and reap a great advantage. Our wool being exported, our trade is also exported and thousands of our manufacturers have followed and more will follow, which will tend much to the unpeopling of our nation, the great abatement of rents and the loss of the nobility and gentry.
If the exportation be effectually prohibited, it is conceived the price would rise, the grower have a higher rate and readier vent, the poor be fully employed, trade much bettered, navigation increased, and consequently the riches of the whole kingdom be much advanced. [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 154.]
Oct. Reasons offered to the House of Commons to demonstrate that a limited exportation of wool will be of public benefit to his Majesty and the nation, and no prejudice to the manufacture.
The exportation has been from time to time allowed from 14 Edw. III. to 1647, and during its exportation there never was any want of it for manufacture nor complaint of the clothier that wool was wanting or the manufacture endangered till 1647.
When it was lawful to export English wool, no Irish was brought to England, but what was brought to English staples to be transported.
Considering the quantity of Spanish and other foreign wool now used and the sort of cloths now made, we do not consume of our own English wool in such thin fine broad cloths above one-third of what was spent 30 years ago in broad cloths, so, though the growth be increased, the consumption is lessened, and the manufacture by reason of the deceitfulness in cloth making prejudiced.
We submit to the judgment of the House what shall be done with the overplus not manufactured, there being now three or four years' wool in several graziers' hands, yet some, which formerly yielded 12l. the pack, has been lately sold at 4l. 1s. the pack.
If the House shall think fit by an Act to prohibit all subjects to transport wool, and to permit all foreign merchants between 1 Nov. and 25 March to buy and transport wool, paying a moderate custom, it is conceived that the price of wool will rise, the customs be increased, and the rent of land improved. Such permission to buy and transport is according to the statutes therein recited. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 361.) [Printed paper. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 374, No. 155.]
[Oct. ?] List of the several offices of the Mint granted since the restoration, the warrants of which all passed by the respective Secretaries of State, the last being a grant of the office of porter to Richard Dallow, dated Oct., 1675. [Ibid. No. 156.]
[Oct. ?] The Fishermen and Seamen of Burnham, Barling, and elsewhere in Essex, to the King. Petition to order a day for a speedy hearing of the cause between themselves and Lord Fitzwalter, who about a month since (17 Sept., 1675, see Privy Council Register, Vol. XI., p. 503) was ordered to give in his speedy answer touching the right of fishing in Walfleet river, in which he claims an exclusive right, although it is a navigable river, a nursery for seamen, has always belonged to his Majesty and his predecessors, and was always free, which he delays to do. [Ten signatures. Ibid. No. 157.]
[Oct. ?] Statement of the mischiefs resulting to English handicraftsmen by the frequent importations of foreign manufactures, the silks, linens, and stuffs imported from France greatly over-balancing the whole English trade with them; with request that the King and Parliament will revive the hearts of thousands of English artists by discountenancing the wearing of foreign manufactures, both by their own examples and by either wholly prohibiting the importation thereof, or by laying a considerable duty on them proportionate to the French duties on English woollen and other commodities. (See Commons' Journals, Vol. IX., p. 365.) [Printed paper. Ibid. No. 158.]
Oct. Lists sent by James Neale to Williamson of King's and merchant ships in the Downs, the wind, &c.
Vol. 374./No. Date. King's. Outward Bound. Inward Bound. Wind. Remarks.
159 (fn. 1) Oct. 1 3 67 0 N.
160 " 2 3 1 0 N.E.
161 " 3 3 1 0 E.
162 " 4 3 0 0 E.
163 " 5 3 2 0 S.
164 " 6 3 2 0 S.W.
165 " 7 3 10 0 S.W.
166 " 8 3 10 3 W.
167 " 9 3 15 3 N.W. A great part of the outward-bound ships sailed to-day, and what are remaining at anchor in the Downs you shall have a just account of tomorrow, if any remain.
168 " 10 2 2 N.N.W.
169 " 11 2 20 0 N.
170 " 12 2 0 0 N.E.
171 " 13 2 4 0 S.W.
172 " 14 2 4 0 W.
173 " 15 2 11 0 S.E.
174 " 16 2 12 2 N.
175 " 17 2 12 0 N.W.
176 " 18 3 0 0 N.E.
177 " 19 3 0 2 N.
178 " 21 3 3 0 W.
179 " 22 3 4 0 W.
180 " 23 4 9 1 W.
181 " 24 4 11 4 S.W.
182 " 25 4 11 2 N.W.
183 " 26 4 11 0 N.W.
184 " 27 4 11 0 N.
185 " 29 4 0 0 E.
186 " 30 4 0 0 E.
187 " 31 4 4 0 N.E.

Footnotes

  • 1. Misdated 31 Sept.